African and African Disapora Studies Department
African and African Disapora Studies Department

New York City Domestic Study Program


Interested in spending Summer 2018 traveling and learning about the Global City with Dr. Eric Tang? This summer, the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies is offering two course in New York City!

 

Students of all disciplines are welcome to enroll in either one or both of our courses.

  1. The Global City: Summer in New York City
  2. New York City: Independent Research

Note: For summer financial aid eligibility, students must be enrolled in 6 credit hours.

Dates

Application Deadline: February 1, 2018

Program Begins: June 10, 2018

Program Ends: July 7, 2018


Application Requirements and Program Details for Summer 2018:

Application instructions:

  1. To apply, download the New York City Domestic Study Application and complete the fillable PDF file. Upon completion email the form to Sade Abramson, the New York City program contact or scroll to the bottom of this page and submit your application via our website. Be sure to answer all questions and fill in all parts of the form.
  2. Deadline to apply is February 1, 2018

Note: All materials should be uploaded via the submission box below or submitted to sade.abramson@austin.utexas.edu. For details regarding the 2018 trip, contact Dr. Eric Tang at erictang@utexas.edu or Sade Abramson, the New York City Domestic Study Program contact, at sade.abramson@austin.utexas.edu.


Course Descriptions

The Global City: Summer In New York City 

The Global City is a term used to describe major urban centers such as New York City, London and Tokyo that function as headquarters for international finance, manufacturing and migration. Global cities are said to stand as clear evidence that we live in truly transnational times - a period in world history when national borders have given way to the free flow of capital and labor from one interconnected global city to the next. Based in New York City, this course challenges the supposed newness of the global city to the next. Based in New York City, this course challenges the supposed newness of the global city concept by revealing how America's largest metropolis has been transnational since its very inception: from the conquest of indigenous land, to the city's involvement in the US slave trade and plantation economy, to its central role in the industrial revolution, to its status as a destination point for migrants from around the world and, finally, to its emergence as the preeminent center of world finance. This course literally traces New York City's history through first-hand visits to major landmarks and historic neighborhoods including African burial grounds, ports, factories, tenements, Harlem, el Barrio, Chinatown, Bed-Stuy (Brooklyn) and Jackson Heights (Queens) - to name but a few. Students will also have an opportunity to visit several of the city's major museums and collections, to meet with community-based organizations and to attend a range of cultural events (music, film and theater). Through it all, the course will meet for class lectures on the history and politics of New York City. Course readings will draw from history, sociology, anthropology, geography, literature and film.

Finally, the course will require each student to conduct independent research project in one of five issue areas:

  1. Labor,
  2. Immigration,
  3. Gentrification,
  4. Privatization of Public Space and
  5. Poverty.

Students will develop a research question in consultation with the instructor, and arrive at answer to that question through a combination of primary research (interviews and/or audio and visual documentation); archival research; secondary source research; and quantitative data collection. Research findings will be presented to the class during the final week of the course.

New York City: Independent Research

This course is a New York City-based Independent Research class that will require each student to carry-out a research project in one of five issue areas:

  1. Labor,
  2. Immigration,
  3. Gentrification,
  4. Privatization of Public Space and
  5. Poverty.

Students will develop a research question in consultation with the instructor, and arrive at an answer to that question trhough a combination of primary research (interviews and/or audio and visual documentation) with individuals or organizations in any of the 5 boroughs of New York City; archival research at a New York City research institute; secondary source research; and quantitative data collection. Some students may also choose to intern at a community-based organization. Research findings will be presented to the class during the final week of the course. The course will likely carry the Independent Inquiry flag.


2018 Approximate Fees 

Students will be housed through NYU Residential Life and Housing Services

Housing $2056

Additional program expenses (e.g. transportation, museum visits, group meals, etc.) $1,244

TOTAL $3,300*

*In addition, students will pay UT tuition and airfare to New York City.


Application