American Studies
American Studies

Marvin Bendele


LecturerPh.D., University of Texas at Austin

Lecturer, Director of Foodways Texas
Marvin Bendele

Contact

Interests


Foodways, Mobility & Migration, Cultural Geography, Borderlands, Texas, Oral History, Hunting/Fishing

Biography


Ph.D., American Studies, The University of Texas at Austin

Courses


AMS 370 • American Food

31235 • Fall 2018
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM BUR 436B

Food is more than sustenance; the foods we eat can also tell us a great deal about the culture and history of groups and individuals throughout our history. This course will investigate American culture and history through food production and consumption with a primary focus on American identities across time and space. We will consider specific food traditions and practices and the ways they are used to perform or signify race, ethnicity, gender, and class, as well as denote political, religious, and regional backgrounds or affiliations. The study of food and foodways can help us to understand our interpersonal and regional connections as well as the ways our food choices both reflect and influence developments in the food industry and American popular culture. We will cover wide-ranging topics including food and mobility, gender roles, immigration, food safety, labor, barbecue and race, food spaces, food ethics, technology, and industrialization among many other topics. The primary goal of the course is to illustrate the significant ways that the simple act of eating influences and is influenced by our local cultures and histories.        

 

Possible Texts:

Kathleen Leonard Turner, How the Other Half Ate: A History of Working Class Meals at the Turn of the Century

Upton Sinclair, The Jungle

Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation

Laura Shapiro, Perfection Salad

Mark Kurlansky, The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell

Michael Pollen, The Omnivore's Dilemma

James McWilliams, Where Locavores Get It Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly 

 

Assignments (include % of grade):

20% - Response Papers / Quizzes

20% - Midterm Exam

20% - Final Exam

40% - Research Paper / Project    

HDO 320 • Multidisc Mthds Exploring Orgs

29754 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM RLP 0.122

Course Description and Objectives

This course is a general introduction to social research methods and their application in relation to the study of organizations. We will consider qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches to research. We will also think about the philosophical foundations of social science, research design, data collection, and data analysis.

Students will be introduced to ethical issues related to human subjects research and will also get hands-on training in data collection and analysis. Social research is a craft, so it takes practice and first-hand experience to do it well. This course emphasizes practical application of research and a “learn by doing” approach.

Course Objectives

By the end of the course, my expectation is that you will be able to do the following:

  • Formulate good research questions and design a research project using methods

    appropriate to the question

  • Collect your own data using methods learned in class

  • Analyze both qualitative and quantitative data

  • Critically evaluate both your own research and that of other researchers

  • Identify potential ethical issues in your research and that of others

HDO 301 • Intro Hmn Dimensions Of Orgs

39470 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CPE 2.214

Course Overview

HDO 301 aims to teach students how to use a liberal arts education to prepare for work in organizational contexts (including business, government, and nonprofits). The course is organized around the themes of negotiation, dispute resolution, and establishing a vision. It uses readings and projects from across the humanities, and the social and behavioral sciences to provide perspectives on these topics.

Students are expected to attend class each week and participation grades will be given. In addition, students will be assigned to teams that will work together on a number of exercises. Grading of those assignments will be done at the level of the team. Part of learning about how to navigate organizational contexts is to engage in negotiation and dispute resolution within your team to ensure that everyone works together. While the professor and teaching assistants are available to help mediate disputes among team members, requests to change teams will not be honored.

Readings and the Canvas Site for the Course

Required books:

Kelley, R.D.G. (2003). Freedom dreams: The black radical imagination. Beacon Press.

Markman, A.B. (2013). Habits of Leadership. New York: Perigee.

Woodruff, P. (1993). Thucydides: On justice power and human nature. Indianapolis: Hackett.

Please note that the Kelley & Woodruff books will be available at the Coop. The Markman book is only available as an e-book and can be found on most popular e-book formats including Kindle, Nook, and iBook.

HDO 301 will use Canvas. Any of the readings that are not part of the required textbook list will be available to download on Canvas. Assignments will be turned in using Canvas. The professor and TAs will make every effort to answer messages sent through Canvas as quickly as possible.

Grading

All assignments and exams will be graded on a 100-point scale. The participation grade is quite simple. All students will sign in for each class. The percentage of classes attended will constitute the participation grade.

Weighting of assignments

Class Participation (10%) Two Exams (20%) Negotiation exercises (30%) Other assignments (20%) Final project (20%)

AMS 370 • American Food

30950 • Fall 2017
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM BUR 436B

Description:

Food is more than sustenance; the foods we eat can also tell us a great deal about the culture and history of groups and individuals throughout our history. This course will investigate American culture and history through food production and consumption with a primary focus on American identities across time and space. We will consider specific food traditions and practices and the ways they are used to perform or signify race, ethnicity, gender, and class, as well as denote political, religious, and regional backgrounds or affiliations. The study of food and foodways can help us to understand our interpersonal and regional connections as well as the ways our food choices both reflect and influence developments in the food industry and American popular culture. We will cover wide-ranging topics including food and mobility, gender roles, immigration, food safety, labor, barbecue and race, food spaces, food ethics, technology, and industrialization among many other topics. The primary goal of the course is to illustrate the significant ways that the simple act of eating influences and is influenced by our local cultures and histories.        

 

Possible Texts:

Kathleen Leonard Turner, How the Other Half Ate: A History of Working Class Meals at the Turn of the Century

Upton Sinclair, The Jungle

Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation

Laura Shapiro, Perfection Salad

Mark Kurlansky, The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell

Michael Pollen, The Omnivore's Dilemma

James McWilliams, Where Locavores Get It Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly 

 

Assignments (include % of grade):

20% - Response Papers / Quizzes

20% - Midterm Exam

20% - Final Exam

40% - Research Paper / Project   

AMS 370 • American Food

30715 • Fall 2016
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM BUR 436B

Food is more than sustenance; the foods we eat can also tell us a great deal about the culture and history of groups and individuals throughout our history. This course will investigate American culture and history through food production and consumption with a primary focus on American identities across time and space. We will consider specific food traditions and practices and the ways they are used to perform or signify race, ethnicity, gender, and class, as well as denote political, religious, and regional backgrounds or affiliations. The study of food and foodways can help us to understand our interpersonal and regional connections as well as the ways our food choices both reflect and influence developments in the food industry and American popular culture. We will cover wide-ranging topics including food and mobility, gender roles, immigration, food safety, labor, barbecue and race, food spaces, food ethics, technology, and industrialization among many other topics. The primary goal of the course is to illustrate the significant ways that the simple act of eating influences and is influenced by our local cultures and histories.        

 

Possible Texts:

Kathleen Leonard Turner, How the Other Half Ate: A History of Working Class Meals at the Turn of the Century

Upton Sinclair, The Jungle

Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation

Laura Shapiro, Perfection Salad

Mark Kurlansky, The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell

Michael Pollen, The Omnivore's Dilemma

James McWilliams, Where Locavores Get It Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly 

 

Assignments (include % of grade):

20% - Response Papers / Quizzes

20% - Midterm Exam

20% - Final Exam

40% - Research Paper / Project    

 

AMS 370 • American Food

29909 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 436A

Food is more than sustenance; the foods we eat can also tell us a great deal about the culture and history of groups and individuals throughout our history. This course will investigate American culture and history through food production and consumption with a primary focus on American identities across time and space. We will consider specific food traditions and practices and the ways they are used to perform or signify race, ethnicity, gender, and class, as well as denote political, religious, and regional backgrounds or affiliations. The study of food and foodways can help us to understand our interpersonal and regional connections as well as the ways our food choices both reflect and influence developments in the food industry and American popular culture. We will cover wide-ranging topics including food and mobility, gender roles, immigration, food safety, labor, barbecue and race, food spaces, food ethics, technology, and industrialization among many other topics. The primary goal of the course is to illustrate the significant ways that the simple act of eating influences and is influenced by our local cultures and histories.        

 

Possible Texts:

Kathleen Leonard Turner, How the Other Half Ate: A History of Working Class Meals at the Turn of the Century

Upton Sinclair, The Jungle

Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation

Laura Shapiro, Perfection Salad

Mark Kurlansky, The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell

Michael Pollen, The Omnivore's Dilemma

James McWilliams, Where Locavores Get It Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly 

 

Assignments (include % of grade):

20% - Response Papers / Quizzes

20% - Midterm Exam

20% - Final Exam

40% - Research Paper / Project    

 

AMS 311S • Beat Landscps & Amer Imaginatn

29493 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM BUR 228

The farm, the inner-city, the desert, the west coast, New Orleans, Texas, the railroad car, the river – these places all conjure certain specific, many times nostalgic, images in our minds. This course will attempt to demythologize these images and ideas of place by examining geographical descriptions in various creative works throughout the twentieth century. We will spend time studying writers of the “Beat Generation” in specific cities like New York and San Francisco, examining the idea of the “unencumbered” hobo or tramp in the context of objects and places like the car, the railroad, and the wilderness, considering song lyrics from blues artists in the farming communities of the Mississippi Delta, and wade through depictions of urban slums in film and literature. We will consider the increasing mobility of American citizens in the twentieth century, the inherent power of being a mobile American, and the plight of the immobile American. In addition we will take an interdisciplinary approach to the particular social and cultural issues that arose regarding sexuality, gender, class, and ethnicity during the twentieth century due to ideas of place, space, landscape, and mobility. In doing so, we will reconsider the myths that authors, directors, and songwriters created about themselves and their places. By the end of the semester, I hope that we will better understand the complex issues surrounding the emergence of myth and its effects on the public perception of place, space, and landscape as well as the fringe, beat and destitute of America.

Course Goals:

At the end of the semester, students should be able to do or understand the following:

  1. Critically analyze images and myths of the twentieth century using an interdisciplinary approach.
  2. Apply analytical tools to contemporary issues, images, and myths.
  3. Comfortably discuss themes in the field of Cultural Geography (i.e., space, place, and landscape).

 

Requirements

Participation and response papers                  20%

Mid-term writing assignment                         20%

Presentation                                                 20%

Final writing assignment                                40%

 

Possible Texts

Jack Kerouac, On the Road

John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath

Robert Johnson, song lyrics

Mitchell Duneier, Sidewalk

Tim Cresswell, The Tramp in America

Course Packet available at Metro Copy

 

Flag: Writing

Profile Pages


External Links