American Studies
American Studies

Books Published By UT AMS Grads in 2016

Thu, November 24, 2016
Books Published By UT AMS Grads in 2016

Congratulations to Dr. Timothy Davis (PhD, 1997), Dr. Rebecca Onion (PhD, 2012) and Dr. Tracy Wuster (PhD, 2011), who all had books published in 2016.

 

Dr. Davis's book, National Park Roads: A Legacy in the American Landscape, is an "extensively researched and richly illustrated book, national parks historian [in which] Timothy Davis highlights the unique qualities of park roads, details the factors influencing their design and development, and examines their role in shaping the national park experience—from the Blue Ridge Parkway and Skyline Drive to Glacier National Park’s Going-to-the-Sun Road, Yellowstone's Grand Loop, Yosemite's Tioga Road, and scores of other scenic drives." Dr. Davis is a historian for the National Parks Service.

 

Dr. Onion's book, Innocent Experiments: Childhood and the Culture of Popular Science in the United States, "examines the rise of informal children’s science education in the twentieth century, from the proliferation of home chemistry sets after World War I to the century-long boom in child-centered science museums [and] looks at how the United States has increasingly focused its energies over the last century into producing young scientists outside of the classroom. She shows that although Americans profess to believe that success in the sciences is synonymous with good citizenship, this idea is deeply complicated in an era when scientific data is hotly contested and many Americans have a conflicted view of science itself." Dr. Onion is a staff writer for Slate.

 

Dr. Wuster's book, Mark Twain: American Humorist, "examines the ways that Mark Twain’s reputation developed at home and abroad in the period between 1865 and 1882, years in which he went from a regional humorist to national and international fame. In the late 1860s, Mark Twain became the exemplar of a school of humor that was thought to be uniquely American. As he moved into more respectable venues in the 1870s, especially through the promotion of William Dean Howells in the Atlantic Monthly, Mark Twain muddied the hierarchical distinctions between class-appropriate leisure and burgeoning forms of mass entertainment, between uplifting humor and debased laughter, and between the literature of high culture and the passing whim of the merely popular." Dr. Wuster teaches writing to electrical and computer engineers at the University of Texas at Austin and is the president of the American Humor Studies Association.

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