Department of Anthropology

ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology

31400-31465 • Reed, Denne
Meets TTH 12:30PM-1:30PM FAC 21
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology-Honors

31470 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 5.172
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Biological Anthropology-Wb

31475
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31480-31505 • Hartigan, John
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM BEL 328
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31510-31535 • Slotta, James
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM GAR 0.102
show description

This course provides an introduction to cultural anthropology, the inductive study of the human condition insofar as it is shaped by our social surround. To this end, anthropologists investigate humanity in all of its variety, developing methods of data collection and analysis, conceptual frameworks, and modes of presentation that are, ideally, adequate to capturing what it means to be human. In this course, we look at social formations both familiar (the nation, the nuclear family) and unfamiliar (the clan, the patrilocal residence group) alongside the cultural values and beliefs that motivate these social formations. We ask: where do values, beliefs, and identities “live”? What practices create, sustain, and transform these values and beliefs?

At the same time, we bring anthropological methods to bear on our own lives to examine how we are embedded in and influenced by social, political, historical and cultural environments in ways that we often do not realize. We challenge our own beliefs about the nature of humanity and society, about the moral and immoral, about the valuable and valueless through careful attention to the wide diversity of ways in which humans live. How do humans’ construct their socio-cultural environment? What becomes striking about our own social lives when set alongside the social life of others? What aspects of our socio-cultural surround are particularly potent in shaping the way we live?

The course aims 1) to develop students’ ability to approach social life as “ethnographers” – that is, to empathize with  people through careful attention to their social and cultural surround, and to recognize ourselves as part of particular social and cultural worlds; and 2) to develop the ability to read academic arguments—and anthropological arguments, in particular—that mobilize evidence and reasons in support of particular, “surprising” claims.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31540 • Sturm, Circe
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31545-31595 • Valdez, Fred
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM JGB 2.324
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304T • Intro To Texas Archaeology

31600 • Wade, Maria
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM
show description

People have been in Texas since about 12,000 years ago and the evidence of their presence throughout time is fascinating.  Ever wondered how we know and can prove that? This course introduces students to Texas archaeology through lectures, interactive virtual labs and hands-on laboratory sections that emphasize experimentation. Texas geographic and environmental diversity provided prehistoric and historic peoples with unique resources and possibilities, and people used that diversity to make choices and develop specific cultural characteristics while interacting with other peoples from the surrounding regions.

Doing archaeology requires teamwork, critical thinking and multidisciplinary approaches. In archaeology, it is often more important to ask relevant questions than provide ready answers. The lectures and labs in this course aim to emphasize these requirements as well as how archaeology relates to other sciences.

This course may be used to fulfill the natural science and technology (Part II) component of the common core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, teamwork, and empirical and quantitative skills.


ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

31605-31620
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM CLA 0.112
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.


ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

31622-31629 • Keating, Elizabeth
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM GSB 2.124
show description

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.


ANT 310L • African American Culture

31630 • Jones, Omi
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JGB 2.216
(also listed as AFR 301)
show description

Please check back with updates.


ANT 310L • Jewish Studies: An Intro

31632 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 2.124
(also listed as J S 311, MES 310, R S 313)
show description

Course Description:

This course introduces students to major themes in Jewish Studies and to the UT faculty who work in the field. It has three thematic units: “Exile and Diaspora,” “Jewish Identity,” and “Jewish Ethics.” On Mondays and Wednesdays faculty offer lectures related to one of the themes. Fridays are dedicated to discussion.

Grade Distribution:

  • 25% Attendance and Participation
  • 15% Discussion leadership and memo
  • 20% Short paper (2-3 pages) unit 1: Exile and Diaspora
  • 20% Short paper (2-3 pages) unit 2: Jewish Identity
  • 20% Short paper (2-3 pages) unit 3: Jewish Ethics

Course Readings:

Selections from Jewish Studies: A Theoretical. Introduction (Key Words in Jewish Studies), by Andrew Busch (Rutgers University Press, 2013).

Selections from The Oxford Handbook of Jewish Studies (Oxford Handbooks), Edited by Martin Goodman, Jeremy Cohen, David Sorkin (2005).

Selections from The Oxford Handbook of Jewish Ethics and Morality (Oxford Handbooks), Edited by Elliot N Dorff and Jonathan N. Crane (Reprint edition 2016)

Other readings and films as supplied by guest lecturers


ANT 320L • German Lang: Hist Perspec

31645 • Pierce, Marc
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 337
(also listed as GER 369, LIN 373)
show description

Course description:

This course gives students a thorough overview of the structure of the German language.  The course begins with a brief introduction to the historical background of the German language, before proceeding to the structure of the German language, including phonology, morphology, and syntax. While various theoretical frameworks will be discussed, the primary focus will be on the data itself.  Important current issues, such as the relative status of standard and non-standard varieties of German, and oral vs. written usage, will also be discussed.  Previous coursework in linguistics is helpful, but not required.  The course will be taught in English.

Course goals: 

By the end of this course, you should be able to:

1.         Analyze and discover the organizing principles of German sounds, words, sentences, and dialects.

2.         Relate acquired linguistic knowledge to everyday language use.

3.         Understand how German differs from English and why

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in German, or fourteen hours of coursework in German and six hours of coursework in linguistics

Required text:

Sally Johnson, Exploring the German Language [available at the University Co-Op]

Additional texts will be posted on Blackboard and/or distributed by the instructor.

Instructor:                 Marc Pierce

E-mail:                       mpierc@austin.utexas.edu (usually the best way to contact me)

Phone:                        232-6360 (office), 471-4123 (Germanic Department)

Grading scheme:

Tests:                          60%

Homework:                 20%

Class participation:     20%

Tests:

There will be three tests in class over the course of the semester.  They will invite your comments on readings and discussions, and may be written in either English or German.  The third test will be given on the last day of class. The instructor also reserves the right to give short quizzes, both announced and unannounced, about the material we have read and discussed.

Homework:

There will be ten short homework assignments over the course of the semester, due dates TBA.  There are also exercises in the Johnson book, which are not required (although you may certainly do them, if you would like).    Please hand in your homework by the due date.  All assignments must be handed in on paper; electronic versions will not be accepted. 

Participation:

Participation includes attendance, asking and answering questions, and taking part in class discussions.  Attendance is crucial.  Unexcused absences will result in poor grades for participation.  Absences will be unexcused except in cases of documented emergency (normally medical or family).  You will need to sign in at the beginning of each class.  Please notify me as soon as possible by e-mail or phone if it is necessary for you to be absent from class.  In accordance with UT policy, you may be excused from class to participate in religious observances and official obligations like club or varsity sports.  In such cases, written documentation must be presented to the instructor at least one week before the absence takes place.


ANT 320L • Talk, Text, God

31650 • Handman, Courtney
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SAC 4.118
show description

As Christianity has become an increasingly important part of many post-colonial communities, attention is turning toward this now global religious tradition that anthropologists once avoided. This course will introduce students to the anthropological study of Christianity where we will focus in particular on the ways in which Christian missionaries and Christian communities participate in traditions of textual circulation in which people are reading, translating, studying, arguing with, resisting, or praying from the Bible. We will look at the complex colonial history of Protestant renunciation of material forms in favor of linguistic rituals. We will also pay attention to the ways that contemporary secular attitudes toward language inherit these dematerializing Protestant sensibilities and the way that different strains of Christianity embrace material forms as a critical response to modernist worlds. Readings will also address some of the newer media forms of global Christian circulation. We will read ethnographic monographs and articles about communities in North America, Melanesia, Africa, and Southeast Asia. 


ANT 322M • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

31660 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.112
(also listed as LAS 324L, MAS 374)
show description

This course examines the cultural prehistory and racial history of Mexican Americans from 1519 to the present. The purpose of the course is to examine how policies and laws enacted by the governments of Spain, Mexico, and the U.S. impacted the ethnic and racial identities of Mexican Americans. The geographic focus of the course is Mexico and the United States Southwest.


ANT 322M • Natv Amer Cul Greater Sthwst

31655 • Webster, Anthony
(also listed as AMS 321)
show description

This class explores the diverse Native cultures of the Southwest. The class focuses on the philosophical underpinnings and the frameworks of meaning and moral responsibility of indigenous peoples of the American Southwest. The goal is to give students a broader view of the Native peoples of North America and specifically of the Southwest. By focusing on the diverse groups of the Southwest, this course aims to increase knowledge concerning specific Native populations. The course will involve three ethnographies and readings that will orient students to peoples and issues of import in the Southwest. This course pays particular attention to the expressive forms of Native American peoples and cultures of the Southwest as well as political economy.


ANT 324L • Anthropol Of The Himalayas

31665 • Hindman, Heather
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.122
(also listed as AAS 330, ANS 361)
show description

This course looks at the history and culture of the Himalayan region, including Northeast India, sections of Pakistan and Afghanistan, and Tibet, but especially Nepal. Some understanding of Asian history, politics and religion will be helpful (but not necessary) as our attempt will not be a comprehensive survey of the region. The Himalayas have been the site of a great deal of anthropological attention and as such we will be simultaneously be exploring several key theoretical, historical and methodological issues within the discipline of anthropology as we learn about places and people in the region. Particular attention will be paid to the area as a site for negotiating identity (caste and indigeneity), development politics, the environment, tourism, diasporas as well as the current political tensions in the region. At the conclusion of the class, students should have a stronger idea of the important role this area has played in the political, religious and social imagination of the world and an appreciation of concepts such as ritual theory, social movements, modernity and gender studies.


ANT 324L • Biomedicine, Ethics, & Cul

31675 • Traphagan, John
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM BUR 208
(also listed as ANS 361, R S 373M)
show description

Health-care professionals, bio-medical researchers, patients, and families in all societies are increasingly faced with ethical issues that arise because of new medical technologies and because of alternative approaches to health and illness. This course focuses on ethical questions such as allocation of medical resources, stem cell research and cloning, organ transplantation, abortion, human experimentation, prolonging life and the right to die, suicide, euthanasia, and the diagnosis and treatment of illnesses such as Alzheimer disease, AIDS, and mental disorders.

This course explores these topics from a global perspective, emphasizing how cultural values and ethical systems define moral issues and inform decision-making about medical care. We will consider ethical theories that have been used in the West to consider medical practice, and compare these with approaches in non-Western cultures such as Japan and India. The course emphasizes the use of case studies to explore issues in medical ethics and to develop the ability to apply ethical theories in ways sensitive to variations in cultural values. 

Students in this course engage in discussion and debate about difficult moral issues and it is likely that members of the class will have different, and sometimes profoundly conflicting, ideas about what is right and wrong. You should feel free to express and support your position; this is an important component of the class.


ANT 324L • Contemp African Pop Culture

31680 • Livermon, Xavier
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CLA 1.104
(also listed as AFR 372G, WGS 340)
show description

The aim of this course is to introduce students to some of the most significant aspects of popular culture in contemporary sub-Saharan Africa. Manifestations of popular culture are considered as markers of modern African identities, embedded in complex and varied socio-cultural, historical and political contexts. Within the current era of global, diasporic, and transnational flows, it is neither sufficient any longer to view Africa solely from the perspective of political economies, nor to discuss contemporary African culture within the tradition-versus-modernity debate. Manifestations of popular culture in Africa show that the continent is part and parcel of the postmodern world, with cultural production simultaneously influenced by global trends and specific African contexts. The course will cover various forms of cultural expression and genres, including popular film, music, literature, dance, comics and cartoons, fashion, sport, street art, theatre, and contemporary visual arts. Attention will be paid to the production modes, audiences and sites of consumption of these different genres and aspects of popular culture. Course instruction will include extensive film and clip viewings, analysis of music, and reading fictional texts such as popular novels and comics.

Texts:

  • Marguerite Abouet Aya: Life in Yop City.
  • Nadine Dolby: Constructing Race: Youth, Identity and Popular Culture in South Africa.
  • Manthia Diawara In Search of Africa.
  • Sokari Ekine ed. SMS Uprising: Mobile Activism in Africa. 
  • Relebohile Moletsane, Claudia Mitchell, and Ann Smith eds. Was it Something I Wore? Dress, Identity, Materialitiy.
  • Mwenda Ntarangwi East African Hip-Hop: Youth Culture and Globalization.
  • Simon Weller and Garth Walker South African Township Barbershops and Salons.

Grading breakdown (percentages):

  • Attendance and Participation 20%
  • Response Papers 20%
  • Midterm 20%
  • Final 40%

ANT 324L • Daily Life In Mesoamerica

31685 • Rodriguez, Enrique
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.112
(also listed as LAS 324L)
show description

In this course we will study the daily life of people in Mesoamerica, from the earliest inhabitants in the region to the myriad ways that Precolumbian life and archaeology affect the lives of people today. We will examine production strategies, agriculture, cooking, household life, burial practices, beautification, the life of children, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and many other aspects of daily life. We will play close attention to variation and continuities through space and time in Mesoamerica, and between different Mesoamerican cultures. We will study a variety of archaeological sites ranging from the small rural site of Chan in Belize, to the giant Teotihuacan in Mexico, from Joya del Ceren (buried in volcanic ash) to Tenochtitlan (buried under modern Mexico City), and many others. While we will study daily life as a worthy object on study in and of itself, we will also examine the relationship between daily life and broad political and economic patterns, including the formation of ranked societies, warfare, and empire-building.


ANT 324L • Environmental Anthropology

31690-31705 • Cons, Jason
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.112
show description

This course will introduce students to core concepts in environmental anthropology. The course covers both on the history of environmental anthropology and different trajectories in the field today including: cultural ecology, political ecology, environmental racism, slow violence, multi-species ethnography, toxic ecologies, and climate change. Students will apply course ideas to a range of contemporary issues in environmental, culture, and society. 


ANT 324L • Gis/Rem Sns Archaeol/Paleo

31735 • Reed, Denne
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 1.402
(also listed as GRG 356T)
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • Global Indigenous Issues

31749 • Canova, Paola
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM SAC 4.118
(also listed as LAS 324L)
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • Hiv/Aids Activism/Heal Arts

31715 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 203
(also listed as AFR 374E, WGS 335)
show description

The AIDS pandemic is still far from over. This course explores the historical and contemporary phenomenon of HIV/AIDS principally in the art and activism of the African Diaspora. For over three decades we as a species have been using activism and artistry to champion the cause, mourn the dead, prevent infection and encourage healthy HIV+ lives. Here in the United States, in the American South, and at UT, we are part of a global movement of contagiously creative and inf ectiously  passionate people determined to honour, preserve and celebrate life in this age of AIDS. Throughout the semester, we will gather local and international resources, tools and strategies vital for our global well-being.


ANT 324L • Intro To African Prehistory

31730 • Denbow, James
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 4.118
(also listed as AFR 322)
show description

This course provides an overview of human biological and cultural evolution in
Africa. The roots of humankind go back almost 6 million years on the continent. This is
an enormous time when one considers that human history in the New World only began
less than 17,000 years ago. In addition, the African continent makes up over 20% of the
earth’s landmass and is more than three times the size of the continental United States!
Today there are more than a thousand languages spoken in Africa and cultural and
ecological diversity is great. Apart from Egypt, Ethiopia, and the Swahili and
Mediterranean coasts, however, written sources only document the last few centuries of
the continent’s history.


The first few weeks of the class will present an overview of the physical,
environmental, cultural and linguistic diversity of the continent. The course will then
focus on the evolution of humankind from its early beginnings over 3 million years ago
up to the beginnings of early civilizations in Africa. (The following semester the
Archaeology of African Thought (ANT 24L) will look more closely at the development
of the ancient civilizations of Ancient Egypt, Axum, Ghana, Kongo and Great Zimbabwe.
The relationships between religion, gender, culture and power will be more fully
addressed in that second course.)


Your books have been selected to discuss different aspects of Africa’s long
history. Barham and Mitchell focus on a detailed archaeological presentation of the early
history of the continent. Reader presents a more generalized overview of the continent’s
history that extends from earliest times into the present. The Reader book will be used for
both semesters.


The lectures will not follow the readings directly, but rather expand on them to
bring material up to date and include discussions of African peoples, cultures and
languages. Students are encouraged to raise questions during the lectures in order to
ensure that topics of interest to you are discussed—it is your class after all. No prior
knowledge of Africa or of archaeology is expected.


The course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed
to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. Therefore a
substantial portion of your grade will come from assignments covering the practices,
beliefs, and histories of non-U.S. cultural groups, past and present.


ANT 324L • Primitive Technology

31725 • Valdez, Fred
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM SAC 4.174
show description

Prehistoric technologies will review various technological developments from earliest prehistoric times into the recent past as an initial backdrop for this course. The development, process, and methods of stone tool making serves as one example. The control and use of fire, the processes of pottery making, aspects of lithic technology, leatherworking, etc. are all among the topics of lectures and discussions. This course intends as a primary interest to study the development, the construction, and the use of prehistoric pottery. 


ANT 324L • Queer Ethnographies

31745 • Merabet, Sofian
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.118
(also listed as WGS 340)
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 324L • Sacred & Ceremonl Textiles

31734 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A303A
(also listed as ISL 372, MEL 321, R S 358, WGS 340)
show description

Textiles and material objects indigenous to the Islamic world, and what they reveal about the culture of various Islamic societies.


ANT 324L • Theories Of Archaeology

31740 • Franklin, Maria
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.174
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 325L • Ethnographies Of Emotion

31765 • Stewart, Kathleen
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM SAC 5.118
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 325L • Jewish Folklore

31750 • Gottesman, Itzik
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GDC 5.304
(also listed as GSD 360, J S 363, R S 357, REE 325)
show description

Dybbuks, golems, evil eye are just some of the more well-known aspects of Jewish folklore, but this course will also examine the folklife of the Jews, their world view, their folk beliefs and fears. Call it folk religion if you will; many of these practices were dismissed by the "offical" Jewish religion as unJewish, but the "folk" persisted and eventually the practice became Judaized and accepted. The influence of the Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism, also led to the introduction of many customs.

Using literary sources, ethnographic memoirs, historical documents, films (among them "The Dybbuk" 1939), folkore collections and field trips (among them - to the oldest Austin Jewish cemetery), we will focus on what makes Jewish folklore Jewish. For example, the high literacy rate among Jews over the centuries and the people's close connection to the written word led to the development of specifically Jewish interpretations of internationally disseminated beliefs. Folklore genres -folktale, legend, folksong, folkmusic, custom, belief and, of course, Jewish humor will be included.

 

Grading Policy

  • Attendance, homework and class participation: 30%
  • Four short papers 30%
  • Midterm and final paper: 40%

 

Reading List

  • Joshua Trachternberg   Jewish Magic and Superstition
  • Joachim Neugroschel   Great Tales of Jewish Fantasy and the Occult
  • Moses Gaster    Maaseh Book
  • I. B. Singer    The Satan in Goray
  • Elizabeth Herzog/Mark Zborowski   Life is With People

ANT 325L • Practices Of Looking

31760 • Campbell, Craig
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM SAC 4.118
show description

“Seeing not only makes us alive to the appearance of things but to being itself.” ~David MacDougall

This class will introduce you to the history of Visual Anthropology which has a bifurcated set of fascinations: the study of visual culture and the use of visual images in the production of anthropological knowledge. In this class, you will develop sensibilities and skills for the examination of vision as a cultural practice. The methodological and analytical tools associated with Visual Anthropology will help you understand broadly how the visual has been constituted as a category and specifically how it relates to the study of culture and society in anthropology.

This course will explore the history of the visual in anthropology as seen in the production of photographs, films, and videos. We will explore themes of media, mediation, everyday life, “the gaze,” documentary forms, materiality, technology, realism and representation, as well as ethics. This course will introduce participants to critical approaches and analytic methods that broaden their toolkit for describing the world and the ways in which it is culturally and historically mediated.


ANT 325L • Technoculture

31752 • Hartigan, John
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM SAC 4.174
show description

Please check back for updates.


ANT 325L • Ut Jews In Civil Rights Era

31757 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 4.120
(also listed as AMS 321, J S 364)
show description

Course Description:

Segregation protests, sit-ins, free love, flower power—Revolution was in the air on 1960’s college campuses—UT included. Where were the Jews? In/out? Right/Left? Greek/geek? Activist/Pacifist? Gay/Straight? White/Other? Students will learn the art of oral history and digital storytelling to uncover the untold tales of UT’s Jewish students in the Age of Aquarius.

 

Course Assessment:

Weekly reading, online posting, class discussion, and attendance (25%)

Archival research and analysis (20%)

Oral Historical audio/video interview, transcription, production, and analysis (20%)

Final Project/Presentation (35%)

 

Oral History Resources:

Donald A Ritchie, Doing Oral History: Practical Advice and Reasonable Explanations for Anyone. 2nd edition. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Barbara Sommer and Mary Quinlan. The Oral History Manual. 2nd edition (2009)

Alessandro Portelli, The Death of Luigi Trastulli and Other Stories: Form and Meaning in Oral History, Albany, N.Y.: SUNY Press, 1991) pp. 1-26 (“The Death of Luigi Trastulli,”).

Martha Norkunas “Teaching to Listen: Listening Exercises and Self-Reflexive Journals,” Oral History Review v. 38, no. 1 (Winter-Spring 2011): 73-108.

 

Content Resources:

Michael E. Staub, ed. The Jewish 1960s: An American Sourcebook (Brandeis Series in American Jewish History, Culture and Life. 2004

Richard Flacks, “The Liberated Generation: An Exploration of the Roots of Student Protest,” Journal of Social Issues 23 (July 1967): 52-75.

Martin Kulhman, “Direct Action at the University of Texas During the Civil Rights Movement, 1960-1965,” Southwestern Historical Quarterly 98 (1995): 551-566.

Beverly Burr. History of Student Activism at the University of Texas at Austin (1960-1988). Unpublished Thesis

Goldstone, Dwonna, N. Integrating the 40 Acres: The Fifty Year Struggle for Racial Equality at the University of Texas. (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2006).


ANT 326F • Great Discovs In Archaeology

31770 • Wade, Maria
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM CLA 1.106
(also listed as EUS 346)
show description

Archaeology shapes the way we understand the human past, and the history of archaeology was shaped by the great discoveries in archaeology and the people who made them. For instance, things that today we take for granted, such as travel agencies, photography, and postcards, or how we understand the politics of modern archaeology and our role in them, or the claims of countries for the return of art objects are all connected to the history of archeology and its discoverers. This course surveys the stories and myths behind some of those discoveries as well as the background of the discoverers. In the process we will discuss how they acquired knowledge, formulated hypotheses, and the impact their early discoveries had on the ways we know the world, think about ourselves, and on how archaeology is practiced today.


ANT 326L • Cultures In Contact

31775 • Covey, Ronald
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.112
(also listed as LAS 324L)
show description

"Cultures in Contact" is a multi-disciplinary course which combines Historical, Anthropological, Geographical and Literary analyses of the continuing "contact period" in the New World.  The issues addressed span the last 500+ years of cultural interaction in the Americas, looking especially at the processes of cultural interaction, competition, cooperation, and synthesis that have taken place among people from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia.


ANT 336L • Natv Amer Culs North Of Mex

31784 • Sturm, Circe
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM SAC 4.118
show description

This upper-division undergraduate course examines contemporary articulations of indigenous cultures and practices in the U.S. and Canada. Because the present cannot be understood without understanding historically how we got to here, this course includes histories that inform the contemporary. We will cover critical developments that shape and are shaped by late 20th century and early 21st century indigenous life. Issues include but are not limited to the American Indian Movement; IdleNoMore; tribal and First Nation citizenship politics; the politics of race and indigeneity in the U.S. and Canada; gaming and other economic development strategies; residential schools; evolving kinship practices; indigenous feminisms, masculinities, and sexualities; indigenous environmental and religious politics (including how “environment” and “religion” are inadequate for understanding those politics!); food sovereignty movements; and science, technology and Native Americans. Course readings come from anthropology, U.S. and Canadian indigenous studies, history, and cultural studies. We will read scholarly work, blogs, and other popular literature. The course features several guest speakers, some via Skype.

 


ANT 346M • Comparative Primate Ecology

31787
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM SAC 5.172
show description

Comparative Primate Ecology will explore the following topics with respect to primates: population ecology, community ecology, feeding adaptations, foraging strategies, ranging behavior, and life history strategies.


ANT 432L • Primate Anatomy

31780 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 5.172
show description

An exploration of the relationship between primate anatomical form and function, with emphasis on adaptations to diet and locomotion.  The course is also designed to demonstrate how such information can be applied to the fossil record in order to reconstruct the evolutionary development of primate adaptations.

There is a two hour lab section associated with this class.