Department of Anthropology

Brian M. Stross


ProfessorPh.D., University of California, Berkeley

Interests


Linguistic Anthropology, Indigenous Mesoamerica, Maya Iconography and Epigraphy, Anthropology of Food, Ethnobotany, Cultural Forms.

Biography


Professor Stross received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1969.  He began teaching at the University of Texas the same year, and remained at UT his entire career.  A Linguistic Anthropologist, Professor Stross studied language use of the Tzeltal Maya, along with many other groups.  His interests extended to the iconography and epigraphy of the Classic Maya, and his knowledge of Mesoamerican languages was extensive.  He was also interested in foodways, feasting, and the language systems that applied to foods. 

Professor Stross worked with many generations of UT students, supervising 23 Dissertations over his 45-year career. He supervised or served on the Ph.D., Masters, or Honors Thesis committees of literally hundreds of students.

Brian Stross was a gentle and generous man with enormous curiosity and a singular dedication to his students.  He was a warm and gracious colleague to generations of junior professors, and as the senior member of our faculty, a wise and steadying presence.

 

Additional affiliations:

Américo Paredes Center for Cultural Studies

Institute for Latin American Studies

Mexican-American Center

Religious Studies Center

Courses taught:

Culture and Communication; Introduction to Graduate Linguistic Anthropology; Speech Play and Verbal Art; Ethnobotany; The Anthropology of Food (Foodways); Maya Hieroglyphic Writing; Indigenous Mesoamerica (Indians of Mexico and Guatemala); Symbolism, Iconography, and Worldview

Courses


ANT 307 • Culture & Communication-Honors

31260 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM SAC 4.118

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 325M • Lang In Culture And Society

31430 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CLA 0.112
(also listed as LIN 373, SOC 352M)

Description  

This course is an upper division introduction to topics in linguistic anthropology.  Languages, like other communication systems, are adapted to new and different environments in which they are spoken, creating and maintaining social realities, reproducing cultural traditions, and conveying messages in a complex interplay of new and old information, sometimes necessary and sometimes frivolous, packaging meaning in various ways that generally conform to standards that can be articulated,  As speech is an important mode of human communication, we start by outlining basic concepts allowing for the description of linguistic form,  In the end we will focus as much on language use as on language structure, and in the process we will examine various expressive speech genres, metaphors that we live by, the power of language, gender preferences in communication, language learning, proverbs, jokes, and multilingualism, among other topics. We will examine these forms, processes, and contexts in an effort to deliver the tools necessary for describing and understanding the multiple ways in which language, culture, and society interact.

Goals

The goals of this course are to introduce students to the study of language use from a sociocultural perspective and to develop skills (through fieldwork and data analysis) in analyzing the role that language plays in the structure and interpretation of human interaction. Students will collect language data from a "speech community" in a setting of their choice, and will use this data: 1) collectively as a basis for examining and questioning concepts discussed in lectures and readings such as ethnicity, identity, power, and gender as they are constructed through language, and 2) individually as a basis from which to generate an analytical paper, which shows an understanding of the major ideas covered in the course but which is specific to student interests.

Grading and Requirement:

Two midterm exams 25% each

10 page analytical paper based on fieldwork due on the last class day 25%

Comprehensive final exam 25%

No penalty for one unexcused absence, but further such absences can lower one’s course grade by two and a half percentage points for each instance.  Exams include information from lectures,readings, and films.

Texts:    

Susan Blum    2009.  (ed.)  Making sense of Language.  Oxford  

 

ANT 322M • Indians Of Mex And Guatemala

31210 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 4.112
(also listed as LAS 324L)

Please check back for updates.

ANT 325M • Lang In Culture And Society

31220 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 420
(also listed as LIN 373, SOC 352M)

Description  

This course is an upper division introduction to topics in linguistic anthropology.  Languages, like other communication systems, are adapted to new and different environments in which they are spoken, creating and maintaining social realities, reproducing cultural traditions, and conveying messages in a complex interplay of new and old information, sometimes necessary and sometimes frivolous, packaging meaning in various ways that generally conform to standards that can be articulated,  As speech is an important mode of human communication, we start by outlining basic concepts allowing for the description of linguistic form,  In the end we will focus as much on language use as on language structure, and in the process we will examine various expressive speech genres, metaphors that we live by, the power of language, gender preferences in communication, language learning, proverbs, jokes, and multilingualism, among other topics. We will examine these forms, processes, and contexts in an effort to deliver the tools necessary for describing and understanding the multiple ways in which language, culture, and society interact.

Goals

The goals of this course are to introduce students to the study of language use from a sociocultural perspective and to develop skills (through fieldwork and data analysis) in analyzing the role that language plays in the structure and interpretation of human interaction. Students will collect language data from a "speech community" in a setting of their choice, and will use this data: 1) collectively as a basis for examining and questioning concepts discussed in lectures and readings such as ethnicity, identity, power, and gender as they are constructed through language, and 2) individually as a basis from which to generate an analytical paper, which shows an understanding of the major ideas covered in the course but which is specific to student interests.

Grading and Requirement:

Two midterm exams 25% each

10 page analytical paper based on fieldwork due on the last class day 25%

Comprehensive final exam 25%

No penalty for one unexcused absence, but further such absences can lower one’s course grade by two and a half percentage points for each instance.  Exams include information from lectures,readings, and films.

Texts:    

Susan Blum    2009.  (ed.)  Making sense of Language.  Oxford  

 

ANT 393 • Speech Play And Verbal Art

31400 • Fall 2012
Meets W 4:00PM-7:00PM SAC 4.116
(also listed as LIN 393)

 

This course is a graduate seminar on speech play and verbal art within a framework of the anthropological study of language.   Speech play, associated with the ludic impulse common in humanity, and verbal art, emphasizing an association with the aesthetic, are overlapping categories of performance involving manipulations of the form component of the speech act, and both could be subsumed under the label speech play.   Speech play is generally found in more informal contexts while verbal art occurs in more formal contexts. 

 

Speech play as a manifestation of culture in discourse, sometimes trivialized in the literature, can also be seen as central to the anthropological enterprise of documenting, translating, and understanding both culture and discourse, because in use it highlights boundaries, points out limits, and illuminates competence conventions derived from patterns of performance.  It is particularly important in providing a useful methodological perspective from which to look through the window that separates one’s own culture from that of an other.

 

We will commence with Dell Hymes’ formulation of speech act components and functions, using it as a basis for investigating speech play and verbal art.  

 

No prior training in linguistics is assumed, expected, or required.

ANT 322M • Indians Of Mex And Guatemala

31305 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 4.112
(also listed as LAS 324L)

 The course opens with an introductory review of the environment, history and prehistory of Mexico and Guatemala, a summary of language distributions and broad characterization of indigenous societies in the region.   The main part of the course describes a series of some 13 representative Indian societies of Mesoamerica--their lifestyles, speaking habits, social patterns, and views of the natural and supernatural universe.   Students should gain insight into the richness and variety of  life in Mesoamerica, into the descriptive strands that can be discerned running through the warp and weft of the Mesoamerican tapestry, and into the ways that people have adapted to changing natural and social environments.  The course will be of interest to students concerned with Latin America, indigenous populations, and anthropology, among other things.

ANT 325M • Lang In Culture And Society

31350 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.112
(also listed as LIN 373, SOC 352M)

Description:

This course is an upper division introduction to topics in linguistic

anthropology. Languages, like other communication systems, are adapted to new and

different environments, creating and maintaining social realities, reproducing cultural

traditions, and conveying messages in a complex interplay of new and old information,

sometimes necessary and sometimes frivolous, packaging meaning in various describable

ways. As speech is an important mode of human communication, we start by outlining

basic concepts allowing for the description of linguistic form. In the end we will focus as

much on language use as on language structure, and we will examine various expressive

speech genres, metaphors that we live by, the power of language, gender preferences in

communication, language learning, proverbs, jokes, and multilingualism, among other

topics. We will examine these forms, processes, and contexts in an effort to deliver the

tools necessary for describing and understanding the multiple ways in which language,

culture, and society interact.

Goals:

The goals of this course are to introduce students to the study of language use

from a sociocultural perspective and to develop skills (through fieldwork and data

analysis) in analyzing the role that language plays in the structure and interpretation of

human interaction. Students will collect language data from a "speech community" in a

setting of their choice, and will use this data: 1) collectively as a basis for examining and

questioning concepts discussed in lectures and readings, such as ethnicity, identity,

power, and gender as they are constructed and negotiated through language, and 2)

individually as a basis from which to generate an analytical paper, which shows an

understanding of the major ideas covered in the course but which is specific to the

individual student’s interests.

Requirements / Exams, Paper, Attendance:

The course grade will be based on two midterm exams 25% each

Comprehensive final exam 25%

10 page (double spaced) analytical paper, derived from fieldwork, that is due on the last class day 

Attendance: No penalty for one unexcused absence, but each additional unexcused

absence can lower one’s course grade by two and a half percentage points.

Text:

Susan Blum (ed.) 2009. Making Sense of Language

ANT 325M • Lang In Culture And Society

31045 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 4.132
(also listed as LIN 373, SOC 352M)

Description:

This course is an upper division introduction to topics in linguistic anthropology. Languages, like other communication systems, are adapted to new and different environments, creating and maintaining social realities, reproducing cultural traditions, and conveying messages in a complex interplay of new and old information, sometimes necessary and sometimes frivolous, packaging meaning in various describable ways. As speech is an important mode of human communication, we start by outlining basic concepts allowing for the description of linguistic form. In the end we will focus as much on language use as on language structure, and we will examine various expressive speech genres, metaphors that we live by, the power of language, gender preferences in communication, language learning, proverbs, jokes, and multilingualism, among other topics. We will examine these forms, processes, and contexts in an effort to deliver the tools necessary for describing and understanding the multiple ways in which language, culture, and society interact.

Goals:

The goals of this course are to introduce students to the study of language use from a sociocultural perspective and to develop skills (through fieldwork and data analysis) in analyzing the role that language plays in the structure and interpretation of human interaction. Students will collect language data from a "speech community" in a setting of their choice, and will use this data: 1) collectively as a basis for examining and questioning concepts discussed in lectures and readings, such as ethnicity, identity, power, and gender as they are constructed and negotiated through language, and 2) individually as a basis from which to generate an analytical paper, which shows an understanding of the major ideas covered in the course but which is specific to the individual student’s interests.

Requirements:

Two midterm exams (25% each)

Comprehensive final exam (25%)

10 page (double spaced) analytical paper, derived from fieldwork, that is due on the last class day (see this URL

http://www.utexas.edu/courses/stross/ant325m_files/analyticalpaper.htm ). Exams include information from lectures, readings, and films.

Attendance: No penalty for one unexcused absence, but each additional unexcused absence can lower one’s course grade by two and a half percentage points.

Text:

Susan Blum (ed.) 2009. Making Sense of Language.

Brief Overview of Major Course Requirements: will include attending class, doing the assigned homework, taking the exams, and writing the analytical paper.

ANT 322M • Indians Of Mex And Guatemala

31270 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.112
(also listed as LAS 324L)

The course starts with an introductory review of the environment, history and prehistory of Mexico and Guatemala, summary of language distributions and broad types of societal grouping.  The main body of the course describes a series of representative Indian societies--their lifestyles, speaking habits, social patterns, and views of the natural and supernatural universe.  Students should gain an insight into the richness and variety of Indian life, and the ways the people have adapted to changing natural and social environments.  The course will be of interest to students concerned with Anthropology, Latin America, or the "Third World" generally.

ANT 393 • Food In Discourse And Thought

31530 • Spring 2011
Meets T 4:00PM-7:00PM SAC 4.116

   Food sustains us, giving meaning, order, and values to our lives; and food reflects the symbolism in our ideological systems.  Food plays an important part in our identity construction, our religious practices, and our socialization.  Foodways can thus tell us a lot about the society in which they play a part.  This course will investigate the facts that we communicate messages by means of as well as about foods, that we communicate frequently and much about foods, and that we can look at foodways to discern cultural presuppositions used in communication.  
     Topics explored in this course will include food preferences and taboos, conversation during the production and consumption of food, food as a topic of conversation, naming and beliefs about foods, food metaphors, social structure in seating and eating, meals and manners, food and education, food and religion, food and sex, food and identity, food and power, food and the senses, food and the flow of time, and maize in Mesoamerica.   
     Food participates in multiple symbolic systems in a society, and one goal of this course, conducted in a seminar format, will be to discern some of the meanings that can be read into the language-like patterns to be found in the choices and variations to be found in what, when, where, and how people eat, as well as what, where, when, and how they talk about food.
     In this course we will have a three ethnographic "exercises" in which participants will collect information on foods that could be interesting and relevant to the course.

ANT 325M • Lang In Culture And Society

30175 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 4.132
(also listed as LIN 373, SOC 352M)

The goals of this course are to introduce students to the study of language use from a sociocultural perspective and to develop skills (through fieldwork and data analysis) in analyzing the role that language plays in the structure and interpretation of human interaction.  Students will collect language data from a “speech community” in a setting of their choice, and will use this data:  1) collectively as a basis for examining and questioning concepts discussed in lectures and readings, such as ethnicity, identity, power, and gender as they are constructed through language, and 2) individually as a basis from which to generate an analytical paper, which shows an understanding of the major ideas covered in the course but which is specific to student interests.

Prerequisite: Anthropology 302, 305, 307, or Linguistics 306; or consent of instructor.

 

ANT 393 • Food In Discourse And Thought

30370 • Fall 2010
Meets W 5:00PM-8:00PM EPS 1.128

    Food sustains us, giving meaning, order, and values to our lives; and food reflects the symbolism in our ideological systems.  Food plays an important part in our identity construction, our religious practices, and our socialization.  Foodways can thus tell us a lot about the society in which they play a part.  This course will investigate the facts that we communicate messages by means of as well as about foods, that we communicate frequently and much about foods, and that we can look at foodways to discern cultural presuppositions used in communication.  

     Topics explored in this course will include food preferences and taboos, conversation during the production and consumption of food, food as a topic of conversation, naming and beliefs about foods, food metaphors, social structure in seating and eating, meals and manners, food and education, food and religion, food and sex, food and identity, food and power, food and the senses, food and the flow of time, and maize in Mesoamerica.  

      Food participates in multiple symbolic systems in a society, and one goal of this course, conducted in a seminar format, will be to discern some of the meanings that can be read into the language-like patterns to be found in the choices and variations in what, when, where, and how people eat, as well as what, where, when, why, and how they talk about food.

     In this course we will have three ethnographic "exercises" in which participants will collect information on foods that could be interesting and relevant to the course.

ANT 322M • Indians Of Mex And Guatemala

30260 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 136
(also listed as LAS 324L)

Please check back for updates.

LIN 393 • Speech Play And Verbal Art

41280 • Spring 2010
Meets W 7:00PM-10:00PM EPS 1.128

This course is an introduction to the typological study of language – the investigation into the nature of human language as informed by cross-linguistic comparison.  Despite the immense variation among the world’s languages, basic patterns emerge through large-scale comparison of linguistic phenomena, allowing the identification of cross-linguistic universals and tendencies. This course will explore these patterns and investigate explanations for their existence, appealing primarily to the communicative  function of language and the historical evolution of languages in doing so.

ANT 325M • Lang In Culture And Society

30495 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.110
(also listed as LIN 373)

The goals of this course are to look at language practices in many different communities, to look at issues in cross-cultural communication, and to understand how 'everyday' language use influences how we think about society and personhood, and the role language plays in creating and maintaining cultures. 

ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

30715 • Fall 2009
Meets M 5:00PM-8:00PM EPS 1.128

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

ANT 322M • Indians Of Mex And Guatemala

29820 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 136
(also listed as LAS 324L)

Please check back for updates.

ANT 307 • Culture & Communication-Hon-W

30490 • Fall 2008
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.120

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 322M • Indians Of Mex And Guatemala

30280 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 136
(also listed as LAS 324L)

Please check back for updates.

ANT 307 • Culture & Communication-Hon-W

30845 • Fall 2007
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.120

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 322M • Indians Of Mex And Guatemala

29885 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 224
(also listed as LAS 324L)

Please check back for updates.

ANT 324L • Anthropology Of Food

29900 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 108
(also listed as LAS 324L)

Please check back for updates.

ANT 307 • Culture & Communication-Hon-W

30370 • Fall 2006
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.120

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 322M • Indians Of Mex And Guatemala

29065 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 224
(also listed as LAS 324L)

Please check back for updates.

ANT 307 • Culture & Communication-Hon-W

28500 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.120

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

28855 • Fall 2005
Meets W 7:00PM-10:00PM EPS 1.128

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

ANT 322M • Indians Of Mex And Guatemala

27655 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 224
(also listed as LAS 324L)

Please check back for updates.

ANT 324L • Anthropology Of Food

27685 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 420

Please check back for updates.

ANT 307 • Culture & Communication-Hon-W

28270 • Fall 2004
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.120

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 322M • Indians Of Mex And Guatemala

26615 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 224
(also listed as LAS 324L)

Please check back for updates.

LAS 399R • Dissertation

36840 • Spring 2004

Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

ANT 307 • Culture & Communication-Hon-W

26805 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.120

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

27230 • Fall 2003
Meets W 7:00PM-10:00PM EPS 1.128

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

LAS 999R • Dissertation

37675 • Fall 2003

Prerequisite: Latin American Studies 399R, 699R, or 999R.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

ANT 322M • Indians Of Mex And Guatemala

26080 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 224
(also listed as LAS 324L)

Please check back for updates.

LAS 399R • Dissertation

36780 • Spring 2003

Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

ANT 307 • Culture & Communication-Hon-W

26522 • Fall 2002
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 1.146

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

LAS 999R • Dissertation

37295 • Fall 2002

Prerequisite: Latin American Studies 399R, 699R, or 999R.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

ANT 322M • Indians Of Mex And Guatemala

26365 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GEO 112
(also listed as LAS 324L)

Please check back for updates.

LAS 399R • Dissertation

36610 • Spring 2002
(also listed as LAS 999R)

Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

ANT 307 • Cul And Communication-Honors-W

26980 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WEL 3.260

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

27370 • Fall 2001
Meets M 7:00PM-10:00PM EPS 1.128

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

ANT 322M • Indians Of Mex And Guatemala

26665 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GEO 112
(also listed as LAS 324L)

Please check back for updates.

LAS 399R • Dissertation

36545 • Spring 2001

Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

27110-27125 • Fall 2000
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.122

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 322M • Indians Of Mex And Guatemala

26285 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GEO 112
(also listed as LAS 324L)

Please check back for updates.

ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

26545 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM EPS 1.130KA

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

LAS 399R • Dissertation

36225 • Spring 2000

Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

Publications


Books:
    
2013  Brian Stross (with John Staller) Lightning in Andean South America and Mesoamerica: Pre-Colombian, Colonial, and Contemporary Perspectives.   Oxford University Press.



Chapters and Articles:

n.d.  Brian Stross  “Teaching Food, Culture, and Discourse”  In Teaching Food in Anthropology, Richard Wilk and Candice Lowe Swift (eds.) (under review)

n.d.  Brian Stross “Akhenaten’s Legacy”  Toutankhamon Magazine. (In Press)

2013  *Brian Stross  “Falsetto Voice and Observational Logic: Motivated MeaningsLanguage in Society  42(2):139-162

2013  *Brian Stross (with Thomas Zumbroich) “Cutting Old Life into New': Teeth Blackening in Western Amazonia”   Anthropos 108 (1): 53-75

2012  *Brian Stross (with Andrew McDonald) “Water Lily and Cosmic Serpent: Equivalent Conduits of the Maya Realm.Journal of Ethnobiology 32:73-106.


Reviews    

n.d.  Brian Stross (Review)  Shamans, Witches, and maya Preists: Native Religion and Ritual in Highland Guatemala.  Krystina Deuss. Ethnohistory (In Press).

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