Department of Classics

Kevin Pluta


Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Research Fellow, Program in Aegean Scripts and History (PASP); Lecturer

Contact

Interests


Bronze Age Archaeology; Greek Alphabet, World Scripts, and Literacy; Indo-European Linguistics; IT and Archaeological Database Design and Implementation

Courses


LAT 323 • Cicero And Catullus

33490 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 112

This junior-level Latin course will use a close reading of selections from the Roman lawyer Cicero’s Pro lege manilia and the poet Catullus’s Carmina to investigate the question of Rome’s provincial expansion in the politics of the Late Roman Republic.  The primary aim of the course will be to consolidate students’ ability to recognize and appropriately translate the complicated syntax of Cicero’s Latin prose and Catullus’s Latin verses.  Still, considerable attention will be given to the broader historical context and consequences of the issues raised by Cicero’s speech and Catullus’s poetry.  Class time will be devoted to some translation of assigned homework as well as discussion of key historical and interpretive points.

In 227 BC, Sicily became Rome’s first province.  The acquisition of provincial territories continued apace throughout the second and first centuries BC.  With this vastly expanded territory, Rome became an empire—but not without complications.  The rapid expansion of provincial holdings brought with it new challenges as well as opportunities: how to govern territories located far from Rome?  How to empower administrators without risking tyranny or enabling the abuse of local citizens? How to fund the military now needed to protect Rome’s holdings? How to manage the shifting demographics and vast disparities in the distribution of land and other forms of wealth by 100 BC?  How to “Romanize” provincial territories?  The last century of the Roman Republic was an exciting but also unsettling time to live.  It was into this world of opportunity but also instability that Cicero and Catullus were born.  Neither was from Rome proper yet each was able to rise to the pinnacle of Roman political and literary life.  Cicero was among the great intellectuals of his generation while Catullus is remembered as an outstanding poet and important precedent for the Roman elegists of the next generation.  Both Cicero and Catullus, through their writings, provide important accounts of Rome’s complicated relationship with her provinces and the citizens of those provinces.

At the start of the semester, we will attempt to cover 7-15 lines of Latin. As the semester progresses, I will gradually increase assignments to cover c. 40 lines of Latin by the end of the semester.  Homework assignments will include online worksheets with questions that cover Latin morphology/syntax and interpretive issues.  Your final grade will be determined by your performance on: 3 midterm exams; 1 short presentation; a 7-10 page paper on some aspect of the course topic, in consultation with the instructor.  As part of the longer paper, each student will anonymously peer review another paper in draft.

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and to read and discuss your peers' work. You should therefore be prepared to do a substantial amount of writing (and re-writing) in this course.

Textbooks

  • Cicero, De Imperio Cn. Pompie Ad Quirites Oratio: Pro Lege Manilia (College Classical Series), ed. C. Macdonald. ISBN# 0892414367)
  • Catullus, The Student’s Catullus, ed. D. Garrison, 4th ed. (University of Oklahoma Press, 2012). ISBN# 0806142324

LAT 506 • First-Year Latin I

33275 • Fall 2016
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 112

This course is an introduction to Latin, the language of ancient Rome and famous writers like Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, and St. Augustine. Latin is also an excellent way to improve your command of other languages: Latin is the source of over 60% of English vocabulary, and also the ancestor of all the “Romance” languages of Europe, including French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Latin 506 introduces basic grammar and vocabulary in an interesting and challenging format, through reading selections from a wide range of Roman authors and exploring aspects of Roman life and culture.  By the end of the semester, students are reading excerpts from famous works and ready to continue into Latin 507.

The course covers chapters 1-27 of Wheelock’s Latin and also selected readings from 38 Latin Stories. There will be daily assignments, regular quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Prerequisites: None. Note: This course may not be counted by students offering two or more admission units or any previous college credit in Latin.  

Latin 506 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective. 

Requirements: Class participation, homework, quizzes, midterm tests, and  a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Latin 507: First-Year Latin II, where they will read selections from Caesar and other authors. 

Texts:

Wheelock, Wheelock's Latin (Harper 6h edition)

Groton & May, 38 Latin Stories (Bolchazy)

Corneau & LeFleur, Workbook to Wheelock's Latin (Harper) optional

Goldman & Szymanski, English Grammar for Students of Latin (Olivia & Hill) (optional)

C C F306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

81569 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM CLA 1.108

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a portion of your grade to come from the course material on ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

LAT 311 • Sec-Yr Lat I: Sel Rom Writers

33110 • Fall 2006
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM CAL 21

This course is a continuation of Latin 507 (or 601C).  In Latin 311, students read Book 3 of Caesar’s Civil War.   The aim of the course is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to build command of basic Latin vocabulary; and to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Caesar’s narrative.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of assigned readings.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Caesar’s narrative.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 311 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement.  A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 312.

The completion of Latin 507 or 601C with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 311.

 

Textbooks

Kennedy, Caesar: De Bello Civile III, 1st ed. (Bristol, 2002).  ISBN 185399636X

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

Traupman, New College Latin and English Dictionary, 3rd ed. (Bantam, 2007)  ISBN 978-0-553-59012-8

LAT 312K • Sec-Yr Lat II: Vergil's Aeneid

31495 • Spring 2006
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM SZB 284

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312

 

Textbooks

Pharr, Aeneid Books I-VI, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1998).  ISBN 978-0-86516-421-5

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

LAT 507 • First-Year Latin II

30080 • Spring 2005
Meets MTWTHF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 308

This course is the second half of a two-semester introduction to the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin.  Translating passages from ancient writers also introduces students to fundamental features of Roman culture. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to reproduce paradigms of all Latin noun, adjective, adverb, and verb forms; to parse and explain the function of Latin words in context; to demonstrate fluency in basic Latin syntax and a growing vocabulary; to master standard pronunciation of Latin; and to translate accurately from Latin into English. In the latter part of the semester, students read selections from the writings of Julius Caesar in the original Latin.

Class time will be devoted to the introduction of new material, reviewing assigned homework, and practice exercises.  Students should expect daily homework assignments and regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; three midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 507 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 311. 

The completion of Latin 506 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 507. Students who have recently had more than two years of high school Latin, or more than two semesters of college Latin should normally take Latin 311.

Textbooks

Wheelock, Wheelock’s Latin, 7th ed. (Harper Collins, 2011).  ISBN 978-0-06-199722-8

English and Irby, A Little Latin Reader, 1st ed. (Oxford: OUP, 2012).  ISBN 978-0-19-984622-1

Groton, Thirty-Eight Latin Stories, 5th ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1995).  ISBN 978-0-86516-289-1

Comeau and LaFleur, Workbook for Wheelock’s Latin, 3rd ed. Rev. (Harper Collins, 2005).  ISBN

0-006-095642-9

Tatum, A Caesar Reader, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 2012).  ISBN 978-0-86516-696-7

LAT 507 • First-Year Latin II

30745 • Fall 2004
Meets MTWTHF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 214

This course is the second half of a two-semester introduction to the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin.  Translating passages from ancient writers also introduces students to fundamental features of Roman culture. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to reproduce paradigms of all Latin noun, adjective, adverb, and verb forms; to parse and explain the function of Latin words in context; to demonstrate fluency in basic Latin syntax and a growing vocabulary; to master standard pronunciation of Latin; and to translate accurately from Latin into English. In the latter part of the semester, students read selections from the writings of Julius Caesar in the original Latin.

Class time will be devoted to the introduction of new material, reviewing assigned homework, and practice exercises.  Students should expect daily homework assignments and regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; three midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 507 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 311. 

The completion of Latin 506 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 507. Students who have recently had more than two years of high school Latin, or more than two semesters of college Latin should normally take Latin 311.

Textbooks

Wheelock, Wheelock’s Latin, 7th ed. (Harper Collins, 2011).  ISBN 978-0-06-199722-8

English and Irby, A Little Latin Reader, 1st ed. (Oxford: OUP, 2012).  ISBN 978-0-19-984622-1

Groton, Thirty-Eight Latin Stories, 5th ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1995).  ISBN 978-0-86516-289-1

Comeau and LaFleur, Workbook for Wheelock’s Latin, 3rd ed. Rev. (Harper Collins, 2005).  ISBN

0-006-095642-9

Tatum, A Caesar Reader, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 2012).  ISBN 978-0-86516-696-7

LAT 506 • First-Year Latin I

28840 • Spring 2004
Meets MTWTHF 12:00PM-1:00PM UTC 4.120

This course is an introduction to Latin, the language of ancient Rome and famous writers like Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, and St. Augustine. Latin is also an excellent way to improve your command of other languages: Latin is the source of over 60% of English vocabulary, and also the ancestor of all the “Romance” languages of Europe, including French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Latin 506 introduces basic grammar and vocabulary in an interesting and challenging format, through reading selections from a wide range of Roman authors and exploring aspects of Roman life and culture.  By the end of the semester, students are reading excerpts from famous works and ready to continue into Latin 507.

The course covers chapters 1-27 of Wheelock’s Latin and also selected readings from 38 Latin Stories. There will be daily assignments, regular quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Prerequisites: None. Note: This course may not be counted by students offering two or more admission units or any previous college credit in Latin.  

Latin 506 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective. 

Requirements: Class participation, homework, quizzes, midterm tests, and  a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Latin 507: First-Year Latin II, where they will read selections from Caesar and other authors. 

Texts:

Wheelock, Wheelock's Latin (Harper 6h edition)

Groton & May, 38 Latin Stories (Bolchazy)

Corneau & LeFleur, Workbook to Wheelock's Latin (Harper) optional

Goldman & Szymanski, English Grammar for Students of Latin (Olivia & Hill) (optional)

LAT 506 • First-Year Latin I

29190 • Fall 2003
Meets MTWTHF 12:00PM-1:00PM RAS 313B

This course is an introduction to Latin, the language of ancient Rome and famous writers like Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, and St. Augustine. Latin is also an excellent way to improve your command of other languages: Latin is the source of over 60% of English vocabulary, and also the ancestor of all the “Romance” languages of Europe, including French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Latin 506 introduces basic grammar and vocabulary in an interesting and challenging format, through reading selections from a wide range of Roman authors and exploring aspects of Roman life and culture.  By the end of the semester, students are reading excerpts from famous works and ready to continue into Latin 507.

The course covers chapters 1-27 of Wheelock’s Latin and also selected readings from 38 Latin Stories. There will be daily assignments, regular quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Prerequisites: None. Note: This course may not be counted by students offering two or more admission units or any previous college credit in Latin.  

Latin 506 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective. 

Requirements: Class participation, homework, quizzes, midterm tests, and  a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Latin 507: First-Year Latin II, where they will read selections from Caesar and other authors. 

Texts:

Wheelock, Wheelock's Latin (Harper 6h edition)

Groton & May, 38 Latin Stories (Bolchazy)

Corneau & LeFleur, Workbook to Wheelock's Latin (Harper) optional

Goldman & Szymanski, English Grammar for Students of Latin (Olivia & Hill) (optional)

LAT 507 • First-Year Latin II

28630 • Spring 2002
Meets MTWTHF 3:00PM-4:00PM WAG 208

This course is the second half of a two-semester introduction to the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin.  Translating passages from ancient writers also introduces students to fundamental features of Roman culture. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to reproduce paradigms of all Latin noun, adjective, adverb, and verb forms; to parse and explain the function of Latin words in context; to demonstrate fluency in basic Latin syntax and a growing vocabulary; to master standard pronunciation of Latin; and to translate accurately from Latin into English. In the latter part of the semester, students read selections from the writings of Julius Caesar in the original Latin.

Class time will be devoted to the introduction of new material, reviewing assigned homework, and practice exercises.  Students should expect daily homework assignments and regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; three midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 507 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 311. 

The completion of Latin 506 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 507. Students who have recently had more than two years of high school Latin, or more than two semesters of college Latin should normally take Latin 311.

Textbooks

Wheelock, Wheelock’s Latin, 7th ed. (Harper Collins, 2011).  ISBN 978-0-06-199722-8

English and Irby, A Little Latin Reader, 1st ed. (Oxford: OUP, 2012).  ISBN 978-0-19-984622-1

Groton, Thirty-Eight Latin Stories, 5th ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1995).  ISBN 978-0-86516-289-1

Comeau and LaFleur, Workbook for Wheelock’s Latin, 3rd ed. Rev. (Harper Collins, 2005).  ISBN

0-006-095642-9

Tatum, A Caesar Reader, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 2012).  ISBN 978-0-86516-696-7

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