Department of Classics

Andrew M Riggsby


Ph.D., UC Berkeley

Lucy Shoe Meritt Professor and Graduate Adviser in Classics, Professor of Art History

Contact

Biography


 

I am an ancient historian and classicist, with an A.B. from Harvard and Ph.D. from UC Berkeley.  My current work focuses on (a) the history of information—its production, organization, and deployment—in the Roman world (and the broader ancient Mediterranean) approached in its social, cultural, and cognitive dimensions and (b) Roman law.  I also continue to do some work in my original area of specialization, the cultural history of Roman political institutions.

 


 

Fields: 

  • Roman Cultural and Cognitive History
  • Latin Prose
  • Roman Law

Awards: 

  • National Endowment for the Humanities/Roger A. Hornsby Rome Prize.  2010-2011.
  • Association of American Publishers (Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division) award for the outstanding book published in Classics and Ancient History in 2006:  Caesar in Gaul and Rome: War in Words.
  • Solmsen Fellow, Institute for Research in the Humanities, University of Wisconsin, Madison 1997-98.

Recent Publications:

  • Roman Law and the Legal World of the Romans.  Cambridge University Press 2010.
  • “Public and Private Criminal Law,” pp. 310-21 in P. du Plessis, C. Ando, and K. Tuori (edd.), Oxford Handbook of Roman Law and Society (Oxford Univ. Press 2016).
  • “Vitruvius and the Limits of Proportion,” Arethusa 49 (2016) 281-297.
  • For a fuller list, see my Academia.edu page.

Courses


AHC 325 • History Of Rome: The Empire

32330-32345 • Spring 2018
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 201
(also listed as HIS 321)

This class will cover the story of the Roman empire from the death of Caesar to the fall of Rome in A.D. 476.  After working our way through the narrative of this period (about half the semester), we will examine a number of topics that cut across time.  The course will touch on politics, law, war, the economy, social classes, gender, material culture, and archaeology.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

This course fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

LAT 390 • Latin In Real Life

32895 • Spring 2018
Meets T 2:30PM-5:30PM WAG 10
We will read a variety of "documentary" Latin texts in several media (inscriptions, papyri, ostraca) with a view to examining how individual agents used the language in concrete social contexts.
 
Topics will include variation over time/space/class (in contrast to the artificial stability of the literary language), the role of untheorized genres in structuring interactions, the social identities of those who acted by writing (and by reading), the size and shape of local writing communities, and the interaction of Latin with other languages.
 
The weekly assignments will involve reading relatively modest quantities of Latin with extra care.

AHC 325 • Hist Of Rome: The Republic

32960-32975 • Fall 2017
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 201
(also listed as CTI 375, HIS 321M)

Covers the period from Rome's foundation through Caesar's murder in 44 B.C.  The emphasis placed on the last two centuries of the Republic when problems accumulated and solutions did not.  All the factors contributing to the Republic's fall will discussed:  political, military, social, economic, religious, etc..

This course carries the Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

LAT 365 • Portrts Of Tyranny: Suetonius

33495 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 112
(also listed as LAT 385)

The biographer (and gossip monger) Suetonius is one of our most important sources for the dynastic period of Imperial Rome.  Suetonius began his series of biographies with Augustus and concluded with Nerva.  Although his biographies are often more literary construction seasoned with outrageous rumor than reliable historical source.  Two of Suetonius’s most entertaining biographies are those of the supposed “bad” Julio-Claudian emperors, Caligula and Nero.   Both biographies are packed with historical details about these important reigns; but also, outrageous rumor: Caligula made his horse a consul and committed incest with his sisters!  Nero slept with his mother and eventually had her murdered!  He was responsible for the Fire of 64, which he set in order to reclaim land for his grand Domus Aurea!

We will read selections from the biographies of Caligula, Nero as well as several other Julio-Claudian and Flavian emperors in Latin during the semester (Latin 385 students will read both biographies in their entirety and will also read self-selected selections from other Lives of Suetonius).  Latin assignments will range from 20-30 lines early in the semester to 40-45 lines by the conclusion of the semester.  We will also read and discuss a selection of secondary articles that address specific aspects of Suetonius Lives, including their historical reliability; methods of composition and style; and Suetonius’s historical context.

Final course grades will be determined by: (Latin 365) 3 in class translation exams; written article review; class participation; and final paper (12-15 pp). (Latin 385) 3 in class translation exams plus translation exam over self-selected passages; written article review; topical in class presentation and short paper; final paper (15-20 pp, including abstract, rough draft, peer review, final draft).  Participation will not be graded but is expected to be satisfactory.  If it is not satisfactory, I will meet with the student to discuss the issue.  If participation does not improve to a satisfactory point, I reserve the right to deduct 10% from the final course grade.

Required Texts:
Hugh Lindsay (ed.), Suetonius: Life of Caligula (Duckworth Press, 1993) 1-85399-375-1 pb.
Brian Warmington, ed.  Suetonius: Nero (2nd ed.)  (Duckworth Press, 1999). 185399541X. pb.
Catharine Edwards (trans.), Suetonius’s Lives of the Caesars (Oxford University Press, 2001) 0-19283-271-9 pb.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags.

AHC 378 • Literacy/Numeracy/Visuality

32930 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112
(also listed as C C 375)

This course will analyze three basic ancient information technologies (literacy, numeracy, and what we will call visuality, i.e. "reading" and "writing" by means of visual representations), largely by tracing the history of how modern scholars have analyzed those practices over the last century or so. 

Class will focus on ancient Rome and (to a lesser extent) Greece, but students with a strong interest in comparable ancient societies (e.g. Near East, India, China) will have an opportunity to work on projects in their area of interest, if some expert supervision can be arranged.

This course carries the Independent inquiry and Writing flags.

C C 383 • Roman Law

33151 • Spring 2017
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM GAR 1.134
(also listed as LAT 390)

After a brief introduction to the principles of Roman Law we will focus most of the semester on the activities of the Imperial jurists.  I propose two main lines of investigation.  1) Taken as “authors,” how do the jurists write?  What textual strategies do they use to express their legal opinions?  How do we answer those questions if we view them individually vs. as exponents of a genre?  2) How, collectively, does the form of juristic practice shape the law.  What, that is, is allowed by the fact that so much law gets written by such a restricted number of men in such restrictive genres?  

Readings will be drawn principally from the Digest.

1 quiz; in-class discussion and reports; final paper.

AHC 325 • Hist Of Rome: The Republic

32800-32815 • Fall 2016
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as CTI 375, HIS 321M)

Covers the period from Rome's foundation through Caesar's murder in 44 B.C.  The emphasis placed on the last two centuries of the Republic when problems accumulated and solutions did not.  All the factors contributing to the Republic's fall will discussed:  political, military, social, economic, religious, etc..

This course carries the Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

AHC 325 • History Of Rome: The Empire

32040 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 101
(also listed as CTI 375, HIS 321)

This class will cover the story of the Roman empire from the death of Caesar to the fall of Rome in A.D. 476.  After working our way through the narrative of this period (about half th semester), we will examine a number of topics that cut across time.  The course will touch on politics, law, war, the economy, social classes, gender, and psychopathic emperors.

LAT 383 • Survey Of Latin Literature

32610 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

Latin Literature Survey

AHC 325 • Hist Of Rome: The Republic

32040 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 101
(also listed as CTI 375, HIS 321M)

Covers the period from Rome's foundation through Caesar's murder in 44 B.C.  The emphasis placed on the last two centuries of the Republic when problems accumulated and solutions did not.  All the factors contributing to the Republic's fall will discussed:  political, military, social, economic, religious, etc..

This course carries the Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

 

Grading:

2 quizzes (each 25%) requiring essay answers

Final exam (50%) requiring essay answers

Texts:

M. Cary & H.H. Scullar, A History of Rome (3rd ed.)

Plutarch, Fall of the Roman Republic (Penguin)

Sallust, Jugarthine War & The Conspiracy of Catiline (Penguin)

Optional:

Appian, Civil Wars (Penguin)

C C 383 • Roman History Survey

32285 • Fall 2015
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 116

The course will be divided into three main segments, followed by a period for student reports.  We will spend three weeks each on:

1) A set of traditional historical “problems,” chosen to span time, space, and types of historical evidence.  The individual problems are important, but substantively and methodologically, this segment will also serve as an introduction for students who don’t necessarily see themselves as historians.

2) Information technology and cognitive history.  Here we will consider a variety of issues arising out of my own current research interests.

3) How did the Roman Empire operate.  Finally, we will turn to the operation of the Empire as a territorial system (empire in one sense), particularly in light of the fact that it had a single ruler (empire in another sense).  We will look at on-going debates about the scope and distribution of power in the Roman world and how those factors affected the success/failure of the imperial project.

Students will participate in regular seminar discussion and produce an independent research paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor.

AHC 325 • History Of Rome: The Empire

32225 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 101
(also listed as CTI 375, HIS 321)

This class will cover the story of the Roman empire from the death of Caesar to the fall of Rome in A.D. 476.  After working our way through the narrative of this period (about half th semester), we will examine a number of topics that cut across time.  The course will touch on politics, law, war, the economy, social classes, gender, and psychopathic emperors.

LAT 365 • Pliny: Cannibals To Elephants

32805 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as LAT 385)

One day/week plus half of the other will be devoted to translating and discussing selected passages from Pliny’s Natural History.  The other half day will be given over to discussing assigned scholarly articles or (late in the semester) student presentations of their original research.  Graduate students will additionally read substantial amounts of the rest of Natural History, not covered in class.  Undergrads will write a final research paper (this project will provide the basis for their in-class presentations)

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry Flags.

AHC 378 • Roman Law

33125 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 112
(also listed as C C 375)

This class will have 3 parts.  1) Introduction to the general outlines of Roman law.  2) close study of primary sources on one area of law. 3) discussion of special problems in Roman law, and how they have been approached over time.

Readings

Roman Law and the Legal World of the Romans, Andrew M. Riggsby

A Casebook on Roman Property, Herbert Hausmaninger (Author), Richard Gamauf (Author), George A. Sheets (Author)

Requirements

2 exams 15% each

Short paper 20%

Long paper 30%

Participation 20%

LAT 385 • Cicero & Genre:theory/Practice

33730 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 214

Cicero and Genre: Theory and Practice

The shared core of the undergraduate and graduate courses will be reading of three texts: Cicero’s oration de Haruspicum Responsis, the dialogue Brutus (parts), and a selection of his letters.  Two days a week will be devoted to translating these works in class, covering much, though not all of the text in a careful fashion.  All students will be tested on this material.

Additionally, students in 385 will do parallel readings of the first Verrine oration, the dialogue de Amicitia, and further selected letters.  This will not be reviewed systematically in class, but it will be tested, and I will make myself available to answer questions as they arise.

Students in 365 will instead do additional study of the various genres Cicero writes in: how are (and aren’t) the works being read typical instances, why does it matter to our reading, and just what is a genre in the first place.  I will give presentations on these topics one day a week for the first several weeks of class.  Students in 365 will have extra assigned secondary reading for these classes.  They will also develop research topics of their own in this area, giving presentations in the later stages of the semester, and writing a final paper.

Texts /Readings:

Cicero, Har. Resp., I Verr., Brutus, Amicit., selected letters (divided between 365 and 385 as above)

Grading Policy:

365: participation 15%, midterm 15%, final 20%; final project 50% (25% final paper, 10% oral presentation, 15% preliminary outlines and drafts)

385: participation 25%, midterm 30%, final 50%

AHC 325 • History Of Rome: The Empire

33025 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 101
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 321)

 

This class will cover the story of the Roman empire from the death of Caesar to the fall of Rome in A.D. 476.  After working our way through the narrative of this period (about half th semester), we will examine a number of topics that cut across time.  The course will touch on politics, law, war, the economy, social classes, gender, and psychopathic emperors.  Grading: weekly quizzes 10% 2 exams 45% final exam 45% Texts: Ancient Rome: A Military and Political History, Christopher S. Mackay  

LAT 365 • Plautus And Early Latin

33605 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 3.120
(also listed as LAT 385)

We will study a variety of early Latin texts (laws, epitaphs, poems, oratory, history), building to a reading of one of the first major works of Latin "literature": Plautus' Casina. Attention will be given both to linguistic and literary issues. Among the latter will be the early evolution of genres, the role of Greek models, the role of performance, and the applicability of the notion of "literature" itself.

Requirements and Grading: 365: Final 40%, Midterm 25%, Paper 20%, Participation 15% 385: Final 25%, Midterm 20%, Paper 35%, Participation 20% [students enrolled in 385 will also do additional Latin and secondary readings not covered during class]

 

AHC 325 • Hist Of Rome: The Republic

32910 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.102
(also listed as HIS 321M)

Covers the period from Rome's foundation through Caesar's murder in 44 B.C.  The emphasis placed on the last two centuries of the Republic when problems accumulated and solutions did not.  All the factors contributing to the Republic's fall will discussed:  political, military, social, economic, religious, etc..

 Grading:

2 quizzes (each 25%) requiring essay answers

Final exam (50%) requiring essay answers

Texts:

M. Cary & H.H. Scullar, A History of Rome (3rd ed.)

Plutarch, Fall of the Roman Republic (Penguin)

Sallust, Jugarthine War & The Conspiracy of Catiline (Penguin)

 Optional:

Appian, Civil Wars (Penguin)

LAT 390 • Latin Epigraphy

33513 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 116

LAT 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Roman studies. Topics given in recent years include Roman comedy, Pliny, and Roman fragmentary historians.

LAT F323 • Caesar

83040 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 2:30PM-5:00PM GAR 0.132
(also listed as LAT F385)

We will study selections from Caesar's Gallic War, setting them in various literary, historical, and cultural contexts. The course will cover the new AP syllabus, plus other important passages.

Requirements and Grading: LAT 323: class participation (10%), mid-term (30%), a short paper (2000 words., 25%), and a final (mostly translation, 35%).

LAT 385: class participation (10%), mid-term (25%), a longer paper (3500 words., 35%), and a final (mostly translation, 30%), plus additional readings outside of class.

Texts: Riggsby, Caesar in Gaul and Rome

Caesar (ed. Walser) Bellum Gallicum

AHC 325 • History Of Rome: The Empire

32920 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 101
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 321)

This class will cover the story of the Roman empire from the death of Caesar to the fall of Rome in A.D. 476.  After working our way through the narrative of this period (about half th semester), we will examine a number of topics that cut across time.  The course will touch on politics, law, war, the economy, social classes, gender, and psychopathic emperors. 

Grading:

2 quizzes (each 25%) requiring essay answers

Final exam (50%) requiring essay answers

Texts:

Ancient Rome: A Military and Political History, Christopher S. Mackay

AHC 378 • Roman Law

32945 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 3.120
(also listed as HIS 350L)

This class will have 3 parts.  1) Introduction to the general outlines of Roman law.  2) close study of primary sources on one area of law. 3) discussion of special problems in Roman law, and how they have been approached over time.

Readings

Roman Law and the Legal World of the Romans, Andrew M. Riggsby

A Casebook on Roman Property, Herbert Hausmaninger (Author), Richard Gamauf (Author), George A. Sheets (Author)

 Requirements

2 exams 15% each

Short paper 20%

Long paper 30%

Participation 20%

C C 383 • Roman History Survey

33035 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 2.124

The aim of the is course is to survey Roman History, concentrating on the period from the Gracchi to Nero (133 BC-AD 68), the most important, most discussed and best documented era.  There will be a combination of lectures and seminar discussions.  For the latter, students may from time to time be required to give brief presentations based on the reading assignments.  We will consider a political/military narrative framework, selected issues of social and cultural history, and problems in the historiography of ancient Rome. Students should have a working knowledge of Latin and/or Greek, since the ancient sources will need to be consulted in the original; an acquaintance with German, and/or French, and/or Italian would also be of help, since important work on the period has been undertaken in these languages.  There will be either a term-paper (20-25 typed pages long), on a topic agreed upon the student and instructor; or the student may instead take the Roman History Examination required of Ph.D. students in Classics and Classical Archaeology, for which this course is designed as preparation.

LAT 323 • Cicero And Catullus

33345 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 208

Cicero was the greatest lawyer of the Roman Republic. He aimed to be the embodiment of the social and political establishment. Catullus, his younger contemporary, preferred to play the artistic rebel. He was the first great Roman writer of lyric poetry and epigram. Nearly the only thing they shared was a deeply snarky sense of humor. We will read both to get their different perspectives on Rome's empire. What was it good for? What did it cost? What effect did it have on the subjects? Did their opinions count? The first object of the course will be to improve reading ability, but we will also devote considerable attention to the kinds of questions just raised and the rhetorical and poetic tactics they bring into play. Readings: Cicero, pro Lege Manilia Catullus, Carmina [selections]

LAT 383 • Genre And Politics

32980 • Spring 2010
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10

Latin Literature Survey

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

32615 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WEL 1.316

This introductory-level course covers the cultural and political history of Ancient Rome, from the city’s origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BCE) to the rise of Augustus and the rule of emperors in the 1st century CE/AD. Students will have the opportunity to learn about Rome’s evolution from a small, hilltop settlement to the head of a world empire. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with the most important buildings, artistic works, events and historical figures of Ancient Rome.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

LAT 323 • Caesar

33085 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 208

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

C C 304C • Ancient Technology

32001 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 201

C C 304C Topics in the Ancient World:

An introductory survey of the highlights of Greek and Roman civilization and early Christianity. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

C C 383 • Cognitive History Of Anc World

32135 • Spring 2009
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as LAT 383)

C C 383 Studies in Classical Civilization:

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

C C 348 • Roman Law-W

32730 • Spring 2008
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 208

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

LAT 324 • Adv Latin Grammar & Compositn

33125 • Spring 2008
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CBA 4.346

This course will provide an intensive review of Latin grammar, morphology and syntax as well as an introduction to the fundamental elements of Latin prose style across a range of genres and periods.  It will be assumed that the student has a good, general grasp of Latin syntax and morphology.  Students registered for Latin 324 must have taken AT LEAST 4 semesters of Latin and, preferably, also at least one upper division Latin prose course at the University of Texas.  Please note that this course will be extremely challenging if you have no experience in reading extended passages of Latin prose.  No previous experience in prose composition is necessary for success in this course; you must, however, be willing to attend class regularly, participate, and prepare the assigned compositions and readings if you expect to do well.   Class meetings will be devoted to discussions of Latin grammar, syntax, and style; review of weekly assignments; and the close reading of extended prose passages.

C C 383 • Roman History

33230 • Fall 2007
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 10

C C 383 Studies in Classical Civilization:

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

LAT 323 • Seneca And Pliny Younger

33580 • Fall 2007
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 112

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

AHC 378 • Cognitive Hist Of Anc World-W

31850 • Spring 2007
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as HIS 350L)

AHC 378 Undergraduate Seminar in Ancient History:

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in Greek and Roman history.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags.

LAT 312K • Sec-Yr Lat II: Vergil's Aeneid

32385 • Spring 2007
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CBA 4.346

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312

 

Textbooks

Pharr, Aeneid Books I-VI, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1998).  ISBN 978-0-86516-421-5

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

LAT 323 • Vergil: The Origins Of Rome

33125 • Fall 2006
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 112

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

LAT 390 • Cicero: Readings

33185 • Fall 2006
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 112

LAT 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Roman studies. Topics given in recent years include Roman comedy, Pliny, and Roman fragmentary historians.

LAT 323 • Sallust

31505 • Spring 2006
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 112

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

AHC 378 • Roman Social History-W

30420 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 208
(also listed as HIS 350L)

AHC 378 Undergraduate Seminar in Ancient History:

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in Greek and Roman history.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags.

LAT 383 • Roman Oratory

31045 • Fall 2005
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 10

Latin Literature Survey

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

29630 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 2.102A

This introductory-level course covers the cultural and political history of Ancient Rome, from the city’s origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BCE) to the rise of Augustus and the rule of emperors in the 1st century CE/AD. Students will have the opportunity to learn about Rome’s evolution from a small, hilltop settlement to the head of a world empire. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with the most important buildings, artistic works, events and historical figures of Ancient Rome.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

C C 383 • Roman Law And Society

29785 • Spring 2005
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 10

C C 383 Studies in Classical Civilization:

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

GK 311 • Sec-Yr Gk I: Prose And Poetry

30525 • Fall 2004
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM WEL 3.266

Continuation of Greek 601C or 507. Introductory readings from classical authors such as Lysias, Plato, and Xenophon. Includes grammar review.

Prerequisites: Greek 601C or 507 with a grade of at least C, or Greek 804 and 412 with a grade of at least C in each.

LAT 180K • Latin Epigraphy

30820 • Fall 2004
Meets F 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 10

This course is meant to provide new graduate students with an introduction to materials and methods of classical scholarship.  The instructor and other members of the department will present introductory lectures and bibliographies on the various disciplines involved in contemporary classical studies.  

Students will be required to attend lectures and colloquia, given by visitors and members of our department.

All students should register for this course on a credit/no credit basis.

LAT 390 • Cicero: Readings

30850 • Fall 2004
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 112

LAT 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Roman studies. Topics given in recent years include Roman comedy, Pliny, and Roman fragmentary historians.

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

28390 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM ART 1.102

This introductory-level course covers the cultural and political history of Ancient Rome, from the city’s origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BCE) to the rise of Augustus and the rule of emperors in the 1st century CE/AD. Students will have the opportunity to learn about Rome’s evolution from a small, hilltop settlement to the head of a world empire. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with the most important buildings, artistic works, events and historical figures of Ancient Rome.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

C C 348 • Roman Politics-W

28480 • Spring 2004
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 10
(also listed as HIS 350L)

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

C C 383 • Roman History

28910 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as LAT 390)

C C 383 Studies in Classical Civilization:

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

LAT 324 • Adv Latin Grammar & Compositn

29274 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 7

This course will provide an intensive review of Latin grammar, morphology and syntax as well as an introduction to the fundamental elements of Latin prose style across a range of genres and periods.  It will be assumed that the student has a good, general grasp of Latin syntax and morphology.  Students registered for Latin 324 must have taken AT LEAST 4 semesters of Latin and, preferably, also at least one upper division Latin prose course at the University of Texas.  Please note that this course will be extremely challenging if you have no experience in reading extended passages of Latin prose.  No previous experience in prose composition is necessary for success in this course; you must, however, be willing to attend class regularly, participate, and prepare the assigned compositions and readings if you expect to do well.   Class meetings will be devoted to discussions of Latin grammar, syntax, and style; review of weekly assignments; and the close reading of extended prose passages.

C C 383 • Imperial Subjects

28145 • Spring 2003
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 10

C C 383 Studies in Classical Civilization:

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

LAT 323 • Nepos And Augustus

28500 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 112

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

C C 348 • Roman Law-W

28580 • Fall 2002
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 112
(also listed as HIS 350L)

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

LAT 365 • Plautus

29045 • Fall 2002
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 112

LAT 365 Seminar in Latin:

Critical study of authors such as Horace, Livy, Lucretius, and Tacitus.

Prerequisites: Latin 323 with a grade of at least C.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags

C C 348 • Ancient Science & Technology-W

28200 • Spring 2002
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 112

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

LAT 323 • Caesar

28680 • Spring 2002
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 112

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

28850 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM FAC 21

This introductory-level course covers the cultural and political history of Ancient Rome, from the city’s origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BCE) to the rise of Augustus and the rule of emperors in the 1st century CE/AD. Students will have the opportunity to learn about Rome’s evolution from a small, hilltop settlement to the head of a world empire. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with the most important buildings, artistic works, events and historical figures of Ancient Rome.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

LAT 385 • Cicero

29485 • Fall 2001
Meets W 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 10

LAT 385 Studies in Classical Latin Literature

 

LAT S386 • Conference Course In Latin Lit

82975 • Summer 2001

May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

C C 348 • Roman Politics-W

28545 • Spring 2001
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 112
(also listed as HIS 350L)

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

LAT 323 • Livy

29025 • Spring 2001
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 112

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

28930 • Fall 2000
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM FAC 21

This introductory-level course covers the cultural and political history of Ancient Rome, from the city’s origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BCE) to the rise of Augustus and the rule of emperors in the 1st century CE/AD. Students will have the opportunity to learn about Rome’s evolution from a small, hilltop settlement to the head of a world empire. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with the most important buildings, artistic works, events and historical figures of Ancient Rome.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

LAT F386 • Conference Course In Latin Lit

82935 • Summer 2000

May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

C C 348 • Roman Social History-W

27940 • Spring 2000
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 112

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

LAT 323 • Sallust

28420 • Spring 2000
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 208

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages