The Thomas Jefferson Center for the Study of Core Texts and Ideas

CTI 301G • Intro To Ancient Greece

28870 • Patterson, James
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM GAR 0.120
(also listed as C C 301)
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This course is a survey of the social, intellectual, philosophical, religious, political, military, scientific, artistic, and literary history of ancient Greece, from its prehistory through classical antiquity to the rise of Christianity, the Byzantine Empire, and the emergence of a country called Greece. Our study will emphasize the so-called Golden Age of Athens (5th century BC, or more precisely 480-404). This is what we might normally think of when we hear the phrase “ancient Greece,” since it is the period of democracy and cultural flourishing we tend to consider the “foundation of Western civilization.” But this “Golden Age” is really just a blip in time and space, and to focus solely on it would be a disservice to our understanding of what the ancient Greek world was about. So we will expand our range, both chronologically and geographically, to cover an historical period from roughly 3,000 BC to 1453 AD and beyond, studying several different Greek cultures (there were dozens of them) as well as the foreign cultures with whom they interacted (including the Akkadians, Sumerians, Egyptians, Etruscans, Phoenicians, Scythians, Persians, Bactrians, Parthians, Jews, Romans, Arabs, and Turks). We will find that the ancient Greek world was far more complex and diverse than one might think. And, by examining not only the similarities but also (and in many ways more importantly) the differences between their cultures and our own, we will better understand how we definitely are and definitely are not related to them.

One of our focuses will be on what is called “the history of ideas,” or how thoughts, worldviews, and beliefs—whether good or bad—change and develop over time. In particular, we will emphasize the development of religious, philosophical, and scientific ideas and see how they influence (and are influenced by) art, literature, and politics. We will also study conceptions of ethnicity and identity. These conceptions tend to develop and be defined in contrast to adversaries, or “others.” Throughout most of antiquity, there was no sense of a Greek culture (in fact, “Greece” is a Roman concept, not a Greek one). In a Texan context, Houston, Dallas, and Austin would all be distinct “nations,” and an ancient Greek would call us all barbarians because, among other things, we wear pants and wash ourselves with soap. Insofar as we can, we will get into the minds of the Greeks themselves and study their world as they saw it. We will do the same with the various ways the modern world has interpreted this ancient history, for history is created by those who look back on it as much as it is by those who live it. Thus, this course offers a unique opportunity to understand not only who the ancient Greeks were but also who we think we are now in light of them.


CTI 301G • Intro To Ancient Greece

28860 • Patterson, James
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GAR 0.120
(also listed as C C 301)
show description

This course is a survey of the social, intellectual, philosophical, religious, political, military, scientific, artistic, and literary history of ancient Greece, from its prehistory through classical antiquity to the rise of Christianity, the Byzantine Empire, and the emergence of a country called Greece. Our study will emphasize the so-called Golden Age of Athens (5th century BC, or more precisely 480-404). This is what we might normally think of when we hear the phrase “ancient Greece,” since it is the period of democracy and cultural flourishing we tend to consider the “foundation of Western civilization.” But this “Golden Age” is really just a blip in time and space, and to focus solely on it would be a disservice to our understanding of what the ancient Greek world was about. So we will expand our range, both chronologically and geographically, to cover an historical period from roughly 3,000 BC to 1453 AD and beyond, studying several different Greek cultures (there were dozens of them) as well as the foreign cultures with whom they interacted (including the Akkadians, Sumerians, Egyptians, Etruscans, Phoenicians, Scythians, Persians, Bactrians, Parthians, Jews, Romans, Arabs, and Turks). We will find that the ancient Greek world was far more complex and diverse than one might think. And, by examining not only the similarities but also (and in many ways more importantly) the differences between their cultures and our own, we will better understand how we definitely are and definitely are not related to them.

One of our focuses will be on what is called “the history of ideas,” or how thoughts, worldviews, and beliefs—whether good or bad—change and develop over time. In particular, we will emphasize the development of religious, philosophical, and scientific ideas and see how they influence (and are influenced by) art, literature, and politics. We will also study conceptions of ethnicity and identity. These conceptions tend to develop and be defined in contrast to adversaries, or “others.” Throughout most of antiquity, there was no sense of a Greek culture (in fact, “Greece” is a Roman concept, not a Greek one). In a Texan context, Houston, Dallas, and Austin would all be distinct “nations,” and an ancient Greek would call us all barbarians because, among other things, we wear pants and wash ourselves with soap. Insofar as we can, we will get into the minds of the Greeks themselves and study their world as they saw it. We will do the same with the various ways the modern world has interpreted this ancient history, for history is created by those who look back on it as much as it is by those who live it. Thus, this course offers a unique opportunity to understand not only who the ancient Greeks were but also who we think we are now in light of them.


CTI 301G • Intro To Ancient Greece

28865 • Gulizio, Joann
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAI 4.42
(also listed as C C 301)
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Please check back for updates.


CTI 302 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thought

28875 • Wensveen, Jonathan
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 208
(also listed as GOV 314E)
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GOALS OF THE COURSE

This course will consist of a survey of the history of political philosophy, with an emphasis on human psychology, its bearing on politics, and vice-versa. We will proceed chronologically from classical to medieval to early modern and finally to late modern political philosophy, studying a key philosopher or theologian from each period—Plato, Augustine, Thomas Hobbes, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, respectively. We will conclude the semester by turning to the originator of evolutionary psychology, Charles Darwin. Throughout, our method will consist of careful readings and discussions of primary texts.

Despite the chronological structure of the course, our leading concern in turning to these long-dead thinkers is not historical. Our aim is to learn from them rather than about them. Our premises are that there are certain basic questions about how to live that confront all human beings in all times and places, that these thinkers offer powerful alternative answers to these questions, and that however much their circumstances may differ from our own, it is possible for them to teach us things of the highest import. In order that we might learn as much as we can from them, we will strive to understand them as they understood themselves, reading them sympathetically but not uncritically.

Questions to be addressed include: What is the best way of life for a human being? What do we most need or long for? What does happiness consist of? Can we attain happiness? How do morality, love, friendship, politics, and piety figure in a well lived human life? What is the character of the concerns that underlie these features of human life? What political arrangement best promotes the human good? What are the possibilities and limits of politics in promoting the human good?

The thinkers we will study are united in taking these questions seriously, but diverge widely in how they answer them. In discerning and beginning to evaluate their answers, on their own terms, and in comparison and contrast to one another, we will become more thoughtful human beings and citizens.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIALS

ONLY the editions specified below are acceptable. Assure that you use them. • Plato, The Republic of Plato, trans. Allan Bloom (New York: Basic Books, 1968). ISBN 0465069347. • Plato, Plato’s “Symposium,” trans. Seth Benardete (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001). ISBN 0226042758. • Augustine, City of God, trans. Henry Bettenson (London: Penguin Classics, 2003). ISBN 0140448948. • Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan, ed. Edwin Curley (Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company, 1994). ISBN 0872201775. • Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Major Political Writings of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, trans. and ed. John T. Scott (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014). ISBN 0226151311. • Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man (London: Penguin Classics, 2004). ISBN 0140436316.


CTI 302 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thought

28880 • Gregg, Benjamin
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 10
(also listed as GOV 314E)
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INSTRUCTOR: Benjamin Gregg

COURSE: CTI 302 / GOV 314
SEMESTER: Fall 2019
UNIQUE:
MEETS: Tu/Th 3:30-5
VENUE: Mezes 2.102
TITLE: Classics of Social and Political Thought

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This seminar explores a range of responses to a fundamental question of political theory: What is human nature? (Indeed: Is there a human nature?) It examines the respective accounts of four of the greatest philosophical thinkers of Western civilization: from the classical era, we read Plato (Republic, ca. 380 BCE) and Augustine (City of God, ca. 400 CE); from the modern era, Hobbes (Leviathan, 1651) and Rousseau (Discourse on the Origin of Inequality, 1755). In its second half, the seminar studies two major contributions in evolutionary psychology. Steven Pinker (2002) articulates the major claims of contemporary evolutionary psychology: that human nature “was designed” by natural selection in the Pleistocene epoch (from 2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) and that our psychological adaptations “were designed” tens of thousands of years ago to solve problems faced by our hunter-gatherer ancestors. This approach implies a distinct vision for the organization of political community, informed as it is by a conception of human nature. David Buller (2005) claims by contrast that our minds are not adapted to the Pleistocene but, like the immune system, are continually adapting over both evolutionary time and individual lifetimes. His argument entails a very different vision for the organization of political community, informed by the rejection of the very idea of human nature. As we read our authors and compare and contrast them with each other, we are guided by a second question: What does each of these theories —— with its respective claims about human nature —— suggest as to how political community might best be organized and, in particular, how social, political and legal justice might best be conceived and pursued in liberal democratic polities, such as the United States, today?

EVALUATION: Course grade is the average of three essays, each three pages, adjusted for quality of class participation

REQUIRED BOOKS:

Plato: The Republic, tr. A. Bloom. Basic Books, ISBN 0465069347

Augustine: City of God. tr. H. Bettenson. Penguin Classics, ISBN 0140448942
Hobbes: Leviathan, ed. E. Curley. Hackett Publishing Company, ISBN 0872201775 Rousseau: First and Second Discourses, tr. R. Masters. St. Martin’s, ISBN 0312694407 Steven Pinker, The Blank State: The Modern Denial of Human Nature

David Buller, Adapting Minds: Evolutionary Psychology and the Persistent Quest for Human Nature


CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

28895 • Landau, Brent
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 208
(also listed as R S 315)
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Among all the influential texts found in the Bible, none has had such an enormous impact on world history and culture as the Book of Genesis has. This may be somewhat surprising: given the fact that Christianity is the world’s largest religion, one might expect that one of the Gospels of the New Testament would be the most influential. Yet Genesis, with its tales of the strange world that existed before the Flood and its recounting of the exploits—sometimes morally questionable—of Israel’s patriarchs, exercised such a hold on the imagination of the earliest Christians that many New Testament writings can actually be seen as extended ruminations on the implications of the Genesis narrative…as can many other great works of literature and art from antiquity to the present. This course will explore the incredibly diverse ways that human beings have sought to make meaning out of this book. We will begin by devoting more than a month to a close reading of Genesis in its entirety—just us and the text (mostly). We will then proceed to some of the most significant interpretations of Genesis. These will include retellings of parts of Genesis from early Jewish and Christian apocryphal writings; creative and influential readings of Genesis from ancient interpreters the Apostle Paul and Augustine of Hippo; and the use of Genesis narrative in the Quran, the foundational scripture of Islam. We will conclude in the early modern period with one of the greatest works of poetry in English, John Milton’s Paradise Lost.


CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

28900 • Kaplan, Jonathan
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 103
(also listed as R S 315)
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The figure of Moses looms large in biblical tradition, in the religions that revere him (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), and in Western thought. In this section of the Bible and its Interpreters, we will examine the figure of Moses in the Bible (with a focus on Exodus and Deuteronomy), the various roles he plays in the biblical tradition including prophet, priest, king, and legislator, and the reception of Moses in Second Temple Judaism (Philo, Dead Sea Scrolls), Christianity, Rabbinic Judaism, and Islam. The later part of the course will explore the way this variegated tradition has been used to inform Western thought through reading selections from representative works such as Machiavelli’s The Prince, Baruch Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise, and Sigmund Freud’s Moses and Monotheism. We will conclude our study of Moses by examining how Moses has been portrayed in American history.


CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

28890 • Yoo, Philip
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 0.120
(also listed as R S 315)
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What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters. We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and their writings. The later part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.


CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

28885 • Yoo, Philip
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM GAR 1.134
(also listed as R S 315)
show description

What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters. We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and their writings. The later part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.


CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

28905 • Bjoeru, Oeyvind
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 2.122
(also listed as R S 315)
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CTI 305G • Intro To The Old Testament

28910 • Wells, Bruce
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as J S 311, MES 310, R S 313C)
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This course will examine the biblical traditions and texts of the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament as products of particular historical and cultural communities—namely, ancient Israel and Judah—and as literary and religious documents. It will look at what we know about where the texts of the Hebrew Bible came from, who wrote them, why they were written, and what changes were made to them over time. The course will treat the texts as both pre-Jewish and pre-Christian, since the vast majority of them were written before Judaism and Christianity came into existence. The course will also consider how an understanding of ancient Near Eastern history and culture can illumine biblical texts and ask to what degree these texts and their authors were influenced by historical and cultural factors.


CTI 306D • History Of Religions Of Asia

28915 • Freiberger, Oliver
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM UTC 3.102
(also listed as ANS 301R, R S 302)
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This course offers a survey of major religious traditions of Asia (Hinduism, Buddhism in South and East Asia, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shinto). It focuses on the historical development of their beliefs, practices, rituals, and customs in social context. The course will combine lectures with class discussions on readings. At the end of the semester, students will have a basic knowledge of the beliefs and practices of those religious traditions, have read important religious texts and discussed issues pertinent to the religions’ adherents, and have a more refined sense of how the category “religion” may be applied. All this enables students to develop a greater awareness of global cultural diversity and will, hopefully, spark the desire to study some of those religions more deeply.

Course materials:

  1. Willard G. Oxtoby, Roy C. Amore, Amir Hussain, eds. World Religions: Eastern Traditions. 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014.
  2. R. K. Narayan, The Mahabharata: A Shortened Modern Prose Version of the Indian Epic. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2000.
  3. Zhuangzi: Basic Writings, translated by Burton Watson. New York: Columbia University Press, 2003.
  4. Readings provided as PDF files on Canvas.

CTI 320 • Classical Quest For Justice

28920 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 0.132
(also listed as GOV 351C)
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his version of Classical Quest for Justice will be taught in a unique way. Rather than trying to cover several different texts and perspectives, the course will cover only one book, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. We will proceed through the book sequentially, and our class meetings will be focused discussions of portions of the text. 
 
This is a demanding class. Though the readings will be short, it is crucial to prepare for every class meeting, and to think about the reading before coming to class. Attendance at class meetings is mandatory. It will also be writing intensive. There will be eight short writing assignments (1 page) throughout the semester, as well as a medium length (5-7 page) paper about 5 weeks into the course. 
 
The course will culminate in a term paper of 12-15 pages. Students will be responsible for formulating their own topic in consultation with the instructor, familiarizing themselves with relevant scholarly literature, and submitting an original interpretation of some part of the Ethics. They will submit a prospectus as one of their short papers, and will have a second medium length (5-7) paper that serves as a first version of the term paper, which they will then expand into their final term paper. 
 
Though there are no prerequisites, it is recommended that you have at least some background in political philosophy before taking the class. 
 
This class will carry flags in Independent Inquiry, Writing, and Ethics. 
 
Texts: Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics (you are required to use the Bartlett / Collins translation from the University of Chicago Press)
 
Grade:
50%: Term Paper
12%: First Paper
12%: Draft Term Paper
16%: Short writing assignments
10%: Class participation and quizzes

CTI 321 • Theor Foundtns Modern Politics

28925 • Stauffer, Devin
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.134
(also listed as GOV 351D)
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GOV 351D (CTI 321)

 

The Theoretical Foundations of Modern Politics

 

Devin Stauffer

 

 

Course Description

 

This course examines the philosophic origins of modern politics and culture by looking at the works of several authors whose writings played decisive roles in the rise and development of modernity. In our study of Machiavelli’s Prince, Hobbes’ Leviathan, Locke’s Second Treatise of Government, and selected political writings of Rousseau and Nietzsche, we will consider how modern political thought broke with the past and offered a new set of political visions. We will consider the differing views of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Nietzsche on issues such as the aims and limits of politics, the role of morality in the harsh world of political necessity, the proper place of religion and reason in political life, and the nature and basis of justice, freedom, and equality. Throughout the course, we will reflect of the impact that the revolutionary doctrines of modern political philosophy have had on the political world in which we live.

 

Texts

 

Machiavelli, The Prince (University of Chicago)

Hobbes, Leviathan (Hackett)

Locke, Two Treatises of Government (Yale)

Rousseau, The First and Second Discourses (St. Martin’s Press)

Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Penguin)

 

Requirements and Grading

 

Paper: 20%

First exam: 25%

Second exam: 25%

Attendance: 10%

Participation: 10%

Quizzes: 10%

 

(Note:  These percentages are approximate, and the paper may be made optional.)

 

Prerequisites

 

Sophomore standing

 

 


CTI 323 • Might And Right Among Nations

28930 • Pangle, Thomas
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM RLP 0.112
(also listed as GOV 351J)
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Might and Right Among Nations (Fall 2019)

GOV 351J AND CTI 323 (Unique numbers GOV 37750 and CTI 33080)

Lectures in RLP 0.112, MWF 1-2 (except for Fridays of weeks of discussion sections; see below)

 

Professor Thomas L. Pangle, Mezes Hall 3.154; office tel. 232 1529; tpangle@austin.utexas.edu

Office hours: TUES. 10-1 PM; or by appt

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

A study of major alternative approaches, elaborated by the greatest political theorists, to the question of the moral character of international relations.

                  The basic aim of the course is twofold: 1) to gain a better understanding of what kind of justice and law exists among nations; and 2) to gain a better understanding of what justice itself means, in human relations, as its nature is revAealed under the stress of the intensely competitive international arena, always overshadowed by the threat of war.

                  We will examine the original, foundational philosophic arguments for: the classical republican struggle for and against empire (Thucydides); Christian Just War theory (Aquinas and Vitoria); Islamic Jihad Theory (The Koran and Hadith; Shaybani, Alfarabi, Avicenna, Ibn Khaldun); the moral supremacy of independent national sovereignty (Hobbes); globalizing moral community achieved through commercialization (Montesquieu); and world legal order achieved through international legal organization (Kant).

                  We will try to uncover the hidden philosophic foundations of our contemporary ways of thinking, and confront our assumptions with challenges from earlier, alien ways of conceiving the world.

                  While we will not forget contemporary issues, we will try to transcend our passionate biases, and view our own immediate situation from a liberating distance, by taking as our primary empirical focus the philosophic historian Thucydides’s dramatic presentation of The Peloponnesian War—a moral as well as military struggle pitting the imperialism of one of history’s greatest democracies (Athens) against the anti-imperialism of one of the most conservative and pious aristocracies in history (Sparta).

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND BASIS OF GRADING: THERE ARE TWO OPTIONS, ONE OF WHICH YOU MUST CHOOSE BY FRI., SEPT. 6.

 

OPTION ONE—MID-TERM EXAM OPTION

40%—Final Exam, held in the final exam period; format will be questions selected at random from study questions handed out at the end of term covering material from the entire term.

30%—Mid-term closed book exam on Thucydides, administered in class, on questions chosen at random from study questions handed out two weeks before.

15%—Attendance (required) at all lectures; each absence after the second, not excused by a doctor’s note, will subtract 2% from the overall final grade. Attendance at lecture will be recorded by noting empty seats; each student must choose a permanent seat to occupy, by beginning of class Mon., Aug. 30.

15%—Answers to weekly quizzes on the readings (clues for which will be in the weekly study questions).

 

OPTION TWO—PAPER/DISCUSSION SECTION OPTION

35%—Final Exam, held in the final exam period; format will be questions selected at random from study questions handed out at the end of term covering material from the entire term.

30%—Two short analytical/interpretative essays (each about 1200-1500 words) on topics to be assigned.

10%—Attendance (required) at all lectures and discussion sections; each absence after the second, not excused by a doctor’s note, will subtract 1% from the overall final grade. Attendance at lecture will be recorded by noting empty seats; each student must choose a permanent seat to occupy, by beginning of class Fri. Sept. 4.

10%—Answers to weekly quizzes on the readings (clues for which will be in the weekly study questions).

15%—Attendance and participation in discussion sections, which will meet Fridays. Sept. 13, 27, Oct. 11, 25, Nov. 8, 29. Meeting Times and Places TBA.

 

REQUIRED TEXTS (be sure to get the correct editions and translations!)

—Some key passages from Thucydides, and major excerpts from Aquinas, Spinoza, Rousseau, and The Federalist as well as readings on the theory of jihad in photocopied booklet (purchase at Co-op).

The Landmark Thucydides, Simon & Schuster, ISBN 0684827905 The translation is not always accurate, and key passages will be found accurately translated in the booklet (see previous).

—Francisco de Vitoria, Political Writings, Cambridge, ISBN 052136714x

—Machiavelli, Discourses on Livy, U. of Chicago, Mansfield and Tarcov, eds. and trans. ISBN 978-0226500362

—Thomas Hobbes, On the Citizen, Cambridge, ISBN# 0521437806 Tuck and Silverthorne, eds.

—Montesquieu, The Spirit of the Laws, Cambridge, ISBN# 0521369746 Anne Cohler et al., eds. and trans.

—Immanuel Kant, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, Harper, ISBN# 0061311596 H. J. Paton, ed. and trans.; and Political Writings,


CTI 326C • Constitutional Interpretatn

28935 • Perry Jr, H
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 4.122
(also listed as GOV 357C)
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General Description of the Course

Politics is often defined as "the authoritative allocation of values." In the American political system, the Constitution is an important source of authority, and it gives preference to certain values. The Constitution is a document of law, politics, and political theory. Determining what the Constitution means, determining how to determine what it means, and determining who should determine what it means are fundamental tasks for participants in the American political process and for students of it. This course may be of interest to those thinking about attending law school, but it is equally valuable to those who have no such interest. Given the nature of our society, understanding the Constitution and constitutional law is part of a liberal arts education. The course considers some, but not many, of the "civil liberties" provisions in the Constitution; those important subjects are considered in other courses.

One objective of the course is for the student to become a constitutional interpreter who contributes intelligently to this ongoing process. Constitutional interpretation is a prerogative of the judiciary, but it is not its preserve. Judges have never been, nor should be, the only ones engaging in constitutional interpretation. Presidents, members of Congress, and many others engage in constitutional interpretation. A more complete course would examine their statements and actions in greater detail. Judges, however, play a very important role in constitutional interpretation. As such, it is important to learn what judges have said the Constitution means and to understand how they came to such conclusions. This necessitates learning how to read and analyze judicial opinions. The student should develop a sufficient comfort level with legal analysis so that she or he can evaluate intelligently important interpretations of the justices and ask the questions that a student of politics and law should ask. Prominent among such questions are those concerned with the proper role of courts and judges in the American political system. We read some scholarly commentary on interpretation and judicial behavior, but we concentrate on the primary material--the Constitution and cases--so that the student can begin to develop his or her own ideas.

Another objective of this course is to improve reasoning and communication skills. Engaging in constitutional reasoning can assist in developing intellectual precision and political persuasiveness. As in most courses, good writing is demanded; but it is also important to develop the capacity to think and speak on one's feet. Mastering the use of language, orally and in writing, increases the ability to think and communicate clearly. Moving toward such mastery is a vital part of education.

The course requires a substantial time commitment. The time required varies greatly over the course of the semester, and as described below, it is hard for the student to plan ahead.

Format of the Course

Constitutional interpretation lends itself to dialog between professor and student and among students. There are few lectures. I use a combination of the Socratic and case methods. This requires students to come to class prepared and to listen to one another. Too often, students do not benefit from this style of teaching because they ignore the comments of fellow students. The method assumes that, instead of lecturing, I am making points through discussion with students. When your colleagues are making important points, I do not have to. It is also an important skill to be able to learn to separate the wheat from the chaff.

Students are required to attend class and participate. The method of teaching presumes that students heard prior discussions. When a student did not hear earlier discussions and then participates, it generally wastes the time of others. I call on students and expect them to be wellprepared. Lack of preparation or repeated absences will hurt one’s grade. If a student is not prepared, he or she must put a note on the lectern before class. Being prepared means that one has read and thought about the material; it does not mean that one must fully understand the material or have the “right” answers. It is also in one's long-term interest to prepare thoroughly for each class because the material is cumulative, and the workload in this course increases dramatically as the semester proceeds. I encourage study groups.

Computers or other electronic devices may not be used in the classroom. Their use is not compatible with the teaching method. That includes glancing at your phone. Phones must be put away. Exceptions are rarely granted and must be approved by me in advance.

Prerequisites

Set by the Government Department: 6 hours lower division government courses.


CTI 327D • Hist Of Rome: The Republic

28940-28955 • Riggsby, Andrew
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.134
(also listed as AHC 325)
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CTI 335 • Origins Of Liberalism

28960 • Martinich, Aloysius
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 308
(also listed as PHL 354)
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Liberal democracy is roughly the theory that individual persons are free and equal, and that each must respect and be respected by other people and the government. Freedom and equality are typically connected with the rights of individuals. So liberalism is an individualistic theory in contrast with 'state' theories, which give priority to the state over individual rights. Key concepts to be discussed include liberty, democracy, the social contract, and the nature of authority and obligation.

The theory of Anglo-American liberalism developed from or competed with several traditions such as divine right theory, patriarchy, absolute sovereignty, democracy, and republicanism. These traditions were influenced by various religious, economic, and political beliefs over a long period. The most important period in this development was seventeenth-century (Stuart) England.

This course is interdisciplinary. It covers politics, philosophy, and religion. The course will cover such political and religious events as King Charles I's Personal Rule, the Long Parliament, the English Civil War, the Commonwealth, the Restoration of the Monarchy, the Exclusion Crisis, and the Glorious Revolution. The most important philosophical texts are Thomas Hobbes's Leviathan and John Locke's Two Treatises of Government. Primary texts on divine right theory and republicanism will also be read.

Texts:

Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan revised edition, ed., Martinich and Batiste (Broadview)
John Locke, Two Treatises of Government (Cambridge UP)
A. P. Martinich, Philosophical Writing 4th ed. (Wiley-Blackwell)
A. P. Martinich, Origins of Liberalism (available on Canvas)

Grading Policy:

Class Attendance and Participation:              20%
Assignments and Quizzes:                           50%
Midterm test:                                              20%
Final Examination (final exam period):          20%


CTI 344D • Dante

28964 • Raffa, Guy
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RLP 0.122
(also listed as E 366D, EUS 347, ITC 348)
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Dante: Fall 2019

ITC 348, same as E 366D, crosslisted with EUS 347

The Divine Comedy offers a remarkable panorama of the late Middle Ages through one man's poetic vision of the afterlife. However, we continue to read and study the poem not only to learn about the thought and culture of medieval and early modern Europe but also because many of the issues confronting Dante and his age are no less important to individuals and societies today. Personal and civic responsibilities, governmental accountability, church-state relations, economics and social justice, Dante's influence on artists and other writers, benefits and limitations of interdisciplinarity—these are some of the themes that will frame our discussion of the Divine Comedy. Although you will read the poem in English, a bilingual edition will enable you to study and learn famous lines in the original Italian. The course is taught in English and contains flags for Writing and Global Cultures.

Danteworlds (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu/): In addition to detailed entries, audio recordings, and study questions, this Web site contains hundreds of images from works by Sandro Botticelli, an anonymous 16th-century artist, John Flaxman, William Blake, Gustave Dorè, and Suloni Robertson.

Through close reading, class discussion, and the use of Danteworlds, you are expected to identify and explain the significance of major characters, references, and ideas in Dante's Divine Comedy (Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise) and Vita Nuova. You will be tested on this ability in responses to study questions (a low-stakes writing assignment) and two in-class exams. An essay, which you will rewrite and expand based on my feedback, will assess your ability to support an interpretation of a specific aspect of Dante's poetry with detailed textual analysis and scholarly research. A peer-editing activity will help you to revise and edit your own work. I expect you to have read the assigned cantos and reviewed the corresponding material in Danteworlds (including the study questions) before class.

Required Texts: (you must use the editions of these texts ordered for the class)

            Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso (Trans. Allen Mandelbaum)

            Vita Nuova (Trans. Barbara Reynolds)

Recommended Text (also ordered for this class): The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Divine Comedy" (Raffa)

Canvas: We will use the CANVAS learning management system to organize and provide course content on-line. When you log in to Canvas (http://canvas.utexas.edu/) and select the course, you will have access to the syllabus, assignments, lecture presentations, grades, and a discussion forum. You will be required to submit most assignments on-line using Canvas. For assistance, consult the student tutorials (https://utexas.instructure.com/courses/633028/pages/student-tutorials) or contact support staff (https://utexas.instructure.com/courses/633028).

Assignments and Computation of Grade:

10%: 1500-word essay on the Inferno (credit for successful completion)

25%: Rewrite and expansion of this essay incorporating scholarly research (graded)

5%:   Annotated bibliography of research sources (credit for successful completion)

5%:   Peer-review (credit for successful completion)

10%: Responses to study questions in Canvas Discussion Forum (credit for successful completion)

30%: Two in-class examinations  (graded: 15% each)

15%: Classwork and participation


CTI 345 • Love In The East And West

28969 • Okur, Jeannette
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM JES A215A
(also listed as C L 323, MEL 321, MES 342)
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Participants in this course will examine various definitions and cultural representations of love, as expressed in major Eastern and Western literary works, and explore the question, "To what extent do conceptions and representations of love differ cross-culturally?" Class activities will include mini-lectures and performance reading, as well as comparative analysis and discussion of the portrayal of topics like "love and beauty," "love and separation," "love and madness," "love and marriage," "love and time," "love and war," "love and self-sacrifice," "love and death," and "love for the divine and love for the human". Participants will also, on occasion, be introduced to significant musical, visual art and cinematic forms/productions related to the poetry, prose and theatrical works read. Students’ engagement in reader response writing and peer review of that writing will enhance the quality of their small and large group discussions.

As all texts will be read in English translation, there is no language prerequisite. However, students capable of reading some texts in the original language/s will be encouraged to do so.

Prerequisites: The course has no prerequisites.


CTI 345 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky

28965 • Livers, Keith
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM BUR 214
(also listed as C L 323, REE 325)
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Description:

This course explores the dilemmas of homicide, suicide, patricide and redemption in the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky — Russia’s greatest chronicler of human suffering and triumph. Over the course of the semester we will read a number of Dostoevsky’s greatest works, including Notes From Underground, Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov. At the same time, we will look at the contemporary intellectual and social trends relevant to the development of Dostoevsky’s career as a writer and thinker.

 

Required Texts:

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes From Underground, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volokhonsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volokhonsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volokhonsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Great Short Works of Fyodor Dostoevsky


CTI 350 • Masterworks Of World Drama

28970 • Lang, Elon
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 304
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Course Description and Objectives

In our media-saturated culture, we encounter drama everyday on the various screens we watch as we live our modern lives. Although these shows and films may seem far removed from the theatrical stage, when we watch these dramas we are participating in a phenomenon that has been a principle means by which Western culture has described and perpetuated itself for over 2,500 years.

In this course we will focus our investigation of drama upon a perennial subject of the dramatic arts: the nature and pursuit of justice. We will seek to examine how different playwrights from different eras of Western literature have balanced elements like mercy, vengeance, fairness, due process, authority, altruism, noble character, prejudice, public opinion, and public service in their definitions of justice. Students will consider whether the dramas in selected ancient, Renaissance, and modern plays present idealistic, realistic, or polemical portrayals of how “justice is served.” We will discuss whether these dramas critique or celebrate the courts and other means society uses to define justice, to defend it, and to enforce laws and codes of conduct. We will open the semester by examining the way contemporary popculture dramas portray justice being served in the American criminal justice system (e.g. TV crime dramas in the tradition of Law and Order). Toward the end of the semester we will consider the way drama instruction is used in some American prisons to facilitate rehabilitation among inmates. 

Since no single course can exhaustively cover the subject of “dramatic masterworks in the Western tradition,” we will emphasize two major goals in this class: (1) to develop critical and analytical skills that can be applied to all forms of literary art, (2) to broaden an understanding of drama’s civic value that can be gained from teaching and studying the classics or using drama as a pedagogical tool. To this end, course requirements will include close reading and in-class discussion of plays, light exploration of philosophies of justice and theories of drama, informal acting, written analysis, revision of essays, peer reviews, and at least one small group project.


CTI 350 • Masterworks Of World Drama

28975 • Lang, Elon
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 304
show description

Course Description and Objectives

In our media-saturated culture, we encounter drama everyday on the various screens we watch as we live our modern lives. Although these shows and films may seem far removed from the theatrical stage, when we watch these dramas we are participating in a phenomenon that has been a principle means by which Western culture has described and perpetuated itself for over 2,500 years.

In this course we will focus our investigation of drama upon a perennial subject of the dramatic arts: the nature and pursuit of justice. We will seek to examine how different playwrights from different eras of Western literature have balanced elements like mercy, vengeance, fairness, due process, authority, altruism, noble character, prejudice, public opinion, and public service in their definitions of justice. Students will consider whether the dramas in selected ancient, Renaissance, and modern plays present idealistic, realistic, or polemical portrayals of how “justice is served.” We will discuss whether these dramas critique or celebrate the courts and other means society uses to define justice, to defend it, and to enforce laws and codes of conduct. We will open the semester by examining the way contemporary popculture dramas portray justice being served in the American criminal justice system (e.g. TV crime dramas in the tradition of Law and Order). Toward the end of the semester we will consider the way drama instruction is used in some American prisons to facilitate rehabilitation among inmates. 

Since no single course can exhaustively cover the subject of “dramatic masterworks in the Western tradition,” we will emphasize two major goals in this class: (1) to develop critical and analytical skills that can be applied to all forms of literary art, (2) to broaden an understanding of drama’s civic value that can be gained from teaching and studying the classics or using drama as a pedagogical tool. To this end, course requirements will include close reading and in-class discussion of plays, light exploration of philosophies of justice and theories of drama, informal acting, written analysis, revision of essays, peer reviews, and at least one small group project.


CTI 375 • Archaic/Classical Greece

28995-29005 • Perlman, Paula
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 201
(also listed as AHC 325, HIS 354E)
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This course focuses on essential developments in Greek history (social, cultural, and political) during the Archaic and Classical Periods (ca. 750-338 BCE): from the rise of the Greek city-states in the eighth century BCE to the subordination of Greece by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 BCE. We will devote roughly equal time to covering major events and personalities, exploring key developments in culture and society, and examining the various types of evidence available for the era (both written and archeological). We will begin (Weeks 1-3) with a brief look at the geography and climate of Greece and its prehistory, including the Bronze and Early Iron Ages (ca. 1600-800 BCE). Then (Weeks 3-5) we will consider the major developments of the Early Archaic Period (ca. 800-600 BCE), including the rise of the city-state (or polis) and the first forms of (small “d”) democracy, the invention of the Greek alphabet, the introduction of massed infantry (or hoplite) warfare, and the diaspora of Greeks across the Mediterranean. Thereafter (Weeks 6-15), we will focus on the two most famous city-states of Greece, Athens and Sparta, and follow their trajectories from their foundation in the Bronze Age, through the Persian War period (490-478 BCE), the Peloponnesian War (430-404 BCE), and the complex period of unstable hegemonies in the first half of the fourth century BCE, culminating in 338 BCE when Philip II of Macedonia established his control over Greece.


CTI 375 • Great Works In Medicine

28984 • Curtis, Todd
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 420
(also listed as AHC 330)
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Great Works in the History of Medicine

This course is part of the Thomas Jefferson Center’s Core Texts and Ideas (CTI) program. In keeping with the spirit of Mortimer Adler's Great Books of the Western World and Charles William Eliot's Harvard Universal Classics, this course will thematically examine signature works in the history of medicine. There are numerous reasons for using the great books approach to teaching the history of medicine. In addition to providing professional inspiration, sense of continuity with the past, and an awareness of medicine's unique role in society, this approach can foster a healthy sense of skepticism about the content and durability of medical dogma allowing students to think more critically about the principles and practices of medicine. The great books in the history of medicine provide numerous examples of why one should be prepared to question long-standing views for the sake of progress. Furthermore, the history of medicine can be a "kindly, useful mentor" which not only provides a forum for meaningful exchanges between physicians and historians, but also allows both groups a means to link historical knowledge to contemporary issues in order to reform medicine and bring about change in public policy. The approach taken in this class will be of great use to pre-med students and to students interested in international and public health.

To better understand the unique implications of the different areas of medicine, each week will entail reading a signature work that is representative of a key topic in the history of medicine (e.g. pharmacology, pathology, anatomy, surgery). After performing an analytical reading of the text with respect to its historical context, students will focus on discovering ethical principles in the text that can be used for modern applications.

Flags: The course carries an Ethics Flag and a Writing Flag. Assessment: One long and two short research papers, graded in-class writing activities. No final. Readings: Jacalyn Duffin, History of Medicine: A Scandalously Short Introduction, 2010 ISBN 978-0802095565; all other readings will be available on CANVAS or through the library’s electronic resources.


CTI 375 • Islamic Theology

28990 • Azam, Hina
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM RLP 0.120
(also listed as ISL 340, MEL 321, MES 342, R S 358)
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Islamic Theology may be understood as that branch of knowledge that comprises the way that Muslims have conceived the natures of God, humanity and the natural world, as well as the relationships between these three.  Muslim contemplation of these subjects has given rise to a number of debates and doctrines.  Some of these have had to do with issues such as the relationship between human will and the divine will, or the origins of sin.  Other disputes have had to do with the nature of governance and the role of the ruler in effecting salvation.  These disputes led to the formation of the various theological-political sects, such as Sunnism and Shi‘ism.  Yet another area of questioning has had to do with the limits of rational knowledge and possibility of meta-cognitive experience of God, or what is known as Sufism. These three classical areas of inquiry – that is, political theory (including sectarian differences), systematic theology (kalam) and mystical theology (Sufism) – will form the main areas of focus in this course.  This is an upper-division discussion- and writing- based course that assumes a prior understanding of Islam. Thus, a major portion of the grade will be based on class participation and the quality of written work. 


CTI 375 • Italian Masterpieces

28985 • Carter, Daniela
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 2.112
(also listed as EUS 347, ITC 337)
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From Michelangelo’s spectacular paintings of the Sistine Chapel and Bernini’s moving sculpture of Apollo and Daphne, to the intense music of Puccini’s Tosca and the fantastic imagination of Fellini’s La dolce vita, Italy has given the world an unparalleled abundance of masterpieces in all the arts. This course will examine some of them in details touching on painting, sculpture, architecture, opera and cinema. Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel, Caravaggio’s provocative religious paintings, Renato Guttuso’s scenes of Sicily, Lorenzo Bernini’s “Apollo and Daphne” and “The Ecstasy of Saint Theresa,” are only a few of the visual treasures we will study. We will sample the greatest Italian poetry of Dante Alighieri and Giacomo Leopardi’s; the narrative of Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa and Italo Calvino; and the plays of Nobel prize winner Luigi Pirandello, who revolutionized the theater in the 20th century. Since the most popular art form in the 19th century Italy was opera, we shall study selected masterpieces by Italy’s two most renowned opera composers: Giuseppe Verdi and Giacomo Puccini. The course will conclude with the films La dolce vita by Federico Fellini and Divorce Italian Style by Pietro Germi. The aim of the course is not only to familiarize students with the richness of Italian culture, but also to inspire them to continue exploring it.

Grade Computation: Two exams 60%; Short quizzes 10%; One Research Paper 20%; Class Participation 10%

Texts:

Dante Alighieri, Divine Comedy, Inferno on line

Giacomo Leopardi: Poems - on Canvas

Italo Calvino: Marcovaldo

Luigi Pirandello: It is so (if you think so), Six Characters in Search of an Author

Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa: The Leopard

Giuseppe Verdi: Otello (Libretto on line)

Giacomo Puccini: Tosca (Libretto on line)

Luchino Visconti: The Leopard (link on Canvas)

Pietro Germi: Divorce Italian Style (link on Canvas)

Works of art by Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Bernini on Canvas (in Power Point) and some critical essays on Canvas and on line.

This course carries the Global Cultures Flag.  Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. 


CTI 375 • The Book Of Job

28989 • Yoo, Philip
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.210
(also listed as J S 363, MES 342, R S 365)
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Although widely known as the story of the innocent sufferer, the book of Job is far less known in its details. Scrutinizing the conventional view of a righteous and moral world order under the deity’s full control, the book of Job puts humans to the test as it addresses whether or not people can remain upright when aggrieved. The book of Job also puts the deity (God) to the test as it weighs the deity’s negligence in failing to deal properly with the wicked and the righteous. As a literary work composed in the the distant past, we will consider the book of Job's quality as ‘wisdom literature’ as we carefully examine the words, experiences, and actions of its characters as well as consider who, if anyone, had the knowledge to offer the “correct” explanation for God’s (in)actions. This course will also explore how the book of Job continues to speak to past and present thinkers who, through their very own experiences, grapple with the problem of evil and its continued presence in a world that is created and ordered by the deity, one who we want to be good.

Readings:

  • Any one of New Oxford Annotated Bible, 5th ed (2018); or 4th ed (2010); or Jewish Study Bible, 2nd ed (2014); or Harper Collins Study Bible, rev. ed (2006).
  • Larrimore, Mark. The Book of Job: A Biography (Princeton University Press, 2013).
  • Wiesel, Elie. Night (Hill and Wang, 2006).
  • Selected readings from Testament of Job; Qur’an; Milton; Maimonides; Calvin; Luther; Kant; Frost

Grading:

  • Attendance and participation (15%);
  • Short reading reports (5 x 5% each = 25%);
  • Paper proposal (10%); Draft Paper (15%);
  • In-class presentation (5%);
  • Final Paper (30%)

CTI 379 • Conference Course

29006
(also listed as HMN 379)
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Please contact the Jefferson Scholars advisor for more information on how to register for the course.