The Thomas Jefferson Center for the Study of Core Texts and Ideas

Dima Shamoun


Ph.D., George Mason University

Dima Shamoun

Contact

Courses


ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

34130 • Spring 2019
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:30PM RLP 1.104
QR SB

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 349K • Econ Of Ethics/Socl Justice

34344 • Spring 2019
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM CBA 4.340

Economics of Entrepreneurship

This course applies insights from economic theory to the practice of starting a new business or expanding a current business.  The course combines elements of strategy, marketing, and entrepreneurial finance courses as typically taught in a business school and an industrial organization course as taught in an economics department.  We start by examining general issues regarding entrepreneurship, in particular the search for markets that can support entrepreneurial profits.  Then, we turn to specific strategic decisions that entrepreneurs make:  pricing, advertising, product location, entry deterrence, etc.  Finally, we examine practical issues in entrepreneurship, including finding capital, business plans, patent protection, negotiation, employee compensation, and auctions as a transactional mechanism.

 

The Economics of Ethics and Social Justice:

 

This course delves into the history of thought on questions relating to ethics, morality, and social justice. We will identify how, in the history of philosophical and economic thought, these terms are related and how they translate into the practice of law and public policy in the United States. Using the tools of economics, we will scrutinize the different theories of social justice used to justify standards for policy on ethical and moral grounds. We will identify and analyze procedures that can and have been used to ensure that the social welfare maximizing outcome coincides with the “just,” “moral,” and “ethical" outcome. We will apply competing theories to our reading of controversial court opinions, regulations, and legislation.  

 

Law and Economics:

In this course we will discuss economic analysis of laws, legal systems, and court rulings, as well as the theory and practice of the common law system. Students will read and respond to case law and prominent authors in the field. Students will analyze and present a case to the class. While no prior knowledge of the law is required, nor knowledge of Game Theory, the course will cover recent applications of law from the game theoretic perspective. 

ECO 349K • Law And Economics

34350 • Spring 2019
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM RLP 1.102

Economics of Entrepreneurship

This course applies insights from economic theory to the practice of starting a new business or expanding a current business.  The course combines elements of strategy, marketing, and entrepreneurial finance courses as typically taught in a business school and an industrial organization course as taught in an economics department.  We start by examining general issues regarding entrepreneurship, in particular the search for markets that can support entrepreneurial profits.  Then, we turn to specific strategic decisions that entrepreneurs make:  pricing, advertising, product location, entry deterrence, etc.  Finally, we examine practical issues in entrepreneurship, including finding capital, business plans, patent protection, negotiation, employee compensation, and auctions as a transactional mechanism.

 

The Economics of Ethics and Social Justice:

 

This course delves into the history of thought on questions relating to ethics, morality, and social justice. We will identify how, in the history of philosophical and economic thought, these terms are related and how they translate into the practice of law and public policy in the United States. Using the tools of economics, we will scrutinize the different theories of social justice used to justify standards for policy on ethical and moral grounds. We will identify and analyze procedures that can and have been used to ensure that the social welfare maximizing outcome coincides with the “just,” “moral,” and “ethical" outcome. We will apply competing theories to our reading of controversial court opinions, regulations, and legislation.  

 

Law and Economics:

In this course we will discuss economic analysis of laws, legal systems, and court rulings, as well as the theory and practice of the common law system. Students will read and respond to case law and prominent authors in the field. Students will analyze and present a case to the class. While no prior knowledge of the law is required, nor knowledge of Game Theory, the course will cover recent applications of law from the game theoretic perspective. 

ECO 301 • Introduction To Economics

34270 • Fall 2018
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM JGB 2.324
QR SB

This course will be a mixture of both Micro and Macro Economics.  Students who wish to be an Economics major MAY NOT use this course toward the major and should take ECO 304K and ECO 304L.

  • Students will learn how economists describe and measure the economy, in the aggregate, as well as specific markets such as the labor market, the housing market, financial markets, and international trade.  Concepts for measurement and data will be covered.
  • Students will learn how economists organize their analysis of economic choices by thinking about how individuals (i) respond to incentives, (ii) seek out exchange in markets, and (iii) form, and participate in, various economic institutions.
  • Students will learn how to think about strategic behavior (for example, markets with a small number of firms, or negotiating trade agreements among a small number of countries).
  • Students will learn about “externalities” and “public goods,” which, by conferring costs or benefits that are not appropriated by individuals or that are “non-rival” in nature (for example, once discovered, a technology can be used by many at the same time), provide reasons for government regulation, taxation, and government-provided goods and services.

ECO 349K • Econ Of Ethics/Socl Justice

34458 • Fall 2018
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM ETC 2.132
E

Economics of Entrepreneurship

This course applies insights from economic theory to the practice of starting a new business or expanding a current business.  The course combines elements of strategy, marketing, and entrepreneurial finance courses as typically taught in a business school and an industrial organization course as taught in an economics department.  We start by examining general issues regarding entrepreneurship, in particular the search for markets that can support entrepreneurial profits.  Then, we turn to specific strategic decisions that entrepreneurs make:  pricing, advertising, product location, entry deterrence, etc.  Finally, we examine practical issues in entrepreneurship, including finding capital, business plans, patent protection, negotiation, employee compensation, and auctions as a transactional mechanism.

 

The Economics of Ethics and Social Justice:

 

This course delves into the history of thought on questions relating to ethics, morality, and social justice. We will identify how, in the history of philosophical and economic thought, these terms are related and how they translate into the practice of law and public policy in the United States. Using the tools of economics, we will scrutinize the different theories of social justice used to justify standards for policy on ethical and moral grounds. We will identify and analyze procedures that can and have been used to ensure that the social welfare maximizing outcome coincides with the “just,” “moral,” and “ethical" outcome. We will apply competing theories to our reading of controversial court opinions, regulations, and legislation.  

 

Law and Economics:

In this course we will discuss economic analysis of laws, legal systems, and court rulings, as well as the theory and practice of the common law system. Students will read and respond to case law and prominent authors in the field. Students will analyze and present a case to the class. While no prior knowledge of the law is required, nor knowledge of Game Theory, the course will cover recent applications of law from the game theoretic perspective. 

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

33565 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.104
QR SB

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 349K • Law And Economics

33765 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 1.104
(also listed as ECO 395K)

This course will provide economic analysis of the theory and practice of the development of a legal system. Students will gain an understanding of the modern economic analysis of law; an ability to read and understand case law; and an ability to understand and analyze legal outcomes using economic theory. No prior knowledge of the law is required. No knowledge of Game Theory is necessary; however, the course will cover recent applications from the game theoretic perspective.

ECO 301 • Introduction To Economics

34140 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM ART 1.102
QR SB

This course will be a mixture of both Micro and Macro Economics.  Students who wish to be an Economics major MAY NOT use this course toward the major and should take ECO 304K and ECO 304L.

  • Students will learn how economists describe and measure the economy, in the aggregate, as well as specific markets such as the labor market, the housing market, financial markets, and international trade.  Concepts for measurement and data will be covered.
  • Students will learn how economists organize their analysis of economic choices by thinking about how individuals (i) respond to incentives, (ii) seek out exchange in markets, and (iii) form, and participate in, various economic institutions.
  • Students will learn how to think about strategic behavior (for example, markets with a small number of firms, or negotiating trade agreements among a small number of countries).
  • Students will learn about “externalities” and “public goods,” which, by conferring costs or benefits that are not appropriated by individuals or that are “non-rival” in nature (for example, once discovered, a technology can be used by many at the same time), provide reasons for government regulation, taxation, and government-provided goods and services.

ECO 349K • Law And Economics

34360 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM ETC 2.132

This course will provide economic analysis of the theory and practice of the development of a legal system. Students will gain an understanding of the modern economic analysis of law; an ability to read and understand case law; and an ability to understand and analyze legal outcomes using economic theory. No prior knowledge of the law is required. No knowledge of Game Theory is necessary; however, the course will cover recent applications from the game theoretic perspective.

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

34084 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.112
QR SB

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 349K • Law And Economics

34259 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 203

This course will provide economic analysis of the theory and practice of the development of a legal system. Students will gain an understanding of the modern economic analysis of law; an ability to read and understand case law; and an ability to understand and analyze legal outcomes using economic theory. No prior knowledge of the law is required. No knowledge of Game Theory is necessary; however, the course will cover recent applications from the game theoretic perspective.

ECO 301 • Introduction To Economics

33920 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAI 3.02
QR SB

This course will be a mixture of both Micro and Macro Economics.  Students who wish to be an Economics major MAY NOT use this course toward the major and should take ECO 304K and ECO 304L.

  • Students will learn how economists describe and measure the economy, in the aggregate, as well as specific markets such as the labor market, the housing market, financial markets, and international trade.  Concepts for measurement and data will be covered.
  • Students will learn how economists organize their analysis of economic choices by thinking about how individuals (i) respond to incentives, (ii) seek out exchange in markets, and (iii) form, and participate in, various economic institutions.
  • Students will learn how to think about strategic behavior (for example, markets with a small number of firms, or negotiating trade agreements among a small number of countries).
  • Students will learn about “externalities” and “public goods,” which, by conferring costs or benefits that are not appropriated by individuals or that are “non-rival” in nature (for example, once discovered, a technology can be used by many at the same time), provide reasons for government regulation, taxation, and government-provided goods and services.

ECO 349K • Law And Economics

34113 • Fall 2016
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM JGB 2.218

This course will provide economic analysis of the theory and practice of the development of a legal system. Students will gain an understanding of the modern economic analysis of law; an ability to read and understand case law; and an ability to understand and analyze legal outcomes using economic theory. No prior knowledge of the law is required. No knowledge of Game Theory is necessary; however, the course will cover recent applications from the game theoretic perspective.

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