The Thomas Jefferson Center for the Study of Core Texts and Ideas

Philip Yoo


Lecturer

Philip Yoo

Contact

Biography


A native of Canada, Philip Yoo earned his Doctor of Philosophy (D.Phil.) in Hebrew Bible at the Faculty of Theology and Religion, University of Oxford in October 2014. His research focuses on biblical interpretation, Ezra-Nehemiah, Second Temple Judaism, and Pentateuchal theory with a current research project on the Exodus and Israelite wilderness accounts and the reception of this tradition by the earliest Jewish and Christian interpreters. He teaches "The Bible and its Interpreters" which includes readings from the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and discussions on 'scriptualism' from more than one religious or philosophic tradition. He is the author of Ezra and the Second Wilderness (Oxford University Press, 2017) and articles in the Journal of Biblical LiteratureJournal for the Study of the Old TestamentZeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft, and Catholic Biblical Quarterly.

 

A full list of publications and presentations can be found here:

https://utexas.academia.edu/PhilipYoo

Courses


CTI 304 • The Bible/Its Interpreters

29975 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 301
GCWr

Check back for updates.

CTI 304 • The Bible/Its Interpreters

29980 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 301
GCWr

Check back for updates.

CTI 375 • The Five Books Of Moses

30070 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM ETC 2.136
GC (also listed as J S 364, MES 342, R S 361)

The first five books of the Bible—Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy—contain well known stories such as the creation of the world, the flood, promises made to Israel’s ancestors, and the revelation of divine law through Moses. Collectively known as the ‘Torah’ in Jewish tradition and the ‘Pentateuch’ in Christian tradition, these five books remain influential in debates about the purpose and nature of the deity (God), the cosmos, law, ritual, ethics, history, family, and nationhood. In this class, we will read the entirety of these five books in translation, investigate the socio-historical circumstances that give shape to these books, and consider how these five books achieve the status of sacred literature. Attention will also be given to the transmission of these five books and its continued significance for its many past and present readers. (With permission of the instructor, students may complete a portion of the course requirements by reading selections from the Hebrew text with the instructor.)

CTI 304 • The Bible/Its Interpreters

28780 • Fall 2020
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM RLP 1.104
GCWr (also listed as R S 315C)

What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters. We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and their writings. The later part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.

CTI 304 • The Bible/Its Interpreters

28785 • Fall 2020
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM RLP 1.104
GCWr (also listed as R S 315C)

What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters. We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and their writings. The later part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.

CTI 375 • The Book Of Job

28895 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLP 1.106
GC (also listed as J S 363, MES 342, R S 361)

Although widely known as the story of the innocent sufferer, the book of Job is far less known in its details. Scrutinizing the conventional view of a righteous and moral world order under the deity’s full control, the book of Job puts humans to the test as it addresses whether or not people can remain upright when aggrieved. The book of Job also puts the deity (God) to the test as it weighs the deity’s negligence in failing to deal properly with the wicked and the righteous. As a literary work composed in the the distant past, we will consider the book of Job's quality as ‘wisdom literature’ as we carefully examine the words, experiences, and actions of its characters as well as consider who, if anyone, had the knowledge to offer the “correct” explanation for God’s (in)actions. This course will also explore how the book of Job continues to speak to past and present thinkers who, through their very own experiences, grapple with the problem of evil and its continued presence in a world that is created and ordered by the deity, one who we want to be good.

R S 365 • The Book Of Job

41945 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 0.132
GC

Please check back for updates.

CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

29385 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 208
GCWr (also listed as R S 315)

What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters.

We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and their writings. The last part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.

CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

29390 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM GAR 0.120
GCWr (also listed as R S 315)

What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters.

We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and their writings. The last part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.

CTI 375 • The Five Books Of Moses

29481 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.124
GC (also listed as J S 364, MES 342, R S 353)

The first five books of the Bible—Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy—contain well known stories such as the creation of the world, the flood, promises made to Israel’s ancestors, and the revelation of divine law through Moses. Collectively known as the ‘Torah’ in Jewish tradition and the ‘Pentateuch’ in Christian tradition, these five books remain influential in debates about the purpose and nature of the deity (God), the cosmos, law, ritual, ethics, history, family, and nationhood. In this class, we will read the entirety of these five books in translation, investigate the socio-historical circumstances that give shape to these books, and consider how these five books achieve the status of sacred literature. Attention will also be given to the transmission of these five books and its continued significance for its many past and present readers.

CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

28885 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM GAR 1.134
GCWr (also listed as R S 315)

What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters. We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and their writings. The later part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.

CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

28890 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 0.120
GCWr (also listed as R S 315)

What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters. We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and their writings. The later part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.

CTI 375 • The Book Of Job

28989 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.210
GC (also listed as J S 363, MES 342, R S 365)

Although widely known as the story of the innocent sufferer, the book of Job is far less known in its details. Scrutinizing the conventional view of a righteous and moral world order under the deity’s full control, the book of Job puts humans to the test as it addresses whether or not people can remain upright when aggrieved. The book of Job also puts the deity (God) to the test as it weighs the deity’s negligence in failing to deal properly with the wicked and the righteous. As a literary work composed in the the distant past, we will consider the book of Job's quality as ‘wisdom literature’ as we carefully examine the words, experiences, and actions of its characters as well as consider who, if anyone, had the knowledge to offer the “correct” explanation for God’s (in)actions. This course will also explore how the book of Job continues to speak to past and present thinkers who, through their very own experiences, grapple with the problem of evil and its continued presence in a world that is created and ordered by the deity, one who we want to be good.

Readings:

  • Any one of New Oxford Annotated Bible, 5th ed (2018); or 4th ed (2010); or Jewish Study Bible, 2nd ed (2014); or Harper Collins Study Bible, rev. ed (2006).
  • Larrimore, Mark. The Book of Job: A Biography (Princeton University Press, 2013).
  • Wiesel, Elie. Night (Hill and Wang, 2006).
  • Selected readings from Testament of Job; Qur’an; Milton; Maimonides; Calvin; Luther; Kant; Frost

Grading:

  • Attendance and participation (15%);
  • Short reading reports (5 x 5% each = 25%);
  • Paper proposal (10%); Draft Paper (15%);
  • In-class presentation (5%);
  • Final Paper (30%)

CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

29320 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM RLP 1.108
GCWr (also listed as R S 315)

Description

What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters. We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and the New Testament. The later part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.

 

Texts

The New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised Standard Version. Edited by Michael D. Coogan, Marc Z. Brettler, and Carol Newsom. 4th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. (indicated by NOAB in the Plan of Study, below)

 

Course Pack with selections from Readings from Philo, Rabbinic Literature, Qur’anic Literature, Maimonides, Augustine, Luther, Spinoza, Mendelsohn, Kierkegaard, and others.

 

Grading

Attendance (10%), 5 short reading reports (2% each or 10%), 2 short papers (15% each or 30%), rewrite of one paper (25%), final exam (25%).

CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

29445 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM RLP 0.106
GCWr (also listed as R S 315)

Description

What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters. We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and the New Testament. The later part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.

 

Texts

The New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised Standard Version. Edited by Michael D. Coogan, Marc Z. Brettler, and Carol Newsom. 4th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. (indicated by NOAB in the Plan of Study, below)

 

Course Pack with selections from Readings from Philo, Rabbinic Literature, Qur’anic Literature, Maimonides, Augustine, Luther, Spinoza, Mendelsohn, Kierkegaard, and others.

 

Grading

Attendance (10%), 5 short reading reports (2% each or 10%), 2 short papers (15% each or 30%), rewrite of one paper (25%), final exam (25%).

CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

33375 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 208
GCWr (also listed as R S 315)

 

Description

What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters. We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and the New Testament. The later part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.

 

Texts

The New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised Standard Version. Edited by Michael D. Coogan, Marc Z. Brettler, and Carol Newsom. 4th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. (indicated by NOAB in the Plan of Study, below)

 

Course Pack with selections from Readings from Philo, Rabbinic Literature, Qur’anic Literature, Maimonides, Augustine, Luther, Spinoza, Mendelsohn, Kierkegaard, and others.

 

Grading

Attendance (10%), 5 short reading reports (2% each or 10%), 2 short papers (15% each or 30%), rewrite of one paper (25%), final exam (25%). 

CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

33950 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.118
GCWr (also listed as R S 315)

Description:

What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters. We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and the New Testament. The later part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.

 

Texts

  • The New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised Standard Version. Edited by Michael D. Coogan, Marc Z. Brettler, and Carol Newsom. 4th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. (indicated by NOAB in the Plan of Study, below)
  • Course Pack with selections from Readings from Philo, Dead Sea Scrolls, Rabbinic Literature, Qur’anic Literature, Maimonides, Augustine, Luther, Spinoza, Mendelsohn, Kierkegaard, and others.

 

Grading

  • Attendance (10%)
  • 5 short reading reports (2% each or 10%)
  • 2 short papers (15% each or 30%)
  • rewrite of one paper (25%)
  • final exam (25%)

CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

33910 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.102
GCWr (also listed as R S 315)

Description:

What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters. We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and the New Testament. The later part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.

 

Texts

  • The New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised Standard Version. Edited by Michael D. Coogan, Marc Z. Brettler, and Carol Newsom. 4th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. (indicated by NOAB in the Plan of Study, below)
  • Course Pack with selections from Readings from Philo, Dead Sea Scrolls, Rabbinic Literature, Qur’anic Literature, Maimonides, Augustine, Luther, Spinoza, Mendelsohn, Kierkegaard, and others.

 

Grading

  • Attendance (10%)
  • 5 short reading reports (2% each or 10%)
  • 2 short papers (15% each or 30%)
  • rewrite of one paper (25%)
  • final exam (25%)

CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

33737 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JES A216A
GCWr (also listed as R S 315)

Description

What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters. We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and the New Testament. The later part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.

Texts

  • The New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised Standard Version. Edited by Michael D. Coogan, Marc Z. Brettler, and Carol Newsom. 4th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. (indicated by NOAB in the Plan of Study, below)
  • Course Pack with selections from Readings from Philo, Rabbinic Literature, Qur’anic Literature, Maimonides, Augustine, Luther, Spinoza, Mendelsohn, Kierkegaard, and others.

 

Grading

  • Attendance (10%)
  • 5 short reading reports (2% each or 10%)
  • 2 short papers (15% each or 30%)
  • rewrite of one paper (25%)
  • final exam (25%). 

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