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WGS F301 • Fertility And Reproduction

82865 • Peng, Ruijie
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM RLP 0.118
CDGC SB
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Please check back for updates.


WGS F301 • Mexican Amer Womn 1910-Pres

82860 • Rosas, Lilia
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM GEA 114
CD HI (also listed as HIS F317L, MAS F319)
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The 1917 Bath Riots of El Paso, led by seventeen-year old Carmelita Torres, is a watershed moment in the history of ethnic Mexican women. Illustrating the intersection between the local and global, we learn how Mexicanas demanded their rights over their own bodies, and asserted dignity and respect in the backdrop of the la frontera and the Revolution of 1910. Through this course, we will comprehensively examine the history of ethnic Mexican women in the United States in the twentieth century. Beginning with the Mexican Revolution, which led to the first major migration of Mexicans to the United States, we will study the lives and roles of ethnic Mexican, (me)Xicanas, Chicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, indigenous, Mexican American, and brown women within the U.S., and along the U.S.-Mexican borderlands. We also will explore how gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, language, spirituality, and citizenship shaped their experiences, and how the writing of their history has changed in the last one hundred years.


WGS F305 • Intro To Women's & Gender Stds

82870 • Nicholus, Sarah
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM BIO 301
CD
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Women’s and Gender Studies is an interdisciplinary field that asks critical questions about the relationships between sex, gender, society, and our own experiences as political acts. In this course, students will come to understand key differences between sex, gender, and sexuality; define feminism both broadly and personally, particularly in relationship to race, class, and other intersectional aspects of identity; learn about queer and trans histories and experiences; explore women’s experiences in international contexts; and investigate the body and its representation as a way to uncover gender norms and expectations. We will also discuss and write about recent social controversies (such as bathroom legislation, bias incidents, the exclusion of groups from the Women’s March on Washington) as moments that reveal and critique the cultural codes of gender. An emphasis will be placed on self-identified women, LGBTQA+ individuals, and people of color.


WGS F335 • US Masculinities

82880 • Beasley, Alex
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM BIO 301
IIWr (also listed as AMS F370)
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What does it mean to be a man? Hiding in plain sight, the idea of masculinity is often taken for granted in American culture. Whereas femininity is discussed at length in the media and popular culture—through national debates about “leaning in,” for instance, or girls’ and women’s struggles with body image— masculinity is rarely given the same attention. Yet masculinity, like femininity, is constructed by cultural ideas about sex, gender, class, and race and has changed dramatically over time. Moreover, ideas about manhood and masculinity have shaped American political, economic, and cultural history in profound ways.

This course explores varied ideas about masculinity in the U.S. from the nineteenth century through the present. We will focus on four primary questions: How have the meanings of manhood changed over time? How have ideas about manhood and manliness affected the history of work in the U.S.? How have ideas about masculinity impacted U.S. international relations? And how do ideas of masculinity intersect with ideas about race, class, and sexuality? Through these questions, we will consider how masculinity relates to ideas about violence and self-sufficiency. We will engage with interdisciplinary literature in history, American Studies, urban studies, gender studies, and anthropology to answer these questions.


WGS F393 • Pop Culture And Higher Educati

82895 • Roland, Ericka
Meets MW 3:00PM-7:00PM SZB 422
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Varies by unique number.


WGS S335 • Performing Lgbtq+

82920 • Bonin, Paul
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GDC 2.410
CDWr (also listed as C L S323)
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This discussion-based seminar takes a multi-disciplinary, multi-media, approach to study LGBTQ performance in the U.S., historically and in the present moment. We will also explore how the fields of queer theory and queer studies have turned to performance and performativity as key modes through which gender and sexuality are expressed and understood. Case studies pay attention the diverse cultural, racial, able, and geographic locations, as well as the variety of platforms/events/organizations that make this moment a vital one for LGBTQ performance. In this class, we pay particular emphasis on queer of color, trans*-, and crip/queer approaches and cultural practices. Focusing on a new performance almost each class day, we will engage a wide variety of performances onstage (dance, film performance art, multi-media works), in galleries (installations), in community sites (social practice art, community-based art), in video/film (online media platforms, as well as film and television markets) to ask how LGBTQ performance has informed LGBTQ experience, and continues to do so today. Given our location, the students will study Austin’s LGBTQ performance scene.


WGS S340 • Latinx Legend Tripping

82925 • Gonzalez-Martin, Rachel
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM BIO 301
CDWr (also listed as AMS S321, E S370W, MAS S374)
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Legend tripping is the process by which individuals and groups visit and/or recreate legendary contexts, with the hopes of facilitating an encounter with the strange. This course will focus on narrative folklore and practice from diverse traditions across the U.S. based Latinx diaspora.  Legends, or folk narratives told as true share interpretations of the strange in everyday social life of tellers and audiences alike. Shared amongst peers and across generations, legends within Latinx communities have been used to influence the behaviors and beliefs of young women. Through reading, collecting, and analyzing legend texts such as La Llorona, Dancing with the Devil, La Lechuza among other stories of supernatural encounters as well as interrogating key figures, such as brujas, curanderas, hechiceras, students will engage with these texts the instrumentalization of a community logic of supernatural belief that impact the development of gender and sexuality identities across US Latinx communities. We will draw on materials from the fields of Folklore, Anthropology, Latina/o Studies, History and American Studies.


WGS W379L • Internship In Wgs

82885
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Experience working in the community or for a nonprofit agency.

Prerequisite: At least twelve semester hours of coursework in women's and gender studies and written consent of the supervising faculty member; consent forms are available in the Center for Women's and Gender Studies.

  • Internship courses are available as part of the class offerings at Women's and Gender Studies.  These are individual instruction courses and do not meet in the classroom as lectures do. 

  • Students are responsible for finding their own internships.  Resources on campus such as Liberal Arts Career ServicesLACS Internship Services, theCareer Exploration Center, the CWGS blog, and the WGS email list serves may help to find an internship.

  • After finding a place to work as an intern, students must also obtain a faculty supervisor for their internship.  CWGS can assist in matching a student with a faculty member based on research interests.  This faculty supervisor will be responsible for submitting a grade for the student. According to the Provost’s office - TAs, RAs, and GRAs are ineligible to serve as faculty supervisors.

  • Once students have an internship and a faculty supervisor, they must fill out and turn in the Internship Proposal Form (PDF) (DOC) to the CWGS office in order to be cleared to register for the course.

  • On the proposal form, the student and faculty member will explain how the student will be graded for the internship course.  Some students keep a work journal that they submit for a grade, some turn in a large paper at the end of their internship.  Other final grade assignments might include a presentation or a larger project that was done for the organization.

More Information at: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/academics/internships.php


WGS W384N • Internship In Wom's/Gend Stds

82890
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Practical working involvement with participating nonprofit and research agencies. The equivalent of ten class hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.


WGS W394 • Conf Crs In Wom's/Gend Studies

82900
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Individual directed readings and conferences on selected problems or topics in women's and gender studies. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Women's and Gender Studies 394 and Women's Studies 394 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

WGS 394: Graduate Conference Course in Women's and Gender Studies.

Individual directed readings and conferences on selected problems or topics in women's and gender studies.

The Conference Course allows  graduate students to work individually with select faculty on specific research problems.  The student is responsible for approaching faculty and designing a semester's work.

The Conference Course is restricted.  The WGS 394 Approval Form must be turned into the CWGS office with faculty signatures before students may register for the WGS 394 Conference Course. 

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/academics/courses/Conference-Course.php


WGS W398R • Master's Report

82915
(also listed as GK W398R, LAS W398R, LAT W398R, LIN W398R)
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Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in women's and gender studies and consent of the graduate adviser.


WGS W698A • Thesis

82905
(also listed as LAS W698A, LAS W698B, LIN W698A, LIN W698B, WGS W698B)
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The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Women's and Gender Studies 698A and Women's Studies 698A may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in women's and gender studies and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Women's and Gender Studies 698A.

The Thesis or Report is required by the Master's Program.  It represents the final paper or research project that the student creates to culminate their coursework in Women's and Gender Studies. A student must be enrolled in the Thesis or Report course during the semester they intend to graduate.

When registering for the Thesis or Report course, the student must turn in the Thesis/Report Proposal Forms linked below.

The Thesis form is used to link the professor to the online grading system.  This also serves as documentation for faculty supervising the Thesis or Report.  Students should sign up for the Thesis course when they have secured a faculty member to work with them.

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/graduate-application/thesis-report.php


WGS W698B • Thesis

82910
(also listed as LAS W698A, LAS W698B, LIN W698A, LIN W698B, WGS W698A)
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The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Women's and Gender Studies 698A and Women's Studies 698A may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in women's and gender studies and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Women's and Gender Studies 698A.

The Thesis or Report is required by the Master's Program.  It represents the final paper or research project that the student creates to culminate their coursework in Women's and Gender Studies. A student must be enrolled in the Thesis or Report course during the semester they intend to graduate.

When registering for the Thesis or Report course, the student must turn in the Thesis/Report Proposal Forms linked below.

The Thesis form is used to link the professor to the online grading system.  This also serves as documentation for faculty supervising the Thesis or Report.  Students should sign up for the Thesis course when they have secured a faculty member to work with them.

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/graduate-application/thesis-report.php



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  • Center for Women's & Gender Studies

    The University of Texas at Austin
    Burdine Hall 536
    2505 University Avenue, A4900
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-471-5765