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WGS 301 • Women, Gender, Lit, Cul-Wb

45995 • Train, Emma • Internet; Asynchronous
CDWr
show description

E 314V  l  6-Women, Gender, Literature, and Culture-WB

 

Instructor:  Train, E

Unique:  35595

Semester:  Spring 2021

Cross-lists:  WGS 301.27, 45995

 

Prerequisite:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This course is structured around the question: What does gender have to do with literature?  We will explore other related questions like:  What do critics, authors, and scholars mean when they use the categories “woman writer,” “female writer,” or “feminist writer”? What are the possibilities and the limitations of these categories?  We will analyze how contemporary female-identified writers negotiate questions related to gender and, in particular, we will examine these how questions of gender are always deeply intertwined with questions of sexuality and of race.  Because these questions are especially evident in texts that challenge traditional literary forms and genres, we will mainly examine texts (including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry) that are speculative, hybrid, and genre-bending and will analyze how and why female-identified writers innovate literary forms.  Although our primary objects of study will be literary texts, this course also aims to explore the shared theoretical ground of literary studies and women and gender studies (WGS), which includes feminist theory, queer theory, and Black studies.  To this aim, we will read literary texts alongside selections of critical and theoretical texts in order to learn how to apply theory as a tool for the close-reading of literature.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other writing-focused disciplines.  In particular, because this course is primarily interested in literary texts, close-reading skills and literary-critical methodologies will be emphasized.  Students will also gain practice using online research tools (e.g. OED, Jstor, Google Scholar) integral to writing and research in humanities disciplines.

 

Tentative Texts:  Gloria E. Anzaldúa’s Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (1987); Octavia E. Butler’s Parable of the Sower (1993); Jos Charles’s feeld (2018); Audre Lorde’s Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches (1984); Eileen Myles’s Inferno (a poet’s novel) (2010).

 

Requirements & Grading:  Three essays will comprise the majority of the student’s grade (75% of the total grade). Revision will be an integral part of writing in this course and each student will have the opportunity to revise each essay based on instructor feedback for a higher grade.  The remainder of each student’s grade (25% of the total grade) will be comprised of frequent but brief writing assignments, such as writing skills exercises, response papers, and Canvas discussion posts.


WGS 301 • Black Queer Art Worlds-Wb

45980 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
CDGC (also listed as AFR 315Q, ANT 310L)
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 301 • Ethncty/Gendr: La Chicana-Wb

45970 • Perez-Zetune, Elena
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CD SB (also listed as MAS 311, SOC 308D)
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WGS 301 • Family Relationships-Wb

45965 • Williamson, Hannah
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
SB
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WGS 301 • Fertility And Reproductn-Wb

45985 • Glass, Jennifer
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CDGC SB (also listed as SOC 307K)
show description

Description:

Why do birth rates rise and fall?  How can the U.S. have both record rates of childlessness as well as the highest rates of teen childbearing and unwanted pregnancy in the industrialized world?  Why does educating women lower birth rates faster than any population control program in the Third World?  This course will explore when, why, how, and with whom Americans bear children, and how we compare to other developed and developing countries in the world.  We will explore infertility and its treatments, the ethics of surrogacy, voluntary childlessness, the rapid rise of nonmarital childbearing in the U.S. and other countries, the politics of childbirth and risks of maternal mortality in developed and developing countries, and the declining populations and rapid aging  of  rich countries including Japan, Italy, and Spain where women have basically stopped having children. 

Texts:  Available at Coop

Liza Mundy, Everything Conceivable, NY: Anchor Books, 2007

Michelle Goldberg, Means of Reproduction , NY: Penguin Bookds, 2010

Grading and Rrequirements:

Two opinion essays: 30%

Midterm exam:       40%

Final exam:             20%

Class participation: 10%

 


WGS 301 • Gay/Lesbian Lit/Culture-Wb

45975 • Mack, Rosemary
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CDWr
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WGS 301 • Gndr/Race/Class Amer Soc-Wb

45990 • Osborne, Lynette
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
CD SB (also listed as SOC 307L)
show description

This course focuses on learning about the ways in which gender, race, class, and sexuality intersect to shape the lived experience in U.S. society. It will primarily focus on the ways in which our identities are socially constructed, how they have changed over time, and on major related social movements (e.g. feminist, civil rights, LGBTQ, etc.). We will discuss the empirical evidence related to power (i.e., domination and subordination) and its relation to the intersections of gender, race, class, and sexuality.


WGS 301 • Latina Perf: Celia-Selena

46000 • Gutierrez, Laura
Meets M 10:00AM-11:30AM GAR 0.102 • Hybrid/Blended
CD VP
show description

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WGS 301 • Perf/Femin/Socl Change-Wb

45979 • Bridgforth, Sharon
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
VP (also listed as AFR 311C)
show description

This course will serve as an exploration of the ways theatrical jazz and Black queer feminist practices generate space for art making and community-building that activates social change, healing and transformation. Assigned readings, prompt-based writing, research, engagement with guest artists, and an embodied developmental process will provide a springboard for the creation of new work.


WGS 303 • Intro To Lgbtq Studies-Wb

46005 • Merabet, Sofian
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM • Internet; Synchronous
CDWr
show description

Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies.

DESCRIPTION:
Explores concepts of gender and sexuality, race, class, religion, and nation; as well as skills in theory, history, and research methods relevant to LGBTQ studies. The course will also survey the making of modern understandings of sexual and LGBTQ identities in the last one hundred years and the implications of this history for broader understandings of gender and sexuality.


WGS 305 • Intro Women's/Gender Stds-Wb

46010 • Pinto, Samantha
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
CD
show description

Women’s and Gender Studies is an interdisciplinary field that asks critical questions about the relationships between sex, gender, society, and our own experiences as political acts. In this course, students will come to understand key differences between sex, gender, and sexuality; define feminism both broadly and personally, particularly in relationship to race, class, and other intersectional aspects of identity; learn about queer and trans histories and experiences; explore women’s experiences in international contexts; and investigate the body and its representation as a way to uncover gender norms and expectations. We will also discuss and write about recent social controversies (such as bathroom legislation, bias incidents, the exclusion of groups from the Women’s March on Washington) as moments that reveal and critique the cultural codes of gender. An emphasis will be placed on self-identified women, LGBTQA+ individuals, and people of color.


WGS 313 • Child Development-Wb

46015 • Speranza, Hallie
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

Same as Human Development and Family Sciences 313.

DESCRIPTION:
Motor, language, cognitive, social, and emotional development in the family context.

PREREQUISITE:
Credit or registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 113L (corresponding Lab for the course), and Psychology 301 with grade of at least C-.


WGS 322D • Population And Society

46020 • Cavanagh, Shannon
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WEL 1.316 • Hybrid/Blended
GC (also listed as SOC 369K)
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Course Objectives

Population studies or demography is an interdisciplinary field, encompassing the study of the size, distribution, and composition of human populations, and the processes of fertility, mortality, and migration through which populations’ change. These processes are closely connected to many of the pressing problems facing contemporary societies. For instance, the funding of health care in developed countries is a major issue because of population aging and declining fertility. Civil unrest in parts of Africa and the Middle East are, in part, a function of persistently high fertility rates. These processes are also important drivers of many contemporary environmental problems. Finally, a grasp of population processes is important for a deeper understanding of the population explosion in urban areas and the higher transmission and impact of AIDS in the developing world.

This course provides an overview of the field of population studies. A sociological approach is emphasized, but economic, geographic, anthropological, and biological perspectives will also be used. Attention will be given to a) the demographic concepts needed to objectively evaluate population issues and b) the substantive content of the population issues. Emphasis will be given to evaluating the evidence regarding debates on population topics.

Reading Materials

Required text:

  • Population and Society: An Introduction to Demography, 2nd edition Dudley Poston and Leon Bouvier. Cambridge University Press: New York.
  • On-line Readings: There are a number of short reading assignments, marked with an [Readings]. These readings can be found in Readings folder in the Course Document section of the class Canvas site and should be read prior to class period. http://canvas.utexas.edu

To access the class home page, go to this link and log into the Canvas system with your UT EID. You will find a link to this course under the heading “My Courses”. All course material will be posted on this web page, including announcements and grades. In addition, readings can be accessed through this web page.

Course Requirements

You are expected to complete all readings for the day's class before coming to class. Read as actively as possible. Class time will be an opportunity to discuss and further explore the readings, so it is essential that everyone comes prepared to participate. Our class periods will be more productive and enjoyable when we all begin with the same materials.

There will be TWO examinations during the semester, each worth 25% of your final grade. The exams will draw from both readings and class discussions. The exams are not cumulative. Each will include multiple choice and short answer questions. Make-up examinations will not be administered except in extreme circumstances and only if I am notified beforehand. All make-up examinations are 100% essay.

You must also complete THREE written assignments. The assignments—on mortality , fertility, and migration—are designed to familiarize you with demographic data on the web, give you an overview of your country of choice, and help you identify your country’s population angle that most interests you. Each assignment is worth 15% of your final grade.

The final 5% of your grade is based on attendance/class participation. I expect you to show up and engage (i.e., not text, sleep, or read the newspaper) with classmates, the TA, and me in the class.

  • Exam 1 - 25%
  • Exam 2 - 25%
  • Fertility Analysis Assignment - 15%
  • Mortality Analysis Assignment - 15%
  • Migration Analysis Assignment – 15%
  • Attendance - 5%

Regarding all class assignments and examinations, students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, other students, and the integrity of the University, all policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced. For more information on University policies, see www.utexas.edu/depts/dps/sjs.

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. To determine if you qualify, please contact the Dean of Students at 471-6259. If they certify your needs, I will work with you to make appropriate arrangements.

Grading

Grading will reflect each individual's mastery of the material, without comparison to other students on a "curve". It is my hope that you will work with others to optimize your learning experience.

  • A (94-100): Excellent grasp of subject matter; provides relevant details and examples; draws clear and interesting connections, exceptionally original, coherent and well‐organized; explains concepts clearly; ideas clearly written/stated, outstanding classroom participation.
  • A- (90-93): Very good grasp of subject matter; provides relevant details and examples; draws clear connections; explains concepts clearly; ideas clearly written/stated.
  • B+ (87-89): Good grasp of some elements above, others need work. B (83-86) Satisfactory grasp of some elements above.
  • B- (80-82): Uneven, spotty grasp of the elements above.
  • C+ (77-79): Limited grasp of the above.
  • C (73-76): Poor grasp of the above.
  • C- (70-72): Very poor grasp of the above.
  • D (60-69): Limited evidence of grasp of material, having done readings, attended class, or completed assignments.
  • F (0 – 59): Insignificant evidence of having done readings, attended class, or completing assignments

WGS 335 • Lgbtq Oppression: Dialog-Wb

46040 • Nguyen, Quynh
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CDE
show description

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WGS 335 • Performing Lgbtq+-Wb

46030 • Darlington, Mary
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
CDWr (also listed as C L 323, T D 357T)
show description

This discussion-based seminar takes a multi-disciplinary, multi-media, approach to study LGBTQ performance in the U.S., historically and in the present moment. We will also explore how the fields of queer theory and queer studies have turned to performance and performativity as key modes through which gender and sexuality are expressed and understood. Case studies pay attention the diverse cultural, racial, able, and geographic locations, as well as the variety of platforms/events/organizations that make this moment a vital one for LGBTQ performance. In this class, we pay particular emphasis on queer of color, trans*-, and crip/queer approaches and cultural practices. Focusing on a new performance almost each class day, we will engage a wide variety of performances onstage (dance, film performance art, multi-media works), in galleries (installations), in community sites (social practice art, community-based art), in video/film (online media platforms, as well as film and television markets) to ask how LGBTQ performance has informed LGBTQ experience, and continues to do so today. Given our location, the students will study Austin’s LGBTQ performance scene.


WGS 335 • The Politics Of Refusal-Wb

46035 • Velasquez-Potts, Michelle
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
CD
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WGS 340 • Chicana Feminisms

46080 • Cotera, Maria
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CMA 2.306 • Hybrid/Blended
CD
show description

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WGS 340 • Diaspora Visions-Wb

46055 • Okediji, Moyosore
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as AFR 335G)
show description

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WGS 340 • Gend/Sex/Fam Ind Rel/Cul-Wb

46050 • Selby, Martha
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as ANS 372K)
show description

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WGS 340 • Human Rights/World Polit-Wb

46065 • Evans, Rhonda
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as GOV 365W)
show description

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WGS 340 • Islamic Ethics-Wb

46075 • Ayoub, Samy
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as ISL 340, MES 342)
show description

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WGS 340 • Latinx Short Story-Wb

46090 • Garcia, Patricia
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CDWr
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WGS 340 • Reproductive Justice/Race

46070 • Rudrappa, Sharmila
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GDC 1.304 • Hybrid/Blended
(also listed as AAS 330M, SOC 335R)
show description

Description

Access to reproductive care is the most significant indicator of social inequality. The rights to have
children, or not, and parent are deeply stratified across societies. And childhood inequalities have
persistent, life-long health effects. In this course we will examine reproductive outcomes for women in
order to study social justice.

Reproductive justice is defined “as the human right to maintain personal bodily autonomy, have children, not have children, and parent the children we have in safe and sustainable communities.” Our working definition of reproduction justice for this course encompasses the processes of becoming pregnant and giving birth, the right to give birth to a child with disabilities, the right to prenatal care, neonatal care, and child care. Taking our cue from reproductive justice activists and scholars, our class readings and discussions will consider the complete physical and mental well-being of women, children, and their families which can potentially be achieved when they have the economic, social and political power, and resources to make healthy decisions about their sexuality, and reproduction.

Reproductive justice is not always achieved because resources are unevenly distributed, based on race, gender, sexuality, abilities/ disabilities, citizenship, and social class. As a result, developing and developed nations are racked with social inequality when it comes to reproductive matters.

From slavery, access to birth control, stratified reproduction, sex selective abortions, and new reproductive technologies, this course will focus on difficult topics; but, no answers will be provided. The expectation is that you will learn, and answer for yourself what you mean by reproductive justice, and how you think it can be achieved. My aim is that we will emerge at the end of the semester with an open mind regarding women’s and children’s health, and a more complicated understanding of what reproductive justice means. You will, hopefully, take the term reproductive justice into your own linguistic repertoire, and from there, attempt to make it a part of your worldview, and everyday life.

Readings

- Readings are on Canvas (marked with asterix), or online and accessible through our library
resources (links provided).
- Please purchase from Amazon.com Ritu Menon and Kamala Bashin’s Borders and Boundaries:
Women in India’s Partition. 1998 or 2000 version.

Course expectations and grading

Attendance Policy
Attendance will be taken every time we meet; you may miss up with 2 classes without affecting your
grade. After that, every class you miss drops your grade by ½ a grade, until you earn an F.

Participation: 5%
I encourage active participation in class. By participation I do not want you to monopolize discussion,
but make remarks that draw people into talking about the issues you want to discuss. Respectful
disagreement is an excellent way to learn.

Current events discussion: 5%
My hope is that you are up on current events, and read newspapers/ listen to the radio and otherwise
keep up with happenings around the world. Current news is filled with reproductive politics. As part of
your course grade please bring in news items (a photcopy/ print-out, or direct our attention to the suitable website) that are relevant to the course. We will start each day with a 5-10 minute discussion on current developments in reproductive justice matters not just in the U.S., but also in other parts of the world (in previous classes we talked about the Zika virus, the criminalization of miscarriage in Guatemala, etc).

Take home exams (two): 30% each
I encourage group work on exams. Please share notes, develop outlines together, and learn from each
other. However, each of you will write up your answers individually and turn in individuals exams.
Please indicate on your exams who you’ve worked with.

Life History: 30%
Please conduct one life history with an older person or a friend. Summarize the person’s thoughts, and
experiences. In the second section of your paper provide an introspection on your own reproductive
ideals for yourself. In the third section compare and contrast your thoughts to the person you’ve spoken with, and think through what might influence these differences. Up to 8 double spaced pages.


WGS 340 • Sex/Power Afr Diaspora-Wb

46060 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CDGC (also listed as AFR 345F, ANT 324L)
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 340 • Trnsnatl Latinx Pop Culture

46085 • Gutierrez, Laura
Meets M 1:00PM-2:30PM GAR 0.102 • Hybrid/Blended
CD
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 340 • Women & Gender In China-Wb

46045 • Li, Huaiyin
Meets M 5:00PM-8:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr (also listed as ANS 372J)
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 345 • Psychology Of Women-Wb

46105 • Awad, Germine
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

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WGS 345 • Sociology Of Education-Wb

46125 • Irizarry, Yasmiyn
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as AFR 321L)
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 345 • Sociology Of Education-Wb

46120 • Muller, Chandra
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr (also listed as AFR 321L, SOC 321L)
show description

DESCRIPTION:

We all have many years of experience in schools and we know what happens in schools. Do schools provide opportunities for people to have a better life? Are schools an equalizer? Are they failing? This course is designed to challenge and think critically about what we think we know about schools and education. We will study sociological research on what schools do, for people, for communities, and for our society. We will consider how people of different social class, race and ethnicity, gender, and disability statuses interact with schools and how inequality in achievement comes about. And we will question what policies might improve schools. The course objective is to better understand the role of education as a social institution and how it contributes to and reduces social inequality.

The course objectives are to use sociological principles and empirical research to:

• Understand schooling and education. What do schools do and how do they do it?
• Analyze how education both contributes to and reduces social inequality.
• Understand the roles that education plays in society. We will consider these roles of education in a historical context and how they have and haven’t changed over time.
• Critically evaluate which school practices and policies contribute to (1) learning among students from different socio-demographic subgroups and (2) exacerbating and reducing inequality.
• Develop a deeper appreciation of our own experiences in education as a child and student (and, if applicable, a parent or a teacher), and the potential experiences that you will have in the future.

Learning goals:

• Use empirical evidence reported in sociological research to discuss how schools work and, how people from different socio-demographic subgroups interact with educational institutions, and the ways that schools may exacerbate or reduce social inequality.
• Discuss and critically evaluate how the institution of education shapes individuals’ behaviors, attitudes, opportunities, and life course outcomes.
• Read and critically analyze empirical evidence reported in research in the sociology of education.
• Apply the knowledge produced by empirical research to analyze practices

 

GRADING:

Your final grade will be calculated using this distribution:
• Exam 1 (February 6) 15%
• Exam 2 (March 6) 20%
• Exam 3 (April 5) 20%
• Project 25% total (Part 1 [due April 12] 5%; Part 2 [due May 3] 20%
• Homework Assignments 20%


WGS 345 • The Family

46115 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLP 1.106 • Hybrid/Blended
Wr (also listed as SOC 323)
show description

In this course we will analyze the family as a social institution, using sociological perspectives.
Studying the family can be tricky in that we all have our own experiences being part of families. It is
important, then, to go beyond our own experiences to explore both the private aspects of the family as
well as public aspects of the family using various kinds of empirical data. Shifting definitions of the
family provide a starting point for an exploration of the history of “the family”. Specific topics include
parental and child roles; gender, race and social class as stratification systems which influence families;
how the family intersects with, is shaped by, and shapes other social institutions, with particular attention to the economy and the world of work as well as state and social policies; and cohabitation, divorce and step families as three important changes in the US family over the last several decades.

Questions we will address include:
• What is the definition of family? (Why is this a complicated question?)
• What social-structural forces shape family processes?
• How is the family a gendered institution?
• How does government attempt to shape families? Support families?

Required Texts
▪ Cohen, Philip N. 2018. The Family; Diversity, Inequality, and Social Change, 2nd edition.
New York: W.W. Norton and Company. You also need access to InQuisitive, which comes with
the textbook. If you purchase a hard copy, there will be an access code inside.
▪ Coontz, Stephanie. 2006. Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage.
New York: Penguin.
▪ Edin, Kathryn J. and H. Luke Shaefer. 2016. $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in
America. New York: Mariner Books.
▪ Lareau, Annette. 2011. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race and Family Life.
Berkeley: University of California Press.
SOC 323 syllabus page 2 of 7
▪ Additional readings posted to our Canvas course site.


WGS 345 • The Family

46110 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM UTC 2.102A • Hybrid/Blended
(also listed as SOC 323)
show description

In this course we will analyze the family as a social institution, using sociological perspectives.
Studying the family can be tricky in that we all have our own experiences being part of families. It is
important, then, to go beyond our own experiences to explore both the private aspects of the family as
well as public aspects of the family using various kinds of empirical data. Shifting definitions of the
family provide a starting point for an exploration of the history of “the family”. Specific topics include
parental and child roles; gender, race and social class as stratification systems which influence families;
how the family intersects with, is shaped by, and shapes other social institutions, with particular attention to the economy and the world of work as well as state and social policies; and cohabitation, divorce and step families as three important changes in the US family over the last several decades.

Questions we will address include:
• What is the definition of family? (Why is this a complicated question?)
• What social-structural forces shape family processes?
• How is the family a gendered institution?
• How does government attempt to shape families? Support families?

Required Texts
▪ Cohen, Philip N. 2018. The Family; Diversity, Inequality, and Social Change, 2nd edition.
New York: W.W. Norton and Company. You also need access to InQuisitive, which comes with
the textbook. If you purchase a hard copy, there will be an access code inside.
▪ Coontz, Stephanie. 2006. Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage.
New York: Penguin.
▪ Edin, Kathryn J. and H. Luke Shaefer. 2016. $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in
America. New York: Mariner Books.
▪ Lareau, Annette. 2011. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race and Family Life.
Berkeley: University of California Press.
SOC 323 syllabus page 2 of 7
▪ Additional readings posted to our Canvas course site.


WGS 345 • Toni Morrison-Wb

46130 • Woodard, Helena
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
CDWr (also listed as AFR 330J)
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 345 • Women And Sports Media-Wb

46109 • McClearen, Jennifer
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 350 • Feminist Theory-Wb

46140 • Velasquez-Potts, Michelle
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr
show description

Restricted to women's and gender studies majors and minors, priority to WGS majors.
Feminist theory with selections from women's and gender studies scholars. Recommended feminist theory course for women's and gender studies majors.


WGS 379S • Senior Seminar-Wb

46160 • Chhun, Lina
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
Wr
show description

Intensive study of selected topics in women's and gender studies.


WGS 392 • Rsch Meths Smnr Wom/Gen Std-Wb

46165 • Lebron, Marisol
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

This course is designed to prepare graduate students in gender studies and the qualitative social sciences to conduct a research project for their master’s theses or similar projects. We will explore a range of research methods and traditions as well as the epistemological assumptions underlying them. We will consider what it means to conduct “feminist” research, as well as the perils and promise of the more participatory research traditions. Some of the research methods we will explore include interviewing, survey research, case studies, textual analysis, and participant observation.


WGS 393 • Art And Activism-Wb

46169 • Nault, Curran
Meets F 1:00PM-4:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Black Studies Theory II-Wb

46170 • Young, Hershini
Meets TH 11:00AM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as AFR 392)
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Comparative Higher Edu

46174 • Somers, Patricia
Meets W 4:00PM-7:00PM SZB 330 • Hybrid/Blended
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Cultrl His Of US Since 1865-Wb

46175 • Mickenberg, Julia
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as AMS 386, HIS 392)
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Decolonizing Gender-Wb

46180 • Chatterjee, Indrani
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as ANS 390, HIS 381)
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HIS 381 - Gender and Decolonial Histories
Indrani Chatterjee, Professor
Judith Coffin, Associate Professor

Our goal in this course is to both historicize and pluralize regimes of gender: in other words, to understand that those regimes vary, often quite starkly, across and within cultures and change historically due to a variety of circumstances. Decolonizing gender in the present global context implies re-investigating plural epistemologies (ways of knowing), ontologies (ways of being, identifications and identities) and practices that gender histories of labor, love, sex, slavery, and family. We will investigate different forms of accommodation, confrontation, and appropriation within and across cultures and times stretching from pre- through post-colonial centuries.

This is a dual-track (reading and research) graduate seminar. Every student will follow the same track for the first 10 weeks. After that, each student will follow a path specific to either a reading track or a research track.

Those who choose the reading track will develop a historiographical final essay (see FAQs at the end of the document) made up of between 5 books or 10 articles, or a combination of these. At least 2 articles and 1 book in this combination should be from readings not included in this course. We recommend this track for early graduate students who want to prepare a preliminary review of literature on a theme that interests them.   

Those who choose the research track will use this opportunity to use some particularly significant primary archives or documents to chart part of an eventual chapter or research proposal.  


FIRST REQUIREMENT: Choose a track.

Reading Track Students: Complete all the required reading and attend all classes. For 6 class meetings (of your choice), write brief reviews of 2-5 pages for 5 marks each (6x5=30). On any one day in the syllabus, lead a class discussion (10). Participate actively in enabling your peers’ discussions (10). As a final project, reading-track students write a historiographic essay of 10-15 pages on a topic developed in conversation with the professor (50).  Finalize topic by Week 5 at the latest. Everyone gets Week 14 off to finish draft of the essay, which will be presented in class for feedback on last class day. Final drafts will be handed over on last day of class to the instructor.  
Research-track students: Attend at least ten classes, completing the assigned reading for those weeks. For 5 of those classes, write brief reviews of 2-5 pages for 5 marks each (5x5= 25). Choose one week when readings are most relevant to your area of interest and lead the class, including in your discussion of the readings an oral presentation in brief relating your own research interest to the reading (for 15 marks). Additional marks depend on your enabling your peers’ learning and discussion. (10). As a final project, write a research paper of 15-20 pages on a topic of relevance to your research proposal (50). Everybody gets Week 14 off to finish a draft of a final essay, which will be presented to peers in class, and then handed over to the instructor on the last day of class.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO BOTH TRACKS:
Though the reading list is currently incomplete, we look forward to teaching and discussing the following books:
1)     Khaled el-Rouayheb, Before Homosexuality in the Arab-Islamic World, 1500 – 1800, University of Chicago Press, 2009, pp. 1-12, 53-110.
2)    Francesca Bray, Technology, Gender and History in Imperial China: Great Transformations Reconsidered. 2013 pbk ISBN 9778-0-415-63959-0
3)    Cynthia Eller, Gentlemen and Amazons: Myth of Matriarchal Prehistory 1861-1900. 2011. ISBN-13: 978-0520266766/ ISBN-10: 9780520266766
4)    Devesh Soneji, Unfinished Gestures, UChicago, 2012. ISBN-10: 0226768104
5)    Glenda Gilmore, Gender and Jim Crow. Chapel Hill: UNC Press. 1996.  ISBN 0807845965
All other readings will be available on Canvas OR through the PCL. It remains the students’ responsibility to ensure they keep up to date with the syllabus and course requirements.


GRADING: This Course will use A, A-, B+, B. Graduate course work should not qualify for a C or lower. 20% of all graduate course work can be taken for Pass/Fail grade as well. If you choose this option for this course, you should find out the date by which you are required to register this option with your department’s graduate office. Making this decision does not exempt any student from the requirements of reading, writing and speaking as part of course-work.


WGS 393 • Feminist Geographies-Wb

46188 • Faria, Caroline
Meets W 10:00AM-1:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Feminist Media Studies-Wb

46189 • McClearen, Jennifer
Meets M 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Gend/Genre Early Mod Fr Lit-Wb

46187 • Bizer, Marc
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as FR 390K)
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Gender and Genre in 16th Century French Literature

Course Description:

It was in 16th century France that women first come into their own as writers, yet not without facing conflict and derision, for traditionally women were expected to take care of their families, make cloth with their looms, and keep quiet. Nevertheless, with this emergence, we see new discourses arise in the period, opposing the dominant misogynistic masculine ones, which asserted the rights of women to speak and to write. It is our goal this semester to examine how masculine and feminine identities were constructed in genres traditionally defined and practiced by men, but also in the literary relationships between men and women and finally women and women.

The course will be taught in English unless all students are from FRIT

Readings (French / English):

Petrarch, Petrarch’s Lyric Poems

Christine de Pizan, Le livre de la cité des dames / The Selected Writings of Christine de Pizan (Norton Critical Edition, ed. Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski).

Joachim Du Bellay, Les Regrets [B] / The Regrets, trans. R. Helgerson (Penn, 2006)

Louise Labé, Pernette du Guillet, Œuvres poétiques, éd. Charpentier / Labé, Complete Poetry and Prose (Chicago 2006) & Pernette du Guillet, Complete Poems (Toronto, 2010)

Marguerite de Navarre, L’Heptaméron / The Heptameron of Margaret, Queen of Navarre (UPenn Digital Library or Penguin)

François Rabelais, Pantagruel (selections), Le Tiers Livre / Pantagruel (trans. J. M. Cohen), The Third Book (trans. Screech, Frame, or Thomas Urquhart and Peter Le Motteux).

Maurice Scève, Délie  / Emblems of Desire (trans. Sieburth, UPenn)

Pierre de Ronsard, Les Amours  / Selected Poems (Penguin)

Michel de Montaigne, Essais / any edition of the translation by Donald Frame

Catherine des Roches, Œuvres & Madeleine des Roches, Les Secondes Œuvres  / From Mother and Daughter (trans. Anne Larsen, Chicago, 2006)


WGS 393 • Gender And Politics-Wb

46190 • Charrad, Mounira
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
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Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Islamic Feminism-Wb

46195 • Azam, Hina
Meets T 3:00PM-6:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as AMS 390, MES 386, R S 390T)
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Description

Islam and feminism are often considered to be contradictory in their essences and objectives. Nevertheless, we now find more than a century of writing by Muslim women (and men) who draw their inspiration from their religion, and who seek to reconcile Islam’s scriptures and traditions with principles of gender equality and justice.  This course explores the idea of Islamic feminism, and surveys its history and key writings.  Students will be introduced to some of the practices, doctrines, and texts of Islam that have been considered most problematic from a women/gender perspective, and will read and discuss the ideas of several critical figures from the 20th and 21st centuries. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to reflect on the idea of, and varying definitions of, “Islamic feminism,” as well as to develop their own definitions of the term. All required readings will be in English. 

In addition to carrying the expected MES, RS and WGS crosslistings, this course also carries an American Studies (AMS) crosslisting, for two reasons: First, much critical work in Islamic feminism is being carried out by U.S.-based scholars, writers,  and activists, and study of that work receives significant attention in this course.  Second, this course seeks to interrogate the dichotomy not only between “Islam” and “feminism,” but also between “Islam” and “the West.” Studying the discourses of Muslim American feminists leads us to imagine different ways of being Muslim, feminist, and American.

 

Course Requirements/Grading

Attendance                                                    20%

Class Participation                                      20%

5 Reading Responses – 8% each               40%

Term Paper in 4 parts                                  35%

-- Part A) Proposal                                 5%

-- Part B) Annotated Bibliography         10%

-- Part C) Outline wIntro & Thesis         5%

-- Part D) Paper                                  15%

 

Course Readings:

Textbooks (tentative list):

  • Margot Badran. Feminism in Islam: Secular and Religious Convergences. 2009.
  • Barbara Stowasser. Women in the Qur’an, Traditions, and Interpretation. 1994.
  • Lamia Shehadeh, The Idea of Women Under Fundamentalist Islam. 2007.
  • Qasim Amin. The Liberation of Woman, and The New Woman. 1900.
  • Fatima Mernissi. The Veil and the Male Elite (Le harem politique – Le Prophète et les femmes). Tr. Mary Jo Lakeland.1987.
  • Amina Wadud. Qur’an and Woman. 1992.
  • Gisela Webb, ed. Windows of Faith. 2000.
  • Aysha Hidayatullah. Feminist Edges of the Qur’an. 2014.
  • Kecia Ali. Sexual Ethics and Islam. 2006.
  • Zaynab Ghazali, Days from my life (Ayyām min ḥayātī). Tr. A. R. Kidwai. 1978.
  • Bint al-Shāṭi’ (‘A’isha bt. ‘Abd al-Raḥmān), Wives of the Prophet (Nisā’ al-Nabī). Tr. Matti Moosa. 1973.

Additional readings (articles, essays, and book chapters) will be available in PDF format on Canvas. 

Arabic primary text reading supplementation: If enough students are interested, an optional session to read primary texts in Arabic can be arranged.

 


WGS 393 • Lorde And Rich-Wb

46200 • Moore, Lisa
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as E 389P)
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Lorde and Rich

Two of the twentieth century’s most important American poets were also among our foremost feminist theorists. In this class, we will read widely in the literature of Audre Lorde and Adrienne Rich, seeking to understand the unique status of poetry in the civil rights, gay liberation, and women's movements of the late twentieth century, the contributions of Black, queer, and feminist poetics to literary history, and the continuing relevance of Lorde and Rich to contemporary intersectional feminist and queer studies.  This class is appropriate for those seeking greater familiarity with feminist anti-racist thinking, lesbian-feminist and queer studies, and poetry and poetics.


WGS 393 • Material Culture In Africa-Wb

46204 • Osseo-Asare, Abena
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as AFR 381, HIS 382L)
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Fabric is at the heart of cultural production in African spaces. From birth, to initiations, to weddings, to funerals, fabric binds together communities, adorning families, and providing the basis for personal wealth. This course explores emerging research on the social history of textiles and clothing, with special reference to cases in Africa and comparative work in South Asia, the Middle East and Latin America. It seeks to integrate this work with ongoing debates in the field of science and technology studies on innovation, and technology transfer and appropriation. Through the lens of fabric, we will examine the meanings of diaspora, empire, modernity, postcolonialism and globalization for everyday people. Case material address the history behind fibers, dyes, weaving, and construction techniques, as well as issues of industrialization, intellectual property rights, sustainability, and global fashion. Course participants will also learn to “read” fabrics, clothing, and textile technologies for historical information through textile and clothing analysis exercises.


WGS 393 • Race And Gender: By Design-Wb

46205 • Lewis, Charlton
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Race/Science In Amer Lit-Wb

46210 • Pinto, Samantha
Meets T 11:00AM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as E 395M)
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Skin & Bones: Race, Gender, and the Scientific Imagination in 19C and Early 20C America

This course examines the rich and recent critical turns to the medical humanities & science studies in the fields of mid to late 19C and early 20C/modernist American literature. Scientific discourse figured prominently in the cultural imagination of this period that covers the rise & institutionalization of professional medicine, sexology, medical racism, eugenics, natural history, museum culture, anthropology, and expedition/exploration “fever.” We will look at recent critical material such Sari Altschuler’s The Medical Imagination, Deirdre Cooper Owens's Medical Bondage, Britt Rusert’s Fugitive Science, Andrea Stone's Black Well Being, and Kyla Schuller’s The Biopolitics of Feeling alongside texts like Willa Cather’s The Professor’s House, Pauline Hopkins’s Of One Blood, Maria Ruiz de Burton’s Who Would Have Thought It?, Zitkala-Sa's American Indian Stories, George Schuyler's Black No More, and Frank Norris’s McTeague. We will also examine autobiographical, scientific, visual, sound, and exhibition materials of the period, particularly those having to do with anthropological & medical study. 


WGS 393 • Sociol Of Sexual Violence

46215 • Gonzalez-Lopez, Gloria
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM JGB 2.202 • Hybrid/Blended
(also listed as SOC 395G)
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Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Surveillance: Art/Theory

46219 • Browne, Simone
Meets T 11:00AM-2:00PM • Hybrid/Blended
(also listed as AFR 387D)
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Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 441 • Root Of Soc/Econ Jstc-Gbr

46095 • Anderson, Barbara
GC
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Study Abroad (Maymester) with School of Social Work in Great Britain.



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  • Center for Women's & Gender Studies

    The University of Texas at Austin
    Burdine Hall 536
    2505 University Avenue, A4900
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-471-5765