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WGS 301 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

44705 • Rosas, Lilia
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GEA 127
CD SB (also listed as MAS 311, SOC 308D)
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COURSE DESCRIPTION

Among the many catalysts that centralized the narratives of Chicanas into the discourse the U.S. Southwest/Mexican Borderlands, the 1971 La Conferencia de Mujeres por la Raza in Houston inspired how Chicanas/Xicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, indigenous, Mexican American, and brown women defined themselves, asserted their roles and identities, and shared their stories. This course privileges the stories, struggles, contestations, imaginations, writings, and accomplishments of Chicanas in the United States in the mid-twentieth and early twentieth-first centuries. Through a close examination of literature, and attention to historical and theoretical materials, we will create a growing understanding of the significance of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, language, spirituality, and citizenship in affecting the daily lives and social worlds of Chicanas. By end of the semester, we will also gain a complex insight into the importance of how Chicana feminism, Xicanisma, intersectionality, migration, borders, and community are formative in the Chicana experience(s).

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will improve their analytical abilities through reading, writing, presenting, and discussing class materials and related literature. As a course within the curriculum of MALS, students will learn about the complexities of the experiences of Chicanas/Xicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, indigenous, Mexican American, and brown women. Ultimately, they will learn to think critically, and develop and defend original arguments, investigate topics within of the scope of Chicana Studies and they will be able to:

Course Goals:

1. Achieve a basic understanding of key concepts, theories, and methods in Chicana feminist thought(s).

2. Analyze a diverse range of texts that portray the experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas or Mexican American women.

3. Identify and discuss the significance of these diverse experiences, perspectives, and expressions that exist among Chicanas.

4. Use and prioritize the analytical lenses of gender and sexuality, along with race, ethnicity, class, religion, region, language, and so on, to understand the identity formations, subjectivities, and the multiple oppressions confronted by Chicanas or Mexican American women.


WGS 301 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

44700 • Rosas, Lilia
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GEA 127
CD SB (also listed as MAS 311, SOC 308D)
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Among the many catalysts that centralized the narratives of Chicanas into the discourse the U.S. Southwest/Mexican Borderlands, the 1971 La Conferencia de Mujeres por la Raza in Houston inspired how Chicanas/Xicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, indigenous, Mexican American, and brown women defined themselves, asserted their roles and identities, and shared their stories. This course privileges the stories, struggles, contestations, imaginations, writings, and accomplishments of Chicanas in the United States in the mid-twentieth and early twentieth-first centuries. Through a close examination of literature, and attention to historical and theoretical materials, we will create a growing understanding of the significance of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, language, spirituality, and citizenship in affecting the daily lives and social worlds of Chicanas. By end of the semester, we will also gain a complex insight into the importance of how Chicana feminism, Xicanisma, intersectionality, migration, borders, and community are formative in the Chicana experience(s).

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will improve their analytical abilities through reading, writing, presenting, and discussing class materials and related literature. As a course within the curriculum of MALS, students will learn about the complexities of the experiences of Chicanas/Xicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, indigenous, Mexican American, and brown women. Ultimately, they will learn to think critically, and develop and defend original arguments, investigate topics within of the scope of Chicana Studies and they will be able to:

Course Goals:

1. Achieve a basic understanding of key concepts, theories, and methods in Chicana feminist thought(s).

2. Analyze a diverse range of texts that portray the experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas or Mexican American women.

3. Identify and discuss the significance of these diverse experiences, perspectives, and expressions that exist among Chicanas.

4. Use and prioritize the analytical lenses of gender and sexuality, along with race, ethnicity, class, religion, region, language, and so on, to understand the identity formations, subjectivities, and the multiple oppressions confronted by Chicanas or Mexican American women.


WGS 301 • Gay & Lesbian Lit & Culture

44710 • Streusand, Deborah
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM RLP 0.122
CDWr (also listed as E 314V)
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E 314V  l  4-Gay and Lesbian Literature and Culture

 

Instructor:  Streusand, D

Unique #:  34460

Semester:  Fall 2019

Cross-lists: WS 301.12

 

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description: This section of E314V will focus on how queer writers use language to express and explore their unique identities.  Mindful of intersectionality, the multiplicity of queer identity, and the many ways writers have chosen to engage with their queerness, the texts chosen for the course represent a variety of identities and genres.  The research and writing you do in this course will help you gain a more complete understanding of the relationship between literature and queer identity today.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Joshua Whitehead, Full-Metal Indigiqueer;Benjamin Alire Sáenz, Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe; Maggie Nelson, The Argonauts; Rivers Solomon, An Unkindness of Ghosts.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays making up 75% of the final grade, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor. In-class presentations will make up 15% of the final grade, while reading responses will make up 10%.


WGS 301 • Intro Black Women's Studies

44714 • Wint, Traci-Ann
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GAR 0.132
CD (also listed as AFR 317D)
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Please check back for updates.


WGS 301 • Intro To Latinx Body Art

44695 • Gonzalez-Martin, Rachel
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 206
CD (also listed as MAS 319)
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Guided by the idea that the human body is a “mobile canvas” (Santos 2009), this course examines the social, emotional, economic, and commercial contexts influencing the production, display and circulation of Latinx body art. We will investigate how people tell personal stories to public audiences through their bodies.  Class topics include: Nail Art & Artists, Cholafied and the Arch of the Eyebrow, My Tía’s Gold Tacones, Latinx-Butch Style, Cholo-Goth Aesthetics, TransForming Latinx Bodies, and many more.  Students will be graded on weekly reading quizzes, personal style-journals, and a final project.


WGS 301 • Women, Gender, Lit, Culture

44720 • Streusand, Deborah
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM RLP 0.122
CDWr (also listed as E 314V)
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E 314V  l 6-Women, Gender, Literature, and Culture

 

Instructor:  Streusand, D

Unique #: 34465

Semester: Fall 2019

Cross-lists: WGS 301.27

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description: This course focuses on how women's writings reflect on and contribute to the cultural understanding of gender and of what it means to be a woman.  Gender is defined by culture, but gendered individuals also produce culture through literary creation.  How do women exercise their literary powers to reinterpret what gender and womanhood mean?  How do the intersections of gender, race, and sexuality shape these writings and their effects on culture?

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enufby Ntozake Shange; Ashby Malinda Lo; selected poems by Gwendolyn Brooks.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays making up 75% of the final grade, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the instructor. In-class presentations will make up 15% of the final grade, while reading responses will make up 10%.


WGS 303 • Introduction To Lgbtq Studies

44725 • Coleman Taylor, Ashley
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GDC 2.402
CDWr
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Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies.

DESCRIPTION:
Explores concepts of gender and sexuality, race, class, religion, and nation; as well as skills in theory, history, and research methods relevant to LGBTQ studies. The course will also survey the making of modern understandings of sexual and LGBTQ identities in the last one hundred years and the implications of this history for broader understandings of gender and sexuality.


WGS 305 • Intro To Women's & Gender Stds

44730 • Vasudevan, Pavithra
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 2.128
CD
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Women’s and Gender Studies is an interdisciplinary field that asks critical questions about the relationships between sex, gender, society, and our own experiences as political acts. In this course, students will come to understand key differences between sex, gender, and sexuality; define feminism both broadly and personally, particularly in relationship to race, class, and other intersectional aspects of identity; learn about queer and trans histories and experiences; explore women’s experiences in international contexts; and investigate the body and its representation as a way to uncover gender norms and expectations. We will also discuss and write about recent social controversies (such as bathroom legislation, bias incidents, the exclusion of groups from the Women’s March on Washington) as moments that reveal and critique the cultural codes of gender. An emphasis will be placed on self-identified women, LGBTQA+ individuals, and people of color.


WGS 313 • Child Development

44735 • Speranza, Hallie
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM FAC 21
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Same as Human Development and Family Sciences 313.

DESCRIPTION:
Motor, language, cognitive, social, and emotional development in the family context.

PREREQUISITE:
Credit or registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 113L (corresponding Lab for the course), and Psychology 301 with grade of at least C-.


WGS 322 • Population And Society

44740 • Cavanagh, Shannon
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM RLP 0.102
GC (also listed as SOC 369K)
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Description

Population studies or demography is an interdisciplinary field, encompassing the study of the size, distribution, and composition of human populations, and the processes of fertility, mortality, and migration through which populations’ change. These processes are closely connected to many of the pressing problems facing contemporary societies. For instance, the funding of health care in developed countries is a major issue because of declining fertility and population aging. Civil unrest in parts of Africa and the Middle East are, in part, a function of persistently high fertility rates. These processes are also important drivers of many contemporary environmental problems. Finally, a grasp of population processes is important for a deeper understanding of the population explosion in urban areas and the higher transmission and impact of AIDS in the developing world. 

This course provides an overview of the field of population studies. A sociological approach is emphasized, but economic, geographic, anthropological, and biological perspectives will also be used. Attention will be given to a) the demographic concepts needed to objectively evaluate population issues and b) the substantive content of the population issues. Emphasis will be given to evaluating the evidence regarding debates on population topics. 

Reading Materials 

Required text: Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues, 10th edition, John R. Weeks. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co. ISBN-10: 0495096377 

On-line Readings: There are a number of short reading assignments, marked with an [EL]. These readings can be found in External Links section of the class Blackboard site and should be read prior to class period. 

Grading and Requirement:

You are expected to complete all readings for the day's class before coming to class. Read as actively as possible. Class time will be an opportunity to discuss and further explore the readings, so it is essential that everyone comes prepared to participate. Our class periods will be more productive and enjoyable when we all begin with the same materials. 

There will be TWO examinations during the semester, each worth 20% of your final grade. The exams will draw from both readings and class discussions. The exams are not cumulative. Each will include multiple choice and short answer questions. Make-up examinations will not be administered except in extreme circumstances and only if I am notified beforehand. All make-up examinations are 100% essay. 

You must also complete TWO assignments and ONE short paper during the semester. The assignments—on mortality and fertility—are designed to familiarize you with demographic data on the web, give you an overview of your country of choice, and help you identify your country’s population angle that most interests you and that you will explore in more detail in the short paper. Each assignment is worth 15% of your final grade. The short paper is worth 25% of your grade. 

The final 5% of your grade is based on attendance/class participation. I expect you to show up and engage (i.e., not text, sleep, or read the newspaper) with classmates, the TA, and me in the class.


WGS 322 • Race/Gender/Surveillance

44755 • Browne, Simone
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLP 0.130
CDE (also listed as AFR 372C, AMS 321, SOC 322V)
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Drawing from social science readings, science fiction (Gattaca, THX-1138, Ex-Machina, Grounded), documentaries, and popular media (24South Park, Orange is the New Black, The Bachelor, Cheaters), this course introduces students to the emerging field of Surveillance Studies.

We examine: slavery, reality TV, sports, Google, trolling + social media, borders, airports, biometric technology, whistleblowers, drones, wearables + fashion, among other topics.


WGS 322 • Sociology Of Race And Work

44750 • Bhalodia, Aarti
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CMA 5.190
CD (also listed as AAS 330, SOC 321R)
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Course Description

Work is a central activity in the lives of most people. Along with providing an income, the type of work one does shapes the worker’s sense of personal identity. Social interaction in the work place provides workers with a set of skills, values, and mindset that influences how the work is done. Structure of a society determines the kind of work it does, who does what type of work, and how much people are paid for their efforts. In the United States, individuals’ racial and gender characteristics deeply shape how labor markets emerge and how skills are evaluated. Jobs are often gender segregated and men and women are remunerated differently. This course is a critical examination of work through a gendered and racial lens. The purpose of this course is to examine concepts such as labor markets, globalization, racial segregation, and gendering of the work place. This course is cross-listed with Asian American Studies and Women’s Studies. This course carries the Cultural Diversity in the United States flag. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.

Course Objectives

Students will be able to sociologically identify concepts such as global markets, transnational labor, care work, service industry, gendered work, and racial segregation in the work place. A majority of the readings, films, and class meetings will focus on contemporary work environment. Students will examine workers in the retail industry, care workers such as nannies, maids, and nurses, transnational workers in the STEM fields, and migrant labor. We will start the class with a survey of different forms of labor throughout the United States’ history. Students will be able to make historical connections between American citizenship, work, and value of one’s labor.


WGS 323C • Primate Social Behavior

44759 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.172
(also listed as ANT 346L)
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COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVE:

This course focuses on the study of primate behavior and why primates do what they do. It is essentially a course on animal behavior with a focus on primates. Thus, this class will explore the basic theoretical principles that guide primatologists and other zoologists. As we examine some of the models used to explain primate behavior, we will explore the behavior of the four radiations of primates in detail. The objective of this course is for students to understand the major theoretical concepts of primate behavior.

COURSE FORMAT AND REQUIREMENTS:

Prerequisite: ANT 301

This class will generally follow a lecture format. There will be projects assigned for outside of the classroom to be “presented” either on Canvas or in the classroom. Project assignments presented/posted after the deadline will not be accepted. Discussion will be encouraged during lectures and we will be discussing the outside projects in class. It is difficult to participate if you are not present in class and so attendance is highly recommended. Plus, the majority (but not all) of the test questions will come from lectures.


WGS 324 • Gender & The News

44760 • Bock, Mary
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CMA 3.120
CD (also listed as J 348D, J 395, WGS 393)
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Description:

This course explores the relationship between gender, journalism, and culture, both historically and currently. It examines the role of the news media in reinforcing and/or challenging prevailing stereotypes and attitudes about gender. The course will focus on producers of journalism and as subjects of media portrayals. We will place those topics in broader perspective by delving a bit into gender theory, popular culture, and political communication. Together we will contend with the ways gender matters in news today—a question that invites many kinds of answers.


WGS 324 • Latina Feminisms And Media

44758 • Beltran, Mary
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GEA 114
CD (also listed as MAS 374, RTF 359S)
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Course Description

This upper-division undergraduate course is designed to shed light on Latina lives, on how Latinas have been represented in the U.S. entertainment media, and have countered those images and narratives through work as producers of films, television, and other media. Using a framework of analysis that combines media studies, Latina/o studies, and gender and women’s studies, we will begin with a focus on historical and contemporary issues that Chicanas and other U.S. Latinas have faced and on Latina activism and feminisms. In the last half of the semester we will study and explore Latina representation in U.S. mediated popular culture and strategies of resistance enacted through Latina film and media production. Weekly screenings that showcase the work of Latina screenwriters, filmmakers, and media producers and other notable work with respect to Latina representation also will be central to our discussions.

 

 


WGS 335 • African Queer Studies

44770 • Wint, Traci-Ann
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 0.122
GC (also listed as AFR 372G)
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Description:

This course explores queer gender and sexuality in Africa, with particular focus on theoretical issues, the colonial encounter, citizenship and activism, media representations. In the first unit, we will examine some of the theoretical issues that are relevant to studying queer gender and sexuality in Africa and in the African Diaspora more broadly. In the second unit, we will explore some of the literature on the impact of colonialism on queer African identities and practices, and we will pay particular attention to its lasting impact on queer African lives in our post-colonial moment. In the third unity, we will read several ethnographic and literary texts on specific communities in order to expand our understanding of the diverse ways in which queer Africans create identities, experience desire, and redefine dominant notions of citizenships. In the final unit of the course, we will examine representations of queer African sexuality in literature, film, and media, focusing especially on representation in relation to recent events in South Africa, Uganda, Malawi, and Senegal. We will pay particular attention to how such representations are shaped by political economy and influenced by the international community.

 

Texts:

Queer African Reader Sokari Ekine and Hakima Abbas eds.

African Sexualities: A reader Sylvia Tamale ed.

Heterosexual Africa?: The History of an Idea from the Age of Exploration to the Age of AIDS Marc Epprecht

OUT in Africa: LGBT Organizing in Namibia and South Africa Ashley Currier

Allah Made Us: Sexual Outlaws in an Islamic African City Rudolf P. Gaudio

Black Bull, Ancestors, and Me: My life as a Lesbian Sangoma Nkunzi Zandile Nkadinde


WGS 335 • Confronting Lgbtq Oppression

44765 • Nguyen, Quynh
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM SZB 432
CD (also listed as S W 360K)
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Course Description

★ Welcome! I am glad you are here.

★ This fall course is the first half of the Peers for Pride Program and prepares students to become peer facilitators of performance-based workshops designed to address macro and micro constructs of LGBTQIA+ justice, racial justice, and multiculturalism, specifically within in the context of power, privilege, and identity. Topics will include, but not limited to race, class, ability, gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation.

★ This semester we build a foundational knowledge of LGBTQA+ identities, the intersectional systems of oppression that affect LGBTQA+ people, and approaches to our core question: “What do thriving LGBTQA+/queer communities look like?”

★ We are also working together to establish our practice of theatre for dialogue, a form of applied theatre in preparation for your facilitation in the spring. This semester you will establish your relationship with each other as an ensemble, you will reflect on your role in collaborative facilitation, and you will work together to propose activating and message scenes to engage audiences in the spring in conversation around LGBTQA+ justice.

★ Along the way, you will put your work in relationship with student and community organizers also doing this work.

★ This semester, you will build skills in intersectional analysis of texts, events, and daily life; ensemble performance work; community alliances; and critical reflection in writing, speaking, and performance.

Things to Keep in Mind

● This is a place for self-development and critical thinking

● Discomfort and dissonance should be expected through the learning process or journey

● This program is grounded in various aspect of critical theory, specifically Dr. Kimbrele Crenshaw’s theory of intersectionality


WGS 335 • Intro To Gender And Sexuality

44763 • Kreischer, Amber
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 112
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 335 • Queering Architectural Taste

44764 • Miller, Adam
Meets F 9:30AM-12:30PM SUT 3.112
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 335C • Queer Media Studies

44774 • Nault, Curran
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CMA 6.170
CDWr (also listed as RTF 359S)
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This course immerses students in the critical and theoretical analysis of queer media in order to explore dominant strategies used by the media industries, as well as those utilized by LGBTQI independents and subcultures. Important to this project are historical shifts in representation, including the mainstreaming of queerness, and the alternative media reception, production and exhibition practices developed by LGBTQI communities. Marginalized queer identities (including qpoc and transgender) will be centralized and the intersections of queer identities, queer politics and media culture will be engaged.

 


WGS 340 • Africana Women's Art

44820 • Okediji, Moyosore
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM DFA 2.204
CD VP (also listed as AFR 374F)
show description

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WGS 340 • Bad Lang: Race/Class/Gender

44850 • Garza, Thomas
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM BUR 212
GC (also listed as C L 323, MAS 363R, REE 325)
show description

Maledicta: (Latin. n., pl. maledictum, sg.), curse words, insults; profane language of all kinds.

When is a word “bad”? Why can one person use a “bad” word with impunity, and another cannot? What marks such usage as acceptable or not?  How do race, socioeconomic class, and gender play into the use of “bad” language in the US? This course undertakes the examination of modern usage of language that has been designated as “bad” through social convention. Usage of forms of obscenities and profanity in popular usage will be examined in an attempt to come to an understanding of how the products of US popular culture portray maledicta in situational contexts. Through an examination of various texts culled from print, film, and music, participants will study the context and use of “bad” language and attempt to determine the underlying principles that dictate its affect and determine its impact on the audience. Though the majority of texts and usage will be taken from English-language sources, several non-English examples of maledicta from Mexican Spanish and Russian will also be examined for contrast and comparison.

 

NB: This course examines texts that contain usage of obscenities, profanity, and offensive language. Students who do not wish to be exposed to such language in use should not sign up for this course.

 

Texts:

• Bad Language: Are Some Words Better than Others? Edwin Battistella. Oxford UP, 2007.

• Expletive Deleted: A Good Look at Bad LanguageRuth Wajnryb. Free press, 2005.

• Course packet


WGS 340 • Contemp Afr Amer Women Fic

44800 • Byrnes, Delia
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 302
CDWr (also listed as AFR 372E, E 376M)
show description

E 376M l 7-Contemporary African American Women’s Fiction

 

Instructor:  Byrnes, D

Unique #:  35205

Semester:  Fall 2019

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E.15, WGS 340.29

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: In this course, we will examine the novels, films, and art of women of African descent produced from the 1980s to the present.  We will focus on how African and African Diasporic women writers, filmmakers, and artists reimagine the past, present, and future.  We will strengthen our understanding of these texts through discussions of history, contemporary political and social life, and a range of theoretical approaches, including cultural studies, feminist theory, and critical race studies.

 

Tentative Texts: Belovedby Toni Morrison; Parable of the Sowerby Octavia Butler; Sing, Unburied, Singby Jesmyn Ward; Lemonadeby Beyoncé.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Blog Posts (10%);Three 2-pg Essays (15%); 5-pg Dialogue Essay (15%); 8-10-pg Research Paper, including Draft (30%); Final Presentation (10%); Attendance and Participation (20%).


WGS 340 • Contemp African Pop Culture

44825 • Livermon, Xavier
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JGB 2.218
GC (also listed as AFR 340)
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 340 • Foundations Of Social Justice

44775 • Rountree, Michele
Meets MW 9:30AM-11:00AM SSW 2.118
CD
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 340 • Freedom Summer

44780 • Burrowes, Nicole
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BIO 301
CD (also listed as AFR 374D)
show description

Course Description:

This course examines one of the most radical moments in civil rights history—the 1964 Mississippi Project. Widely known as “Freedom Summer,” this civil rights campaign organized a multi-faceted program that challenged white supremacy in one of the nation’s most racially oppressive and violent states through the development of Freedom Schools, voter registration drives, and an alternative political party called the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Even more, Freedom Summer called on Black women and men from the community, many of whom were poor and disenfranchised, to lead their own movement.

It was during the Freedom Summer campaign that activists debated the merits of non-violence vs. self-defense; the limits of charismatic male leadership; and the role of white allies in the struggle for Black freedom. In the face of extraordinary violence and economic deprivation, Black Mississippians waged one of the most powerful, yet understudied, movements in civil rights history, and they modeled the maxim that “ordinary people can accomplish extraordinary things.”

Using scholarly texts, primary sources, film and music, students will explore the 1964 Freedom Summer Project in order to understand diverse struggles, leadership styles, and competing interpretations of what it means to be free. Borrowing directly from the original Freedom School curriculum, students will contemplate the “myths of society” as well as theoretical and conceptual frameworks necessary for the creation of a just society. This course also seeks to draw connections through a roaming classroom format in which we will gather at various sites in our surrounding community on occasion.

 

Readings:

  • Faith S. Holsaert, ed., Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC(Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2012);
  • Payne, Charles M. I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle. Moody, Anne. Coming of Age in Mississippi. 
  • McGuire, Danielle L. At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance: A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power. 
  • Hale, John. The Freedom Schools: Student Activists in the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement. 
  • Umoja, Akinyele Omowale We Will Shoot Back: Armed Resistance in the Mississippi Freedom Movement. 
  • Ransby, Barbara. Ella Baker & the Black Freedom Movement: A Radical Democratic Vision. 
  • Dittmer, John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. 
  • Cobb, Charles. This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed. 
  • Hamlin, Françoise. Crossroads At Clarksdale: The Black Freedom Struggle in the Mississippi Delta after World War II.
  • Barbara Ransby, Making All Black Lives Matter

WGS 340 • Gender Pol In Islamic World

44817 • Charrad, Mounira
Meets MW 5:00PM-6:30PM SAC 5.118
GCWr (also listed as ISL 373, MES 341, R S 358, SOC 336G)
show description

Description:

The course is devoted to the study of gender politics in the Islamic world. It is designed to help students gain a better knowledge of the Islamic world and, at the same time, increase their understanding of major sociological concepts such as gender, social organization, culture, and politics. It shows how culture is mediated by politics, resulting in diverse interpretations of the cultural tradition and in different policies with respect to gender. We start by examining the themes and issues that are part of the common denominator of the Islamic tradition.  We then consider how the diversity can be explained. The focus is on women’s rights, which have been a key political issue in several countries and internationally. We also discuss current events and the Arab Spring.

Texts:  TBA

Grading and Requirements:

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

 

The course will include a combination of short papers and one research paper on a relevant topic of the student’s choice.

 


WGS 340 • Graf/Pstr Art: Islam World

44845 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 308
GC (also listed as ANT 324L, ISL 373, MES 342, R S 358)
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 340 • Historcl Images Afr In Film

44815 • Falola, Oloruntoyin
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM GAR 0.120
Wr (also listed as AFR 374F, HIS 350L)
show description

    Since the late 1980s, the African film industry has undergone radical changes that reflect an increasingly globalized economy and the impact of structural adjustment policies. This revolution is characterized by the low-budget, direct to video films commonly referred to as Nollywood.  While these films have come under criticism for their low production values and popularization of negative cultural stereotypes, the Nigerian video industry has risen to colossal proportions, sweeping across the continent and throughout the global diaspora.  The purpose of this course is to examine the rise of Nollywood and the genesis of a popular African art form.  Through a combination of films and readings, students will explore how Nollywood, in comparison with the established FESPACO film industry and Hollywood, depicts the society and culture of Nigeria, and Africa as a whole.  Additionally, this course seeks to engage students in a debate about how popular films affect historical imaginations and memory.  While these images have previously been the product of Hollywood and Francophone films, this course will introduce Nollywood as an alternative to how Nigerians and Africa as a whole understand their history.  

Texts:
Haynes, Jonathan, ed. Nigerian Video Films. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2000.

Rosenstone, Robert A. Visions of the Past: The Challenge of Film to Our Idea of History.
Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1995.

Saul, Mahir and Ralph A. Austen, eds. Viewing African Cinema in the Twenty-First Century:
Art Films and the Nollywood Video Revolution. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2010.

*There will also be several journal articles assigned throughout the semester.  These will be available through the university library’s online databases and posted to the course documents section of the class Blackboard page.
ASSSIGNMENTS:
Assignment                 Due                            Points
Attendance                 Every class session    50
Book/Film Review      Week 6                100
Conference Report     Week 10                50
Final Paper                 Week 15                200
Discussion Posts      See syllabus for deadlines    100


WGS 340 • Holocaust Aftereffects

44844 • Bos, Pascale
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 337
GC (also listed as C L 323, GSD 360, J S 365)
show description

Description: The events of the Holocaust changed Western culture in fundamental ways. Not only was a great part of Jewish culture in Europe destroyed, the circumstances of the Nazi genocide as a modern, highly rationalized, efficient form of mass murder which took place in the heart of civilized Europe changed the conception of the progress of modernity and the Enlightenment in fundamental ways. This course explores the historical, political, psychological, theological, and cultural fall-out, as well as literary and cinematic responses in Europe and the U.S. to these events as they first became known, and as one moved further away from it in time and came to understand its pronounced and often problematic after effects. Central to our inquiry is the realization that the events of the Holocaust have left indelible traces in European and U.S. culture and culture production, of which a closer look (first decade by decade, then moving on to a number of themes and questions), reveals profound insights into current day culture, politics, and society.

Required Texts: Levi and Rothberg, The Holocaust: Theoretical Readings; Art Spiegelman, Maus I ⅈ Ruth Klüger, Still Alive: a Girlhood Remembered; Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz; Elie Wiesel, Night; Additional course packet Films: Nuit et Brouillard; Holocaust (excerpts); Shoah (excerpts); Schindler's List (excerpt)

Grading Policy: Attendance/participation 15% Response papers (2) 10% Class presentation 10% Presentation paper 15% Midterm exam 20% Final research paper 30% (proposal, bibliography, outline + 1st, 5% each, paper: 15%)


WGS 340 • Intro To African Art

44784 • Okediji, Moyosore
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM DFA 2.204
CDGC (also listed as AFR 374F)
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 340 • Queer Ethnographies

44840 • Merabet, Sofian
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.118
Wr (also listed as ANT 324L)
show description

This upper-level undergraduate writing course deals with the anthropological analysis of queer gender and sexuality. Its aim is to critically evaluate formative concepts and theories that have been subject to recent debates within Anthropology, Gender Studies, and Queer Theory. Through the reading of a variety of ethnographies from Asia and the Americas, we will partly explore how terms like “women” and “men,” “femininity” and “masculinity,” as well as “homosexuality,” “heterosexuality,” “bisexuality,” and “transsexuality” structure people’s experiences, but also how local terminologies inform sexual identity formations around the globe. In this vein, the course focuses on local-level social and cultural processes that challenge a wide range of heteronormativities within a regional and global framework. The basic theme of the material for this course concerns the extent to which both realities and the ways in which they are perceived are socio-cultural constructs that are subject to constant change. This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the session and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to go to the University Writing Center, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work. Because students fulfill three hours of their Core Communication requirement with a Writing Flag course, courses flagged for writing address the following new “core objectives”: Critical Thinking Skills: to include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information. Communication Skills: to include effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication. Teamwork: to include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal. Personal Responsibility: to include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making


WGS 340 • Reproductive Justice & Race

44789 • Rudrappa, Sharmila
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM RLP 0.122
CDEWr (also listed as AAS 330, SOC 321K)
show description

Description:

Since the Cairo Conference on Population and Development in 1994 state policies concerning women’s health around the world have taken a turn away from population control to reproductive health. Within this context, activists and scholars alike have turned their attention to reproductive justice that envisions the complete physical and mental well-being of women and girls, which can potentially be achieved when they have the economic, social, and political power and resources to make healthy decisions about their bodies, sexuality, and reproduction. In this class we ask: how do various social movements define reproductive justice? How is access to reproductive rights stratified by race and class? Through drawing students’ attention to specific case studies, this course illuminates on the specific challenges faced by women of color in the U.S., as well as women in developing countries across the world. Topics we will cover are forcible sterilization, access (or lack of access) to birth control, population control policies, prenatal and postnatal care, maternal and infant health outcomes in various parts of the world, sex selective abortions, new reproductive technologies, and stratified reproduction. As part of the final part of the course the students will think through the reproductive health issues facing women of color on campus, through conducting a survey. 


WGS 340 • Sexuality/Gender In Latin Amer

44790 • Zazueta, Maria
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SRH 1.320
GC (also listed as HIS 363K, LAS 366)
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 340 • South Asian Migration To US

44810 • Bhalodia, Aarti
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CMA 3.114
CDGC HI (also listed as AAS 325, ANS 372, HIS 365G)
show description

Course Description

This course examines the South Asian diaspora in the United States. We will cover migration of people from India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh to United States and other parts of the world. While studying the history and culture of South Asian America, we will discuss globalization, transnationalism, migration, assimilation, formation of a diaspora, discrimination, and gender and sexuality, all major themes in Asian American Studies. The course is arranged chronologically and thematically. We will start in the nineteenth century following the journey of the first South Asian migrants to the U.S. We will then move on to studying the formation of Bengali-African, Punjabi-Mexican and other multiracial communities. We will study how American immigration laws have facilitated or inhibited South Asian migration to the U.S. in the twentieth century. Topics covered include economic and social reasons for migration, adaptation to American life, cultural and religious assimilation, changing family structures, and discrimination and exclusion. We will end the semester by discussing South Asian American life in the twenty-first century.

This course carries the Cultural Diversity in the United States flag. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present. http://www.utexas.edu/ugs/ccc/teaching-resources/syllabus

Course Objectives

Through the semester we will study more than a century of South Asian American history. A primary goal of this course is to highlight the diversity within South Asian America. We will encounter a diaspora whose members belong to different religious, linguistic, economic and social groups. Many came to the United States forcibly to seek economic opportunities lacking at 2 home. Others came enthusiastically with dreams of making it “big” in the land of abundant opportunities. We will also examine South Asian American interactions with other Americans in the fields of social activism and community development.

You are encouraged to participate in South Asian American life in Austin. I will bring to your attention relevant films, lectures, art, music, and dance performances. Our class meetings will be a blend of lectures and discussions.


WGS 340 • Transnatl Latinx Pop Culture

44794 • Enriquez, Mirasol
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ B0.302
CD (also listed as LAS 328, MAS 374)
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 340 • Veiling In The Muslim World

44795 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 203
GC (also listed as ANS 372, ISL 372, R S 358)
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 340 • Women And Gender In China

44799 • Li, Huaiyin
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM GAR 1.122
GCWr (also listed as HIS 350L)
show description

This course examines women and gender in China from imperial times to the present.  Major themes include the changing conceptions of masculinity and femininity in Chinese cultural and religious contexts; gender roles and inequalities in the patriarchal family and society; the varying discourse on women and gender in the modern period; women’s dilemma in the Chinese Revolution; new challenges to women and new conceptions of gender and sexuality during the reform era since the 1980s.  There is no prerequisite for attending this course, but some background in Chinese history is recommended.
Robin Wang, Images of Women in Chinese Thought and Culture (Hackett Publishing Company, 2003)
Patricia Ebrey, The Inner Quarters: Marriage and the Lives of Chinese Women in the Sung Period. (University of California Press, 1993)
Zheng Wang, Women in the Chinese Enlightenment: Oral and Textual Histories (University of California Press, 1999)
Leslie Chang, Factory Girls: From Village to City in a Changing China (Spiegel & Grau, 2009)
Emily Honig and Gail Hershatter. Personal Voices: Chinese Women in the 1980's. (Stanford University Press,1988)
Xueping Zhong, Some of Us: Chinese Women Growing up in the Mao Era. (Rutgers University Press, 2001)
1) Class participation (20%)
2) Mid-term and final examination (15% each, 30% total)
3) Research paper (40%)
4) Attendance (10%)


WGS 340 • Writing Slavery

44805 • Woodard, Helena
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 204
CDWr (also listed as AFR 374F, E 376M)
show description

E 376M  l  3-Writing Slavery

 

Instructor:  Woodard, H

Unique #:  35215

Semester:  Fall 2019

Cross-lists:  AFR 374F.6; WGS 340.31

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: This course proposes two primary objectives rooted in past and present literary representations of slavery. Thematizing “the trope of the talking book,” (Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s The Signifying Monkey), the course first examines seminal slave narratives, e.g. the literature of the enslaved as discursive strategies, from self-actualization and resistance to early formations of a black literary discourse.  The course then explores how slavery is (re)written, controversially in a presentist context by contemporary authors, particularly in historical fiction or neo-slave narratives that seek to restore agency and reclaim subjectivity for enslaved individuals.  Ultimately, the course engages larger issues about the different venues that writings about slavery offer for academic disciplines, literary instruction and/or pedagogy.

 

Required Readings (subject to change):  Elizabeth Alexander, The Venus Hottentot: Poems; Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother; Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Classic Slave Narratives; Charles Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition;Suzan-Lori Parks, The America Play and Other Works; Marlene Nourbise Philip, Zong!; Fred D’Aguiar, Feeding the Ghosts; Edward P. Jones, The Known World; Course Pak (Speedway on Dobie).

 

Requirements & Grading: .75: Three critical essays (25% each; 4-5 pages per essay, typed, double spaced) and one major rewrite of essay I or II (includes peer evaluation; see revision instruction handout); .15: Response papers based on course reading (1-2 pages), reading quizzes, class participation; .10: Oral group presentations, accompanied by one-page written report.

 

Attendance: Regular attendance is required.  More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course.  The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies.  If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class.  You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

 

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

 

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade.  This is a writing-intensive course.  No final exam is given.


WGS 345 • American Dilemmas

44885 • Green, Penny
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM RLP 1.108
CDEWr (also listed as SOC 336C, URB 354)
show description

Description:  

This course examines critical American social problems that threaten the very fabric of our collective life as a nation.  These include problems in the economy and political system, social class and income inequality, racial/ethnic inequality, gender inequality and heterosexism, problems in education, and problems of illness and health care.  The course has three main objectives.  One involves providing students with the theoretical and methodological tools needed to critically analyze these problems from a sociological perspective.  A second involves providing students with current data and other information documenting the seriousness of these problems.  The final objective focuses on evaluating social policies addressing these problems (e.g., welfare-to-work programs, pay equity legislation), with special reference to questions of social justice, the common good, as well as public and individual responsibility.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, with a strong emphasis upon the latter. 

Required Readings: 

A packet of readings to be purchased from Austin Text Books at 2116 Guadalupe (i.e., the Drag)

Additional readings will be made available on Blackboard

Attendance Policy:

Regular attendance and punctuality are expected.  You’re allowed three absences without penalty during the semester (excluding our introductory class meeting).  The nonpenalized absences are intended to cover such situations as illness, family emergencies, university sponsored trips, etc.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming advance, written notification is given.

Tentative Grading Policy:

Four Short Papers (2-3 pages)            65%

Class Participation                              20%

Pop Quizzes                                        15%

 


WGS 345 • Sociology Of Education

44880 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM JES A203A
Wr (also listed as AFR 321L, SOC 321L)
show description

This course examines education from a sociological perspective. We will use various theories to explore the institution of education, going beyond our own individual experiences with education. Specific topics include public education; stratification within and between schools; and educational reform. The primary focus will be K-12 education in the United States.


WGS 345 • Socl Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen

44870 • Hoberman, John
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GEA 114
GCWr (also listed as EUS 347, GSD 341D)
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 345 • The Family

44865 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLP 0.128
(also listed as SOC 323)
show description

Description

This course analyzes the family as a social institution, using the sociological perspective. 

Studying the family can be tricky in that we all have our own experiences being part of families.  It is important, then, to go beyond our own experiences to explore both the private aspects of the family as well as public aspects of the family using various kinds of empirical data.  Shifting definitions of the family are the context for a brief history of the family.  Throughout the course we will explore family change. Specific topics will include dating, “hooking up” and marriage; parents and children; cohabitation, divorce and stepfamilies; and how the family intersects with, is shaped by, and shapes other social institutions, with particular attention to the economy and the world of work as well as state and social policies.

 Grading Policy

Students will be evaluated via short papers, in-class short answer and essay examinations, a group project, and class participation. 

 Texts: (subject to change)

Bogle, Kathleen.  2008.  Hooking Up: Sex, Dating and Relationships on Campus.  NYU Press.       

Coontz, Stephanie.  2006.  Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage. New York: Penguin.                

Ferguson, Susan J. (ed.).  2010.  Shifting the Center: Understanding Contemporary Families, Fourth Edition.  Boston: McGraw-Hill. 

Lareau, Annette.   2011. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life, Second Edition with an Update a Decade Later.  Berkeley: University of California Press.

Stone, Pamela.  2007. Opting Out? Why Women Really Quit Careers and Head Home. Berkeley: University of California Press.


WGS 345 • Thtr Dialog:expl Intprsnl Viol

44859 • Coleman, Shavonne
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM WIN 1.164
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 345 • Thtr Studies: Young Audiences

44860 • Hartmann, Jennifer
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WIN 1.108
Wr
show description

Please check back for updates.


WGS 356 • Intro To Feminist Rsch Methods

44895 • Kafer, Alison
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 0.132
EIIWr
show description

Introduction to feminist research methods across a range of traditional disciplines. Designed to prepare students to analyze research within gender studies and to develop their own research skills.


WGS 379L • Internship In Wgs

44905
show description

Experience working in the community or for a nonprofit agency.

Prerequisite: At least twelve semester hours of coursework in women's and gender studies and written consent of the supervising faculty member; consent forms are available in the Center for Women's and Gender Studies.

More Information at: https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/cwgs/courses/internships.php


WGS 391 • Feminist Theories

44910 • Gonzalez-Lopez, Gloria
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM RLP 0.108
show description

Restricted to students in the WGS MA Program.  This course introduces students to feminist theory as it intersects with race, nation, and sexuality. Since this is an introductory course, we will not explore feminist theory in all its incarnations. Rather than charting the historical development of a single body of knowledge called feminism, the class will read contemporary work by women that deals with questions of representation, reproduction, labor, transnationalism, and colonialism. Each week we will unpack one primary text with the intent of understanding the circumstances of its production, its significance, and how it can help us think about our own work.


WGS 393 • Black Women's Intellectual His

44915 • Farmer, Ashley
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM GAR 1.122
(also listed as AFR 381, HIS 392)
show description

This goal of this course is to explore the historiography of black women’s thought from Early America to the present day. Throughout the course, we will trace the ideological continuities and disjunctures in the texts black women across the African Diaspora have produced. We will also engage with a range of scholars in order to address how historians have approached the intersections of women, gender, sexuality and black thought.

Sample Texts:
Mia Bay, Farah J. Griffin, Martha Jones, Barbara Savage, Toward an Intellectual History of Black Women
Ashley Farmer, Remaking Black Power: How Black Women Transformed an Era
Brittney Coper, Beyond Respectability: The Intellectual Thought of Race Women
Beverly Guy-Sheftall ed. Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought
C. Riley Norton, Black on Both Sides: A Racial History of Trans Identity
Marisa Fuentes, Dispossessed Lives: Enslaved Women, Violence, and the Archive
Stephanie Y. Evans, Black Women in the Ivory Tower, 1850-1954: An Intellectual History
Vincent Carrretta, Phillis Wheatley: Biography of a Genius in Bondage 

Grading:
Discussion Leadership: 15%

Reading Notes: 12 %

Class Participation: 13%

4 Reading Skills Essays: 60 %


WGS 393 • Equity Diversity Higher Edu

44919 • Garces, Liliana
Meets T 1:00PM-4:00PM SZB 364
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Gender & The News

44920 • Bock, Mary
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CMA 3.120
(also listed as J 348D, J 395, WGS 324)
show description

Description:

This course explores the relationship between gender, journalism, and culture, both historically and currently. It examines the role of the news media in reinforcing and/or challenging prevailing stereotypes and attitudes about gender. The course will focus on producers of journalism and as subjects of media portrayals. We will place those topics in broader perspective by delving a bit into gender theory, popular culture, and political communication. Together we will contend with the ways gender matters in news today—a question that invites many kinds of answers.


WGS 393 • Gender, Health, And Society

44935 • Angel, Jacqueline
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 3.124
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Modernisms And Modernity

44944 • Wilkinson, Lynn
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 232
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Poetics/Politics Of Violence

44945 • Dominguez-Ruvalcaba, Hector
Meets W 5:00PM-8:00PM BEN 1.106
(also listed as ILA 387, LAS 381)
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The objective of this seminar is to study the most important aesthetic currents in Latin America that have focused on the representation of different forms of violence, from the second half of twentieth century to the beginning of twenty-first century. In turn, the seminar will analyze various intellectual and political debates regarding violence on the continent. Questions related to the relationship between politics and cultural production, political violence and the Cold War, neoliberal politics and criminal organizations, gender and sexuality violence, patriarchal institutions, and the politics of the body will be proposed as subjects of enquiry. It is relevant for this course to define the paradigms through which Spanish American creators and intellectuals interpret violence in the context of cold war and neoliberal economy and its implicit forms of oppression, people's control, and cultural expressions. That is, our main point of inquiry is how the different expressions of violence have been determinant in the articulation of various aesthetic expression forms: testimonio, crónica, performance, hip hop, soap operas, narco-series, etcetera. The topics this seminar will address are: Colombia's literatura de la violencia, dirty war in the Southern Cone, Central American guerrillas, 1968 and the political violence in Mexico, racial conflicts in indigenous and afro-descendant populations, narco-culture, and homophobic and misogynist violence.

Grade criteria:

Oral presentations 20%

Class participation 20%

Annotated bibliography 10 %

First draft of term paper 10%

Term paper 40%

Biobliography:

Benavides, Hugo.  Drugs, Thugs and Divas. Telenovelas and Narcodramas in Latin America.  Austin: The University of Texas Press, 2008.

Benjamin, Walter.  Para una crítica de la violencia. Mexico City: Premiá, 1982.

Coronil, Fernando, Julie Skurskied, ed.  States of Violence.  Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2006.

Franco, Jean.  Una modernidad cruel. México: Fondo de Cultura Económica, 2016.

González Rodríguez, Sergio.  Huesos en el desierto.  Barcelona: Anagrama, 2002.

Lemebel, Pedro.  Tengo miedo torero.Santiago: Seix Barral, 2001.

Montemayor, Carlos.  Guerra en el paraíso. México: Diana, 1991.

Parra, Eduardo Antonio.  Nostalgia de la sombra. Mexico City: Joaquín Mortiz, 2002.

Pécaut, Daniel.  Las FARC ¿Una guerrilla sin fin o sin fines?Bogotá: Norma, 2008.

Pía Lara, María.  Narrar el mal. Una teoría postmetafísica del juicio reflexionante.  México: Gedisa, 2009.

Ramírez, Sergio.  Adiós muchachos. Una memoria de la revolución sandinista.  Madrid: Alfaguara, 2007 (1999).

Rotker, Susana, ed.Ciudadanías del miedo.Caracas: Nueva Sociedad, 200,185-201.

Schultze-Kraft, Peter, ed.  La horrible noche. Relatos de violencia y guerra en Colombia.  Bogotá: Planeta, 2001.

Segato, Rita Laura.  "Qué es un feminicidio. Notas para un debate emergente." Brasilia: n/ed, 2006.

Thayer, Willy.  El fragmento repetido. Escritos en estado de excepción.  Santiago:  Ediciones Metales Pesados, 2006.

Uribe, María Victoria.  "Reflexiones sobre estética y violencia en Colombia."  Estética y violencia: necropolítica, militarización y vidas lloradas.  Helena Chávez Mac Gregor, ed.  México: UNAM, 2012.

Valencia, Sayak.  Capitalismo Gore. Tenerife: Melusina, 2010.

Films:

Boogie. Dir. Gustavo Cova. 2009.

Canoa.Dir. Felipe Cazals. 1976.

El sicario. Room 164.Dir. Gianfranco Rossi, 2011.

Garage Olimpo. Dir. MarcoBechis, 1999.

La teta asustada. Dir. Claudia Llosa, 2009.

Machuca. Dir. Andrés Wood. 2004.

 


WGS 393 • Queer Migrations

44949 • Chavez, Karma
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM GWB 1.130
(also listed as MAS 392)
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Rsch In African American Hist

44955 • Berry, Daina
Meets M 12:00PM-3:00PM SRH 2.106
(also listed as AFR 385, AMS 391, HIS 389)
show description

This is a graduate research course for doctoral students interested in learning how to conduct archival research. Employing a thematic approach to historical studies, students will examine sources related to African American History, Slavery, and the Domestic Slave Trade housed at the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History. The Natchez Trace Collection serves as the core collection researched in this course. With more than 450 linear feet of primary resources, this collection contains slaveholding records, personal papers, photographs, maps, newspapers, broadsides, diaries and other political, business and legal records related to slavery in the Gulf South states of Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. Students will learn how to locate, transcribe, analyze, and interpret a variety of records culminating with a research paper based on primary documents at the end of the semester.

 

Students should familiarize themselves with the Briscoe website:

http://www.cah.utexas.edu/

 

In addition to drawing upon the resources in this large collection, members of the library staff will make guest presentations on topics related to the research process, archival preservation, and how to navigate various complementary collections on campus and at other institutions. Students are expected to produce a research paper primarily based on the holdings in the Briscoe Center, in particular the Natchez Trace Collection, yet some may wish to consult other repositories on campus including the archival material from the Benson Center and Harry Ransom Center if their approved paper topics fall beyond the Gulf South. The professor expects this course to draw upon students interested in US slavery as well as comparative slavery in the Americas -broadly definedand welcomes scholars in a variety of fields including but not limited to History, African and African Diaspora Studies, Anthropology, American Studies, and Art History.

 

Required Readings:

Martha Jones, Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America

Stephanie Jones-Rogers, They Were Her Property: White Women as Slavery Owners in the American South

Barbara Krauthamer, Black Slaves, Indian Masters: Slavery, Emancipation, and Citizenship in the Native American South

Maurie McInnis, Slaves Waiting for Sale: Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade

Damian Pargas, Slavery and Forced Migration in the Antebellum South

Caitlin Rosenthal, Accounting for Slavery: Masters and Management

Calvin Schermerhorn, Unrequited Toil: A History of United States Slavery

 


WGS 393 • Sex/Intimacy: Hist Persp

44959 • Coffin, Judith
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM CBA 4.338
(also listed as HIS 383)
show description

This seminar considers the histories of different kinds of intimacy, from sex, love, friendship, family, and marriage to neighborliness. We’ll be interested in the character of those relationships, how they are shaped by gender, racial, national, or ethnic inequality and difference. We will look at their political consequences: the emotions, bonds, conflicts, and violence they generate. We will look at state interest in regulating these relationships and ordinary people’s strategies for guarding secrets and privacy.  We will devote several sessions to considering the sources for such research and the use of “intimate” documents, such as letters, diaries, and autobiography.

Most of the readings will be drawn from European and American history. Students from all fields and disciplines are welcome, and students choose their own topic for their final essays.

 

Readings will include selections from Lauren Berlant, The Female Complaint; Deborah Cohen, Family Secrets: Shame and Privacy in Modern Britain; Annette Gordon Reed, The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family; Nancy F. Cott, Public Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation; George Chauncey, Gay New York; Mary Louise Roberts, What Soldiers Do; Sarah Igo, The Known Citizen: A History of Privacy in Modern America; and Gail Hershatter, Dangerous pleasures: prostitution and modernity in twentieth-century Shanghai.

 

 Requirements:

1) 25% Preparation and informed, cooperative participation in discussion. 2) 25% 5 short précis (2 pp., double-spaced) of the weekly readings. 3) 50% Final review essay on the subject of your choice.


WGS 393 • Staging Black Feminism

44965 • Thompson, Lisa
Meets T 11:00AM-2:00PM MEZ 1.104
(also listed as AFR 388, AMS 391, T D 387D)
show description

Description:

This graduate course considers the feminist practices of black women cultural producers including filmmakers, playwrights, visual artists, musicians, and performance artists. Besides engaging with primary materials, we will draw on black feminist scholarly texts in order to explore such topics as black womanhood, the black female body, black histories, sexuality, politics and aging. We will trace the genealogy of black feminist artistic practices and performances from the 1950s to the present. We will explore the ways that their work challenges the male gaze, the capitalist market place, heteronormativity and racial hierarchies. Some of the artists under consideration include: Julie Dash, Kara Walker, Valerie June, Ava DuVernay, Suzan-Lori Parks, Lorraine O’Grady, Tanya Hamilton, Carrie Mae Weems, Tina Turner, Anna Deavere Smith, Diana Ross, Lynn Nottage, Kasi Lemmons, Lorna Simpson, Issa Rae, and Adrienne Kennedy.

  

Sample Texts:

  • Sandra Adell, Contemporary Plays by African American Women: Ten Complete Works
  • Sharon Bridgforth, The Bull-Jean Stories
  • Kimberley Juanita Brown, The Repeating Black Body: Slavery’s Visual Resonance in the Contemporary
  • Hazel Carby, Reconstructing Womanhood
  • Nicole Fleetwood, Troubling Vision: Performance, Visuality, and Blackness
  • Lorraine Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun
  • E. Patrick Johnson, Ramón H. Rivera-Servera, Eds. Solo/Black/Woman: Scripts, Interviews, and Essays
  • Uri McMillan, Embodied Avatars: Genealogies of Black Feminist Art and Performance.
  • Dominique Morisseau, Sunset Baby
  • Suzan-Lori Parks, Venus
  • Lynn Nottage, By the Way, Meet Vera Stark
  • Ntozake Shange, For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf
  • Anna Deavere Smith, Twilight: Los Angeles
  • Cherise Smith, Enacting Others: Politics of Identity in Eleanor Antin, Nikki S. Lee, Adrian Piper, and Anna Deavere Smith 

WGS 393 • US Capitalism And Culture

44969 • Beasley, Alex
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM BUR 436B
(also listed as AMS 390, HIS 392)
show description

This graduate seminar surveys key texts in the history of U.S. capitalism, paying particular attention to how capitalism has shaped American culture, and how American culture has shaped capitalism. We will place scholarship from the “new history of capitalism” into conversation with older texts to ask a series of questions: What is capitalism? What is culture? How does the “new history of capitalism” stem from and diverge from older histories of labor, business, and consumption? What is the relationship between the history of capitalism and American Studies? Our analysis will foreground scholars interrogating racial capitalism, settler colonialism, empire, gender, and sexuality, and we will also examine debates in the field about whether the “new history of capitalism” is or is not antagonistic to the so-called “cultural turn.”


WGS 393 • Weak Theory

44975 • Bennett, Chad
Meets W 12:00PM-3:00PM CAL 323
(also listed as E 396L)
show description

This seminar will survey the varying theoretical approaches associated with what has been called “weak theory,” including reparative reading, post-critique, distant reading, surface reading, thin description, and new formalism. Our effort will be to track affinities among this array of methods while remaining alert to the different motivations and stakes at work in their interests in the provisional and the probable rather than the strong or totalizing. Reading will include work by Susan Sontag, Roland Barthes, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Rita Felski, Sianne Ngai, Sharon Marcus, Stephen Best, Heather Love, Paul K. Saint-Amour, and others, as well as skeptical or oppositional responses to this work. In what ways does weak theory speak to, challenge, or baffle strong theories? To what extent does weak theory actually depend upon and perhaps quietly replicate strong theories? How can weak theory help us to reimagine power and to consider the limits and affordances of forms of suspended agency? How might weak theory promote a more expansive sense of canon, objects of study, and aesthetic categories? As we pose such questions of foundational and recent texts associated with weak theory, our aim will be to test the potential of weak theories for our own scholarly projects.


WGS 393 • Writing Workshop: Wgs

44980 • Nicholus, Sarah
Meets T 12:30PM-3:30PM CBA 4.346
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 394 • Conf Crs In Wom's/Gend Studies

44985
show description

WGS 394: Graduate Conference Course in Women's and Gender Studies.

Individual directed readings and conferences on selected problems or topics in women's and gender studies.

The Conference Course allows  graduate students to work individually with select faculty on specific research problems.  The student is responsible for approaching faculty and designing a semester's work.

The Conference Course is restricted.  The WGS 394 Approval Form must be turned into the CWGS office with faculty signatures before students may register for the WGS 394 Conference Course.

https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/cwgs/courses/conference.php

 


WGS 398R • Master's Report

45000
(also listed as ILA 398R, LAS 398R)
show description

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in women's and gender studies and consent of the graduate adviser.


WGS 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

44904
(also listed as AHC 679HB, C C 679HA, HMN 679HA, HMN 679HB, LIN 679HA)
show description

WGS 698A • Thesis

44990
(also listed as LAS 698A, LAS 698B, LIN 698A, LIN 698B, WGS 698B)
show description

The Thesis or Report is required by the Master's Program.  It represents the final paper or research project that the student creates to culminate their coursework in Women's and Gender Studies. A student must be enrolled in the Thesis or Report course during the semester they intend to graduate.

When registering for the Thesis or Report course, the student must turn in the Thesis/Report Proposal Forms linked below.

The Thesis form is used to link the professor to the online grading system.  This also serves as documentation for faculty supervising the Thesis or Report.  Students should sign up for the Thesis course when they have secured a faculty member to work with them.

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/graduate-application/thesis-report.php


WGS 698B • Thesis

44995
(also listed as LAS 698A, LAS 698B, LIN 698A, LIN 698B, WGS 698A)
show description

The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Women's and Gender Studies 698A and Women's Studies 698A may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in women's and gender studies and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Women's and Gender Studies 698A.

The Thesis or Report is required by the Master's Program.  It represents the final paper or research project that the student creates to culminate their coursework in Women's and Gender Studies. A student must be enrolled in the Thesis or Report course during the semester they intend to graduate.

When registering for the Thesis or Report course, the student must turn in the Thesis/Report Proposal Forms linked below.

The Thesis form is used to link the professor to the online grading system.  This also serves as documentation for faculty supervising the Thesis or Report.  Students should sign up for the Thesis course when they have secured a faculty member to work with them.

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/graduate-application/thesis-report.php



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  • Center for Women's & Gender Studies

    The University of Texas at Austin
    Burdine Hall 536
    2505 University Avenue, A4900
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-471-5765