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WGS 301 • Family Relationships

45245 • Orozco-Lapray, Diana
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM PAI 3.02
SB
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WGS 301 • Fertility And Reproduction

45259 • Carroll, Caitlin
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 3.132
CDGC SB (also listed as SOC 307K)
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Description

This course will explore when, why, and how people bear children around the world. We will look at the social factors associated with declining fertility, voluntary childlessness, unplanned fertility, non-marital and teen childbearing, delayed parenting and infertility, assisted reproduction, surrogacy, maternal and infant mortality/morbidity, population control, family planning, and government support for families. Throughout the course, you will develop your sociological imagination by learning how to connect what happens in individual’s lives to broader, demographic trends that transform the economic and political landscape of societies worldwide.

In an ideal world, all people would have the freedom to decide whether, when, and how to have and raise children. Needless to say, we do not live in an ideal world. In this course, we examine how, and to what effect, social forces act on people’s reproductive lives and decision making. Our goal will be to analyze the politics of reproduction by drawing on readings, films, discussions, group work, and assignments. We will familiarize ourselves with concepts like reproductive governance, stratified reproduction, and reproductive labor, and study cases from the U.S. and around the world as we apply these concepts to real-life situations that range from the one-child policy to migrant domestic workers, from surrogacy to disability. Through the class, we will attempt to answer the following questions: What is reproduction—is it just childbearing and rearing, or is it more than that? How do the pressures on people’s reproductive lives vary by social positions of race, gender, sexuality, class, and nation? And finally, can reproduction serve as a lens through which to understand our society and ourselves?

Required Texts and Readings

There are no texts required to purchase for this class. Required readings will be posted on Canvas or are available through the UT Library. Many of our readings come from the compilation Reproduction and Society, edited by Carole Joffe and Jennifer Reich (2015), which is available as an E-Book through the UT library. You may wish to download the book in its entirety to use throughout the semester.

Grading Policy

Class time will include lectures, discussion, and classroom exercises. Students will be evaluated on class participation, which will include discussions, short in-class responses, and (if necessary) quizzes. I encourage you to express your opinions, ask questions, and present outside information to boost your participation grade. Exams will be essay questions, covering both the readings, films, and materials presented in class. The final is not cumulative. Finally, students are required to complete a final paper on a relevant topic.

Grade composition:    

Exams (2) 60%  

Final paper 30%

Class participation 10 %


WGS 301 • Intro Afr Amer Women's Hist

45270 • Farmer, Ashley
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SZB 2.802
CD HI (also listed as AFR 315I)
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WGS 301 • Intro Black Women's Studies

45255 • Colon Pizzini, Bethzabeth
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 1.102
CD (also listed as AFR 315P)
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WGS 301 • Intro To Latinx Body Art

45240 • Gonzalez-Martin, Rachel
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WCP 5.102
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WGS 301 • Mexican Amer Womn 1910-Pres

45250 • Rodriguez, Annette
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 0.128
CD HI (also listed as MAS 319)
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WGS 301 • Rights In Modern America

45269 • Green, Laurie
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 206
CD
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WGS 301 • Women, Gender, Lit, Cul-Wb

45260 • Schuster, Sarah
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
CDWr
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WGS 301 • Women, Gender, Lit, Culture

45265 • Farrell Rodriguez, Kaitlyn
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM PMA 5.126
CDWr (also listed as E 314V)
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E 314V  |  6-Women, Gender, Literature, and Culture

Instructor:  Farrell Rodriguez, K

Unique #:  35170

Semester:  Spring 2022

Cross-lists:  WGS 301.27, 45265

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

Description:  What features “define” female creativity, culture, and art?  How are women’s identities and agencies portrayed and performed through literature and film?  How do the intersections of our own identities inform the way we understand and engage with gender, literature, and culture?  In this course, we will analyze several genres of art – including novels, poetry, film, and visual arts – to explore the multifaceted components of culture produced by authors who identify as women.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course carries a writing flag and a cultural diversity in the US flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will constitute a major part of the final grade.  Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience.  You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of several U.S. cultural groups that have experienced persistent marginalization.

Tentative Reading List:  Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own (1929) (excerpts) • Octavia Butler, Kindred (1979) • Imogen Binnie, Nevada (2013) • Brief Supplementary Readings accessible on Canvas, including: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, “The Yellow Wallpaper”; Gloria Anzaldúa “Speaking in Tongues: A Letter to Third World Women Writers”; Alice Walker “In Search of Our Mother’s Gardens”; Alice Sola Kim “Mothers, Lock Up Your Daughters Because They Are Terrifying”.

Requirements & Grading:  The grade of this writing intensive course will be based on the following three components:  1) Participation through Weekly Discussion Posts (15%) and Daily Class Participation (5%); 2) Minor Writing Assignments (two brief essays, each of which are worth 10% each); and 3) Major Essays, which each require a substantial revision (these essays and their revisions constitute 60% total of the course grade).

 


WGS 303 • Introduction To Lgbtq Studies

45279 • Mixon, Amanda
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PMA 5.116
CDWr
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Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies.

DESCRIPTION:
Explores concepts of gender and sexuality, race, class, religion, and nation; as well as skills in theory, history, and research methods relevant to LGBTQ studies. The course will also survey the making of modern understandings of sexual and LGBTQ identities in the last one hundred years and the implications of this history for broader understandings of gender and sexuality.


WGS 303 • Introduction To Lgbtq Studies

45275 • Mixon, Amanda
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLP 1.108
CDWr
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Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies.

DESCRIPTION:
Explores concepts of gender and sexuality, race, class, religion, and nation; as well as skills in theory, history, and research methods relevant to LGBTQ studies. The course will also survey the making of modern understandings of sexual and LGBTQ identities in the last one hundred years and the implications of this history for broader understandings of gender and sexuality.


WGS 305 • Intro To Wmn's/Gndr Studies-Wb

45280 • Mixon, Amanda • Internet; Asynchronous
CDE
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Women’s and Gender Studies is an interdisciplinary field that asks critical questions about the relationships between sex, gender, society, and our own experiences as political acts. In this course, students will come to understand key differences between sex, gender, and sexuality; define feminism both broadly and personally, particularly in relationship to race, class, and other intersectional aspects of identity; learn about queer and trans histories and experiences; explore women’s experiences in international contexts; and investigate the body and its representation as a way to uncover gender norms and expectations. We will also discuss and write about recent social controversies (such as bathroom legislation, bias incidents, the exclusion of groups from the Women’s March on Washington) as moments that reveal and critique the cultural codes of gender. An emphasis will be placed on self-identified women, LGBTQA+ individuals, and people of color.


WGS 313 • Child Development

45285 • Speranza, Hallie
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM GEA 105
show description

Same as Human Development and Family Sciences 313.

DESCRIPTION:
Motor, language, cognitive, social, and emotional development in the family context.

PREREQUISITE:
Credit or registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 113L (corresponding Lab for the course), and Psychology 301 with grade of at least C-.


WGS 322D • Population And Society

45290 • Cavanagh, Shannon
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLP 0.112
GC (also listed as SOC 369K)
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Course Objectives

Population studies or demography is an interdisciplinary field, encompassing the study of the size, distribution, and composition of human populations, and the processes of fertility, mortality, and migration through which populations’ change. These processes are closely connected to many of the pressing problems facing contemporary societies. For instance, the funding of health care in developed countries is a major issue because of population aging and declining fertility. Civil unrest in parts of Africa and the Middle East are, in part, a function of persistently high fertility rates. These processes are also important drivers of many contemporary environmental problems. Finally, a grasp of population processes is important for a deeper understanding of the population explosion in urban areas and the higher transmission and impact of AIDS in the developing world.

This course provides an overview of the field of population studies. A sociological approach is emphasized, but economic, geographic, anthropological, and biological perspectives will also be used. Attention will be given to a) the demographic concepts needed to objectively evaluate population issues and b) the substantive content of the population issues. Emphasis will be given to evaluating the evidence regarding debates on population topics.

Reading Materials

Required text:

  • Population and Society: An Introduction to Demography, 2nd edition Dudley Poston and Leon Bouvier. Cambridge University Press: New York.
  • On-line Readings: There are a number of short reading assignments, marked with an [Readings]. These readings can be found in Readings folder in the Course Document section of the class Canvas site and should be read prior to class period. http://canvas.utexas.edu

To access the class home page, go to this link and log into the Canvas system with your UT EID. You will find a link to this course under the heading “My Courses”. All course material will be posted on this web page, including announcements and grades. In addition, readings can be accessed through this web page.

Course Requirements

You are expected to complete all readings for the day's class before coming to class. Read as actively as possible. Class time will be an opportunity to discuss and further explore the readings, so it is essential that everyone comes prepared to participate. Our class periods will be more productive and enjoyable when we all begin with the same materials.

There will be TWO examinations during the semester, each worth 25% of your final grade. The exams will draw from both readings and class discussions. The exams are not cumulative. Each will include multiple choice and short answer questions. Make-up examinations will not be administered except in extreme circumstances and only if I am notified beforehand. All make-up examinations are 100% essay.

You must also complete THREE written assignments. The assignments—on mortality , fertility, and migration—are designed to familiarize you with demographic data on the web, give you an overview of your country of choice, and help you identify your country’s population angle that most interests you. Each assignment is worth 15% of your final grade.

The final 5% of your grade is based on attendance/class participation. I expect you to show up and engage (i.e., not text, sleep, or read the newspaper) with classmates, the TA, and me in the class.

  • Exam 1 - 25%
  • Exam 2 - 25%
  • Fertility Analysis Assignment - 15%
  • Mortality Analysis Assignment - 15%
  • Migration Analysis Assignment – 15%
  • Attendance - 5%

Regarding all class assignments and examinations, students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, other students, and the integrity of the University, all policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced. For more information on University policies, see www.utexas.edu/depts/dps/sjs.

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. To determine if you qualify, please contact the Dean of Students at 471-6259. If they certify your needs, I will work with you to make appropriate arrangements.

Grading

Grading will reflect each individual's mastery of the material, without comparison to other students on a "curve". It is my hope that you will work with others to optimize your learning experience.

  • A (94-100): Excellent grasp of subject matter; provides relevant details and examples; draws clear and interesting connections, exceptionally original, coherent and well‐organized; explains concepts clearly; ideas clearly written/stated, outstanding classroom participation.
  • A- (90-93): Very good grasp of subject matter; provides relevant details and examples; draws clear connections; explains concepts clearly; ideas clearly written/stated.
  • B+ (87-89): Good grasp of some elements above, others need work. B (83-86) Satisfactory grasp of some elements above.
  • B- (80-82): Uneven, spotty grasp of the elements above.
  • C+ (77-79): Limited grasp of the above.
  • C (73-76): Poor grasp of the above.
  • C- (70-72): Very poor grasp of the above.
  • D (60-69): Limited evidence of grasp of material, having done readings, attended class, or completed assignments.
  • F (0 – 59): Insignificant evidence of having done readings, attended class, or completing assignments

WGS 335 • African Queer Studies

45315 • Young, Hershini
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GWB 1.130
GC
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WGS 335 • Beyonce Fmnsm/Rihanna Wmnsm

45325-45340 • Holm, Charles
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 214
(also listed as AFR 330)
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WGS 335 • Hiv/Aids Actvs/Heal Arts-Wb

45320 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM • Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as AFR 350J)
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WGS 335 • Lgbtq Oppression: Dialog

45310 • Nguyen, Quynh-Huong
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 0.122
CDE
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WGS 335 • Trans Identies And/As Performa

45305 • Bonin, Paul
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WIN 1.148
CDWr
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WGS 340 • Diaspora Visions-Wb

45360 • Okediji, Moyosore
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as AFR 335G)
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WGS 340 • Fashion And Desire-Wb

45385 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM • Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as AFR 330C)
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WGS 340 • Gender And Modern India

45375 • Chatterjee, Indrani
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 1.126
GC (also listed as ANS 361)
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WGS 340 • Latina Feminisms And Media

45350 • Beltran, Mary
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CMA 3.120
CD (also listed as MAS 374)
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WGS 340 • Latinx Short Story

45395 • Garcia, Patricia
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 304 • Hybrid/Blended
CDWr
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WGS 340 • Reproductive Justice/Race

45380 • Rudrappa, Sharmila
Meets MW 8:30AM-10:00AM RLP 0.104
CDWr (also listed as AAS 330M, SOC 335R)
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Description

Access to reproductive care is the most significant indicator of social inequality. The rights to have
children, or not, and parent are deeply stratified across societies. And childhood inequalities have
persistent, life-long health effects. In this course we will examine reproductive outcomes for women in
order to study social justice.

Reproductive justice is defined “as the human right to maintain personal bodily autonomy, have children, not have children, and parent the children we have in safe and sustainable communities.” Our working definition of reproduction justice for this course encompasses the processes of becoming pregnant and giving birth, the right to give birth to a child with disabilities, the right to prenatal care, neonatal care, and child care. Taking our cue from reproductive justice activists and scholars, our class readings and discussions will consider the complete physical and mental well-being of women, children, and their families which can potentially be achieved when they have the economic, social and political power, and resources to make healthy decisions about their sexuality, and reproduction.

Reproductive justice is not always achieved because resources are unevenly distributed, based on race, gender, sexuality, abilities/ disabilities, citizenship, and social class. As a result, developing and developed nations are racked with social inequality when it comes to reproductive matters.

From slavery, access to birth control, stratified reproduction, sex selective abortions, and new reproductive technologies, this course will focus on difficult topics; but, no answers will be provided. The expectation is that you will learn, and answer for yourself what you mean by reproductive justice, and how you think it can be achieved. My aim is that we will emerge at the end of the semester with an open mind regarding women’s and children’s health, and a more complicated understanding of what reproductive justice means. You will, hopefully, take the term reproductive justice into your own linguistic repertoire, and from there, attempt to make it a part of your worldview, and everyday life.

Readings

- Readings are on Canvas (marked with asterix), or online and accessible through our library
resources (links provided).
- Please purchase from Amazon.com Ritu Menon and Kamala Bashin’s Borders and Boundaries:
Women in India’s Partition. 1998 or 2000 version.

Course expectations and grading

Attendance Policy
Attendance will be taken every time we meet; you may miss up with 2 classes without affecting your
grade. After that, every class you miss drops your grade by ½ a grade, until you earn an F.

Participation: 5%
I encourage active participation in class. By participation I do not want you to monopolize discussion,
but make remarks that draw people into talking about the issues you want to discuss. Respectful
disagreement is an excellent way to learn.

Current events discussion: 5%
My hope is that you are up on current events, and read newspapers/ listen to the radio and otherwise
keep up with happenings around the world. Current news is filled with reproductive politics. As part of
your course grade please bring in news items (a photcopy/ print-out, or direct our attention to the suitable website) that are relevant to the course. We will start each day with a 5-10 minute discussion on current developments in reproductive justice matters not just in the U.S., but also in other parts of the world (in previous classes we talked about the Zika virus, the criminalization of miscarriage in Guatemala, etc).

Take home exams (two): 30% each
I encourage group work on exams. Please share notes, develop outlines together, and learn from each
other. However, each of you will write up your answers individually and turn in individuals exams.
Please indicate on your exams who you’ve worked with.

Life History: 30%
Please conduct one life history with an older person or a friend. Summarize the person’s thoughts, and
experiences. In the second section of your paper provide an introspection on your own reproductive
ideals for yourself. In the third section compare and contrast your thoughts to the person you’ve spoken with, and think through what might influence these differences. Up to 8 double spaced pages.


WGS 340 • Sacred/Ceremonial Textiles

45365 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A203A
GC (also listed as ANT 324L, ISL 372, MEL 321)
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WGS 340 • Trnsnatl Latinx Pop Culture

45390 • Gutierrez, Laura
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WCP 5.102
CD
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WGS 340 • Wmn/Resistnc Contemp E Euro

45370 • Lutsyshyna, Oksana
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GEA 127
EGCWr (also listed as EUS 347, REE 325)
show description

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WGS 340 • Women And Gender In China

45359 • Li, Huaiyin
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM MEZ 1.208
Wr (also listed as ANS 372J)
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WGS 340 • Women/Gender/Sport In US

45355 • Eby, Beth
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BIO 301
CDWr
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WGS 345 • Animals/American Culture

45420 • Davis, Janet
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM BUR 436A
IIWr HI (also listed as HIS 350R)
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WGS 345 • Psychology Of Women

45400 • Awad, Germine
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SZB 3.814
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WGS 345 • Sociology Of Education

45410 • Irizarry, Yasmiyn
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 1.108
(also listed as AFR 321L, SOC 321L)
show description

Description

The goal of this course is to ask some fundamental questions about the relationship between education and society. To answer these questions, we will take an in-depth look at the structures, practices, social contexts, and outcomes of schooling. We will examine the purpose and role of schools, explore the linkages between schools and social stratification, discuss how various schooling outcomes are produced, and consider sociological perspectives on contemporary educational inequality and reform. You will have many opportunities to reflect upon your own educational experience and worldview, while also thinking critically about how various social forces have come to shape your schooling experiences, and how these experiences may differ from that of your peers, as well as that of other young adults around the country.

Readings

The Structure of Schooling: Readings in the Sociology of Education, 3rd Edition. Both new and used copies, as well as ebook and rental options, are available online.

Additional readings will be available on Canvas.

Performance Assessment

Your final course grade will be determined as follows:

Participation................ 5%

Reading Quizzes.......... 10%

Discussion leader........ 3%

Discussion questions... 2%

Discussion responses.. 10%

Discussion.................... 15%

Reflection paper 1....... 15%

Reflection paper 2....... 15%

Reflection Papers........ 30%

Exam 1......................... 20%

Exam 2......................... 20%

Exams.......................... 40%

Grading Scale

Letter

Percentage

A

93-100

A-

90-92.9

B+

87-89.9

B

83-86.9

B-

80-82.9

C+

77-79.9

C

73-76.9

C-

70-72.9

D+

67-69.9

D

63-66.9

D-

60-62.9

F

<60

 


WGS 345 • The Family

45405 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM RLP 0.112
(also listed as SOC 323)
show description

Description

In this course we will analyze the family as a social institution, using sociological perspectives. Studying the family can be tricky in that we all have our own experiences being part of families. It is important, then, to go beyond our own experiences to explore both the private aspects of the family as well as public aspects of the family using various kinds of empirical data. Shifting definitions of the family provide a starting point for an exploration of the history of “the family”. Specific topics include parental and child roles; gender, race and social class as stratification systems which influence families; how the family intersects with, is shaped by, and shapes other social institutions, with particular attention to the economy and the world of work as well as state and social policies; and cohabitation, divorce and step families as three important changes in the US family over the last several decades.

Questions we will address include:

  • What is the definition of family? (Why is this a complicated question?)
  • What social-structural forces shape family processes?
  • How is the family a gendered institution?
  • How does government attempt to shape families? Support families?

Required Texts

Cohen, Philip N. 2018. The Family; Diversity, Inequality, and Social Change, 2nd edition. New York: W.W. Norton and Company. You also need access to InQuisitive, which comes with the textbook. If you purchase a hard copy, there will be an access code inside.

Coontz, Stephanie. 2006. Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage. New York: Penguin.

Edin, Kathryn J. and H. Luke Shaefer. 2016. $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America. New York: Mariner Books. Lareau, Annette. 2011. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race and Family Life. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Additional readings will be posted to our Canvas course site.


WGS 345 • Women In Postwar America

45415 • Green, Laurie
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 1.134
IIWr HI (also listed as HIS 350R)
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WGS 350 • Feminist Theory

45430 • Chhun, Lina
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 0.122
Wr
show description

Restricted to women's and gender studies majors and minors, priority to WGS majors.
Feminist theory with selections from women's and gender studies scholars. Recommended feminist theory course for women's and gender studies majors.


WGS 358Q • Supervised Research

45435
II
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Supervised individual research on an issue in women's and gender studies.
Written consent of the supervising faculty member required; consent forms are available in the Center for Women's
and Gender Studies.



WGS 379L • Internship In Wgs

45445
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Experience working in the community or for a nonprofit agency.

Prerequisite: At least twelve semester hours of coursework in women's and gender studies and written consent of the supervising faculty member; consent forms are available in the Center for Women's and Gender Studies.

More Information at: https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/cwgs/courses/internships.php


WGS 379S • Senior Seminar

45450 • Smith, Christen
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PMA 6.112
Wr
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Intensive study of selected topics in women's and gender studies.


WGS 392 • Rsch Meths Smnr Wom's/Gend Std

45455 • Eby, Beth
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM CMA 3.134
show description

This course is designed to prepare graduate students in gender studies and the qualitative social sciences to conduct a research project for their master’s theses or similar projects. We will explore a range of research methods and traditions as well as the epistemological assumptions underlying them. We will consider what it means to conduct “feminist” research, as well as the perils and promise of the more participatory research traditions. Some of the research methods we will explore include interviewing, survey research, case studies, textual analysis, and participant observation.


WGS 393 • Black Studies Theory II

45460 • Alagraa, Bedour
Meets T 12:30PM-3:30PM BUR 128
(also listed as AFR 392)
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Body In Indian Medcn/Myth

45465 • Selby, Martha
Meets W 5:00PM-8:00PM PAR 305
(also listed as ANS 384, R S 394T)
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Cultural Hist Of US Since 1865

45470 • Davis, Janet
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM BUR 436B
(also listed as AMS 386, HIS 392)
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Excavating Chicana Feminisms

45475 • Cotera, Maria
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM GDC 2.402
(also listed as MAS 392)
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Latina Feminist Media Studies

45480 • Beltran, Mary
Meets F 1:00PM-4:00PM CMA 6.174 • Hybrid/Blended
(also listed as MAS 392)
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Performnc/Race/Violence/Body

45485 • Smith, Christen
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM RLP 0.108
(also listed as AFR 387C)
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Psychology Of Women/Gender

45490 • Awad, Germine
Meets M 1:00PM-4:00PM
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Religion And The Senses

45499 • Brown, Khytie
Meets TH 3:00PM-6:00PM BUR 554
(also listed as R S 383T)
show description

Can you smell God? Is it possible to taste race? How do we make sense of the senses?  What do touching, tasting, smelling, hearing, and seeing have to do with social categories like, race, gender, sexuality, and disability? What do we gain from thinking sensorially? Using the works of religious scholars,  cultural anthropologists, cultural historians, disability studies, and queer studies scholars, the course is built on the premise that every domain of sensory experience is also an arena for structuring the social roles and interactions that make up our social world; that is, we learn social divisions, distinctions of gender, class, race, ability and more through our senses. Far from being objective physiological processes, the senses are culturally mediated. The course foregrounds the category of religion as a key site for cultivating the senses in relation to social markers of difference.


WGS 393 • Sociol Of Women's Movements

45509 • Charrad, Mounira
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM RLP 1.302F
(also listed as SOC 395G)
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Course Description:  The course is devoted to the study of women’s movements from a comparative perspective. We consider forms of feminism, agendas, modes of organization, the challenges that women face in different cultures and the interaction between local/national movements and the international discourse of women’s rights.  We examine women’s movements within their national and regional contexts with attention to structures of national power, or political fields, which include the state, political parties and social movements. We ask whether women’s movements have addressed a core set of issues and how the issues have varied with time and place. We also consider transnational or global movements and linkages between women’s movements and other movements such as nationalism.

In the course of discussing substantive issues addressed in each reading, we consider the methodology used by different authors and compare the advantages and limitations of comparative-historical research, surveys, interviews, participant observation, and other methods in the sociology of women’s movements. Students can choose to write a paper or a research proposal as a step towards their future research. A research proposal should specify not only the question to be investigated but also the research method. Students may choose to focus their own work in the seminar on a given country or on intra-region and international comparisons.

Course Requirements:  The course meets once a week and attendance is required. The course grade is based upon the following:  Position Papers/Critiques of Readings 20%, a take home essay 40 % and a Research Proposal 40%.

Required Texts:

Books:

  • Basu, Amrita, Women’s Movements in the Global Era: The Power of Local Feminisms. 2nd Westview Press. 2017. Electronic version at UT.
  • Cameron, Deborah. Feminism: A brief Introduction to the Ideas, Debates and Politics of the Movement. Chicago Univ Press, 2019.
  • Ferree, Myra Marx, Varieties of Feminism: German Gender Politics in Global Perspective.  Stanford University Press, 2012.  Electronic version at UT.
  • Frazer, Nancy, 2020. Fortunes of Feminism: From State Managed Capitalism to Neo-Liberal Crisis.
  • Tripp, Aili Mari, Seeking Legitimacy: Why Arab Autocracies Adopt Women’s Rights. Cambridge University Press, 2019. Electronic version at UT.

Articles:

  • Herr, Ranjoo Seodu, “Reclaiming Third World Feminism: or Why Transnational Feminism Needs Third World Feminisms.” Meridians, Vol 12, No. 1, 2014: 1-30.
  • Kandiyoti, Deniz. “Bargaining with Patriarchy,” Gender and Society. Vol 2, No. 3, 1988: 274-290.
  • Ray, R. and A.C. Korteweg, “Women’s Movements in the Third World: Identity, Mobilization, and Autonomy,” Annual Review of Sociology, 1999, 25: 47-71.
  • Charrad, Mounira M. “Gender in the Middle East: Islam, States, Agency. ” Annual Review of Sociology. Vol 37, 2011: 417-37.
  • Nussbaum, Martha. “Women’s Progress and Women’s Human Rights.” Human Rights Quarterly3 (2016): 589–622.
  • Charrad, Mounira M. “Women Ally with the Devil” Ch. 3 in States and Women’s Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco, UC Press, 2001.Electronic version at UT.
  • Charrad, Mounira M. & Rita Stephan, 2020. “The Power of Presence: Professional Women Leaders and Family Law Reform in Morocco.” Mounira M. Charrad & Rita Stephan. Social Politics.

Recommended:

  • Delap, Lucy. 2020. Feminisms: A Global History. University of Chicago Press.
  • Paxton, Pamela and Melanie M. Hughes, Women, Politics and Power: A Global Perspective, Pine Forge, 2007.
  • Ferree, Myra Marx and Aila Mari Tripp, Global Feminism: Transnational Women’s Activism, Organizing, and Human Rights New York U Press, 2006.

Journals to Consult

AJS, ASR, Theory and Society, Sociological Forum, Sociological Theory, Social Politics, Gender and Society, Women’s Studies International Forum, Signs.

Note:  Scholars in the field will be invited as our guest lecturers to tell us about their research. The dates for their visit to the seminar are to be announced. The syllabus will be revised to reflect their availability and other changes we make in the course of the semester. Please watch for updates on Canvas.


WGS 393 • Surveillance: Art/Theory

45510 • Browne, Simone
Meets M 11:00AM-2:00PM RLP 0.124
(also listed as AFR 387C)
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Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Transatl Feminisms Age Of Rev

45515 • Moore, Lisa
Meets W 12:00PM-3:00PM CAL 323
(also listed as E 392M)
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TRANSATLANTIC FEMINISMS IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTIONS

Between the English Revolution of 1689 and the end of the Haitian Revolution in 1804, the transatlantic world was rocked by industrial and political change.  The emergence of the Enlightenment values of equality, liberty, and human rights took place alongside the rise of capitalism, slavery, imperialist violence, and ecological catastrophe.  Throughout this period, all kinds of women seized opportunities to argue for an expansion of their roles and rights, to protest their indenture and enslavement, to push back against settler colonialism, and to argue for a better world to come out of the experimental political systems that were being devised. But repeatedly, revolutionary promises failed to extend to these liberatory possibilities. This course examines feminist writing in a variety of genres produced in the English-speaking Atlantic world of the eighteenth century, including materials from Britain, British North America, the British Caribbean, Native North America, Africa, and the African diaspora.  

What were the major concerns of eighteenth-century writers critical of the violences and violations of their time?  What was the range of meanings of the category “woman” in this period, across cultures, classes, and communities? How were discourses of gender understood in relation to those of sexuality, disability, race, nation, and sovereignty? What difference does literary genre and/or expressive medium make to how women are represented and advocated for?  How do letters, transcribed narratives, and popular periodical verse, as well as polished verse satire, plays, novels, and philosophical tracts, broaden our definitions of the “literary”?  And how do the various “Englishes” used in writing by slaves, free women of color, enslaved women, Native women, bluestockings, Loyalists and Patriots, and colonial planters challenge our definitions of eighteenth-century “English” literature?  Is there a “feminist Atlantic” in eighteenth century literature?

This course will be of interest to English department students focusing on feminist and queer studies, postcolonial and ethnic studies, early American literature, and British literature of the 17th-19th centuries. It will also be useful to students outside the English department as a historical background for modern feminist thought and an opportunity to learn about cultural studies methods from a literary perspective. This course has generated several successful dissertation projects and even a book since it was first offered in 2011.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

There will be a significant professional development component to this course.  Assignments will be structured to give students practice with the skills of the professional scholar, and the final assignment for the entire class will be the planning and participation in a one-day conference with an invited outside speaker.


WGS 394 • Conf Crs In Wom's/Gend Studies

45520
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WGS 394: Graduate Conference Course in Women's and Gender Studies.

Individual directed readings and conferences on selected problems or topics in women's and gender studies.

The Conference Course allows  graduate students to work individually with select faculty on specific research problems.  The student is responsible for approaching faculty and designing a semester's work.

The Conference Course is restricted.  The WGS 394 Approval Form must be turned into the CWGS office with faculty signatures before students may register for the WGS 394 Conference Course.

https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/cwgs/courses/conference.php

 


WGS 398R • Master's Report

45535
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Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in women's and gender studies and consent of the graduate adviser.



WGS 698A • Thesis

45525
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The Thesis or Report is required by the Master's Program.  It represents the final paper or research project that the student creates to culminate their coursework in Women's and Gender Studies. A student must be enrolled in the Thesis or Report course during the semester they intend to graduate.

When registering for the Thesis or Report course, the student must turn in the Thesis/Report Proposal Forms linked below.

The Thesis form is used to link the professor to the online grading system.  This also serves as documentation for faculty supervising the Thesis or Report.  Students should sign up for the Thesis course when they have secured a faculty member to work with them.

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/graduate-application/thesis-report.php


WGS 698B • Thesis

45530
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The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Women's and Gender Studies 698A and Women's Studies 698A may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in women's and gender studies and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Women's and Gender Studies 698A.

The Thesis or Report is required by the Master's Program.  It represents the final paper or research project that the student creates to culminate their coursework in Women's and Gender Studies. A student must be enrolled in the Thesis or Report course during the semester they intend to graduate.

When registering for the Thesis or Report course, the student must turn in the Thesis/Report Proposal Forms linked below.

The Thesis form is used to link the professor to the online grading system.  This also serves as documentation for faculty supervising the Thesis or Report.  Students should sign up for the Thesis course when they have secured a faculty member to work with them.

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/graduate-application/thesis-report.php



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  • Center for Women's & Gender Studies

    The University of Texas at Austin
    Burdine Hall 536
    2505 University Avenue, A4900
    Austin, Texas 78712
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