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WGS 301 • Women, Gender, Lit, Culture

46149
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CMA 5.190
CDWr
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WGS 301 • Women, Gender, Lit, Culture

46145
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM RLP 0.122
CDWr
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WGS 301 • Black Queer Art Worlds

46144 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 308
CDGC (also listed as AFR 315Q, ANT 310L)
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WGS 301 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

46125 • Rosas, Lilia
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BIO 301
CD SB (also listed as MAS 311, SOC 308D)
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Among the many catalysts that centralized the narratives of Chicanas into the discourse the U.S. Southwest/Mexican Borderlands, the 1971 La Conferencia de Mujeres por la Raza in Houston inspired how Chicanas/Xicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, indigenous, Mexican American, and brown women defined themselves, asserted their roles and identities, and shared their stories. This course privileges the stories, struggles, contestations, imaginations, writings, and accomplishments of Chicanas in the United States in the mid-twentieth and early twentieth-first centuries. Through a close examination of literature, and attention to historical and theoretical materials, we will create a growing understanding of the significance of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, language, spirituality, and citizenship in affecting the daily lives and social worlds of Chicanas. By end of the semester, we will also gain a complex insight into the importance of how Chicana feminism, Xicanisma, intersectionality, migration, borders, and community are formative in the Chicana experience(s).

 


WGS 301 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

46130 • Rosas, Lilia
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BIO 301
CD SB (also listed as MAS 311, SOC 308D)
show description

Among the many catalysts that centralized the narratives of Chicanas into the discourse the U.S. Southwest/Mexican Borderlands, the 1971 La Conferencia de Mujeres por la Raza in Houston inspired how Chicanas/Xicanas, xicanindias, mestizas, indigenous, Mexican American, and brown women defined themselves, asserted their roles and identities, and shared their stories. This course privileges the stories, struggles, contestations, imaginations, writings, and accomplishments of Chicanas in the United States in the mid-twentieth and early twentieth-first centuries. Through a close examination of literature, and attention to historical and theoretical materials, we will create a growing understanding of the significance of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, language, spirituality, and citizenship in affecting the daily lives and social worlds of Chicanas. By end of the semester, we will also gain a complex insight into the importance of how Chicana feminism, Xicanisma, intersectionality, migration, borders, and community are formative in the Chicana experience(s).

 


WGS 301 • Fertility And Reproduction

46143 • Carroll, Caitlin
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM RLP 0.102
CDGC SB (also listed as SOC 307K)
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WGS 301 • Gay & Lesbian Lit & Culture

46135 • Nelson, Lauren
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.124
CDWr (also listed as E 314V)
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E 314V  l  Gay and Lesbian Literature and Culture

Instructor:  Nelson, L

Unique #:  35925

Semester:  Fall 2021

Cross-lists:  WGS 301.12, 46135

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

Description:  This course will take up the particular question of queer diaspora:  how do literary expressions of queer desire and queer genders respond to shifting national boundaries?  In particular, how do queer writers use migration to think about how and when sexuality intersects with global histories of imperialism and racial dispossession?  We will read a variety of texts by queer writers of color from around the world including the Caribbean, the United Kingdom, Vietnam, the United States, and Canada.  While the texts on the syllabus are largely written in the contemporary (post-1945) period, we will consider how they represent a wide range of historical issues, such as the transatlantic slave trade, the decolonization movements of the 1950s and 60s, the AIDS pandemic, and the opioid crisis.  Our reading of each text will be informed by the specific cultural and historical movements interpolated by the texts, and we will consider how these movements affect the representational tactics of each work.  In addition, we will refer to both classic and contemporary theories of gender performance, sexual dis/identification, race and coloniality to better understand each text’s political commitments.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course carries a writing flag and a cultural diversity in the US flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will constitute a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Reading List:  Michelle Cliff’s No Telephone to Heaven (1987) Ocean Vuong’s On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous (2019), Andrew Salkey’s Escape to an Autumn Pavement (2009), assorted essays and poems by Natalie Diaz, Audre Lorde, Dionne Brand, and others.

Requirements & Grading:  Three essays will comprise the majority of the student’s grade (75% of the total grade), one of which will require a mandatory revision while the others will have optional revisions.  Revision will be an integral part of writing in this course and each student will have the opportunity to revise each essay based on instructor feedback for a higher grade.  The remainder of each student’s grade (25% of the total grade) will include a combination of frequent but brief writing assignments as well as in-class participation, such as weekly response papers, Canvas discussion posts, short presentations, and discussion questions.


WGS 301 • Latina Perf: Celia-Selena

46150 • Gutierrez, Laura
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BUR 212
CD VP (also listed as MAS 315)
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WGS 303 • Introduction To Lgbtq Studies

46154
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM BIO 301
CDWr
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Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies.

DESCRIPTION:
Explores concepts of gender and sexuality, race, class, religion, and nation; as well as skills in theory, history, and research methods relevant to LGBTQ studies. The course will also survey the making of modern understandings of sexual and LGBTQ identities in the last one hundred years and the implications of this history for broader understandings of gender and sexuality.


WGS 303 • Introduction To Lgbtq Studies

46153
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM GEA 127
CDWr
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Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies.

DESCRIPTION:
Explores concepts of gender and sexuality, race, class, religion, and nation; as well as skills in theory, history, and research methods relevant to LGBTQ studies. The course will also survey the making of modern understandings of sexual and LGBTQ identities in the last one hundred years and the implications of this history for broader understandings of gender and sexuality.


WGS 305 • Intro To Wmn's/Gndr Studies-Wb

46155 • Internet; Asynchronous
CD
show description

Women’s and Gender Studies is an interdisciplinary field that asks critical questions about the relationships between sex, gender, society, and our own experiences as political acts. In this course, students will come to understand key differences between sex, gender, and sexuality; define feminism both broadly and personally, particularly in relationship to race, class, and other intersectional aspects of identity; learn about queer and trans histories and experiences; explore women’s experiences in international contexts; and investigate the body and its representation as a way to uncover gender norms and expectations. We will also discuss and write about recent social controversies (such as bathroom legislation, bias incidents, the exclusion of groups from the Women’s March on Washington) as moments that reveal and critique the cultural codes of gender. An emphasis will be placed on self-identified women, LGBTQA+ individuals, and people of color.


WGS 313 • Child Development

46160 • Speranza, Hallie
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM WEL 3.502
show description

Same as Human Development and Family Sciences 313.

DESCRIPTION:
Motor, language, cognitive, social, and emotional development in the family context.

PREREQUISITE:
Credit or registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 113L (corresponding Lab for the course), and Psychology 301 with grade of at least C-.


WGS 322C • Sociology Of Gender

46165 • Williams, Christine
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 3.104
CD (also listed as SOC 333K)
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Course Description

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of gender in U.S. society. Gender structures the experiences of people in all major social institutions, including the family, the workplace, and schools. We will explore how gender impacts our lives and life chances. The central themes of the course are historical changes in gender beliefs and practices; socialization practices that reproduce gendered identities; how race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality shape the experience of gender; and the relationship between gender, power, and social inequality. 

The goals of the course are:

  • To understand the sociological perspective as it relates to gender. What are gender stereotypes? How do social institutions, including schools, the mass media, families, and work organizations, treat men and women? You should be able to discuss how the social environment influences the behavior and experiences of men and women.
  • To understand how gender is related to other forms of social inequality. How do men and women from different racial/ethnic groups, social class positions, and sexual orientations, experience gender inequality? You should be able to discuss hegemonic, marginalized, and alternative definitions of masculinity and femininity.
  • To understand how and why gender norms change over time. Why are behaviors that were considered “masculine” at one time now considered “feminine”?  What role do social movements (including feminism) play in changing society’s expectations of appropriate behavior for men and women? How has globalization altered relationships between men and women?
  • To develop a deeper appreciation of how your own experiences, views, choices, and opportunities have been shaped by gender.

 

This course carries the UGS flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States, which means that it is “designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.”

This course does NOT carry a writing flag. However, you are required to write several essays. 


WGS 335 • Confronting Lgbtq Oppressn

46195 • Nguyen, Quynh-Huong
Meets T 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 1.108 • Hybrid/Blended
CD (also listed as S W 360K, T D 357T)
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This fall course is the first half of the Peers for Pride Program and prepares students to become peer facilitators of performance-based workshops designed to address macro and micro constructs of LGBTQIA+ justice, racial justice, and multiculturalism, specifically within the context of power, privilege, and identity. Topics will include, but not limited to race, class, ability, gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation.


WGS 335 • Music And Lgbtqia+ Cultures

46190 • Gabrillo, James
Meets TTH 5:30PM-7:00PM MRH 4.126
CD
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WGS 335 • Queer Migrations

46200 • Chavez, Karma
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GEA 114
CD (also listed as MAS 335M)
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WGS 335C • Queer Media Studies

46205 • Nault, Curran
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CMA 6.170
CDWr
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WGS 340 • Afr Amer Women Pol Activism

46284 • Philpot, Tasha
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 278
CD
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WGS 340 • Africana Women's Art-Wb

46235 • Okediji, Moyosore
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM • Internet; Synchronous
CD VP
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WGS 340 • Chicana Feminisms

46260 • Cotera, Maria
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM BIO 301
CD (also listed as MAS 337C)
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WGS 340 • Foundatns Of Social Justice

46215 • Bishop, Octavious
Meets MW 9:30AM-11:00AM SSW 2.118
CD
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WGS 340 • Goddesses World Relig/Cul

46225 • Selby, Martha
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 108
GC (also listed as ANS 340F, ANT 322J, R S 373G)
show description

This course will provide a historical and cross-cultural overview of the relationship between feminine and religious cultural expressions through comparative examinations and analyses of various goddess figures in world religions. We will begin our study in Asia; specifically in India, where goddess worship is a vital part of contemporary Hinduism in all parts of the subcontinent. From the goddesses of the Hindu tradition (Kālī and Lakṣmī, for example), we will move on to female figures in the Jain and Buddhist Mahāyāna pantheons (such as Kuan-Yin, popular in China, Korea, and Japan), and then on to some of the goddesses of western antiquity (Inanna, Isis, Athena, and Aphrodite), including a brief consideration of Mary in her various goddess aspects. We will end the course with a brief study of “neo-pagan” goddess worship in America. Issues relating to gender, sexuality, power, and violence (domestic and political) will be emphasized as themes throughout the course.

 


WGS 340 • Holocaust Aftereffects

46255 • Bos, Pascale
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 337
GC (also listed as C L 323, EUS 346, GSD 360, J S 365, R S 357V)
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In this course, we specifically examine the significant influence of American Hollywood representations of the Holocaust as they have shaped and are reflective of the American cultural memory of the Holocaust. In contrast to Europe where the events of the Holocaust took place and were witnessed personally, knowledge of the events in the United States has been from its earliest inception been mediated by cinematic images, be it of a documentary nature – newsreel footage of the opening of the concentration camps in 1945 - or of a more fictionalized nature. By tracing how Hollywood has shaped a uniquely American way of viewing the Holocaust, and while contrasting this at times with other (European) film traditions, we consider in some depth what particular American cultural or political considerations, sensibilities, and concerns, led to the production of certain films in different decades and not others, how certain genres and cinematic techniques work and why they became popular, and why particular movies became blockbusters while others did not. 

Grading:

  • Attendance/participation/prep (15%)
  • Film Precis (10%)
  • Website evaluation (10%)
  • Response paper (10%)
  • Class presentation (10%)
  • Final Project (45%)

WGS 340 • Human Rights/World Politics

46259 • Evans, Rhonda
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM WAG 201
(also listed as GOV 365W)
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WGS 340 • Italian Television Advertis

46275 • Russi, Cinzia
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PMA 6.112
GC (also listed as EUS 347, ITC 338)
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WGS 340 • J Alvarez/S Cisneros

46258 • Garcia, Patricia
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 101
(also listed as E 348C, MAS 345C)
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E 348C  l  Julia Alvarez and Sandra Cisneros

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  36508

Semester:  Fall 2021

Cross-lists:  MAS 345C, xxxxx; WGS 340.86, xxxxx

 

Prerequisites:  Upper-division standing.

Description:  The careers of two of the most important Latina writers of the last 30 years, Sandra Cisneros and Julia Alvarez, cover multiple genres:  short fiction, novels, poetry, children’s and young adult literature, and non-fiction.  Moreover, the construction of ethnic and gendered identity within their works creates a Latino/a aesthetics, especially in considering the merging of author and speaker, fiction and history, and, stylistically, poetic and prose voices.  Through our readings and discussions, we will also compare their different ethnic experiences in the United States as Mexican American and Caribbean/Dominican American writers.  In addition to writing analytical essays, students will also construct and present a bibliography of secondary resources and literary criticism on the author of his/her choice.

Texts: 

Cisneros:  “Woman Hollering Creek” and Other Stories; Caramelo; The House on Mango Street; Loose Woman.

Alvarez:  How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents; ¡Yo!; In the Time of the Butterflies; How Tia Lola Came to Visit Stay; The Woman I Keep to Myself.

Requirements & Grading:  Class participation and attendance (10%); Peer Response Workshops (10%); Essays (2 total; Essay 1 will undergo a substantial revision after peer workshop and instructor feedback (60%); Bibliography and Presentation (20%)


WGS 340 • Latina Feminism And Health

46265 • Minich, Julie
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 2.128
CD (also listed as MAS 337F)
show description

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WGS 340 • Latinx Legend Tripping

46220 • Gonzalez-Martin, Rachel
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 304
CDWr (also listed as AMS 321, E 323D, MAS 374)
show description

Legend tripping is the process by which individuals and groups visit and/or recreate legendary contexts, with the hopes of facilitating an encounter with the strange. This course will focus on narrative folklore and practice from diverse traditions across the U.S. based Latinx diaspora.  Legends, or folk narratives told as true share interpretations of the strange in everyday social life of tellers and audiences alike. Shared amongst peers and across generations, legends within Latinx communities have been used to influence the behaviors and beliefs of young women. Through reading, collecting, and analyzing legend texts such as La Llorona, Dancing with the Devil, La Lechuza among other stories of supernatural encounters as well as interrogating key figures, such as brujas, curanderas, hechiceras, students will engage with these texts the instrumentalization of a community logic of supernatural belief that impact the development of gender and sexuality identities across US Latinx communities. We will draw on materials from the fields of Folklore, Anthropology, Latina/o Studies, History and American Studies.


WGS 340 • Musical/American Identities

46224 • Beltran, Mary
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CMA 3.116
(also listed as AMS 321)
show description

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WGS 340 • Sex & Power In Afr Diaspora

46240 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 127
CDGC (also listed as AFR 345F, ANT 324L)
show description

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WGS 340 • Sexuality/Gender In Lat Am

46270 • Zazueta, Maria
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SRH 1.320
GC (also listed as LAS 366)
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WGS 340 • South Asian Migration To US

46230 • Bhalodia, Aarti
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM RLP 0.122
CD HI (also listed as AAS 325J)
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WGS 340 • Tejana Cultural Studies

46285 • Rosas, Lilia
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM WAG 208
CDIIWr (also listed as MAS 337I)
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WGS 340 • Women And Socl Mvmnts In US

46245 • Green, Laurie
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 2.112
HI (also listed as AFR 351C, AMS 321, HIS 365G)
show description

This upper-division history course examines women’s participation in both well-known and lesser-known social movements during the twentieth century, more deeply than is possible in a U.S. history survey course. Throughout, we explore women’s activism in movements that specifically targeted women’s rights, such as the woman suffrage movement. However, we also consider women’s participation in movements that do not outwardly appear to be movements about women’s rights, such as the Civil Rights Movement.

In addition to exploring the scope and contours of women’s activism, the course will place particular emphasis on four themes:
1) impacts of contemporary cultural understandings of gender on social movements, and the reverse
2) tensions between ideas of women’s rights that emphasized equality of the sexes and those that emphasized difference
3) perspectives on whether you can write a universal history of women or need to write separate histories along lines such as race, class, region and/or sexual preference
4) power relations not only between men and women but among women

Possible Required Readings
SHORT READINGS will be available on Canvas.
BOOKS:
Crow Dog, Mary. Lakota Woman.  Reprint edition, Grove Press, 2011.
Moody, Anne. Coming of Age in Mississippi. 1968; reprint edition, Delta, 2004.
Orleck, Annelise. Common Sense and a Little Fire: Women and Working-Class Politics in the United States, 1900-1965. University of North Carolina Press, 1995.

Course Evaluation
Short written assignments: Submission grades                 20%
Film reviews: Total of 2                            15%
Historical evidence forms: Total of 3                    15%
Collaborative Projects: Total of 3 (excluding final project)        10%    
Historical Essay                                20%
Final Project: (17% Individual portion; 3% Group project)        20%
Attendance:  Loss of points over 3 unexcused absences


WGS 345 • American Food

46314 • Bendele, Marvin
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM CBA 4.342
IIWr (also listed as AMS 370)
show description

Same as Women's and Gender Studies 345 (Topic 41: American Food). Studies diverse American food cultures from a humanities perspective, exploring connections between global, national, and local communities. Uses scholarship in the field of food studies as well as cookbooks, novels, poetry, photographs, songs, documentaries, and oral histories to investigate the past and present of American food communities.


WGS 345 • Sociology Of Education

46300 • Carroll, Jamie
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM RLP 1.108
Wr (also listed as AFR 321L, SOC 321L)
show description

DESCRIPTION:

We all have many years of experience in schools and we know what happens in schools. Do schools provide opportunities for people to have a better life? Are schools an equalizer? Are they failing? This course is designed to challenge and think critically about what we think we know about schools and education. We will study sociological research on what schools do, for people, for communities, and for our society. We will consider how people of different social class, race and ethnicity, gender, and disability statuses interact with schools and how inequality in achievement comes about. And we will question what policies might improve schools. The course objective is to better understand the role of education as a social institution and how it contributes to and reduces social inequality.

The course objectives are to use sociological principles and empirical research to:

• Understand schooling and education. What do schools do and how do they do it?
• Analyze how education both contributes to and reduces social inequality.
• Understand the roles that education plays in society. We will consider these roles of education in a historical context and how they have and haven’t changed over time.
• Critically evaluate which school practices and policies contribute to (1) learning among students from different socio-demographic subgroups and (2) exacerbating and reducing inequality.
• Develop a deeper appreciation of our own experiences in education as a child and student (and, if applicable, a parent or a teacher), and the potential experiences that you will have in the future.

Learning goals:

• Use empirical evidence reported in sociological research to discuss how schools work and, how people from different socio-demographic subgroups interact with educational institutions, and the ways that schools may exacerbate or reduce social inequality.
• Discuss and critically evaluate how the institution of education shapes individuals’ behaviors, attitudes, opportunities, and life course outcomes.
• Read and critically analyze empirical evidence reported in research in the sociology of education.
• Apply the knowledge produced by empirical research to analyze practices

GRADING:

Your final grade will be calculated using this distribution:
• Exam 1 (February 6) 15%
• Exam 2 (March 6) 20%
• Exam 3 (April 5) 20%
• Project 25% total (Part 1 [due April 12] 5%; Part 2 [due May 3] 20%
• Homework Assignments 20%


WGS 345 • Thtr Studies: Young Audiences

46295 • Schroeder-Arce, Roxanne
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WIN 1.108
Wr
show description

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WGS 345 • Virginia Woolf

46310 • Fiehn, Charlotte
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 105
(also listed as E 349S)
show description

E 349S  l  8-Virginia Woolf

Instructor:  Fiehn, C

Unique #:  36510

Semester:  Fall 2021

Cross-lists:  WGS 345.40, 46310

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  In this reading-intensive course, we will be examining some of the major fictional works of Virginia Woolf.  We will explore several of Woolf’s self-described “sketches” or short stories; we will read Woolf’s major novels and modernist manifestos (essays).  Some of the areas of inquiry the class will be exploring are the value and limitations of high modernism, aesthetics and politics, English literary heritage and tradition, and feminism (Woolf’s critiques of patriarchy, war, and fascism).

Texts:  Selected essays, including “Modern Fiction” (1925). The Voyage Out (1915); Jacob’s Room (1922); Mrs. Dalloway (1925); The Waves(1931); The Years (1937); Between the Acts (1942).

Requirements & Grading:  Class participation (10% of final grade); Response essays (300 words) (30% of final grade); 2 short papers (4-5 pages) (30% of final grade); Prospectus/bibliography and semester paper (8-10 pages) (30% of final grade).

This is a reading-intensive, seminar-style analysis and discussion-based course; to succeed in the class, students must make sure to keep up with the reading assignments.  If you are too busy to do heavy reading, you might want to enroll in another class.  Students must also demonstrate that they have completed the required reading and have thought about it--analyzed it closely, rigorously, critically, and creatively.


WGS 345 • Witches, Workers, And Wives

46305 • Hardwick, Julie
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 4.122
GC (also listed as EUS 346, HIS 343W)
show description

Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place.  In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender, family and power in early modern Europe.  The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways – including religious reformations, more powerful governments, the domestic impacts of colonialism that included the forced migration of people of African descent to Europe and involvement with slavery in many indirect forms, and the economic transformation we call the transition to capitalism.  Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life. We will focus on lived experience to explore how women's experiences compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, members of racial and religious minorities, spouses or parents.  Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

Discussion of the assigned readings (see below) will be an important element of this class: you will learn more effectively when you take an active part in the analysis of the material to be covered. Consequently you must expect to read every reading assignment very carefully and thoughtfully. You should come to each class ready to ask questions and contribute observations. You will need to demonstrate mastery of the readings to do well on the exams.

Daily class readings are available on Canvas or online through the Library Catalogue. 

Grading:
Midterm 20%
Final 30%
Reading grids 20%
Witchcraft group projects 20%
Preparation and engagement 10%


WGS 356 • Intro To Feminist Rsch Methods

46320 • Eby, Beth
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CMA 3.114
EIIWr
show description

Introduction to feminist research methods across a range of traditional disciplines. Designed to prepare students to analyze research within gender studies and to develop their own research skills.


WGS 358Q • Supervised Research

46325
II
show description

Supervised individual research on an issue in women's and gender studies.
Written consent of the supervising faculty member required; consent forms are available in the Center for Women's
and Gender Studies.



WGS 360 • Rsch/Thesis In Wom's/Gend Stds

46330
II
show description

Individual project or paper to be completed under the direction of a women's and gender studies faculty member.

Written consent of the supervising faculty member required, consent forms available in the Center for Women's and Gender Studies for that purpose.



WGS 379L • Internship In Wgs

46340
show description

Experience working in the community or for a nonprofit agency.

Prerequisite: At least twelve semester hours of coursework in women's and gender studies and written consent of the supervising faculty member; consent forms are available in the Center for Women's and Gender Studies.

More Information at: https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/cwgs/courses/internships.php


WGS 384N • Internship In Wom's/Gend Stds

46344
show description

 

Practical working involvement with participating nonprofit and research agencies. The equivalent of ten class hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

More information here: https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/cwgs/courses/internships.php


WGS 391 • Feminist Theories

46350 • Gonzalez-Lopez, Gloria
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM BEN 1.102
show description

Restricted to students in the WGS MA Program.  This course introduces students to feminist theory as it intersects with race, nation, and sexuality. Since this is an introductory course, we will not explore feminist theory in all its incarnations. Rather than charting the historical development of a single body of knowledge called feminism, the class will read contemporary work by women that deals with questions of representation, reproduction, labor, transnationalism, and colonialism. Each week we will unpack one primary text with the intent of understanding the circumstances of its production, its significance, and how it can help us think about our own work.


WGS 393 • Adult Devel, Aging, & Hlth

46354 • Holahan, Carole
Meets TH 1:00PM-4:00PM BEL 710B
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Gender/Technol/Information-Wb

46364 • Doty, Philip
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM • Internet; Synchronous
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Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Performing Blackness

46365 • Thompson, Lisa
Meets W 12:00PM-3:00PM MEZ 1.102
(also listed as AFR 387C, AMS 391)
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Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Gender, Health, And Society

46360 • Angel, Jacqueline
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 3.316
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Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Sexuality And Disability-Wb

46368 • Winges-Yanez, Nichole • Internet; Asynchronous
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Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Thresholds Of Identity

46369 • Wettlaufer, Alexandra
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM HRH 2.106C
(also listed as C L 386, FR 390M)
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Required Texts:

Chateaubriand, Atala and René

Staël, Corinne

Duras, Ourika

Balzac, Le Père Goriot

Sand, Indiana

Tristan, Pérégrinations d’une paria

Baudelaire, Le Spleen de Paris

Fromentin, Une année dans le Sahel

Flaubert, Trois contes

Zola, Nana

Rachilde, Monsieur Vénus

 

            This course will consider the ideas of borders, boundaries, and transgression in nineteenth-century French fiction, with a particular focus on the (re)construction of national and gendered identities in France from the Revolution of 1789 to the fin-de-siècle. At the same time, we will think about disruptions of form and genre, the role of the artist during the period, and the social/political implications of identity, voice, and subjectivity. In an increasingly mobile culture, where travel, migration, displacement, colonization, and cosmopolitanisms modeled new conceptions of inclusion and exclusion, the thresholds of place and space, self and other, and the fundamental role of liminality and uncertainty took on new meanings in the French imaginary. Our readings will include novels set in Louisiana, Italy, the Caribbean, Peru, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Ile Bourbon (Réunion) as well as in Paris and the provinces, as we explore the role of alterity—other places, other spaces, and other voices—in nineteenth-century France’s field of cultural production and its volatile political landscape.      


WGS 393 • Women, Right To Vote Americas

46367
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 1.320
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Women and the right to vote in the Americas

Teresa Cristina de Novaes Marques   

History Departent/Universidade de Brasilia  

 

Course description: This course examines in comparison the long historical path for the achievement of women´s right to vote in the Americas. It focuses on the case of 10 countries in the Americas.

In the year of 2020, the United States celebrates the centennial of the passage of the 19th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, which guaranteed women in this country the right to vote. The strategies adopted by North American suffragists inspired many movements in Latin American, including in Brazil.

In fact, suffragist groups in the Americas shared many commonalities, such the belief in the justice of the full citizenship for educated women, and the recourse to similar tactics to persuade movers and shakers, like lobbying candidates for public offices, developing their own press, making public demonstrations, gathering signatures, and broadcasting radio transmissions. Despite all these features, the suffragist groups in the Americas faced their own set of obstacles presented in their individual political system. For instance, in the 1920s, both Brazil and the United States were federal regimes. In the U.S., states had autonomy to define the requisites for being a voting citizen. In Brazil, on the contrary, the federal format refrained the Union from intervening in the economics of the states, but the setting of citizenship requirements was a prerogative of the Union.

In Mexico, as in Brazil, the 1917 Constitution used male words to refer to citizen (ciudadano). This apparent technical choice proved to represent an obstacle to extend the vote to women. The writing of the Constitution consumed much political energy from the suffragist groups to promote the revision of the Charter and obtain the vote.

In Argentina in 1932, an important attempt to extend the right to women was associated with the right to divorce, a political maneuver that killed the possibilities of the bill. In Peru, the right to vote to national elections was extended to educated women in 1955, but the universal vote was adopted in 1979 only. In Brazil, the universal vote was adopted in 1988.  

Frustrated in the Parliamentary front, suffragists negotiated the vote with centralist leaders. The vote came as a concession in several Latin American nations, such as Brazil, Peru, Ecuador, Argentina. Consequently, the electoral participation of most ordinary women – black or indigenous, was limited. The social valor of voting was treasured by white middle-class only.

At first, the course explores the intellectual obstacles which prevented women from voting, the format of the political campaigns for the vote, and their political agenda. Then, it examines historiographical contributions to several aspects of the struggle for political rights in the Continent. Because the experience of citizenship is still biased by gender and racial relations in Latin America, the course brings into attention historiographical contributions to discuss aspects of the separation of male and female social roles in the political systems under these lenses too.   

The selected authors approach suffragism under the following problems: how nations conducted elections, which were the requisites to the voter, how movements were organized, arguments in favor of suffrage, arguments against it, the real integration of women in the political systems, the influence of ethnical and racial relations in the integration of women in the system, the influence of international politics.

Objectives: As a result of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Identify the key political actors to the women´s suffrage in each country examined.
  • Access historiographical interpretations of class and racial bias which limited the full participation of women in political life.
  • Identify common arguments in favor of suffrage and against it.
  • Identify the political strategies used by political groups who worked for the suffrage.
  • Identify the importance of the writing of constitutions for the setting of citizenship requirements in Latin America.
  • Identify the specificity of the historical process which led women in Latin America to fully participate in public sphere.
  • Identify the importance of the Inter-American diplomacy for the extension of the women´s rights in the Americas in the after the World War II.

Requirements for the course:

This course will be reading intensive. A basic knowledge of Spanish is recommended to keep up with the activities. Texts presented in Portuguese will be worked in the form of lectures. In case the students do not feel comfortable in reading extensive texts in Spanish, alternative bibliography in English is listed in this syllabus.

Students are expected to fully participate in the debates, sharing the task of summarizing the main arguments of the readings assigned for each week. Up to two students should initiate the discussion in each session. 

The final examination will take the form of an essay examining historical sources under the lens of the theoretical and the methodological approaches examined during the course. Students are expected to share the development of their research project with the class along the week sessions, and share the outcome of their exercise at the last session. 

Distribution of the grade:

Final essay plus presentation (60 % of the grade)

Class participation (40% of the grade)

Office hours: to be determined. Contact: tcnovaes610@gmail.com


WGS 394 • Conf Crs In Wom's/Gend Studies

46370
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WGS 394: Graduate Conference Course in Women's and Gender Studies.

Individual directed readings and conferences on selected problems or topics in women's and gender studies.

The Conference Course allows  graduate students to work individually with select faculty on specific research problems.  The student is responsible for approaching faculty and designing a semester's work.

The Conference Course is restricted.  The WGS 394 Approval Form must be turned into the CWGS office with faculty signatures before students may register for the WGS 394 Conference Course.

https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/cwgs/courses/conference.php

 








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  • Center for Women's & Gender Studies

    The University of Texas at Austin
    Burdine Hall 536
    2505 University Avenue, A4900
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-471-5765