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WGS 301 • Asian Amer Creative Arts

46210 • Shorb, Katherine
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM JES A205A
(also listed as AAS 310, T D 311T)
show description

Flags: Cultural Diversity in the U.S. and Writing

This course examines theatre, dance and performance art by and about Asian Americans. We analyze these media in social, political, and historical contexts. We also use these sources as models for creating our own original work. As such, this class is focused on praxis--the marriage of theory and practice. In other words, this course combines analysis of writing and media with learning basic methods for collaboration and devising performance. We define Asian America broadly, including both immigrants and people of Asian descent who have lived in the Americas for multiple generations. We engage with both documented (via text, video, or description) and live performance to examine how performance as a medium and mode of making meaning affects our perception of the world. We employ strategies from gender studies, queer studies, performance studies, and critical race studies to discuss how Asian Americans make meaning through performance, and how performance represents Asian America. Finally, we use our critical analysis to discover and apply creative strategies toward building meaning around Asian America that reflects our own political and social beliefs and hopes. This class is open to anyone who finds Asian American identity, identity more broadly, and/or performance of interest. No previous experience with Asian American studies or performance studies required.

Potential authors, companies, and texts include: Josephine Lee, Karen Shimakawa, Esther Kim Lee, Yutian Wong, Young Jean Lee, Ayad Akhtar, Chay Yew, David Henry Hwang, Jessica Hagedorn, Aasif Mandvi, D'Lo, Eiko and Koma, Ananya Chatterjee, Ma-Yi Theatre, East-West Players, Mu Performing Arts, Silk Road Theatre, Kristina Wong, Damon Chua, Pangea World Theatre, Teresa Cha, Yoko Ono, M.I.A., Qui Nguyen, and David Eng.


WGS 301 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

46240 • Hey-Colon, Rebeca
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GDC 4.302
(also listed as AMS 315, MAS 311, SOC 308D)
show description

Description:

This course centers on the experiences of Chicanas and Latinas in the United States in the late 20th and early 21st century. Through interaction with literature, film, and historical/archival material we will craft an evolving understanding of how ethnicity, gender, race, class, language, citizenship, and other variables can simultaneously create community and cause rifts within the Latina population. Special emphasis will be placed on Chicanas, Puerto Ricans, Cuban-Americans, and Dominican-Americans. By the end of the course you will have acquired an overall understanding of the particularities of each group, as well as of the common experiences they share.

 Sample Readings (subject to change)

 The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

 How to Leave Hialeah by Jeannine Capó Crucet

 Soledad by Angie Cruz

 West Side Story (film)


WGS 301 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

46235 • Gray, Amanda
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 105
(also listed as SOC 308D)
show description

Introductory Topics in Women's and Gender Studies.  Check cross-listings for originating field of study.


WGS 301 • Family Relationships

46225 • Walsh, Courtney
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GEA 127
show description

Introductory Topics in Women's and Gender Studies.  Check cross-listings for originating field of study.


WGS 301 • Family Relationships

46230 • Williamson, Hannah
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM FAC 21
show description

Introductory Topics in Women's and Gender Studies.  Check cross-listings for originating field of study.


WGS 301 • Fertility And Reproduction

46250 • Glass, Jennifer
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.102
(also listed as SOC 307K)
show description

Description:

Why do birth rates rise and fall?  How can the U.S. have both record rates of childlessness as well as the highest rates of teen childbearing and unwanted pregnancy in the industrialized world?  Why does educating women lower birth rates faster than any population control program in the Third World?  This course will explore when, why, how, and with whom Americans bear children, and how we compare to other developed and developing countries in the world.  We will explore infertility and its treatments, the ethics of surrogacy, voluntary childlessness, the rapid rise of nonmarital childbearing in the U.S. and other countries, the politics of childbirth and risks of maternal mortality in developed and developing countries, and the declining populations and rapid aging  of  rich countries including Japan, Italy, and Spain where women have basically stopped having children. 

Texts:  Available at Coop

Liza Mundy, Everything Conceivable, NY: Anchor Books, 2007

Michelle Goldberg, Means of Reproduction , NY: Penguin Bookds, 2010

Grading and Rrequirements:

Two opinion essays: 30%

Midterm exam:       40%

Final exam:             20%

Class participation: 10%

 


WGS 301 • Gay & Lesbian Lit & Culture

46245 • Frank, Sarah
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 104
(also listed as E 314V)
show description

E 314V  l  4-Gay and Lesbian Literature and Culture

 

Instructor:  Frank, S

Unique #:  34370

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  WGS 301

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  Yes

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  In this course, students will be introduced to fiction, poetry, and criticism by gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans, and/or queer writers.  Readings, discussions, and assignments will situate contemporary queer literature in historical context, emphasizing the role of important movements and events—including the Stonewall Riots, lesbian feminism, the AIDS epidemic, and drag and ball culture—in shaping modern queer and LGBT identities.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Andrew Holleran, Dancer from the Dance; Sarah Schulman, People in Trouble; Jennie Livingston, Paris is Burning, and others.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Major assignments include two short papers focusing on Close Reading and Intertextual Analysis, and one digital assignment focusing on the analysis of visual media.

 

Students’ performances will be evaluated based on The Learning Record, a portfolio style of assessment.


WGS 301 • Introduction To Modern Africa

46215 • Falola, Oloruntoyin
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.134
(also listed as AFR 310K, HIS 310)
show description

This course introduces students to the history of Africa since 1800 to the present. The course is divided into four parts: Part I – an overview of African life before 1800. Part II – an overview of the partition of Africa and the upheavals to economic, political, cultural, and social institutions. Part III – an over view of colonial histories, the struggles for freedom, and the euphoria of independence. Part IV – an overview of the legacies and disappointments of colonialism, and the post-colonialism. Because the continent is so vast, its history complex, and the time period so wide, each part will have a case study to illuminate each section of the course more concretely, giving students both depth and breadth in a subject for which they have little or no prior knowledge. The readings augment the lectures and allow students to follow their interests from the topics covered. This is a great course to take before “that trip to Africa!” The class will also utilize feature films and documentaries to illustrate the historical issues more vividly. Karibu! Welcome!


WGS 301 • Toni Morrison & August Wilson

46220 • Thompson, Lisa
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.102
(also listed as AFR 317F, AMS 315, T D 311T)
show description

Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison and the late Pulitzer award-winning playwright August Wilson are two of the most honored and prolific African American writers in history. They both make race (and particularly blackness) central to their work. Morrison, considered a “leading voice in current debates about constructions of race and gender in U.S. literature and culture . . . refuses to allow race to be relegated to the margins of literary discourse.” Similarly, Wilson cautioned against a premature, post-racial vision of the world (especially considering the cultural politics of American theatre). We will explore how notions of race and power erupt in Morrison’s “fantastic earthy realism” and Wilson’s “dramatic vision.” The class will consider their engagement with American history, trace the African American cultural influences evident in their work, and study film adaptations of their texts. Finally, by reading their essays, interviews, and speeches we will measure Morrison’s and Wilson’s influence as public intellectuals. 


WGS 301 • Women, Gender, Lit, Culture

46255 • Mills, Regina
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM FAC 7
(also listed as E 314V)
show description

E 314V  l  6-Women, Gender, Literature, and Culture

 

Instructor:  Mills, R

Unique #:  34380

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  WGS 301

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  Yes

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  In this course, we will consider how gender has (and continues to) influence the way that we read, write, and play.  In this course, we will read (and play) stories that identify, interrogate, and rebel against gendered tropes in three genres: short stories, life writing, and video games.  In addition, we will consider the following questions:  How does gender interact with other categories of identity, such as race, age, religion, sexual orientation, disability, and ethnicity? How have reading, writing, and playing communities been historically constructed in regards to gender norms? Is there a “woman’s way” of reading, writing, and playing? Why do we so often conflate “women” and “gender”?

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

This course also contains a cultural diversity flag.

 

Required Texts (subject to change):Bloodchild and Other Stories (2005, 2nd ed.) by Octavia Butler • Zami: A New Spelling of My Name: A Biomythography (1982)by Audre Lorde • Gone Home (2013, video game) • Additional readings on Canvas

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, one of which will have a multimedia component.  The first essay must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (75% of the final grade).  You will also be graded based on reading quizzes, reaction pieces, and class participation (25% of the final grade).


WGS 301 • Women, Gender, Lit, Culture

46260 • Rivera-Dundas, Adena
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A203A
(also listed as E 314V)
show description

E 314L  l  6-Women, Gender, Literature, and Culture

 

Instructor:  Rivera-Dundas, A

Unique #:  34385

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  To justify his silencing of Senator Elizabeth Warren, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell now famously remarked, “She was warned.  She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted.”  In this course, we will read women who persist in the face of those who would silence them.  Starting with the Harlem Renaissance, touching on second-wave feminism, and focusing on the contemporary moment, this course will trace the lineage of women speaking out against racist, sexist, and homophobic oppression.  We will consider how form and genre relate to acts of political dissent, and how writing creates freedoms that other forms of public speech negate.  As a class we will try to answer questions such as:  What does it mean to use storytelling to fight oppression?  What types of narratives emerge when giving voice to marginalized communities?  How do female-authored texts engage with race, class, and sexuality and to what degree are those commitments inseparable?

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Jesmyn Ward’s The Men We Reaped, Claudia Rankine's Citizen,Chris Kraus’s I Love Dick,and selections from bell hooks, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Maggie Nelson.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (80% of the final grade).  There may also be graded short assignments, reading journals, and in-class presentations (20% of the final grade).


WGS 303 • Introduction To Lgbtq Studies

46265 • Nault, Curran
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 0.120
show description

Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies.

DESCRIPTION:
Explores concepts of gender and sexuality, race, class, religion, and nation; as well as skills in theory, history, and research methods relevant to LGBTQ studies. The course will also survey the making of modern understandings of sexual and LGBTQ identities in the last one hundred years and the implications of this history for broader understandings of gender and sexuality.


WGS 305 • Intro To Women's & Gender Stds

46275 • Somers-Willett, Susan
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 3.116
show description

Women’s and Gender Studies is an interdisciplinary field that asks critical questions about the relationships between sex, gender, society, and our own experiences as political acts. In this course, students will come to understand key differences between sex, gender, and sexuality; define feminism both broadly and personally, particularly in relationship to race, class, and other intersectional aspects of identity; learn about queer and trans histories and experiences; explore women’s experiences in international contexts; and investigate the body and its representation as a way to uncover gender norms and expectations. We will also discuss and write about recent social controversies (such as bathroom legislation, bias incidents, the exclusion of groups from the Women’s March on Washington) as moments that reveal and critique the cultural codes of gender. An emphasis will be placed on self-identified women, LGBTQA+ individuals, and people of color.


WGS 313 • Child Development

46285 • Speranza, Hallie
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM GAR 0.102
show description

Same as Human Development and Family Sciences 313.

DESCRIPTION:
Motor, language, cognitive, social, and emotional development in the family context.

PREREQUISITE:
Credit or registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 113L (corresponding Lab for the course), and Psychology 301 with grade of at least C-.


WGS 313 • Child Development

46280 • Kreischer, Amber
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CPE 2.216
show description

Same as Human Development and Family Sciences 313.

DESCRIPTION:
Motor, language, cognitive, social, and emotional development in the family context.

PREREQUISITE:
Credit or registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 113L (corresponding Lab for the course), and Psychology 301 with grade of at least C-.


WGS 322 • Population And Society

46295 • Raley, Kelly
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.102
(also listed as SOC 369K)
show description

 

Description:

Population studies or demography is an interdisciplinary field, incorporating insights from sociology, economics, geography, anthropology, biology, and other disciplines. Fertility, mortality, and migration are the social processes through which populations change and so these are the foundations of demography. Yet understanding these mechanisms of population change requires us to draw on theory and research on political, economic, cultural, and natural forces. 

One goal of this class is to provide students with a basic understanding of human population composition and variation across time and space. Demography has developed useful tools to describe population change and a second goal of this class is to teach students about demographic theory, data, and method.

Grading:

There will be three exams. There will not be a cumulative final.

Be sure to mark your calendar!  No make-up exams except in extreme circumstances.  Make ups may be 100% essay.

Assignments - You will choose 4 of 6 written assignments to complete.

Note: We will not accept late assignments.

Grades are calculated as a weighted average of grades on assignments, papers, and exams. A=93-100; A-90-92; B+=87-89; B=83-86; B-=80-82; C+=77-79; C=73-76; C-70-72; D+=67-69; D=63-66; D-=60-62; F < 60.

Reading Materials

Required text: Demography: The Study of Human Populatin by Lundquist, Anderton, & Yaukey. Waveland Press, Inc.

On-line Readings: There are a number of short reading assignments, marked with an [Readings].

 

 


WGS 322 • Sociology Of Gender

46290 • Palmo, Nina
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as SOC 333K)
show description

Description:

n this course we will study the meaning of gender in contemporary American society, along with its meaning historically and across cultures. We will chart the ways in which gender is produced and regulated through social institutions such as the workplace, family, and religion, and how this shapes our everyday. The course will also explore how race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality shape conceptions of gender.  
 
Readings: 
 
Course readings will consist of peer-reviewed journal articles. 
 
Grading: 
 
Grading will be based on exams and 3-4 brief writing assignments. 

WGS 324 • Gender & The News

46305 • Chen, Gina
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CMA 3.116
(also listed as WGS 393)
show description

Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies in Communication.

DESCRIPTION:
Multidisciplinary course examining issues of women, gender, and sexuality in media industries, texts, and audiences.


WGS 324 • Gender And Media Culture

46302 • McClearen, Jennifer
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CMA 3.120
show description

Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies in Communication.

DESCRIPTION:
Multidisciplinary course examining issues of women, gender, and sexuality in media industries, texts, and audiences.


WGS 324 • Gender/Race/Sexlty Sport Media

46304 • McClearen, Jennifer
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CMA 3.124
show description

Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies in Communication.

DESCRIPTION:
Multidisciplinary course examining issues of women, gender, and sexuality in media industries, texts, and audiences.


WGS 335 • Beyonce Femnsm/Rihanna Womnsm

46310-46335 • Tinsley, Natasha
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM GAR 0.102
(also listed as AFR 372C)
show description

Course Description

“Texas. Texas. Texas.” In her musical film Lemonade, Beyoncé—costumed in a spectacularly African-print dress—sings these opening words to “Daddy Lessons” while swaying to a single guitar at Fort Macomb, New Orleans. Departing from the wide-ranging locations of her self-titled album, this shot encapsulates the vision of her current work: an unapologetically black feminism that situates itself in the historical and political landscape of the U.S. South in general, and Texas and Louisiana in particular. In this course, we follow Beyoncé’s invitation to consider the U.S. South as a fertile site for black feminist imaginations and projects. Beginning with close readings of Lemonade and Beyoncé, we enter into conversation with other black feminist texts that engage black women’s aesthetic, spiritual, erotic, and political traditions in Louisiana, Texas, and Alabama. The course provides students with an introduction to media studies methodology as well as black feminist theory, and challenges us to imagine what gender politics look like when black women, and the U.S. South, become central rather than peripheral to our worldviews.


WGS 335 • Human Sexuality

46340 • Jowers, Esbelle
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BEL 858
show description

Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies.

DESCRIPTION:
The perspectives, experiences, and cultural contributions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer people, examined from different disciplinary and/or interdisciplinary perspectives according to the
topic.


WGS 335 • Lgbtq Oppression: Dialog

46345 • Hogan, Kristen
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM JES A217A
(also listed as S W 360K, T D 357T)
show description

This course is the second part of the “Peers for Pride” facilitation program. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and asexual people, as well as all people identifying under the queer umbrella (LGBTQA+) on the UT campus face everyday stresses and obstacles created by homophobia, biphobia, transphobia, and acephobia, often in connection with other forms of oppression including racism, sexism, and ableism. In this course students become peer educators and facilitate performance-based LGBTQA+ and racial justice workshops in classes, in dorms, with student organizations, and as open workshops to change the campus climate. Throughout the semester, we continue to build our knowledge of performance-based social justice facilitation in higher education and of LGBTQA+ realities.


WGS 335 • Queer Study In Low Culture

46342 • Gutterman, Lauren
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 436A
show description

Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies.

DESCRIPTION:
The perspectives, experiences, and cultural contributions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer people, examined from different disciplinary and/or interdisciplinary perspectives according to the
topic.


WGS 340 • Alvarez And Cisneros

46349 • Garcia, Patricia
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 103
(also listed as E 349S, MAS 374)
show description

DESCRIPTION:

The careers of two of the most important Latina writers of the last 30 years, Sandra Cisneros and Julia Alvarez, cover multiple genres:  short fiction, novels, poetry, children’s and young adult literature, and non-fiction.  Moreover, the construction of ethnic and gendered identity within their works creates a Latino/a aesthetics, especially in considering the merging of author and speaker, fiction and history, and, stylistically, poetic and prose voices.  Through our readings and discussions, we will also compare their different ethnic experiences in the United States as Mexican American and Caribbean/Dominican American writers.  In addition to writing analytical essays, students will also construct and present a bibliography of secondary resources and literary criticism on the author of his/her choice.

 

TEXT:

Cisneros

  • “Woman Hollering Creek” and Other Stories
  • Caramelo
  • The House on Mango Street
  • Loose Woman

Alvarez

  • How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents
  • ¡Yo!
  • In the Time of the Butterflies
  • How Tia Lola Came to Visit Stay
  • The Woman I Keep to Myself

 

           

GRADING:

Class participation and attendance (10%)

Peer Response Workshops (10%)

Essays (2 total; Essay 1 will undergo a substantial revision after peer workshop and instructor feedback; 60%)

Bibliography and Presentation (20%)


WGS 340 • Black Queer Literature/Film

46385 • Richardson, Matt
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM SAC 5.102
(also listed as AFR 372E, E 376M)
show description

In recent years the term “queer” has emerged as an identity and an analytical framework that focuses on non-normative ways of being. This seminar will combine elements of critical race theory and queer theory to investigate the particular experiences and cultural production of Black sexual and gender variant communities. We will analyze written works and films/videos by and about lesbians, bisexual, transgender and gay Black people.  Emphasis will be on understanding the historical and theoretical construction of sexual and gender identities and sexual/cultural practices in Black communities. Special attention will be paid to the construction of race, gender and sexual identities in North America, the Caribbean and the United Kingdom.

Required Texts

Audre Lorde Sister/Outsider & Zami: A New Spelling of My Name

Jackie Kay Trumpet

Melvin Dixon Vanishing Rooms

Sharon Bridgforth Love, Conjure, Blues

Samuel Delaney, Times Square Red, Times Square Blue

Films from various artists including Marlon Riggs, Isaac Julien, Yvonne Welbon and Cheryl Dunye.

Films: Even though these are films are not paper reading material, all films are required texts for the class. Students may be required to watch some films outside of class time. At such times, films will be available at the Fine Arts Library.

Course Reader: Readers are available at Jenn’s Copy on Guadalupe and 21st St.

Course Requirements:

Requirement Breakdown:

Attendance                                     10%

Midterm Paper 4-6pgs                   20%

Presentation Paper 4-6pgs            20%

Presentation/Blog Posts/Abstract   20%

Final Paper (8-10)                          30%


WGS 340 • Black Women/Transnatl State

46410 • Smith, Christen
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GEA 114
(also listed as AFR 372F, ANT 324L, LAS 324L)
show description

This course surveys black women’s experiences living with and confronting state oppression around the world. From the United States to Brazil, black women experience similar patterns of political, social and economic inequality. Transnationally, racism, sexism, patriarchy, homophobia, and classism affect the quality of life of black women, particularly within nation-states with legacies of slavery and colonialism. This course takes an historical, social and theoretical look at the roots of this inequality and how black women have chosen to respond to it locally and globally. How have interlocking forms of oppression affected black women’s citizenship within the modern nation-state? How have black women, in turn, sought to organize themselves in response to this oppression?

Objectives

1) To think critically about the multiple forms of oppression that affect black women’s lives globally;

2) To consider how black women’s political identity has been defined by experiences with oppression transnationally;

3) To define and articulate black women’s agency in response to oppression

Key Topics: Racism, sexism, patriarchy, homophobia, classism, transnationalism, representation, agency, black feminism.


WGS 340 • Chicana Feminisms

46348 • Guidotti-Hernandez, Nicole
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM CMA 5.190
(also listed as AMS 321, MAS 374)
show description

DESCRIPTION:

Emerging out of the social protest movements of the 1960’s, Chicana Feminists offered an alternative mapping of feminist literary and political thought with the issues of gender, race, and sexuality as their primary concerns. In this course, we will examine what constitute advanced topics in Chicana Feminism, including the history of the movement, in its multiple incarnations, and its epistemological interventions into the contemporary period. Tracing Chicana feminist theory as it broke off from Chicano nationalist politics of the 1960’s, to a politics that is concerned with practices of communal feminism that encompasses men and women of the working classes, we will examine how it has shifted and changed over time.  We will also look at how Chicana feminist thought breaks with and intersects with Euro-American or European models of feminism. In addition, we will examine the ways in which contemporary Chicana Feminists have moved towards a more third-world and/or transnational model of feminism that takes into account the inequities that exist between first and third world subjects.  Through the study of essays, testimonios, film, and literatures that engage feminism, we will discuss how material conditions, spirituality, gender inequality, class inequality, racial inequality, and questions of sexuality allow Chicana women to engage in activities that we might understand as feminist. Students will undertake a final research paper for the course

 

TEXT:

Arredondo, et. all                Chicana Feminisms

Blackwell, Maylei                Chicana Power

García, Alma, Ed.                  Chicana Feminist Thought: the Basic Historical Writings

Cisneros, Sandra                  Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories

Hurtado, Aida                                   Voicing Chicana Feminisms

Moraga, Cherríe.                   Loving in the War Years: lo que nunca pasó por sus labios

Pardo                                      Mexican American Women Activists

Viramontes, Helena                       The Moths and Other Stories

 

           

GRADING:

Class Participation (discussions, attendance, and twitter feed)         25%

Oral Presentation                                                                                        10%

Essay 1 and 2                                                                                                30%

Prospectus and Bibliography for Final Essay                                         10%

Final Paper                                                                                                   25%


WGS 340 • Community & Social Devel-Gha

46350 • Jones, Omi
(also listed as AFR 374C, AFR 387D, ANT 324L, T D 357T, T D 387D)
show description

In this course, students will participate in social change strategies that Ghanaians employ to strengthen their individual lives, their communities, and their environment.  These strategies include the work of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), art for social justice, and social service agencies.  The course involves both experiential and classroom learning, with an international-based service learning component that intentionally integrates community service, theatre for social change, academic learning, and civic engagement. This course is offered alongside Texas State University’s “Ghana:  Human Rights and Social Justice Applied” which expands the opportunities for learning from a wide range of faculty and fellow students. During the course, students will work with various non-governmental organizations, arts organizations, social service agencies, schools, and/or community-based organizations to implement small-scale community and/or art projects that will: 1) enhance student learning, 2) meet small-scale community needs and 3) allow students to critically reflect upon their entire study-abroad experience. 


WGS 340 • Diaspora Visions

46390 • Okediji, Moyosore
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM DFA 2.204
(also listed as AFR 374F)
show description

Multidisciplinary course examining experiences and issues of gender in different cultures.


WGS 340 • Gender And Modern India

46360 • Chatterjee, Indrani
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 1.126
(also listed as ANS 361, HIS 364G)
show description

This is a three-part course that examines the shifting nature of modernity between precolonial and colonial periods in the Indian subcontinent. The first part immerses students in plural ways of thinking, inhabiting and performing gender. They will be asked to read Sufi and Bhakti poetry, distinguish between biological personhood and social selfhood, place relationships of men and women in wider matrixes of kinship, caste-jati, economy and class formations. The second part will enable students to explore British colonial legal, administrative and economic processes in 1700-1900. These processes reconstituted older codes of gender as well as the structures within which women experienced marriage, abortion, inheritance, divorce and death. In the final segment, each student will evaluate how these developments empowered some women while disabling others. They will learn to assess the contradictory movements by undertaking direct research into one of the reform movements of the nineteenth or twentieth century, or by writing a review essay based on the available books on this theme in the UT library.


Required Reading: 1 text book, 1 novel, and multiple articles and primary documents posted by the instructor on Canvas ( Students must buy:  Geraldine Forbes, Women in Modern India (Cambridge University Press, revised edition) and  Bapsi Sidhwa, Ice Candy Man (older title) Cracking India (new title, Penguin Books, 1989, 1991, 2006).


Required Written Work: 1 map quiz (10), 2 short responses (20) , 1 mid-term with IDs (30), 1 final essay (20).

Grading is based on Attendance (10), in-class discussion of a document (10), and all segments of written work (80)


WGS 340 • Gender/Art In Muslim World

46405 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 303
(also listed as ANS 372, ISL 373)
show description

Multidisciplinary course examining experiences and issues of gender in different cultures.


WGS 340 • Historcl Images Afr In Film

46380 • Falola, Oloruntoyin
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM MEZ 1.216
(also listed as AFR 374F, HIS 350L)
show description

Since the late 1980s, the African film industry has undergone radical changes that reflect an increasingly globalized economy and the impact of structural adjustment policies. This revolution is characterized by the low-budget, direct to video films commonly referred to as Nollywood.  While these films have come under criticism for their low production values and popularization of negative cultural stereotypes, the Nigerian video industry has risen to colossal proportions, sweeping across the continent and throughout the global diaspora.  The purpose of this course is to examine the rise of Nollywood and the genesis of a popular African art form.  Through a combination of films and readings, students will explore how Nollywood, in comparison with the established FESPACO film industry and Hollywood, depicts the society and culture of Nigeria, and Africa as a whole.  Additionally, this course seeks to engage students in a debate about how popular films affect historical imaginations and memory.  While these images have previously been the product of Hollywood and Francophone films, this course will introduce Nollywood as an alternative to how Nigerians and Africa as a whole understand their history. 

Texts:

Haynes, Jonathan, ed. Nigerian Video Films. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2000.

Rosenstone, Robert A. Visions of the Past: The Challenge of Film to Our Idea of History.

Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1995.

Saul, Mahir and Ralph A. Austen, eds. Viewing African Cinema in the Twenty-First Century:

Art Films and the Nollywood Video Revolution. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2010.

*There will also be several journal articles assigned throughout the semester.  These will be available through the university library’s online databases and posted to the course documents section of the class Blackboard page.

ASSSIGNMENTS:

Assignment                Due                           Points

Attendance                Every class session           50

Book/Film Review    Week 6                     100

Conference Report Week 10                   50

Final Paper                Week 15                   200

Discussion Posts       See syllabus for deadlines          100


WGS 340 • Human Rights & World Politics

46365 • Evans, Rhonda
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 201
(also listed as GOV 365N)
show description

Human rights feature prominently in contemporary world politics. The decades since World War II have witnessed the construction of a large and complex international human rights regime that consists of the United Nations and several regionally based human rights systems. This course, focusing primarily on the UN, introduces you to the legal, political, and policy dimensions of international human rights. In so doing, it: (1) explores the philosophical and moral foundations of these rights; (2) surveys the legal and institutional infrastructure and processes that exist at domestic and international levels for the promotion of human rights; (3) examines the main actors involved in human rights advocacy, including states, international organizations, tribunals, activists, nongovernmental organizations, and national human rights institutions; and (4) emphasizes the role of law and quasi-judicial institutions in international human rights advocacy. The following questions animate this course. What exactly are international human rights?  How do they matter, if at all?  In other words, do human rights work? And if so, under what conditions do they work? These are very important questions considering the significant resources and efforts that are devoted to international human rights institutions and advocacy each year. And yet, you may be surprised to learn that we actually know relatively little about the efficacy of international human rights. In exploring why this is so, we will consider the various challenges to studying international human rights from an empirical (as opposed to a normative) perspective. This will require us to cover the basic mechanics of political science research. Students should emerge from this course with an enhanced understanding of the mechanics of human rights advocacy and an improved ability to evaluate its effectiveness. 

 

c)   Grading Policy

The final course grade will be based on a student’s performance on three exams, a five-page paper, and an assigned research project.

 

d)   Texts

We will only use a course packet.  No textbooks are required.


WGS 340 • Sex & Power In Afr Diaspora

46395 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 1.102
(also listed as AFR 372G, ANT 324L)
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Exploration of various experiences and theories of sex, intimacy, and desire alongside intellectual and artistic engagements with power hierarchies and spirituality across transnational black communities. Subjects include the concept of "erotic subjectivity" from various theoretical and methodological angles, principally within African diasporic contexts.


WGS 340 • South Asian Migration To US

46375 • Bhalodia-Dhanani, Aarti
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SZB 240
(also listed as AAS 325, ANS 372, HIS 365G)
show description

Flag: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

This course examines the South Asian diaspora in United States. We will cover migration of people from India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh to United States and other parts of the world. While studying the history and culture of South Asian America, we will discuss globalization, transnationalism, migration, assimilation, formation of a diaspora, discrimination, and gender and sexuality, all major themes in Asian American Studies. The course is arranged chronologically and thematically. We will start in the nineteenth century following the journey of the first South Asian migrants to US. We will then move on to studying the Bengali and Punjabi immigrants to U.S. and the formation of Bengali-African and Punjabi-Mexican communities. We will study how American immigration laws have facilitated or inhibited South Asian migration to US in the twentieth century. Topics covered include economic and social reasons for migration, adaptation to American life, cultural and religious assimilation, changing family structures, and discrimination and exclusion. We will end the semester by discussing South Asian American life in the twenty-first century.

Texts:
Karen Isaken Leonard, The South Asian Americans  
Vivek Bald, Bengali Harlem and the Lost Histories of South Asian America
Judith M. Brown, Global South Asians: Introducing the Modern Diaspora
Shamita Das Gupta edited, A Patchwork Shawl: Chronicles of South Asian Women in America
Knut A. Jacobsen and R. Pratap Kumar edited, South Asians in the Diaspora: Histories and Religious Traditions
Susan Kosby and R. Radhakrishnan edited, Transnational South Asians: The Making of a Neo-Diaspora           

Grades:
Attendance: 5%
Class Participation: 10%
Object Analysis Assignment: 5%
Exam 1: 25%
Exam 2: 25%
Research paper topic and bibliography: 5%
Research paper: 25%


WGS 340 • The Qur'an

46400 • Azam, Hina
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 1
(also listed as ISL 340)
show description

Multidisciplinary course examining experiences and issues of gender in different cultures.


WGS 340 • Veiling In The Muslim World

46370 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 101
(also listed as ANS 372, ANT 324L, ISL 372, MEL 321, R S 358, SOC 321K)
show description

Description:

This course will deal with the cultural significance and historical practices of veiling, “Hijab”, in the Muslim world. The issue of veiling as it relates to women has been subject to different interpretations and viewed from various perspectives, and with recent political developments and the resurgence of Islam, the debate over it and over women’s roles in Muslim countries has taken various shapes.  A number of Muslim countries are going back to their Islamic traditions and implementing a code of behavior that involves some form of veiling in Public /or segregation to various degrees for women. In some Muslim nations women are re-veiling on their own. In others, women resist the enforcement of such practices. We will examine the various perspectives, interpretations and practices relating to Hijab in the Muslim world with respect to politics, religion, feminism, culture, new wave of women converts and the phenomenon of “Islamic fashion” as a marketing tool.    

 Texts

 Reader Packet.

Will be announced where the Packet is sold

 Book:

Faegheh Shirazi. The Veil Unveiled: Hijab in Modern Culture. University Press of Florida, 2001, and 2003

Grading:

Active participation (assigned article with discussion questions/ is a group activity) 10%

Regular Class Attendance 5%

3 quizzes (Lowest grade will be dropped) 20%

Midterm Exam 30%

Final Research Paper (20%), and Oral Presentation %15 (This is a group activity)

 

 


WGS 345 • Animals/American Culture

46470 • Davis, Janet
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 436A
(also listed as HIS 350R)
show description

Topics in Women's and Gender Studies.


WGS 345 • Psychology Of Women

46425 • Awad, Germine
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 4.134
show description

Topics in Women's and Gender Studies.


WGS 345 • Psychsocl Iss Womens Health

46464 • Holahan, Carole
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEL 858
show description

Topics in Women's and Gender Studies.


WGS 345 • Sociology Of Education

46455 • Muller, Chandra
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 3.106
(also listed as AFR 321L, SOC 321L)
show description

Description:

We all have many years of experience in schools and we know what happens in schools. Do schools provide opportunities for people to have a better life? Are schools an equalizer? Are they failing? Is mandated testing a good thing? This course is designed to challenge and think critically about what we think we know about schools and education. We will study sociological research on what schools do, for people, for communities, and for our society. We will consider how people of different races, ethnicities, gender, and disability statuses interact with schools and how inequality in achievement comes about. And we will question what policies might improve schools. This is not a course where you will learn that there is one right or true answer. Rather, we will draw on our own backgrounds and experiences, read and discuss academic research, debate and argue about the issues, all with the goal of challenging and transforming our ideas. The course objective is to better understand education and social inequality.


WGS 345 • The Family

46445 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.128
(also listed as SOC 323)
show description

Description

This course analyzes the family as a social institution, using the sociological perspective. 

Studying the family can be tricky in that we all have our own experiences being part of families.  It is important, then, to go beyond our own experiences to explore both the private aspects of the family as well as public aspects of the family using various kinds of empirical data.  Shifting definitions of the family are the context for a brief history of the family.  Throughout the course we will explore family change. Specific topics will include dating, “hooking up” and marriage; parents and children; cohabitation, divorce and stepfamilies; and how the family intersects with, is shaped by, and shapes other social institutions, with particular attention to the economy and the world of work as well as state and social policies.

 Grading Policy

Students will be evaluated via short papers, in-class short answer and essay examinations, a group project, and class participation. 

 Texts: (subject to change)

Bogle, Kathleen.  2008.  Hooking Up: Sex, Dating and Relationships on Campus.  NYU Press.       

Coontz, Stephanie.  2006.  Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage. New York: Penguin.                

Ferguson, Susan J. (ed.).  2010.  Shifting the Center: Understanding Contemporary Families, Fourth Edition.  Boston: McGraw-Hill. 

Lareau, Annette.   2011. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life, Second Edition with an Update a Decade Later.  Berkeley: University of California Press.

Stone, Pamela.  2007. Opting Out? Why Women Really Quit Careers and Head Home. Berkeley: University of California Press.


WGS 345 • The Family

46440 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM ETC 2.132
(also listed as SOC 323)
show description

Description:

In this course we will analyze the family as a social institution, using sociological perspectives.

Shifting definitions of the family provide a starting point for an exploration of the history of “the family”. Throughout the course we will explore if and how the family is declining and changing using conservative, liberal, centrist and feminist perspectives. Specific topics will include parental and child roles; gender, race and social class as stratification systems which influence families; how the family intersects with, is shaped by, and shapes other social institutions, with particular attention to the economy and the world of work as well as state and social policies; and cohabitation, divorce and stepfamilies as three important changes in the US family over the last several decades.

The primary objectives for this course are:

• To use a sociological perspective in studying families, with an emphasis on diversity within and

between families.

• To think about families in societal context.

• To sharpen critical thinking skills by participating in class discussions and other group activities and completing writing assignments that require analysis and revision.

Questions we will address include:

• What is the definition of family? (Why is this a complicated question?)

• What social-structural forces shape family processes?

• How is the family a gendered institution?

• How does government attempt to shape families? Support families?

Texts:

  • Coontz, Stephanie. 2006. Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage. New York: Penguin.
  • Edin, Kathryn and Luke Shaefer.  2016.  $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America.  Mariner Books.
  • Lareau, Annette. 2011. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life,Second Edition with an Update a Decade Later. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Rothman, Barbara Katz. 2016. A Bun in the Oven: How the Food and Birth Movements Resist Industrialization. New York University Press.

 Additional readings will be posted to our Canvas course site.

Grading and Requirements:

Literature Review and Revision (30% total)

Peer Review (10%)

Portfolio (25%)

Class Presentation (15%)

Class Synthesis (10%)

Participation (10%)


WGS 345 • Toni Morrison

46474 • Dechavez, Yvette
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.120
(also listed as AFR 372E, E 349S)
show description

E 349S  l  5-Toni Morrison

 

Instructor:  DeChavez, Y

Unique #:  35014

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E; WGS 345

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This course examines select novels by Nobel laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Toni Morrison.  The novels thematize womanism as theory, which incorporates race, gender, and culture in experiences uniquely shared by women--particularly women of color--across class and regional boundaries.  Collectively, Morrison's characters confront a wide range of challenging crises:  infanticide, male-female relations, familial conflict, socio-economical, cultural survival, etc.  Morrison's novels are a gloss on the African-American literary tradition, deeply rooted in the American literary tradition.

 

Required Reading (subject to change):  The Bluest Eye, 1970; Sula, 1973; Song of Solomon, 1977; Beloved, 1987; Jazz, 1992; A Mercy, 2008; God Help the Child.

 

Audio-Visual Aids:  Toni Morrison with Bill Moyers, History of Ideas Series; Toni Morrison on Beloved; Jazz and the Harlem Renaissance; Toni Morrison on Oprah Winfrey (Song of Solomon); The Margaret Garner Opera (documentary).

 

Requirements & Grading:  .50 Two Critical essays TBA (5 pages each; typed, ds); .30 A Reading Notebook (12-page minimum; typed, ds; see separate instruction sheet); .20 Presentations (TBA) / quizzes / class participation.

 

ATTENDANCE:  Regular attendance is required.  More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. Penalties may range from a reduction in overall course grade to failure of the course itself.  I reserve the right to make decisions on a case-by-case basis.  The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies.  If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class.  You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.  Read each novel completely by the first day of discussion for that book.  No makeup for quizzes is permitted.  Course pack articles are required reading.

 

GRADING SCALE:  Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric.  Please note that to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage.  Thus, a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999.  The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

 

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

 

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade.  This is a writing-intensive course.  No final exam is given.


WGS 345 • Vamps, Stars, And The Diva

46435 • Bonifazio, Paola
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 1.106
(also listed as EUS 347, F C 345, ITC 349)
show description

Prof. Paola Bonifazio and Prof. Hervé Picherit

Spring 2018

 

ITC349/FC356  “Vamps, Stars, and the Diva 

From superhuman being to girl next-door, from international commodity to national icon: what is a star? In this course, students will study French and Italian films through the lens of stardom, exploring the many cultural and social meanings of which the faces and bodies of stars are revealing. We will examine the role that female stars play in the construction of national and gender identities, while also taking into consideration the transnational and transcultural aspects of stardom and the film industry. Blurring gender boundaries, we will also investigate the director as diva, star performances as cross-dressing, and female heroes in masculine film genres such as action movies.

 

There are three main goals for this course.  The first is the acquisition of the intellectual and interpretative tools specific to film comprehension, analysis and creation.  The second is the establishment of a sense of the history of cinema as an international medium, and of French and Italian cinema in particular.  The third main goal for the course is the interrogation of different forms of female stardom, whether real or represented cinematographically.  The course will also encourage students to establish links between the films shown in the class, but also with other media.  Most importantly, the class is designed to cultivate film literacy, allowing students both to engage critically and create with this medium.

 

Required Text:

Ed Sikov. Introduction to Film Studies. New York: Columbia University Press, 2009. 

 

Films:

Angel-A (2005)

Everybody’s Woman (Max Ophuls, 1934)

Les Enfants du paradis (1945)

La strada (Federico Fellini, 1954)

Et Dieu créa la femme (1956)

Bitter Rice (Giuseppe De Santis, 1949)

Cléo de 5 à 7 (1962)

L’Avventura (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1960)

Un éléphant ça trompe énormément (1976)

A Special Day (1977)

Irma Vep (1996)

Double Hour (2009) 


WGS 345 • Virginia Woolf

46465 • Carter, Mia
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 105
(also listed as E 349S)
show description

E 349S  l  8-Virginia Woolf

 

Instructor:  Carter, M

Unique #:  35015

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  WGS 345

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  In this reading-intensive course, we will be examining some of the major fictional works of Virginia Woolf.  We will start with Woolf’s self-described “sketches” or short stories; we will also read Woolf’s major novels and modernist manifestos (essays).  Some of the areas of inquiry the class will be exploring are the value and limitations of high modernism, aesthetics and politics, English literary heritage and tradition, and feminism (Woolf’s critiques of patriarchy, war, and fascism).

 

Texts:  Selected essays, including “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” (1923), “Modern Fiction” (1925).

The Complete Shorter Fiction of Virginia Woolf; The Voyage Out (1915); Jacob’s Room (1922); To the Lighthouse (1927); The Waves (1931); The Years (1937); Between the Acts (1942).

 

Requirements & Grading:  Two 6-8-page critical analysis essays (35% each: 70% of final grade); consistently active, substantial and significant participation, a portion of which will be comprised by reading quizzes (30% of final grade).

 

This is a reading-intensive, seminar-style analysis and discussion based course; in order to succeed in the class, students must make sure to keep up with the reading assignments.  If you are too busy to do heavy reading, you might want to enroll in another class.  Students must also demonstrate that they have completed the required reading and have thought about it--analyzed it closely, rigorously, critically, and creatively.  Active and significant participation comprises a substantial portion of the final grade (30%); therefore, neither silence nor lack of preparedness will serve you well in this class.  Since I cannot tell you what these texts mean, your success depends--to a great extent--on your willingness to engage with the texts and with your fellow classmates.  No one has the final, correct, absolute interpretation of these books.  I invite you to take risks, to challenge yourself, and to share your understanding of each novel or essay.

 

Attendance Policy: Please read with caution and care, and take seriously: Three absences will drop you a full letter grade (an A will become a B, etc.); four or more absences will guarantee your failure of this class.

 

*No late papers will be accepted; incomplete grades will only be given in cases of documented medical emergencies.


WGS 345 • Witches, Workers, And Wives

46460 • Hardwick, Julie
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CLA 0.128
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 343W)
show description

Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place. In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender and family and that shaped attitudes about gender and power in early modern Europe. The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways - religious reformations, European governments became more powerful at home and established colonies world wide, economic transformation as people became consumers and production expanded exponentially. Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life. In this class, we will explore how women's experiences of these patterns compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, spouses or parents. Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

Discussion of the assigned readings (see below) will be an important element of this class: you will learn more effectively when you take an active part in the analysis of the material to be covered. Consequently you must expect to read every reading assignment very carefully and thoughtfully. You should come to each class ready to ask questions and contribute observations.

You will need to demonstrate mastery of the readings to do well on the exams.

Warning: absence from class will inevitably have a serious impact on your grade because you cannot participate if you are not present. Each of you may be absent twice with no penalty. For every absence after that, three points will be deducted from your participation grade for each absence not justified by a written explanation. Please note, however, that attendance is the only the first prerequisite for participation, so that perfect attendance and complete silence will result in a grade that reflects only partial fulfillment of participation.

Daily class readings are available on Canvas or online through the Library Catalogue. (Deleted last section here.)

Grading:

Midterm 25%

Final 35%

Reading grids 20%

Witchcraft group projects 10%

Preparation and engagement 10%


WGS 345 • Women And Sport

46452 • Todd, Janice
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEL 602A
show description

Topics in Women's and Gender Studies.


WGS 350 • Feminist Theory

46475 • Singh, Balbir
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 0.120
show description

Restricted to women's and gender studies majors and minors, priority to WGS majors.
Feminist theory with selections from women's and gender studies scholars. Recommended feminist theory course for women's and gender studies majors.


WGS 358Q • Supervised Research

46480
(also listed as AAS 318Q, AAS 358Q, HMN 358Q, LAH 358Q)
show description

Supervised individual research on an issue in women's and gender studies.
Written consent of the supervising faculty member required; consent forms are available in the Center for Women's
and Gender Studies.



WGS 360 • Rsch/Thesis In Wom's/Gend Stds

46485
show description

Individual project or paper to be completed under the direction of a women's and gender studies faculty member.

Written consent of the supervising faculty member required, consent forms available in the Center for Women's and Gender Studies for that purpose.



WGS 379L • Internship In Wgs

46560
show description

Experience working in the community or for a nonprofit agency.

Prerequisite: At least twelve semester hours of coursework in women's and gender studies and written consent of the supervising faculty member; consent forms are available in the Center for Women's and Gender Studies.

More Information at: https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/cwgs/courses/internships.php


WGS 379S • Senior Seminar

46565 • Heinzelman, Susan
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.206
show description

Intensive study of selected topics in women's and gender studies.


WGS 441 • Roots Of Socl/Econ Justice-Gbr

46420 • Anderson, Barbara
show description

Study Abroad (Maymester) with School of Social Work in Great Britain.


WGS 466 • Guidance In Adult-Child Rels

46490-46545 • Ammon, Natalie
Meets W 5:00PM-7:00PM CPE 2.206
show description

Theory and implementation of positive child and adult interactions, communication, and guidance strategies.


WGS 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

46550
(also listed as AAS 679HA, AAS 679HB, AHC 679HA, AHC 679HB, C C 679HA, C C 679HB, GK 679HA, GK 679HB, HMN 679HA, HMN 679HB, LAS 679HA, LAS 679HB, LAT 679HA, LAT 679HB, LIN 679HA, LIN 679HB, WGS 679HB)
show description

WGS 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

46555
(also listed as AAS 679HA, AAS 679HB, AHC 679HA, AHC 679HB, C C 679HA, C C 679HB, GK 679HA, GK 679HB, HMN 679HA, HMN 679HB, LAS 679HA, LAS 679HB, LAT 679HA, LAT 679HB, LIN 679HA, LIN 679HB, WGS 679HA)
show description


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  • Center for Women's & Gender Studies

    The University of Texas at Austin
    Burdine Hall 536
    2505 University Avenue, A4900
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-471-5765