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WGS 301 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

44980 • Garcia, Patricia
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 206
CD SB (also listed as MAS 311, SOC 308D)
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Course Descriptoin Description:

The experiences of Mexican American women or Chicanas in the United States vary according to generation, immigrant status, socioeconomic status, education, gender, sexuality, labor, and political engagement.  This course seeks to illuminate some of the lived experience of Chicanas from a historical and contemporary perspective. Through our readings and discussions, we examine the development of Chicana feminist theory and practice, especially as seen in artistic and literary responses. Such an understanding will include an introduction to key figures in the Chicana feminism movement, as well as feminist and post-colonial thought. We will formulate ideas, views, and responses to these perspectivesthrough an examination of works by Chicana writers and artists.  Finally, we will examine Chicana feminism as an active, dynamic practice in which we engage in daily through our study and in our own lived experiences.

 Course Objectives:

  • Identify and define key concepts, theories, and figures of Chicana feminist thought.
  • Identify and analyze the diverse experiences of Chicanas living in the US both in a historical and contemporary perspective
  • Analyze texts by Chicana writers and artists using Chicana feminism as a theoretical approach.
  • Use critical thinking and writing skills to develop original arguments about course materials.
  • Apply Chicana feminist thought to our own experiences, using what we have learned to think more critically about the issues of race, class, and gender in the United States.

 Course Flags:

This course carries the Cultural Diversity flag.  The Cultural Diversity requirement increases your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. Courses carrying this flag ask you to explore the beliefs, practices, and histories of at least one cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization. Many of these courses also encourage you to reflect on your own cultural experiences.

 Texts: Gloria Anzaldúa Borderlands/La Frontera;

Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street

“Woman Hollering Creek” and other Stories;

Reyna Grande, The Distance Between Usand Dancing with Butterflies

All books are available at the UT Co-op and any articles will be posted on Canvas.

 


WGS 301 • Family Relationships

44975 • Williamson, Hannah
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM MEZ 1.306
SB
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WGS 301 • Family Relationships

44970 • Deanda, Jacqueline
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM ETC 2.114
SB
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WGS 301 • Fertility And Reproduction

44990 • Glass, Jennifer
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 0.102
CDGC SB (also listed as SOC 307K)
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Description:

Why do birth rates rise and fall?  How can the U.S. have both record rates of childlessness as well as the highest rates of teen childbearing and unwanted pregnancy in the industrialized world?  Why does educating women lower birth rates faster than any population control program in the Third World?  This course will explore when, why, how, and with whom Americans bear children, and how we compare to other developed and developing countries in the world.  We will explore infertility and its treatments, the ethics of surrogacy, voluntary childlessness, the rapid rise of nonmarital childbearing in the U.S. and other countries, the politics of childbirth and risks of maternal mortality in developed and developing countries, and the declining populations and rapid aging  of  rich countries including Japan, Italy, and Spain where women have basically stopped having children. 

Texts:  Available at Coop

Liza Mundy, Everything Conceivable, NY: Anchor Books, 2007

Michelle Goldberg, Means of Reproduction , NY: Penguin Bookds, 2010

Grading and Rrequirements:

Two opinion essays: 30%

Midterm exam:       40%

Final exam:             20%

Class participation: 10%

 


WGS 301 • Gay & Lesbian Lit & Culture

44985 • Streusand, Deborah
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 308
CDWr (also listed as E 314V)
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E 314V  l  4-Gay and Lesbian Literature and Culture

 

Instructor: Streusand, D

Unique #:  34985

Semester: Spring 2020

Cross-lists: WS 301.12

 

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description: This section of E314V will focus on how queer writers use language to express and explore their unique identities.  Mindful of intersectionality, the multiplicity of queer identity, and the many ways writers have chosen to engage with their queerness, the texts chosen for the course represent a variety of identities and genres.  The research and writing you do in this course will help you gain a more complete understanding of the relationship between literature and queer identity today.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Joshua Whitehead, Full-Metal Indigiqueer;Benjamin Alire Sáenz, Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe; Maggie Nelson, The Argonauts; Rivers Solomon, An Unkindness of Ghosts.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays making up 75% of the final grade, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor. In-class presentations will make up 15% of the final grade, while reading responses will make up 10%.


WGS 301 • Latina Perfor: Celia-Selena

44969 • Gutierrez, Laura
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 3.116
CD (also listed as MAS 319)
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WGS 303 • Introduction To Lgbtq Studies

45000 • Velasquez-Potts, Michelle
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 1.108
CDWr
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Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies.

DESCRIPTION:
Explores concepts of gender and sexuality, race, class, religion, and nation; as well as skills in theory, history, and research methods relevant to LGBTQ studies. The course will also survey the making of modern understandings of sexual and LGBTQ identities in the last one hundred years and the implications of this history for broader understandings of gender and sexuality.


WGS 305 • Intro To Women's & Gender Stds

45005 • Eby, Beth
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GDC 2.210
CD
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Women’s and Gender Studies is an interdisciplinary field that asks critical questions about the relationships between sex, gender, society, and our own experiences as political acts. In this course, students will come to understand key differences between sex, gender, and sexuality; define feminism both broadly and personally, particularly in relationship to race, class, and other intersectional aspects of identity; learn about queer and trans histories and experiences; explore women’s experiences in international contexts; and investigate the body and its representation as a way to uncover gender norms and expectations. We will also discuss and write about recent social controversies (such as bathroom legislation, bias incidents, the exclusion of groups from the Women’s March on Washington) as moments that reveal and critique the cultural codes of gender. An emphasis will be placed on self-identified women, LGBTQA+ individuals, and people of color.


WGS 313 • Child Development

45015 • Speranza, Hallie
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM CMA 2.306
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Same as Human Development and Family Sciences 313.

DESCRIPTION:
Motor, language, cognitive, social, and emotional development in the family context.

PREREQUISITE:
Credit or registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 113L (corresponding Lab for the course), and Psychology 301 with grade of at least C-.


WGS 313 • Child Development

45010 • Kreischer, Amber
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 420
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Same as Human Development and Family Sciences 313.

DESCRIPTION:
Motor, language, cognitive, social, and emotional development in the family context.

PREREQUISITE:
Credit or registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 113L (corresponding Lab for the course), and Psychology 301 with grade of at least C-.


WGS 324 • Gender & The News

45020
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BMC 3.206
CD
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WGS 335 • Beyonce Fmnsm/Rihanna Wmnsm

45040-45065 • Wint, Traci-Ann
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM GDC 2.216
CDGC
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WGS 335 • Latinx Sexualities

45025 • Rosas, Lilia
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 103
CDIIWr (also listed as AFR 372C, AMS 370, MAS 374)
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WGS 335 • Lgbtq Oppression: Dialog

45035 • Nguyen, Quynh
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM GDC 2.410
CDE
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WGS 335 • U.s. Masculinities

45030 • Beasley, Alex
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 436A
IIWr (also listed as AMS 370)
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WGS 340 • African Hist Films & Photos

45069 • Falola, Oloruntoyin
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM UTC 3.134
GC (also listed as AFR 372G, HIS 364G)
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Western exposure to Sub-Saharan Africa has primarily been through stylized Hollywood films which rarely speak to the historical backgrounds of past and present conflicts.  These films can have detrimental effects on popular conceptions of Africa, its peoples, and its plights.  Furthermore, these films can lead to an overwhelming lack of understanding for the complexities of the events in Africa’s recent history.  This course seeks to increase understanding of the social, economic, and political challenges present in the past fifty years of Africa’s history through an examination of several poular films.  Each film will serve a twofold purpose.  First, they will act as a case study used to speak to an issue central to the history of Africa, and second, aid in dispelling many of the misconceptions present in popular portrayals of Africa.  Each film will be accompanied by a text that corresponds with the respective subject matter.  It is the intention of these texts to offer greater analysis and generate critical discussions of the films, their subjects, depictions of characters, and events.  The ultimate goal of these discussions is to enhance students’ knowledge and perceptions of Africa, its societies, cultures, governments, and histories.

    Ukadike, N. Frank.  “Western Film Images of Africa:  Genealogy of an Ideological Formulation.” Black Scholar 21 n. 2 (March-May 1990): 30-48

    Price, Robert M.  The Apartheid State in Crisis:  Political Transformation in South Africa, 1975-1990.  New York and Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 1991.

    Brantley, Cynthia.  The Giriama and Colonial Resistance in Kenya, 1800-1920. Berkeley: The University of California Press, 1981.

    Mamdani, Mahmod. When victims Become Killers: Colonialism, Nationalism, and the Genocide in Rwanda. Princeton Unversity Press, 2001.

    Beah, Ishmael. A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007.

Two book reviews of 4-5 pages.

 

Research paper of 15-20 pages.

 

Regular class attendance and participation.

 

 

 

Texts (subject to change)


WGS 340 • Diaspora Visions

45089 • Okediji, Moyosore
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM DFA 2.204
GC (also listed as AFR 374F)
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WGS 340 • Forugh Farrokhzad/Her Ptry

45068 • Hillmann, Michael
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 305
GC (also listed as C L 323, MES 342)
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The popularity of poet Forugh Farrokhzad (1935-1967) has burgeoned in Iran to the point where she stands as a cult or even national hero for some people and as the most discussed female figure in the 1,100-year history of Persian literature. This Forugh Farrokhzād and Her Poetry course examines the factors in her remarkable popularity in Iran through a study of her life, an appreciative reading of her major poems, and an examination of the social and cultural context in which she lived and which transformed from the Pahlavi monarchy (1921/5-1979) into the Islamic Republic of Iran (1979- ).

The first woman in the 1,100-year history of Persian literature to present recognizably individuated feminine speakers in her verse, Farrokhzād is a leading figure among the modernist Iranian poets whose works challenged traditional(ist) Persian poetry in the second half of the 20th century.


WGS 340 • Human Rights/World Politics

45104 • Evans, Rhonda
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 214
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WGS 340 • Human Trafficking West Afr

45074 • Osezua, Oghoadena
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 101
GC (also listed as AFR 374C, ANT 324L)
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WGS 340 • Italian Television Advertising

45075 • Russi, Cinzia
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.204
GC (also listed as EUS 347, ITC 338)
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WGS 340 • Latina Filmmakers

45079 • Enriquez, Mirasol
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GWB 1.130
CD (also listed as MAS 374)
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This course is focused on the history of U.S.-based Latina filmmakers (primarily directors, producers, and screenwriters) and the images they have created. The class will begin with a brief examination of early representations of Latinas in Hollywood film. The remainder of the semester will be spent investigating Latinas’ points of entry into the film industry while interrogating traditional notions of authorship that have relegated their labor and creative contributions to the margins of film history. Students will view short, experimental, documentary, and feature-length films and videos made by U.S.-based Latinas from the 1960s onward, and consider how the filmmakers have (and/or have not) been able to subvert stereotypes as they have gained increasing amounts of control over their own images, particularly since the 1990s. Central to the discussion will be the ways in which the Latina body, marked by race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality, is used to produce meaning about Latinidad in the United States, as well as how those conceptions have shifted over time. Themes of particular interest include issues related to authorship and creative control, personal, ethnic, and national identity, and the commodification of Latinidad. 


WGS 340 • Medieval Women Mystics

45090 • Straubhaar, Sandra
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM BUR 337
GCWr (also listed as EUS 347, GSD 361D, R S 357)
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DESCRIPTION:

The life and writings of Saint Birgitta of Sweden, fourteenth-century visionary, religious reformer and pilgrim, will be examined and compared with her predecessor Hildegard of Bingen (Germany) and her successor Margery Kempe (England).  Social and historical contexts for all three visionary women will be explored in depth, particularly the factors behind Birgitta’s emerging as such an authoritative voice, both political and religious, within the milieu of fourteenth-century Europe.  Other related figures, predominantly Julian of Norwich, but also Christina of Markyate, Christina Mirabilis, Angela de Foligno, Jeanne d’Arc and Catherine of Siena may be visited.  We will also explore varieties of spirituality and spiritual thinking including: anchorism and asceticism; Marian piety and Goddess-imagery; virginity and female creativity; and  bridal imagery.  Any theoretical framework – religious; scientific; theological; medical; archetypal; or any other – will be allowed.  No single orthodoxy or heterodoxy should become primary in our investigations: all may have a voice (and it need not be a consistent one).  We will try to allow the past to speak for itself, always realizing that we, the readers/listeners/watchers, will necessarily apply some kind of “spin” based on our own backgrounds. 

Two things to remember when you investigate the lives and thought of people of the past: 1. They were vastly different from us; and 2) They were uncannily like us.  Both 1) and 2) are entirely true.

 

GRADING:

This course is a Writing Flag course, and most of your grade will come from the evaluation of writing-related activities.

The breakdown is like this:

Quizzes on Reading (on most days when readings are due):    10 %

Two six-page reaction papers or position papers, 15% each =   30 %

In-class peer review activities on these papers:    10 %

Reading Journals (turned in every other Wednesday)    15 %

One three- to five-page group project (groups of 3-4):    15 %

One six-page research paper:      20 %


WGS 340 • Muslim Women In Politics

45095 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 2.124
(also listed as ANT 324N, ISL 372, R S 358D)
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There has been a religious resurgence since the 1970s, and Islam has come to play a significant role in the world. Despite the restrictions placed on women by the religious authorities, the most unexpected effect of this religious renaissance is the overwhelming political participation of many Muslim women at different levels in their respective cultures. While a large number of Muslim women are winning elections in many countries, in general, women's rights are still an issue in the Muslim world.

Since the beginning of recorded Islamic history, Muslim women with political influence have held political offices and positions of leadership. At the same time, we know that in some Muslim nations the rights of women are limited, and their participation as public servants is almost impossible. In both of these cases, Islam is given as the key rationale for participation or lack of participation of women in their society. Both Quranic and hadith commentators vary as to whether women's political participation is a correct interpretation of religious imperatives.

Debate about the religious legitimacy of Muslim women and their participation in politics are the themes of this course. We will study and discuss the historical developments and debates about both religious and cultural perspectives that affect the role of Muslim women in politics. We will study important Muslim women who have held or hold important political positions or influential positions in NGOs or as political activists and grassroot leaders. In addition, we also will study issues on gender, ethnicity, culture, and faith that impact Muslim women's political participation and how Muslim women constitute themselves as social and political actors as a result of their interactions within the structural frameworks and political cultures.


WGS 340 • Race/Capitalism/Environment

45080 • Vasudevan, Pavithra
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM RLP 0.122
CDGC (also listed as AFR 372C, GRG 356T)
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WGS 340 • Russian/Mexican Men In Pop Cul

45085 • Garza, Thomas
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM PAR 1
CDGC (also listed as C L 323, MAS 374, REE 325)
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Description:

Over the past twenty-five years, the image of urban Mexican and Russian men has changed; the physically strong, often violent, and emotionally unavailable male of 1990s film, television, and popular music has been replaced by the more balanced, emotional, and cerebral performances of the 2000s. While still maintaining their mantle of macho, i.e., powerful, attractive, and decisive masculinity, the New Machos of the New Millennium in Mexico and Russia represent cultural transformations of masculinity. They reflect the need for a “feminized,” but not emasculated, male cultural hero to counterbalance the harsh and crude reality of male-dominated criminal life and the men who participate in it. In effect, these recent portraits eschew more traditional popular portraits of machismo, while maintaining the social and cultural status of masculinity in both. And they do so in dialogue with each other. This course undertakes the study of representations of masculinity in products of Mexican and Russian popular culture at the end of the twentieth and the beginning of the twenty-first centuries.

 

In both Mexican/Mexican-American and Slavic studies, much recent attention has been focused on the role and place of men in cultural, political, and social environments have appeared and received critical praise. This course juxtaposes these influential cultural portraits of masculinity in popular culture: Mexican and Russian. The course constitutes a comparative study of the performance of masculinity in Russian and Mexican cultures. It provides with provocative cultural perspectives on what it means to be macho in the twenty-first century. The course will engage texts from cultural, gender, ethnic, and media studies, as well from Slavic and Latino studies.

 

Grading:

Shorter essay (4-5 pp.)                           25%

Film Review (2-3 pp.)                           20%

Seminar presentation                             20%

Longer Paper (8-10)                                          25%

Participation                                                     10%


WGS 340 • Wmn/Resistnc Contemp E Euro

45100 • Lutsyshyna, Oksana
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GEA 127
GC (also listed as EUS 347, REE 325)
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Description

This course will examine works of a number of Eastern European women writers such as Olga Tokarczuk (Poland), Svetlana Alexievich (Belarus), Oksana Zabuzhko (Ukraine), Dubravka Ugresic (Croatia), Herta Muller (Romania – Germany), Sofi Oksanen (Finland), and Ludmila Petrushevskaya (Russia), and trace their role and involvement in resisting not only political regimes but also gender-based oppression. We will also read supplemental articles, interviews, and secondary sources to provide a general understanding of contemporary politics and ethnic conflict as well as gender roles in Easter Europe. Through class discussion, students will discuss the many forms and repercussions of women’s resistance to recent issues and events within this strategic region.

 

Grading

Journals, 1-2 page long, on authors of choice (4) 20%

To in-class exams 20%

Final paper (may be based on one of the journals) 30%

Presentation 20%

Participation 10%


WGS 345 • American Dilemmas

45125 • Green, Penny
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JGB 2.202
CDEWr (also listed as SOC 336C, URB 354)
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Description:  

This course examines critical American social problems that threaten the very fabric of our collective life as a nation.  These include problems in the economy and political system, social class and income inequality, racial/ethnic inequality, gender inequality and heterosexism, problems in education, and problems of illness and health care.  The course has three main objectives.  One involves providing students with the theoretical and methodological tools needed to critically analyze these problems from a sociological perspective.  A second involves providing students with current data and other information documenting the seriousness of these problems.  The final objective focuses on evaluating social policies addressing these problems (e.g., welfare-to-work programs, pay equity legislation), with special reference to questions of social justice, the common good, as well as public and individual responsibility.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, with a strong emphasis upon the latter. 

Required Readings: 

A packet of readings to be purchased from Austin Text Books at 2116 Guadalupe (i.e., the Drag)

Additional readings will be made available on Blackboard

Attendance Policy:

Regular attendance and punctuality are expected.  You’re allowed three absences without penalty during the semester (excluding our introductory class meeting).  The nonpenalized absences are intended to cover such situations as illness, family emergencies, university sponsored trips, etc.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming advance, written notification is given.

Tentative Grading Policy:

Four Short Papers (2-3 pages)            65%

Class Participation                              20%

Pop Quizzes                                        15%

 


WGS 345 • Animals/American Culture

45145 • Davis, Janet
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM BUR 436A
IIWr HI (also listed as AMS 370, HIS 350R)
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WGS 345 • Diversity In Human Devlpmnt

45110 • Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A203A
CDWr
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WGS 345 • Gay And Lesbian Lit And Cul

45135 • Moore, Lisa
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 206
CDWr (also listed as E 370W)
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E 370W l 8-Gay and Lesbian Literature and Culture

 

Instructor:  Moore, L

Unique #:  35620

Semester:  Spring 2020

Cross-lists:  WGS 345.30

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: In this course, we will examine the tradition of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer self-representation in English through literary texts that document the emergence of a queer literary tradition and community.  Writing assignments will emphasize careful close reading and formal analysis of these texts in two short papers; both of these papers will be revised. Our final project will be an in-class reading and performance of student writing.

 

Texts:  Baldwin, Giovanni's Room; Brown, Rubyfruit Jungle; Walker, The Color Purple; Rich, selected poems; Lorde, Zami: A New Spelling of my Name; Anzaldua, Borderlands/La Frontera; Kushner,Angels in America Part I: Millenium Approaches; Bridgforth, Love/Conjure Blues; Chee, Edinburgh; Bechdel, Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic; Corral, Slow Lightning; Diaz, When My Brother Was an Aztec.

 

Films: Schiller, Rosenberg,Before Stonewall; Scagliotti, After Stonewall; Van Sant, Milk.

 

Requirements & Grading: Two Blackboard posts (100 words each) per week (14 weeks): 20% of final grade; Two 3-5-page essays: each 20% of final grade; Performance as a peer editor: 10% of final grade; Final group presentation: 10% of final grade.


WGS 345 • Psychology Of Women

45114 • Awad, Germine
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SZB 296
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WGS 345 • Punks/Divas In Se Europe

45115 • Beronja, Vladislav
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 306
GCWr (also listed as EUS 347, REE 325)
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“What kind of music do you listen to?” can be a loaded question. Based on your taste in music, others will invariably place you in a specific (sub)culture, class, lifestyle, and even speculate about your political commitments. Your taste in music can make or break a friendship, produce feelings of camaraderie as well as of repulsion.

For some time now, scholars have viewed popular music as a dynamic cultural field, where various social meanings—attached to race, nationality, gender, and sexuality—are constantly being produced, contested, and negotiated among different communities of listeners.

This insight into music as crucial site of political struggle and collective identity formation will be the starting point in our analysis of popular music genres in the Balkans, a region of Europe that has undergone sweeping historical changes in the 20th and 21st centuries, including the fall of Communism and—in the case of former Yugoslavia—the formation of seven new nation-states through a series of bloody and brutal wars. We will begin the class by examining the emergence of Western pop genres, such as punk and new wave rock, in late socialism (in the 1980s), which became associated with urban youth subcultures, sophisticated irony, and liberalization of the one-party state.  From there, we will move to the analysis of “turbo-folk,” a curious mixture of contemporary electronic and traditional folk music that became extremely popular in the 1990s, when the conflict in Yugoslavia was at its peak. Featuring extravagant and scandalous Balkan divas, roughly equivalent to Rihanna and Lady Gaga in the U.S., turbo-folk was (and still is) connected with nationalism, the new mafia elite, and general cultural decline. We will watch videos, examine arguments for and against turbo-folk, and try to pin down its political functions, cultural meanings, and recent transformations. We will end the class by examining new trends in Balkan popular music, such hip-hop and Balkan brass, and their relationship to recent protest movements, minority politics, and claims of cultural (in)authenticity.

In addition to scholarly literature, we will make a substantial use of a class Tumblr blog, featuring music videos, song lyrics, links to other blogs, album covers and other visual and audio materials, which will allow us to fully immerse ourselves in different sounds, scenes, fashion styles, and communities we will be studying throughout this course.

Grading:

10%-class participation and attendance

10% map quiz of the Balkan countries/major historical events

25%-weekly discussion post (250 words or more)

25%-take-home midterm exam (short essay format)

5%-abstract and outline of long essay

25%-one long essay (8-9 pages) or multimedia project


WGS 345 • Sociology Of Education

45123 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 0.112
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WGS 345 • The Family

45124 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM CAL 100
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WGS 345 • Thtr Dialog:expl Intprsnl Viol

45120 • Coleman, Shavonne
Meets W 4:00PM-7:00PM WIN 2.112
CDE
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WGS 345 • Toni Morrison

45150 • Woodard, Helena
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 204
CDWr (also listed as AFR 372E, E 349S)
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E 349S l 5-Toni Morrison

 

Instructor:  Woodard, H

Unique #:  35530

Semester:  Spring 2020

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E.1; WGS 345.46

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: This course examines select novels by Nobel laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Toni Morrison.  The novels thematize womanism as theory, which incorporates race, gender, and culture in experiences uniquely shared by women--particularly women of color--across class and regional boundaries.  Collectively, Morrison's characters confront a wide range of challenging crises:  infanticide, male-female relations, familial conflict, socio-economical, cultural survival, etc.  Morrison's novels are a gloss on the African-American literary tradition, deeply rooted in the American literary tradition.

 

Required Reading (subject to change): The Bluest Eye, 1970; Sula, 1973; Song of Solomon, 1977; Beloved, 1987; Jazz, 1992; A Mercy, 2008; God Help the Child.

 

Audio-Visual Aids: Toni Morrison with Bill Moyers, History of Ideas Series; Toni Morrison on Beloved; Jazz and the Harlem Renaissance; Toni Morrison on Oprah Winfrey (Song of Solomon); The Margaret Garner Opera (documentary).

 

Requirements & Grading: .50 Two Critical essays TBA (5 pages each; typed, ds); .30 A Reading Notebook (12-page minimum; typed, ds; see separate instruction sheet); .20 Presentations (TBA) / quizzes / class participation.

 

ATTENDANCE: Regular attendance is required.  More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. Penalties may range from a reduction in overall course grade to failure of the course itself.  I reserve the right to make decisions on a case-by-case basis.  The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies.  If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class.  You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.  Read each novel completely by the first day of discussion for that book.  No makeup for quizzes is permitted.  Course pack articles are required reading.

 

GRADING SCALE: Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric.  Please note that to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage.  Thus, a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999.  The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

 

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

 

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade.  This is a writing-intensive course.  No final exam is given.


WGS 345 • Virginia Woolf

45140 • Echols, Reid
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM RLP 0.104
GCWr (also listed as E 349S)
show description

E 349S  •  8-Virginia Woolf

 

Instructor:  Echols, R

Unique #:  35535

Semester:  Spring 2020

Cross-lists:  WGS 345.40

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  In this course, we will consider the fiction, essays, and historical context of Virginia Woolf, one of the twentieth century’s most puzzling, original, and incisive writers.  We will read Woolf’s major novels, as well as selected essays, reviews, and shorter fiction, in addition to selections from Woolf’s Bloomsbury contemporaries.  In doing so, we will explore a number of the cultural, political, and aesthetic concerns that occupied Woolf’s writing, including (but not limited to) the value and limitations of high modernism, the relationship between aesthetics and politics, the status of English literary heritage and tradition in a time of empire, and Woolf’s feminist critiques of patriarchy, war, and fascism.

 

Texts: 

Selected essays, including “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” (1923), “Modern Fiction” (1925), and “A Room of One’s Own” (1929).

The Complete Shorter Fiction of Virginia Woolf; The Voyage Out(1915); Mrs. Dalloway (1927); Orlando(1928); The Waves(1931); The Years(1937); “Three Guineas” (long essay, 1938); and Between the Acts(1942).

 

Requirements & Grading:  Three (3-4 page) critical analysis essays (20% each: 60% of final grade); consistentlyactive, substantial and significant participation, a portion of which will be comprised by reading quizzes (20% of final grade); Research and presentation on Harry Ransom Center materials (20% of final grade).

 

This is a reading-intensive, seminar-style analysis- and discussion-based course; in order to succeed in the class, students must make sure to keep up with the reading assignments. If you are too busy to do heavy (and often heady) reading, you might want to enroll in another class.  Students must also demonstrate that they have completed the required reading andhave thought about it--analyzed it closely, rigorously, critically, and creatively.  Active and significant participation comprises a substantial portion of the final grade (20%); therefore, neither silence nor lack of preparedness will serve you well in this class.  I invite you to take risks, to challenge yourself, and to share your understanding of each novel or essay.

 

Attendance Policy: Three absences will drop you a full letter grade (an A will become a B, etc.); four or more absences will guaranteeyour failure of this class.  

 

*No late papers will be accepted; incomplete grades will only be given in cases of documented medical or family emergencies.


WGS 345 • Witches, Workers, And Wives

45130 • Hardwick, Julie
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM RLP 0.128
GC (also listed as EUS 346, HIS 343W)
show description

Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place.  In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender and family and that shaped attitudes about gender and power in early modern Europe.  The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways – including religious reformations, more powerful governments, global colonial empires and the domestic impacts of colonialism that included growing populations of free and enslaved people of color, and the economic transformation we call the transition to capitalism.  Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life. We will explore how women's experiences compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, members of racial, ethnic and religious minorities, spouses or parents.  Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

 

Discussion of the assigned readings (see below) will be an important element of this class: you will learn more effectively when you take an active part in the analysis of the material to be covered. Consequently you must expect to read every reading assignment very carefully and thoughtfully. You should come to each class ready to ask questions and contribute observations.

 

You will need to demonstrate mastery of the readings to do well on the exams.

 

Warning: absence from class will inevitably have a serious impact on your grade because you cannot participate if you are not present. Each of you may be absent twice with no penalty. For every absence after that, three points will be deducted from your participation grade for each absence not justified by a written explanation. Please note, however, that attendance is the only the first prerequisite for participation, so that perfect attendance and complete silence will result in a grade that reflects only partial fulfillment of participation.

 

Daily class readings are available on Canvas or online through the Library Catalogue. (Deleted last section here.)

Grading:

Midterm 25%

Final 35%

Reading grids 20%

Witchcraft group projects 10%

Preparation and engagement 10%


WGS 345 • Women's Autobiographcl Wrtg

45155 • Mackay, Carol
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 302
CDWr (also listed as E 370W)
show description

E 370W l 11-Women’s Autobiographical Writing

 

Instructor:  MacKay, C

Unique #: 35625

Semester: Spring 2020

Cross-lists: WGS 345.48

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: Writers have always employed an ingenious array of narrative strategies to construct and project their sense of an autobiographical self, but historically that task has entailed an additional cultural challenge--if not an outright psychological impossibility--for women writers worldwide.  Although the male autobiographical impulse did not fully begin to manifest itself in Western culture until Rousseau (notwithstanding the anomaly of St. Augustine), women still tended to confine themselves to the less overt (and egoistic) modes of the diary, letter, memoir (often purporting to be about another subject), and fiction.  It is the goal of this course to examine the autobiographical impulse in women's writing by exploring the concept of the individualistic self vs. the sense of self as a part of community (and duty)--and the ways in which that communal self can both partake of humankind and participate in self-actualization.

 

We will begin by reading excerpts from Carolyn Heilbrun's Writing a Woman's Life(1988) and conclude with Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own(1929). In between, we will be tracing women's autobiographical writings from Sappho to Tillie Olsen, encompassing as well the recorded experience of the African American, the Chinese American, and the Chicana.  Although members of the class may have read individual titles from the course list before, they will now have the opportunity to read them critically within the context of other women's writing--itself likely to be a first-time experience.  Finally, each student will be responsible for introducing to the rest of the class a single work not on the reading list and "outside" its cultural curve; these titles will constitute a multicultural list for future (and I hope immediate!) reading.

 

Texts: 

Selected poetry (oral reports): Sappho, Bradstreet, Wheatley, E. Brontë, E.B. Browning, Rossetti, Dickinson, H.D., Moore, Brooks, Bishop, Plath, Rich, Sexton, Giovanni, Levertov, Lorde.

Selections (handouts): Julian of Norwich, Revelations of Divine Love(1373); Kempe, The Book of Margery Kempe(1436-38); St. Teresa, The Life of Teresa of Jesus(1562-65); Wollstonecraft, Travels in Norway and Sweden(1796); A. James, Diary(1892); Olsen, Silences(1978).

Books (to be purchased): C. Brontë, Jane Eyre(1847); H.E. Wilson, Our Nig; or Sketches from the Life of a Free Black(1859); Gilman, The Yellow Wallpaper(1899); Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own(1929);Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings(1969); Sarton, Journal of a Solitude(1973); Kingston, The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts(1975); Cisneros, House on Mango Street(1983).

 

Requirements & Grading: Writing and class discussion will constitute the primary activities of this course. Students will write three papers--the first two of approximately 4-5 pp. each, the last a more extended paper of 10 pp.--and deliver two brief oral reports.  All papers will receive extensive critical commentary and will be discussed in office-hour consultation; 75% of course grade will be based on these papers.  (N.B. This course fulfills the requirements for the Cultural Diversity and Writing flags.)  The remaining percentage points will be satisfied by the oral reports and regular class participation/attendance.


WGS 350 • Feminist Theory

45165 • Velasquez-Potts, Michelle
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 3.116
Wr
show description

Restricted to women's and gender studies majors and minors, priority to WGS majors.
Feminist theory with selections from women's and gender studies scholars. Recommended feminist theory course for women's and gender studies majors.


WGS 358Q • Supervised Research

45170
II (also listed as HMN 358Q, LAH 358Q)
show description

Supervised individual research on an issue in women's and gender studies.
Written consent of the supervising faculty member required; consent forms are available in the Center for Women's
and Gender Studies.



WGS 360 • Rsch/Thesis In Wom's/Gend Stds

45175
II
show description

Individual project or paper to be completed under the direction of a women's and gender studies faculty member.

Written consent of the supervising faculty member required, consent forms available in the Center for Women's and Gender Studies for that purpose.



WGS 379L • Internship In Wgs

45180
show description

Experience working in the community or for a nonprofit agency.

Prerequisite: At least twelve semester hours of coursework in women's and gender studies and written consent of the supervising faculty member; consent forms are available in the Center for Women's and Gender Studies.

More Information at: https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/cwgs/courses/internships.php


WGS 379S • Senior Seminar

45185 • Kafer, Alison
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 0.128
Wr
show description

Intensive study of selected topics in women's and gender studies.


WGS 384N • Internship In Wom's/Gend Stds

45189
show description

 

Practical working involvement with participating nonprofit and research agencies. The equivalent of ten class hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

More information here: https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/cwgs/courses/internships.php


WGS 392 • Rsch Meths Smnr Wom's/Gend Std

45190 • Livermon, Xavier
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM CMA 3.134
show description

This course is designed to prepare graduate students in gender studies and the qualitative social sciences to conduct a research project for their master’s theses or similar projects. We will explore a range of research methods and traditions as well as the epistemological assumptions underlying them. We will consider what it means to conduct “feminist” research, as well as the perils and promise of the more participatory research traditions. Some of the research methods we will explore include interviewing, survey research, case studies, textual analysis, and participant observation.


WGS 393 • Black Studies Theory II

45195 • Young, Hershini
Meets TH 10:00AM-1:00PM GWB 1.138
(also listed as AFR 392)
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Crit Conscsness In High Edu

45205 • Roland, Ericka
Meets M 4:00PM-7:00PM SZB 364
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Cultural Hist Of US Since 1865

45210 • Davis, Janet
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM BUR 436B
(also listed as AMS 386, HIS 392)
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Feminist Geographies

45215 • Faria, Caroline
Meets W 10:00AM-1:00PM RLP 3.710
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Feminst Geopol: Race/Empire

45220 • Vasudevan, Pavithra
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM BUR 128
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Gender And Politics

45223 • Charrad, Mounira
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM RLP 1.302F
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Gender, Technol/Information

45221 • Doty, Philip
Meets T 3:00PM-6:00PM UTA 1.204
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Gender/Race In Sports Media

45222 • McClearen, Jennifer
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM CMA 3.130
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Global Trans Media Studies

45224 • Nault, Curran
Meets M 9:00AM-12:00PM CMA 3.130
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Identity/Politics

45225 • Arens, Katherine
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CMA 3.108
(also listed as C L 382, PHL 387)
show description

Katherine Arens

Department of Germanic Studies

arens@austin.utexas.edu

 

Spring 2020:  WGS 393 (45225)  = CL  382 (34075)

T/TH 12-30-200 CMA 3.108

 

Identity (and) Politics:

From Class Identity to Positionality and Intersectionality

 

This course will offer students a laboratory in which they can work through the practical implications of theories of identity and politics from Marx through contemporary work in positionality and intersectionality.  It is a "laboratory"  framed as a work-in-progress seminar, where students start the semester with a project or type of cultural text that they are interested in, and then use that text’s/text type’s cultural site to explore it as reflecting different generations' debates about identity, politics, and power.  By the end of the class, students will be expected to present a well-theorized case study project outline that combines the texts read in the class with further research in theory and on the chosen texts – the kind of document suitable for submission to a conference, journal, or granting agency. 

The theories to be discussed originate in work by Kant, Hegel, and Marx; critically, they add up to a very contemporary call for understanding texts as participant in social and political networks, not only personal psychology, and for understanding the projects of culture not as representational (imposing social norms or authorial insight onto them) but as interventional -- as speaking from nexes of power and social/historical/cultural praxis that create subject positions and mediate agency within groups.  This class, therefore, investigates culture from a post-bourgeois lens, investigating texts rather than art, consumption rather than production of ideology, and the limits and potentials for signification rather than simple reception.

Their goal, and the goal of this class, is to explore generations of texts designed not just to lead/oppose/revolt, but to recenter and pull focus onto interpretations that privilege the multiplicity of subject positions emerging from texts – more than those that signify, testify, and teach rather than preach, but also those inspiring acts of resistant consumption of cultural traditions. The class will introduce (not survey) scholarship in the various subfields in order to open out the map for the various strands of cultural analysis that can be used in students’ individual project-investigations into identity politics as a research field. 

 

SELECTED READINGS (all readings will be available as pdfs on the class Canvas site):

Marx, selections from the "German Ideology"

Marcuse, "One-Dimensional Man"

Benhabib, "Below the Asphalt"

Horkheimer, "Traditional and Critical Theory"

Patricia Hill Collins, Intersectionality

and essays by Lacan, Kristeva, Irigaray, Deleuze, Lyotard, Kornbluh, Gates, Sandra Harding, bell hooks, and work on intersectionality and postcoloniality

 

GRADING

20% oral introductions to theories (strictly limited to 5 min;  deductions for overrun)

10% abstract for final project

15% map of analysis and research

15% theory postings

40% 20-pp final paper OR 7-10 page conference paper plus a grant proposal (5-10 pp).

 


WGS 393 • Life Writing

45229 • Mickenberg, Julia
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM BUR 436B
(also listed as AMS 390, E 395M)
show description

This class considers the possibilities of life writing (with a focus on biography but also encompassing autobiography, memoir, and related genres) as a window into history, culture, society, and politics as they relate to subjectivity, intimate relations, sexuality, and affect. Covering a range of formal possibilities and disciplinary approaches as well as theoretical perspectives, and emphasizing writings by women and feminist theory, the class will culminate in either a critically-informed comparison of several (auto)biographical texts or the creation of a work that uses a biographical or autobiographical frame for exploration of issues that extend well beyond the individual or individuals in question.

Possible texts[*]

  1. Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, A Midwife’s Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1912 (1991)
  2. Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861)
  3. Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Wild Unrest: Charlotte Perkins Gilman and the Making of The Yellow Wallpaper (2012)
  4. Saidiya Hartman, Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments: Intimate Histories of Social Upheaval (2018)
  5. Gertrude Stein, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas (1933)
  6. Erik Erikson, Young Man Luther: A Study in Psychoanalysis and History (1958)
  7. Norman Mailer, Marilyn: A Biography (1973)
  8. Lauren Redniss, Radioactive: A Tale of Love and Fallout (2015)
  9. Rebecca Skoot, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (2011)
  10. David Hadju, Positively Fourth Street: The Lives and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez, and Richard Fariña (2011) or Patty Smith, Just Kids (2008)
  11. Robert Caro, Path to Power: The Years of Lyndon    Johnson (2011)
  12. Ruth Behar, Translated Woman (1993)
  13. Hermione Lee, Biography: A Very Short Introduction (2009)
  14. Laura Marcus, Auto/biographical Discourses (1999)

Additional readings on Canvas or in packet

[*] Books may not be read in full, and final text selections t.b.a.—if you are considering registering for the class and have strong feelings about the reading list, please feel free to get in touch with me to offer your input (mickenberg@austin.utexas.edu)


WGS 393 • Memory And Trauma

45230 • Bos, Pascale
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 128
(also listed as C L 381, GER 382N)
show description

Course Description
An interdisciplinary investigation of the significance of ideological structures of thought in historical contexts. Emphasis is on the genealogy, interpretative power, and critical reception of ideas that inform the ends and methods of German studies as a discipline.

 


WGS 393 • Multiethnic Feminist Forms

45235 • Pinto, Samantha
Meets TH 11:00AM-2:00PM PAR 214
(also listed as AFR 388, AMS 391, E 395M)
show description

This course will cover contemporary genre, and genre-bending work in multiethnic American feminist literature and theory, with a focus on intersections of race, gender, & sexuality. Primary texts will include: In the Wake, Electric Arches, Nanette, Self-Devouring Growth, Argonauts, Paul Takes the Form of a Mortal Girl, Slave Play, Wayward Lives, Look, Fairview, and work by Jia Tolentino, Rebecca Roanhorse, Carmen Machado, Issa Rae, and Deborah Paredez, among others. We will read ultra contemporary criticism and theory in Black Studies, American Studies, Ethnic Studies, Critical Race Studies, Queer Studies, Literary & Cultural Studies, and Feminism alongside these texts in order to ask:  How has contemporary creative feminist form affected the production of feminist criticism? How has feminist criticism informed the production of expressive culture?  How and why does form matter to feminist thought? What happens when feminist thought inhabits different genres of creative and critical expression?


WGS 393 • Perf, Fems & Body In Ams

45240 • Gutierrez, Laura
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM CMA 3.108
(also listed as MAS 392)
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Psychology Of Women & Gender

45244 • Awad, Germine
Meets T 1:00PM-4:00PM SZB 268
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Race And Gender By Design

45245 • Lewis, Charlton
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM SUT 2.114
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Sexuality And Culture

45249 • Merabet, Sofian
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM WCP 5.118
(also listed as ANT 391)
show description

This graduate seminar deals with the cultural analysis of sexuality. Its aim is to evaluate

critically formative concepts and theories that have been subject to debates within

Anthropology, History, Philosophy, and Gender Studies/Queer Theory. Through the

reading of a variety of texts, we will explore the central position sexuality occupies

within culture. By discussing recent scholarship covering Affect Theory and Critical

Gender Studies, we will examine the ways in which the nation and the state are closely

tied to the politics of sexuality, gender, race and class and consider how bodies marked

by those concepts are situated in space and time. One of the basic themes of the material

for this course concerns the extent to which both realities and their perceptions are sociocultural

constructs that are subject to constant change and, therefore, need historical

contextualization.


WGS 393 • Sick/Slow/Mad: Crip Theory

45250 • Kafer, Alison
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM CAL 323
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Sociol Of Sexual Violence

45254 • Gonzalez-Lopez, Gloria
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM RLP 3.214F
(also listed as SOC 395G)
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 393 • Women/Politics/Public Policy

45255 • Rodriguez, Victoria
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM SRH 3.212
show description

Interdisciplinary topics relating to Women's and Gender Studies.  Seats restricted to WGS MA and Portfolio students during early registration.  Check cross-listings for home departments and originating field of study.


WGS 394 • Conf Crs In Wom's/Gend Studies

45260
show description

WGS 394: Graduate Conference Course in Women's and Gender Studies.

Individual directed readings and conferences on selected problems or topics in women's and gender studies.

The Conference Course allows  graduate students to work individually with select faculty on specific research problems.  The student is responsible for approaching faculty and designing a semester's work.

The Conference Course is restricted.  The WGS 394 Approval Form must be turned into the CWGS office with faculty signatures before students may register for the WGS 394 Conference Course.

https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/cwgs/courses/conference.php

 


WGS 398R • Master's Report

45275
(also listed as ILA 398R, LAS 398R)
show description

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in women's and gender studies and consent of the graduate adviser.


WGS 441 • Roots Of Socl/Econ Justice-Gbr

45105 • Anderson, Barbara
GC
show description

Study Abroad (Maymester) with School of Social Work in Great Britain.


WGS 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

45179
(also listed as AHC 679HA, AHC 679HB, C C 679HA, C C 679HB, HMN 679HA, HMN 679HB, LAS 679HA, LIN 679HA, LIN 679HB, SPN 377H, WGS 679HB)
show description

WGS 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

45178
(also listed as AHC 679HA, AHC 679HB, C C 679HA, C C 679HB, HMN 679HA, HMN 679HB, LAS 679HA, LIN 679HA, LIN 679HB, SPN 377H, WGS 679HA)
show description

WGS 698A • Thesis

45265
(also listed as LAS 698A, LAS 698B, LIN 698A, LIN 698B, WGS 698B)
show description

The Thesis or Report is required by the Master's Program.  It represents the final paper or research project that the student creates to culminate their coursework in Women's and Gender Studies. A student must be enrolled in the Thesis or Report course during the semester they intend to graduate.

When registering for the Thesis or Report course, the student must turn in the Thesis/Report Proposal Forms linked below.

The Thesis form is used to link the professor to the online grading system.  This also serves as documentation for faculty supervising the Thesis or Report.  Students should sign up for the Thesis course when they have secured a faculty member to work with them.

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/graduate-application/thesis-report.php


WGS 698B • Thesis

45270
(also listed as LAS 698A, LAS 698B, LIN 698A, LIN 698B, WGS 698A)
show description

The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Women's and Gender Studies 698A and Women's Studies 698A may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in women's and gender studies and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Women's and Gender Studies 698A.

The Thesis or Report is required by the Master's Program.  It represents the final paper or research project that the student creates to culminate their coursework in Women's and Gender Studies. A student must be enrolled in the Thesis or Report course during the semester they intend to graduate.

When registering for the Thesis or Report course, the student must turn in the Thesis/Report Proposal Forms linked below.

The Thesis form is used to link the professor to the online grading system.  This also serves as documentation for faculty supervising the Thesis or Report.  Students should sign up for the Thesis course when they have secured a faculty member to work with them.

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/graduate-application/thesis-report.php



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  • Center for Women's & Gender Studies

    The University of Texas at Austin
    Burdine Hall 536
    2505 University Avenue, A4900
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-471-5765