Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

Sequoia Maner


Teacher's Assistant - Department of English
Sequoia Maner

Contact

  • Office: FAC 16
  • Office Hours: M: 3-4:30pm and Th: 2:30-4pm
  • Campus Mail Code: B5000

Interests


Hip-Hop Studies, Poetics, Visual Representations of Black Masculinity (film, performance art and paintings), Biopolitics

Biography


Sequoia Maner is a PhD student in the Department of English at the University of Texas at Austin. She recieved her BA in English from Duke University in 2008. Her academic interests broadly include contemporary black poetics and fiction in the United States. More specifically, her writings interrogate relationships of power, identity formation in urban spaces, and black masculinity and subjectivity. She's interested in the mythology of "great men"; some figures she's written about include Jay-Z, Barack Obama, Otis Redding, Jean Michel Basquiat, Kehinde Wiley and Malcolm X. She specializes in the rhetoric of Hip-Hop, is a poet and critic, and hopes to one day interview Jay-Z.

PUBLICATIONS

Review of The Cultural Politics of Slam Poetry by Susan B.A. Somers-Willett. E3W Review of Books 12 (Spring 2012).

CONFERENCE PAPERS

"The Poetics of Jay-Z: Sampling Sound and Form." Presented in 2012 at the Queer Poetics Conference at the University of Texas, Austin.

Courses


AFR 372E • Afr Am Lit Snc Harlm Renais

29775 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM JES A203A
(also listed as E 376S)

E 376S  l  African American Literature Since the Harlem Renaissance

 

Instructor:  Maner, S

Unique #:  35170

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  Scholar Orlando Patterson coined the term “social death” to capture how enslaved Africans were methodically reduced to chattel through processes of alienation.  Justified through laws, language, and symbols, social death and its stigma of inferiority came to rigidly define the black American.  This course explores the possibilities for self-definition and citizenship in the wake of legal and social formations which created caste systems, denigrating stereotypes, and environments of poverty for large numbers of black Americans.

 

Using texts drawn from poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, this course moves through the historical periods of the long Cold War, the Second Reconstruction (Civil Rights era), and the post-soul present to examine black Americans relationship to citizenship.  Particular historical events will serve as nodes or points of focus for our inquiries including:  the 1955 lynching of Emmett Till; the 1985 bombing of MOVE headquarters in Philadelphia; the 1992 Los Angeles Riots; the federal response to Hurricane Katrina in 2005; the killing of Trayvon Martin in 2012.

 

Undoubtedly, we face scary and confusing realities.  Gentrification, police murders of unarmed civilians, mass incarceration, and school systems which have left some of the most vulnerable members of society behind are just a few of the big issues the nation faces regarding racism and social justice.  This course’s selection of African American literature will help us to approach and imagine beyond these constraining social formations.

 

Sample Texts (subject to change):  The Street by Anne Petry; Notes of a Native Son by James Baldwin; Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison; A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines; The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander; Women, Race, and Class by Angela Y. Davis.

 

Poetry selections from: Patricia Smith, June Jordan, Lucille Clifton, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Claudia Rankine, and Nikky Finney.

 

*Requirements & Grading:  Two short essays (30%); Rewrite of one short essay (10%); Final long essay (25%); Blog posts (20%); Quizzes and Participation (15%).

E 314V • African American Lit And Cul

34975 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.122
(also listed as AFR 317F)

E 314V  l  1-African American Literature and Culture

 

Instructor:  Maner, S

Unique #:  34975

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  AFR 317F

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This course explores the richness of African American literary and cultural traditions.  We will read novels, poetry, and essays that explore the construction and expression of black identity from chattel slavery through our contemporary #BlackLivesMatter era.  Additionally, music and film will help us think through how race, gender, and class have been negotiated in African American culture.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; James Baldwin’s Notes of a Native Son; Alice Walker’s The Color Purple.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade).  There will also be short reading quizzes and weekly blog posts (30% of the final grade).

AFR 317F • African American Lit And Cul

29325 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.102
(also listed as E 314V)

E 314V  l  1-African American Literature and Culture

Instructor:  Maner, S

Unique #:  33900

Semester:  Spring 2016

Cross-lists:  AFR 317F

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description:  This course covers the rich traditions and pressing concerns of African American literature and culture through several eras including slavery and Reconstruction, the New Negro Renaissance and the Civil Rights era.  We’ll study notions of historical progress, repetition, and futurism through the voices of writers who have worked to push the black American experience from margin to center.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts:  Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861); Ann Petry’s The Street (1946); Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952)

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. (70% of the final grade).  There will also be in-class reading quizzes, weekly blog posts, and in-class presentations (30% of the final grade)

AFR 317F • African American Lit And Cul

29580 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 105
(also listed as E 314V)

E 314V  l  1-African American Literature and Culture

Instructor:  Maner, S

Unique #:  33885

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  AFR 317F

Flags:  Cultural Diversity in the U.S.; Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course covers the rich traditions and pressing concerns of African American literature and culture through several eras including slavery and Reconstruction, the New Negro Renaissance and the Civil Rights era. We’ll study notions of historical progress, repetition, and futurism through the voices of black women who have worked to push the black American experience from margin to center.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities. Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts: Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861); Ann Petry’s The Street (1946); Sister Souljah’s The Coldest Winter Ever (1991).

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade). There will also be short reading quizzes, reaction blog posts, and in-class presentations (30% of the final grade).

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Hip-Hop

43640 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 5:00PM-6:30PM MEZ B0.302

In this course we will interrogate the rhetorical power of hip hop and the specific cultural contexts from which hip hop springs. We will study the many arguments that hip hop makes and the various arguments made against hip hop. In particular, we will focus on the methods by which controversial messages regarding issues such as race and sexuality are performed and disseminated. In this course, students will unpack the rhetorical devices that underlie generation hip hop’s artistic innovation, dope fashion, fresh beats, and sick flows. Ultimately, this course will examine how hip hop culture has and continues to shape our worldviews.

Students will use the tools of rhetorical analysis to decode the numerous (conflicting) arguments that hip hop and its critics make. The first unit of the course will be devoted to using research tools to map a hip hop historiography. Unit 2 will examine the many controversial aspects of hip hop culture as it relates to identity and the public sphere. Finally, students will make an informed and nuanced argument about a hip hop controversy, presenting their work in visual and textual forms in Unit 3. By the end of the semester, students will have created an archive that represents a cogent history of various viewpoints, both from within and outside hip hop discourse. The goals of the course will be to improve your writing and rhetorical analysis skills when it comes to hip hop texts and their contexts.

Assignments and Grading

Students will be graded on the following assignments:

Short Writing Assignments - 20%?

Essay 1.1- 10%?

Essay 1.2 - 10%*?

Essay 2.1 - 10%?

Essay 2.2 - 10%*?

Final Paper Presentation - 10%**?

Visual + Textual 3.1 - 15%?

Visual + Textual 3.2 - 15%*

*Peer review required?

**Meeting with instructor required

Required Texts and Course Readings

1.      Crowley, Sharon, and Michael Stancliff. Critical Situations: A Rhetoric for Writing in Communities (2012).

2.      Custom course packet featuring leading hip hop scholars such as Imani Perry, Jeff Chang, Tricia Rose, and Mark Anthony Neal

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Hip-Hop

44680 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM MEZ 2.122

In this course we will interrogate the rhetorical power of hip hop and the specific cultural contexts from which hip hop springs. We will study the many arguments that hip hop makes and the various arguments made against hip hop. In particular, we will focus on the methods by which controversial messages regarding issues such as race and sexuality are performed and disseminated. In this course, students will unpack the rhetorical devices that underlie generation hip hop’s artistic innovation, dope fashion, fresh beats, and sick flows. Ultimately, this course will examine how hip hop culture has and continues to shape our worldviews.

Students will use the tools of rhetorical analysis to decode the numerous (conflicting) arguments that hip hop and its critics make. The first unit of the course will be devoted to using research tools to map a hip hop historiography. Unit 2 will examine the many controversial aspects of hip hop culture as it relates to identity and the public sphere. Finally, students will make an informed and nuanced argument about a hip hop controversy, presenting their work in visual and textual forms in Unit 3. By the end of the semester, students will have created an archive that represents a cogent history of various viewpoints, both from within and outside hip hop discourse. The goals of the course will be to improve your writing and rhetorical analysis skills when it comes to hip hop texts and their contexts.

Assignments and Grading

Students will be graded on the following assignments:

Short Writing Assignments - 20%?

Essay 1.1- 10%?

Essay 1.2 - 10%*?

Essay 2.1 - 10%?

Essay 2.2 - 10%*?

Final Paper Presentation - 10%**?

Visual + Textual 3.1 - 15%?

Visual + Textual 3.2 - 15%*

*Peer review required?

**Meeting with instructor required

Required Texts and Course Readings

1.      Crowley, Sharon, and Michael Stancliff. Critical Situations: A Rhetoric for Writing in Communities (2012).

2.      Custom course packet featuring leading hip hop scholars such as Imani Perry, Jeff Chang, Tricia Rose, and Mark Anthony Neal

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