Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

YVETTE MARIE DECHAVEZ


Courses


E 349S • Toni Morrison

35014 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.120
(also listed as AFR 372E, WGS 345)

E 349S  l  5-Toni Morrison

 

Instructor:  DeChavez, Y

Unique #:  35014

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E; WGS 345

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This course examines select novels by Nobel laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Toni Morrison.  The novels thematize womanism as theory, which incorporates race, gender, and culture in experiences uniquely shared by women--particularly women of color--across class and regional boundaries.  Collectively, Morrison's characters confront a wide range of challenging crises:  infanticide, male-female relations, familial conflict, socio-economical, cultural survival, etc.  Morrison's novels are a gloss on the African-American literary tradition, deeply rooted in the American literary tradition.

 

Required Reading (subject to change):  The Bluest Eye, 1970; Sula, 1973; Song of Solomon, 1977; Beloved, 1987; Jazz, 1992; A Mercy, 2008; God Help the Child.

 

Audio-Visual Aids:  Toni Morrison with Bill Moyers, History of Ideas Series; Toni Morrison on Beloved; Jazz and the Harlem Renaissance; Toni Morrison on Oprah Winfrey (Song of Solomon); The Margaret Garner Opera (documentary).

 

Requirements & Grading:  .50 Two Critical essays TBA (5 pages each; typed, ds); .30 A Reading Notebook (12-page minimum; typed, ds; see separate instruction sheet); .20 Presentations (TBA) / quizzes / class participation.

 

ATTENDANCE:  Regular attendance is required.  More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. Penalties may range from a reduction in overall course grade to failure of the course itself.  I reserve the right to make decisions on a case-by-case basis.  The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies.  If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class.  You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.  Read each novel completely by the first day of discussion for that book.  No makeup for quizzes is permitted.  Course pack articles are required reading.

 

GRADING SCALE:  Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric.  Please note that to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage.  Thus, a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999.  The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

 

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

 

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade.  This is a writing-intensive course.  No final exam is given.

E 377M • American Novel After 1960

35175 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM MEZ 1.102

E 377M  l  The American Novel after 1960

 

Instructor:  DeChavez, Y

Unique #:  35175

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This course will focus on the American novel and the stories it tells about the past, present, and future.  We will focus on a diverse group of voices and investigate how these voices diverge and come together.  We will think about the role of the American novel, who we value as American novelists, and what the novel itself looks like.  The goal of this course is for students to think critically about each text and to connect with both literature and America in a new way.

 

Texts (Tentative):  Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye; Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street; Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Jennifer Egan, A Visit from the Goon Squad.

 

Requirements & Grading (Subject to Change):  Class Participation, including reading quizzes--20%; 1 in-class oral presentation and annotated bibliography--25%; 2 short (1250-1500 word) analytical essays, one of which may be rewritten for credit--30% (15% each); and one take-home final essay exam--25%.

 

Attendance:  Students are allowed three unexcused absences during the semester.  Additional absences will result in a lower course grade.

AFR 372E • Afr Am Lit Thru Harl Renais

30505 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 208
(also listed as E 376R)

E 376R  l  African American Literature through the Harlem Renaissance

 

Instructor:  DeChavez, Y.

Unique #:  35720

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  The eighteenth century saw the inauguration of writing from enslaved Africans in America.  Even from a condition of bondage, their work contributes to literary and intellectual debates about the nature and limitations of freedom, personhood and citizenship.  We will begin by examining issues of gender and sexuality from the perspectives of slaves and freed people.  We will also examine works by African American authors writing a generation after slavery as they look back to slavery in order to imagine the future of African Americans.  This course is a survey of major black writers in the context of slavery and its immediate aftermath.  Throughout the course, we will view films and documentaries that illuminate this period of African American culture and history.

 

Texts:  Henry Bibb: Narrative of the life and adventures of Henry Bib • Olaudah Equiano: The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings • David Walker: Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World • Frederick Douglass: Narrative of the Life • Harriet Jacobs: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl • Frances Ellen Watkins Harper: Iola Leroy • Charles Chesnutt: Marrow of Tradition • Nella Larsen: Quicksand and Passing

 

Requirements & Grading:  Two Short Papers (4-6 pages each), 40%; Final Paper, 40%; Attendance, 10%; Participation, 10%.

AFR 372E • Afr Am Lit Snc Harlm Renais

30510 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 204
(also listed as E 376S)

E 376S  l  African American Literature Since the Harlem Renaissance

 

Instructor:  DeChavez, Y

Unique #:  35725

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  Is the problem of the 21st century still the color line—as W.E.B. Du Bois (The Souls of Black Folks) termed it a century ago?  Or have we reached a so-called “post racial” or racially transcendent phase or era in which race has significantly declined—ideas foregrounded in writings by Julius Wilson and Paul Gilroy, among others?  How is the color line implicated in a postmodernist framework differently than in a modernist one? For example, writers like the late Claudia Tate argue that because of the continuation of racial oppression and “the demand for black literature to identify and militate against it, black literature evolves so as to prove that racism exists in the real world and is not a figment of the black imagination.”  Such a view resists psychoanalytical readings that center the individual’s primary nurturing environment, rather than the external circumstances that precondition that environment.  Conversely, psychoanalysis readings of racism risk designating race as pathology.  Enter Epifano San Juan, who observes that race is “an unstable and decentered complex of social meanings constantly being transformed by political struggle….  It is a framework for articulating identity and difference, a process that governs the political and ideological constitution of subjects/agents in history.”  This course engages the eclectic quality of African-American literature since the Harlem Renaissance.

 

Texts (subject to change):  Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Ann Petry, The Street; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Jesmyn Ward Salvage the Bones; Beyoncé, Lemonade; Claudia Rankine Citizen

 

Requirements & Grading:  Two short essays (20% each, 4-5 pages per essay, typed; ds), Rough Draft of Essay I (10%), Final Essay (30%, 6-7 pages), Response papers (10%, 1-2 pages) Attendance and Reading Quizzes (10%)

 

Attendance:  Regular attendance is required.  You are allowed 3 unexcused absences. After this, your grade will be lowered half a letter for each additional absence (e.g. From an A to A-, A- to B+, etc.) You are responsible for all work covered in your absence, including class discussion.

 

Grading Scale:  A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (61-63); F (0-60).

E 377M • American Novel After 1960

35735 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 206

E 377M  l  The American Novel after 1960

 

Instructor:  DeChavez, Y

Unique #:  35735

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This course will focus on the American novel and the stories it tells about the past, present, and future.  We will focus on a diverse group of voices and investigate how these voices diverge and come together.  We will think about the role of the American novel, who we value as American novelists, and what the novel itself looks like.  The goal of this course is for students to think critically about each text and to connect with both literature and America in a new way.

 

Texts (Tentative):  Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye; Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street; Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Jennifer Egan, A Visit from the Goon Squad.

 

Requirements & Grading (Subject to Change):  Class Participation, including reading quizzes--20%; 1 in-class oral presentation and annotated bibliography--25%; 2 short (1250-1500 word) analytical essays, one of which may be rewritten for credit--30% (15% each); and one take-home final essay exam--25%.

 

Attendance:  Students are allowed three unexcused absences during the semester.  Additional absences will result in a lower course grade.

AFR 317F • African American Lit And Cul

29675 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.102
(also listed as E 314V)

E 314V  l  1-African American Literature and Culture

Instructor:  DeChavez, Y

Unique #:  34135

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  AFR 317F

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Cultural Diversity in the U.S.; Writing

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course touches on many facets of African American literature and culture. We will begin with a discussion of slavery and the Middle Passage and move toward the present, focusing on the ways in which the past continues to inform the present moment. We will examine a variety of texts, including novels, performances, and musical pieces. This course will address topics such as gender and sexuality, racism, and the potential for political and social change in America.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities. Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts: Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; W.E.B. DuBois, selections from The Souls of Black Folk; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Michelle Alexander, selections from The New Jim Crow.

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade). There may also be short quizzes, reaction papers, and/or in-class presentations (30% of the final grade).

E 314V • Mexican American Lit And Cul

35240 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JES A203A
(also listed as MAS 314)

Instructor:  DeChavez, Y

Unique #:  35240

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  MAS 314

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: In this course, the promise and failures of the American Dream will guide our discussion of Mexican American literature and culture. The course will focus on the imagined spaces that literature opens up for Mexican Americans, and how these spaces are used to critique and re-imagine the American Dream in the real world. We will address topics such as immigration, gender and sexuality, popular culture, and the potential for Chicana/os to build coalitions with others to enact political and social change in America. Additionally, we will examine the ways in which the American Dream has shaped Mexican Americans’ lived experience, including the formation of both individual and national identities. This course will be built upon the foundations of Mexican and Mexican American history, showing how, from the moment of European conquest, these histories work together to create the present for Chicana/os, and push against the American Dream.

Tentative Texts: Villarreal, Jose Antonio. Pocho (1959); Anzaldua, Gloria. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza; Islas, Arturo. The Rain God (1984); Casares, Oscar. Brownsville (2003); Palacio, Melinda. Ocotillo Dreams (2011).

In addition to the listed texts, you are required to purchase a course reader that contains supplemental works by authors such as Octavio Paz and Sandra Cisneros.

Requirements & Grading: (3) Critical Reading Responses, 20%; Creative Critical Response, 15%; Quizzes, 10%; 5-7-pg Critical Essay, 15%; Critical Essay Revision, 20%; In-class Writing Exercises, 10%; Participation, 10%.

E 314V • Mexican American Lit And Cul

35065 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CAL 200
(also listed as MAS 314)

Instructor:  DeChavez, Y            Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  35065            Flags:  Cultural Diversity; Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  MAS 314            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: In this course, the promise and failures of the American Dream will guide our discussion of Mexican American literature and culture. The course will focus on the imagined spaces that literature opens up for Mexican Americans, and how these spaces are used to critique and re-imagine the American Dream in the real world. We will address topics such as immigration, gender and sexuality, popular culture, and the potential for Chicana/os to build coalitions with others to enact political and social change in America. Additionally, we will examine the ways in which the American Dream has shaped Mexican Americans’ lived experience, including the formation of both individual and national identities. This course will be built upon the foundations of Mexican and Mexican American history, showing how, from the moment of European conquest, these histories work together to create the present for Chicana/os, and push against the American Dream.

Tentative Texts: Villarreal, Jose Antonio. Pocho (1959); Anzaldua, Gloria. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza; Islas, Arturo. The Rain God (1984); Casares, Oscar. Brownsville (2003); Palacio, Melinda. Ocotillo Dreams (2011).

In addition to the listed texts, you are required to purchase a course reader that contains supplemental works by authors such as Octavio Paz and Sandra Cisneros.

Requirements & Grading: (3) Critical Reading Responses, 20%; Creative Critical Response, 15%; Quizzes, 10%; 5-7-pg Critical Essay, 15%; Critical Essay Revision, 20%; In-class Writing Exercises, 10%; Participation, 10%.

RHE S306 • Rhetoric And Writing

87975 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 310

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.

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