Department of English

Adena Rivera-Dundas


Postdoctoral FellowPh.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Postdoctoral Lecturer
Adena Rivera-Dundas

Contact

Courses


E 314L • The Pulitzer Prize-Wb

35545 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

E 314L  l  8-The Pulitzer Prize-WB

 

Instructor:  Rivera-Dundas, A

Unique #:  35545

Semester:  Spring 2021

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  The Pulitzer Prize, called the “keystone to the canon of American literature” by some and derided as “championing mediocrity” by others, has been awarded since 1917. In this class, we will look at some of the most recent winners of the prizes—specifically in fiction, poetry, drama, and music—to think about American literary canon creation and the contemporary moment.  What texts constitute a list of great American works in the 21st century and who decides? What do the winners tell us about the political, literary, and historical context of the moment in which they won? How do race, ethnicity, and gender constitute American identity and what stories are considered prizeworthy?

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

Tentative Texts:  The Tradition by Jericho Brown (Poetry Winner 2020); There There by Tommy Orange (Fiction Finalist 2019); DAMN. by Kendrick Lamar (Music Winner 2018); Sweat by Lynn Nottage (Drama Winner 2017); Native Guard by Natasha Trethewey (Poetry Winner 2007).

 

Requirements & Grading:  Four essays (3-5 pages each), 45%; Eight short exercises (1-2 pages each), 35%; Participation, 20%.

E 376S • Afr Am Lit Snc Harlm Renais-Wb

36260 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
CD (also listed as AFR 330L)

E 376S  l  African American Literature since the Harlem Renaissance-WB

 

Instructor:  Rivera-Dundas, A

Unique #:  36260

Semester:  Spring 2021

Cross-lists:  AFR 330L, 31100

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  In her description of “visionary fiction,” scholar Walidah Imarisha writes, “Once the imagination is unshackled, liberation is limitless.” Following the call of Black feminist writers, scholars, and activists, this class imagines what kinds of worlds are possible when we tell stories that dismantle systems of power. We will read stories by Black writers that utilize magic realism, fantasy, science fiction, and speculative archives as tools to critique American structures of oppression and domination. In addition to being stories of resistance, these are narratives of power and beauty, magic and joy. What is it about speculative fiction that is a distinctly Black genre? How is Black feminism itself a speculative fiction project? This class will look at the history of speculative fiction in the hands of Black writers to interrogate how our narratives shape our world, and what power lies in bending and breaking the rules of realism.

 

Texts:  Beloved by Toni Morrison (1988); Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler (1993); The Intuitionist by Colson Whitehead (1999); The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin (2015); Binti by Nnedi Okorafor (2015); and Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments: Intimate Histories of Riotous Black Girls, Troublesome Women, and Queer Radicals by Saidiya Hartman (2019)

 

Requirements & Grading:  Peer review/Preliminary draft of first short paper (4 pages), 10%; Two short papers (4 pages each), 40%; Final critical essay (6-7 pages), 35%; Reading responses 15%.

E 314L • The Pulitzer Prize-Wb

34350 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

E 314L  l  8-The Pulitzer Prize

 

Instructor:  Rivera-Dundas, A

Unique #:  34350 and 34359

Semester:  Fall 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  The Pulitzer Prize, called the “keystone to the canon of American literature” by some and derided as “championing mediocrity” by others, has been awarded since 1917.  In this class, we will look at some of the most recent winners of the prizes—specifically in fiction, poetry, drama, and music—to think about American literary canon creation and the contemporary moment.  What texts constitute a list of great American works in the 21st century and who decides?  What do the winners tell us about the political, literary, and historical context of the moment in which they won?  How do race, ethnicity, and gender constitute American identity and what stories are considered prize worthy?

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

Tentative Texts:  The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead (Fiction Winner 2020); The Tradition by Jericho Brown (Poetry Winner 2020); There There by Tommy Orange (Fiction Finalist 2019); The Idiot by Elif Batuman (Fiction Finalist 2018); DAMN. by Kendrick Lamar (Music Winner 2018); Olio by Tyehimba Jess (Poetry Winner 2016); Hamilton the Musical by Lin Manuel Miranda (Drama Winner 2016).

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 4 short essays, two of which must be revised and resubmitted (80% of the final grade).  There will also be graded short assignments, in-class presentations, and required participation (20% of the final grade).

E 314L • The Pulitzer Prize-Wb

34359 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

E 314L  l  8-The Pulitzer Prize

 

Instructor:  Rivera-Dundas, A

Unique #:  34350 and 34359

Semester:  Fall 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  The Pulitzer Prize, called the “keystone to the canon of American literature” by some and derided as “championing mediocrity” by others, has been awarded since 1917.  In this class, we will look at some of the most recent winners of the prizes—specifically in fiction, poetry, drama, and music—to think about American literary canon creation and the contemporary moment.  What texts constitute a list of great American works in the 21st century and who decides?  What do the winners tell us about the political, literary, and historical context of the moment in which they won?  How do race, ethnicity, and gender constitute American identity and what stories are considered prize worthy?

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

Tentative Texts:  The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead (Fiction Winner 2020); The Tradition by Jericho Brown (Poetry Winner 2020); There There by Tommy Orange (Fiction Finalist 2019); The Idiot by Elif Batuman (Fiction Finalist 2018); DAMN. by Kendrick Lamar (Music Winner 2018); Olio by Tyehimba Jess (Poetry Winner 2016); Hamilton the Musical by Lin Manuel Miranda (Drama Winner 2016).

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 4 short essays, two of which must be revised and resubmitted (80% of the final grade).  There will also be graded short assignments, in-class presentations, and required participation (20% of the final grade).

E 314V • African American Lit And Cul

35150 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 210
CDWr (also listed as AFR 317F)

E 314V  l  1-African American Literature and Culture

 

Instructor:  Rivera-Dundas, A

 Unique #:  35150

Semester:  Fall 2018

Cross-lists:  AFR 317F.1

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This course will engage with the rich literary tradition of black female writers, starting with the rise of black feminism in the 1980s and ending with the contemporary moment.  As a class, we will read long- and short-form fiction, experimental prose, essays, and poetry in order to investigate ways in which literary form informs, challenges, or is shaped by intersectionality and anti-racist politics.  This class will ask students to consider the relationship between race, gender, and literature, and ask what writing and reading can do in the face of sexist and racist systems.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative texts:  Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Claudia Rankine's Citizen,and selections from bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Maya Angelou, and Saidiya Hartman.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 4 short essays, two of which must be revised and resubmitted (80% of the final grade).  There will also be graded short assignments, in-class presentations, and required participation (20% of the final grade).

E 314V • Women, Gender, Lit, Culture

34385 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A203A
CDWr (also listed as WGS 301)

E 314L  l  6-Women, Gender, Literature, and Culture

 

Instructor:  Rivera-Dundas, A

Unique #:  34385

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  To justify his silencing of Senator Elizabeth Warren, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell now famously remarked, “She was warned.  She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted.”  In this course, we will read women who persist in the face of those who would silence them.  Starting with the Harlem Renaissance, touching on second-wave feminism, and focusing on the contemporary moment, this course will trace the lineage of women speaking out against racist, sexist, and homophobic oppression.  We will consider how form and genre relate to acts of political dissent, and how writing creates freedoms that other forms of public speech negate.  As a class we will try to answer questions such as:  What does it mean to use storytelling to fight oppression?  What types of narratives emerge when giving voice to marginalized communities?  How do female-authored texts engage with race, class, and sexuality and to what degree are those commitments inseparable?

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Jesmyn Ward’s The Men We Reaped, Claudia Rankine's Citizen,Chris Kraus’s I Love Dick,and selections from bell hooks, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Maggie Nelson.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (80% of the final grade).  There may also be graded short assignments, reading journals, and in-class presentations (20% of the final grade).

RHE F306 • Rhetoric And Writing

84890 • Summer 2017
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM MEZ 2.122
C1

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.

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