Department of English

Patricia M. García


LecturerPh.D., Texas A&M University

Patricia M. García

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-4991
  • Office: CAL 305
  • Office Hours: MWF 2-3p & by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B5000

Interests


Renaissance literature; women, gender, and literature; cultural studies.

Biography


Patricia M. García is a lecturer in the department of English and the Center for Mexican American Studies.  Her research interests include Renaissance literature, Chicano/a literature, gender studies, English pedagogy, and service-learning methodologies.  She serves as the Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the South Central Renaissance Conference and as an associate editor for the journal Seventeenth Century News.

Courses


E 321 • Shakespeare

34965 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 101
GC

E 321  l  Shakespeare

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  34965

Semester:  Fall 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: This course studies selected plays of William Shakespeare, one of the most important and widely read writers of the English early modern period.  We will read to develop our comprehension and analytical skills in both reading and writing.  Through film and, if possible, live performances, we will examine performance choices as they expand our understanding of the play’s themes and language.  Finally, we will present our own short, informal performances of selected scenes or speeches to experience Shakespeare beyond the roles of reader and audience.

 

Texts: Folger Shakespeare Library editions of the following plays:  Hamlet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, King Lear,The Tempest, Henry V, Twelfth Night.

 

Requirements & Grading: Exams 60%; Discussion 15%; Attendance/Participation 10%; Performances 15%.

E 360R • Lit Studies For Hs Eng Tchrs

35120 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 204
Wr

E 360R  l  Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35120

Semester:  Fall 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

NOTE:  Intended for students seeking a secondary school teaching certificate.

 

Description: Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today.  Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how to best develop what Robert Scholes calls "Textual Power."  Recognizing that texts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable, this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers.

 

Texts: Burke, Jim The English Teacher’s Companion4th edition; Cisneros, Sandra, The House on Mango Street; Shakespeare, William, Twelfth Night (Folger Shakespeare Library edition); Dove, Rita, ed. Penguin Anthology of Twentieth Century American Poetry.

 

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation, 10%; Essays (4 total) 40%; Writing Portfolio 30%; Oral Presentations 20%.

E S321 • Shakespeare-Gbr

80780 • Summer 2019
GC

E s321  l  Shakespeare—GBR

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  80780

Semester:  Summer 2019, Oxford Summer Program, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: This course studies selected plays of William Shakespeare, and we will be fortunate enough to view performances of the plays we study in Stratford upon Avon, Shakespeare’s birthplace and home to the Royal Shakespeare Company, and at Globe Theater in London.  We will also tour various Shakespeare historical sites in Stratford.  As we read the plays, we will analyze Shakespeare’s use of dramatic action, imagery, and character to practice our critical thinking skills.  As we view the plays, we will examine the company’s performance choices as they expand our understanding of the play’s themes and language.  We will each keep a journal that records their responses to the reading and the viewing of plays.  Finally, in acting companies that we will form in class, we will present our own short performances of selected scenes to experience Shakespeare beyond the roles of reader and audience.

 

Texts: Romeo and Juliet; Measure for Measure; As You Like It, A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Henry IV Part 1(Folger Shakespeare Library editions preferred).

 

Requirements & Grading: Journals 40%; Acting Company performance 30%; Reflective Essay 20%; Attendance/Participation 10%.

E 316L • British Literature

35040-35075 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ 1.306
GC HU

E 316L  l British Literature

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35040-35075

Semester:  Spring 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction: No

 

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills.  Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today.  Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

 

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B, Pearson Longman, 2008

 

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation (including required attendance in discussion sections) 15%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; reading quizzes 20%; exams (4 total) 50%.

E 376M • Latinx Short Story

35695 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CAL 200
CDWr (also listed as MAS 374, WGS 340)

Description:

This course will consider the emergence of the Latinx short story as a significant site for the examination of the multiple intersectionalities of transnational, diasporic Latinx communities. Major questions include: how does the Latinx short story map out the terrain of latinidad in the United States? How do these short stories engage issues of representations given the absence of other institutional forms of knowledge? Topics will include: the short story form as the creative intersectionality of racial, gender, class, and sexuality ideologies; the role of the publishing industry and MFA programs in creating the conditions for the Latinx short story; migration and exile within the Latinx imaginary; the urban Latinx experience; cultural hybridity in multiply-situated borderlands; feminist explorations of power, gender, and sexuality; tropicalization; aesthetic form and social mediations.

 

Text:

Writers may include Sandra Cisneros, Oscar Casares, Helen Viramontes, Carmen Maria Machado, Junot Diaz, Benjamin Saenz, Manuel Munoz, Ana Castillo, Jenine Capo Crucet, Jovita Gonzalez, America Paredes, Manuel Martinez, among others.

 

This course will carry the writing flag and cultural diversity flag.

E 321 • Shakespeare

35670 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM JES A216A
GC

E 321  l  Shakespeare

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35670

Semester:  Fall 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This course studies selected plays of William Shakespeare, one of the most important and widely read writers of the English early modern period.  We will read to develop our comprehension and analytical skills in both reading and writing.  Through film and, if possible, live performances, we will examine performance choices as they expand our understanding of the play’s themes and language.  Finally, we will present our own short, informal performances of selected scenes or speeches to experience Shakespeare beyond the roles of reader and audience.

 

Texts:  Folger Shakespeare Library editions of the following plays:  Hamlet, Antony and Cleopatra, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, King Lear, The Tempest, Henry V

 

Requirements & Grading:  Exams 60%; Discussion 15%; Attendance/Participation 10%; Performances 15%.

E 360R • Lit Studies For Hs Eng Tchrs

35800 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 204
Wr

E 360R  l  Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35800

Semester:  Fall 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  see NOTE below

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

NOTE:  Intended for students seeking a secondary school teaching certificate.

 

Description:  Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today.  Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how to best develop what Robert Scholes calls "Textual Power."  Recognizing that texts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable, this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers.

 

Texts:  Burke, Jim The English Teacher’s Companion 4th edition; Cisneros, Sandra, The House on Mango Street; Shakespeare, William, Hamlet (Folger Shakespeare Library edition); Dove, Rita, ed. Penguin Anthology of Twentieth Century American Poetry.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance and participation, 10%; Essays (4 total) 40%; Writing Portfolio 30%; Oral Presentations 20%.

E S316L • British Literature

81390 • Summer 2018
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 302
GCWr HU

E s316L  l  British Literature

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  81390

Semester:  Summer 2018, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present.  While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills.  Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today.  Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

 

Texts:  Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008

 

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance and participation 10%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; Close Reading Essays (50%) Reading Quizzes (25%).

E 316L • British Literature

34560 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 204
GC HU

E 316L  l  British Literature

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  34560 and 34565

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present.  While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills.  Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today.  Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

 

Texts:  Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance and participation 15%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; Reading quizzes 20%; Exams (4 total) 50%.

E 316L • British Literature

34565 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 105
GC HU

E 316L  l  British Literature

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  34560 and 34565

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present.  While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills.  Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today.  Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

 

Texts:  Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance and participation 15%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; Reading quizzes 20%; Exams (4 total) 50%.

E 349S • Alvarez And Cisneros

34997 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 103
CD (also listed as MAS 374, WGS 340)

DESCRIPTION:

The careers of two of the most important Latina writers of the last 30 years, Sandra Cisneros and Julia Alvarez, cover multiple genres:  short fiction, novels, poetry, children’s and young adult literature, and non-fiction.  Moreover, the construction of ethnic and gendered identity within their works creates a Latino/a aesthetics, especially in considering the merging of author and speaker, fiction and history, and, stylistically, poetic and prose voices.  Through our readings and discussions, we will also compare their different ethnic experiences in the United States as Mexican American and Caribbean/Dominican American writers.  In addition to writing analytical essays, students will also construct and present a bibliography of secondary resources and literary criticism on the author of his/her choice.

 

TEXT:

Cisneros

  • “Woman Hollering Creek” and Other Stories
  • Caramelo
  • The House on Mango Street
  • Loose Woman

Alvarez

  • How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents
  • ¡Yo!
  • In the Time of the Butterflies
  • How Tia Lola Came to Visit Stay
  • The Woman I Keep to Myself

 

           

GRADING:

Class participation and attendance (10%)

Peer Response Workshops (10%)

Essays (2 total; Essay 1 will undergo a substantial revision after peer workshop and instructor feedback; 60%)

Bibliography and Presentation (20%)

E 316L • British Literature

35120-35145 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.306
GC HU

E 316L  l  British Literature

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35120-35145

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present.  While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills.  Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today.  Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

 

Texts:  Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B, Pearson Longman, 2008; Measure for Measure (Folger Library Edition, 2004)

 

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance and participation (including required attendance in discussion sections) 15%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; reading quizzes 20%; exams (4 total) 50%.

E 321 • Shakespeare

35485 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.120
GC

E 321  l  Shakespeare

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35485

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This course studies selected plays of William Shakespeare, one of the most important and widely read writers of the English early modern period.  We will read to develop our comprehension and analytical skills in both reading and writing.  Through film and, if possible, live performances, we will examine performance choices as they expand our understanding of the play’s themes and language.  Finally, we will present our own short, informal performances of selected scenes or speeches to experience Shakespeare beyond the roles of reader and audience.

 

Texts:  Folger Shakespeare Library editions of the following plays: Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Measure for Measure, The Tempest, Romeo and Juliet

 

Requirements & Grading:  Exams 60%; Journal 15%; Attendance/Participation 10%; Performances 15%.

E 360R • Lit Studies For Hs Eng Tchrs

35645 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 204
Wr

E 360R  l  Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35645

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  see NOTE below

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

NOTE:  Intended for students seeking a secondary school teaching certificate.

 

Description:  Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today.  Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how to best develop what Robert Scholes calls "Textual Power."  Recognizing that texts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable, this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers.

 

Texts:  Gere, Anne. Language and Reflection: An Integrated Approach to Teaching English (Prentice Hall); Cisneros, Sandra, The House on Mango Street; Shakespeare, William, Measure for Measure (Folger Shakespeare Library edition); Dove, Rita, ed. Penguin Anthology of Twentieth Century American Poetry; Reading packet at Speedway Printers.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance and participation, 10%; Essays (4 total) 40%; Writing Portfolio 30%; Oral Presentations 20%.

E S321 • Shakespeare-Gbr

81790 • Summer 2017
GC

E s321  l  Shakespeare—GBR

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  81790

Semester:  Summer 2017, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions: Oxford Summer Program participants

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This course studies selected plays of William Shakespeare, and we will be fortunate enough to view performances of the plays we study in Stratford upon Avon, Shakespeare’s birthplace and home to the Royal Shakespeare Company, and at Globe Theater in London.  We will also tour various Shakespeare historical sites in Stratford.  As we read the plays, we will analyze Shakespeare’s use of dramatic action, imagery, and character to practice our critical thinking skills.  As we view the plays, we will examine the company’s performance choices as they expand our understanding of the play’s themes and language.  We will each keep a journal that records their responses to the reading and the viewing of plays.  Finally, in acting companies that we will form in class, we will present our own short performances of selected scenes to experience Shakespeare beyond the roles of reader and audience.

 

Texts:  Antony and Cleopatra; Julius Caesar; The Tempest; Much Ado about Nothing (Folger Shakespeare Library editions preferred).

 

Requirements & Grading:  Journals 40%; Acting Company performance 30%; Reflective Essay 20%; Attendance/Participation 10%.

AMS 315 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

30700 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 101
CD SB (also listed as MAS 311, SOC 308D, WGS 301)

Please check back for updates.

E 316L • British Literature

35045 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 204
GC HU

E 316L  l  British Literature

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35045 & 35050

Semester:  Spring 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

 

Description:  This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present.  While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills.  Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today.  Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

 

Texts:  Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008

 

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance and participation 15%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; Reading quizzes 20%; Exams (4 total) 50%.

E 316L • British Literature

35050 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 204
GC HU

E 316L  l  British Literature

 

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35045 & 35050

Semester:  Spring 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

 

Description:  This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present.  While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills.  Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today.  Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

 

Texts:  Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008

 

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance and participation 15%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; Reading quizzes 20%; Exams (4 total) 50%.

E 316L • British Literature

34900-34925 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM GAR 0.102
GC HU

E 316L  l  British Literature

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  34900-34925

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description:  This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present.  While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills.  Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today.  Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts:  • Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B, Pearson Longman, 2008 • Richard III (Folger Library Edition, 2004)

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance and participation (including required attendance in discussion sections) 15%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; reading quizzes 20%; exams (4 total) 50%.

E 321 • Shakespeare

35285 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 105
GC

E 321  l  Shakespeare

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35285

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  This course studies selected plays of William Shakespeare, one of the most important and widely read writers of the English early modern period.  We will read to develop our comprehension and analytical skills in both reading and writing.  Through film and, if possible, live performances, we will examine performance choices as they expand our understanding of the play’s themes and language.  Finally, we will present our own short, informal performances of selected scenes or speeches to experience Shakespeare beyond the roles of reader and audience.

Texts:  Folger Shakespeare Library editions of the following plays:  A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, King Lear, The Tempest, Hamlet, Henry V, Richard III.

Requirements & Grading:  Exams 60%; Journal 15%; Attendance/Participation 10%; Performances 15%.

E 360R • Lit Studies For Hs Eng Tchrs

35470 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 204
Wr

E 360R  l  Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35470

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  see NOTE below

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

NOTE:  Intended for students seeking a secondary school teaching certificate.

Description:  Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today.  Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how to best develop what Robert Scholes calls "Textual Power."  Recognizing that texts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable, this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers.

Texts:  • Gere, Anne. Language and Reflection: An Integrated Approach to Teaching English (Prentice Hall) • Cisneros, Sandra, The House on Mango Street • Shakespeare, William, Richard III (Folger Shakespeare Library edition) • Dove, Rita, ed. Penguin Anthology of Twentieth Century American Poetry • Reading packet at Speedway Printers.

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance and participation, 10%; Essays (4 total) 40%; Writing Portfolio 30%; Oral Presentations 20%.

E S316L • British Literature

82075 • Summer 2016
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 303
GC

E s316L  l  British Literature

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  82075

Semester:  Summer 2016, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description:  This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present.  While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills.  Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today.  Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts:  Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance and participation 15%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; Reading quizzes 20%; Exams (4 total) 50%.

E 314V • Mexican American Lit And Cul

33910 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GAR 2.128
CDWr (also listed as MAS 314)

E 314V  l  3-Mexican American Literature and Culture

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  33910

Semester:  Spring 2016

Cross-lists:  MAS 314

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course will consider the relationship between Mexican-American literature and culture and the social conditions of its production. Through a study of a variety of texts (including fiction, poetry, art, and film), we will examine the development of individual and cultural identity from both historical and contemporary perspectives.  Some issues we will examine include cultural nationalism during the Chicano Renaissance; post-movement critiques of nationalist aesthetics; the intersection of ethnicity, class, and gender in the formulation of identity; aesthetics and agency in art; and the impact of immigration in the shaping of the Mexican-American experience.  Critical reading and writing skills will aid in our discussions of these issues and in our own examination of self-identity.

Texts: Borderlands/La Frontera by Gloria Anzaldúa; The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros; y no se lo tragó la tierra/and the earth did not swallow him by Tomás Rivera; Brownsville by Oscar Casáres; Across a Hundred Mountains by Reyna Grande, Slow Lightening by Edwardo Corral.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and Participation 10%; Reading Responses 15%; Presentation 15%; Essays (3) 60%.

E 316L • British Literature

34145 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 105
GC

E 316L  l  British Literature

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  34145

Semester:  Spring 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  Discovery Scholars

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation 15%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; Reading quizzes 20%; Exams (4 total) 50%.

E 321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

34480 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM GAR 2.128
GC

E 321  l  Shakespeare: Selected Plays

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  34480

Semester:  Spring 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course studies selected plays of William Shakespeare, one of the most important and widely read writers of the English early modern period. As we read the plays, we will analyze Shakespeare’s use of dramatic action, imagery, and character to practice our critical thinking skills. Through film and, if possible, live performances, we will examine performance choices as they expand our understanding of the play’s themes and language. Students will write journal entries that record their responses to the reading and the viewing of plays.  Finally, we will present our own short, informal performances of selected scenes or speeches to experience Shakespeare beyond the roles of reader and audience.

Texts: David Bevington, The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Pearson-Longman, publishers).

Requirements & Grading: Exams 60%; Journal 15%; Attendance/Participation 10%; Performances 15%.

E 316L • British Literature

33995-34020 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM GAR 0.102
GC HU

E 316L  l  British Literature

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  33995-34020

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Global Cultures

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts:Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B, Pearson Longman, 2008 • A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Folger Library Edition, 2004)

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation (including required attendance in discussion sections) 15%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; reading quizzes 20%; exams (4 total) 50%.

E 316L • British Literature

34125 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 103
GC HU

E 316L  l  British Literature

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  34125

Semester:  Spring 2015

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Global Cultures

Restrictions:  Discovery Scholars

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts:Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008 • A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Folger Library Edition, 2004)

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation 15%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; Reading quizzes 20%; Exams (4 total) 50%.

E 360R • Lit Studies For Hs Eng Tchrs

34565 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 304
Wr

E 360R  l  Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  34565

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  [see NOTE below]

Computer Instruction:  No

E 360R and RHE 379C (Topic: Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

NOTE: Intended for students seeking a secondary school teaching certificate.

Description: Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today. Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how to best develop what Robert Scholes calls "Textual Power." Recognizing that texts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable, this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers.

Texts: ??• Gere, Anne. Language and Reflection: An Integrated Approach to Teaching English (Prentice Hall) • Cisneros, Sandra, The House on Mango Street • Shakespeare, William, Much Ado About Nothing (Folger Shakespeare Library edition) • Dove, Rita, ed. Penguin Anthology of Twentieth Century American Poetry • Reading packet at Speedway Printers.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation, 10%; Essays (4 total) 40%; Writing Portfolio 30%; Oral Presentations 20%.

E 314V • Mexican American Lit And Cul

34140 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 101
CDWr (also listed as MAS 314)

E 314V  l  3-Mexican American Literature and Culture

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  34140

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  MAS 314

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Cultural Diversity in the U.S.; Writing

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course will consider the relationship between Mexican-American literature and culture and the social conditions of its production. Through a study of a variety of texts (including fiction, poetry, art, and film), we will examine the development of individual and cultural identity from both historical and contemporary perspectives.  Some issues we will examine include cultural nationalism during the Chicano Renaissance; post-movement critiques of nationalist aesthetics; the intersection of ethnicity, class, and gender in the formulation of identity; aesthetics and agency in art; and the impact of immigration in the shaping of the Mexican-American experience.  Critical reading and writing skills will aid in our discussions of these issues and in our own examination of self-identity.

Texts: Borderlands/La Frontera by Gloria Anzaldúa; The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros; y no se lo tragó la tierra/and the earth did not swallow him by Tomás Rivera; Brownsville by Oscar Casáres; Across a Hundred Mountains by Reyna Grande, Slow Lightening by Edwardo Corral.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and Participation 10%; Reading Responses 15%; Presentation 15%; Essays (3) 60%.

E 316L • British Literature

34310 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CAL 200
GC

E 316L  l  British Literature

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  34310

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  Longhorn Scholars

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Global Cultures

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation 15%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; reading quizzes 20%; exams (4 total) 50%.

E 316L • British Literature

35295 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 306
GC

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35295

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Global Cultures

Restrictions:  n/a

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B, Pearson Longman, 2008; Much Ado About Nothing (Folger Shakespeare Library edition, 2004).

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation 10%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; reading quizzes (6 total): 15%; exams (4 total) 60%.

E 316L • British Literature

35400 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 308
GC

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35400

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Global Cultures

Restrictions:  Longhorn Scholars

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008.; Much Ado About Nothing (Folger Shakespeare Library edition, 2004).

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation 10%; Close Reading Exercises 15%; reading quizzes (6 total): 15%; exams (4 total) 60%.

E 360R • Lit Std For H S Teacher Of Eng

35885 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 304
Wr

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35885

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  [see Note below]

Computer Instruction:  No

E 360R and RHE 379C (Topic: Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

NOTE: Intended for students seeking a secondary school teaching certificate.

Description: Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today. Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how to best develop what Robert Scholes calls "Textual Power." Recognizing that texts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable, this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers.

Texts: ??Gere, Anne. Language and Reflection: An Integrated Approach to Teaching English (Prentice Hall) • Cisneros, Sandra, The House on Mango Street • Shakespeare, William, Much Ado about Nothing (Folger Shakespeare Library edition) • Dove, Rita, ed. Penguin Anthology of Twentieth Century American Poetry • Sherman Alexie The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian • Reading packet at Speedway Printers.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation, 10%; Essays (4 total) 40%; Writing Portfolio 30%; Oral Presentations 20%.

E F321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

83170 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 105
GC

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  83170

Semester:  Summer 2014, first session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Global Cultures

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course studies selected plays of William Shakespeare, one of the most important and widely read writers of the English early modern period. As we read the plays, we will analyze Shakespeare’s use of dramatic action, imagery, and character to practice our critical thinking skills. Through film and, if possible, live performances, we will examine performance choices as they expand our understanding of the play’s themes and language. Students will write journal entries that record their responses to the reading and the viewing of plays.  Finally, we will present our own short, informal performances of selected scenes or speeches to experience Shakespeare beyond the roles of reader and audience.

Texts: David Bevington, The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Pearson-Longman, publishers).

Requirements & Grading: Exams 60%; Journal 15%; Attendance/Participation 10%; Performances 15%.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35455 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 208
GC HU

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35455

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation 10%; reading quizzes (6 total): 15%; exams (4 total) 75%.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35685 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 208
GC HU

Instructor:  García, P

Unique #:  35685

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation 10%; reading quizzes (6 total): 15%; exams (4 total) 75%.

MAS 374 • Alvarez And Cisneros

36676 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.202
CDWr

Please check back for updates.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35330 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 105
GC HU

Instructor:  García, P            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  35330            Flags:  Global Cultures

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  Longhorn Scholars

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008; William Shakespeare Othello.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation 10%; reading quizzes (6 total): 15%; exams (4 total) 75%.  

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35331 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 103
GC HU

Instructor:  García, P            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  35331            Flags:  Global Cultures

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008; William Shakespeare Othello.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation 10%; reading quizzes (6 total): 15%; exams (4 total) 75%.  

E 360R • Lit Std For H S Teacher Of Eng

35885 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 304
Wr

Instructor:  García, P.            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35885            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  [see Note below]

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 360R and RHE 379C (Topic: Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English) may not both be counted.

NOTE: Intended for students seeking a secondary school teaching certificate.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today. Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how to best develop what Robert Scholes calls "Textual Power." Recognizing that texts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable, this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers.

Texts: ?Shakespeare, William, Othello; Cisneros, Sandra, The House on Mango Street; O’Brien, Tim, The Things They Carried; Course Packet at Speedway Printing.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation, 10%; short response essays, 10%: peer response workshops, 10%; 2 essays (Essay 1 will under go a substantial revision with both student and teacher feedback), 60%; presentation, 10%.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

34955 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 2.124
GC HU

Instructor:  García, P            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  34955            Flags:  Global Cultures

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008.

Requirements & Grading: Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Plus/minus grades will be awarded. See schedule for dates of all assignments. Reading quizzes (unannounced, 6 total): 20% of final grade. Major Exams (4 total): 80% of final grade Please note: to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+. A = 94-100, A- = 90-93, B+ = 87-89, B = 84-86, B- = 80-83, C+ = 77-79, C = 74-76 C- = 70-73, D+ = 67-69, D = 64-66, D- = 60-63.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35120 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 105
GC HU

Instructor:  García, P            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  35120 & 35125            Flags:  Global Cultures

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  Longhorn Scholars

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008.

Requirements & Grading: Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Plus/minus grades will be awarded. See schedule for dates of all assignments. Reading quizzes (unannounced, 6 total): 20% of final grade. Major Exams (4 total): 80% of final grade Please note: to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+. A = 94-100, A- = 90-93, B+ = 87-89, B = 84-86, B- = 80-83, C+ = 77-79, C = 74-76 C- = 70-73, D+ = 67-69, D = 64-66, D- = 60-63.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35125 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 105
GC HU

Instructor:  García, P            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  35120 & 35125            Flags:  Global Cultures

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  Longhorn Scholars

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008.

Requirements & Grading: Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Plus/minus grades will be awarded. See schedule for dates of all assignments. Reading quizzes (unannounced, 6 total): 20% of final grade. Major Exams (4 total): 80% of final grade Please note: to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+. A = 94-100, A- = 90-93, B+ = 87-89, B = 84-86, B- = 80-83, C+ = 77-79, C = 74-76 C- = 70-73, D+ = 67-69, D = 64-66, D- = 60-63.

E 314V • Mexican American Lit And Cul

34750 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 304
CDWr (also listed as MAS 314)

Instructor:  García, P            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  34750            Flags:  Writing, Cultural Diversity

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  MAS 314            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course will consider the relationship between Mexican-American literature and the social conditions of its production, mainly concentrating on novels written between 1967 and the present. Topics will include: literary form and cultural nationalism during the Chicano Renaissance, post-movement critiques of nationalist aesthetics, and the impact of immigration in the shaping of the Mexican-American experience.

Texts: Borderlands/La Frontera by Gloria Anzaldúa; House on Mango Street and Woman Hollering Creek by Sandra Cisneros; y no se lo tragó la tierra/and the earth did not swallow him by Tomás Rivera; Brownsville by Oscar Casares; Crazy Loco by David Rice

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes 15%; Response Essays 10%; Presentation 15%; Essays (2) 60%.

E 321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

35305 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 206
GC

Instructor:  García, P            Areas:  I

Unique #:  35305            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course studies selected plays of William Shakespeare, one of the most important and widely read writers of the English early modern period. We will read to develop our comprehension and analytical skills in both reading and writing, and we will also examine Shakespeare in performance through film and, hopefully, live theater. A tentative reading schedule follows: A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Twelfth Night; The Tempest; Antony and Cleopatra; Hamlet; 1 Henry IV; Henry V.

Texts: David Bevington, The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Pearson-Longman, publishers).

Requirements & Grading: 4 major exams (100%)

E 360R • Lit Std For H S Teacher Of Eng

35540 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 103
Wr

Instructor:  García, P.            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35540            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  [see Note below]

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 360R and RHE 379C (Topic: Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English) may not both be counted.

NOTE: Intended for students seeking a secondary school teaching certificate.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today. Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how to best develop what Robert Scholes calls "Textual Power." Recognizing that texts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable, this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers.

Texts: Richter, David H., Falling Into Theory: Conflicting Views On Reading Literature; Shakespeare, William, The Merchant of Venice; Vendler, Helen, Poems. Poets. Poetry: An Introduction and Anthology; Cisneros, Sandra, The House on Mango Street; O’Brien, Tim, The Things They Carried; Packet of Xeroxes available at Speedway Printing.

Requirements & Grading:  Short reading responses 30%; 3 short essays (3-5 pages) 45%; attendance and presentations 25%.

E S316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

83830 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 301
HU

Instructor:  García, P            Areas:  n/a

Unique #: 83830            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008.

Requirements & Grading:  5 major exams (20% each; 100% total). See schedule for dates of all assignments. Attendance is required and more than 3 absences will result in a 5 point reduction in your final grade.  Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. The University does not recognize the grade of A+. A = 94-100, A- = 90-93, B+ = 87-89, B = 84-86, B- = 80-83, C+ = 77-79, C = 74-76 C- = 70-73, D+ = 67-69, D = 64-66, D- = 60-63.

E 314V • Mexican American Lit And Cul

34705 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.210
CDWr (also listed as MAS 314)

Instructor:  García, P            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  34705            Flags:  Writing, Cultural Diversity

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  MAS 314            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course will consider the relationship between Mexican-American literature and the social conditions of its production, mainly concentrating on novels written between 1967 and the present. Topics will include: literary form and cultural nationalism during the Chicano Renaissance, post-movement critiques of nationalist aesthetics, and the impact of immigration in the shaping of the Mexican-American experience.

Texts: Borderlands/La Frontera by Gloria Anzaldúa; House on Mango Street and Woman Hollering Creek by Sandra Cisneros; y no se low tragó la tierra/and the earth did not swallow him by Tomás Rivera; Brownsville by Oscar Casares; Crazy Loco by David Rice.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes 15%; 3 Short Critical Essays (2-4 pages each) 30%; Research Essay (6-8 pages) 30%; Midterm and Final Exam 25%.

Please note that at least 2 of the short critical essays will undergo a substantial revision process and the research essay will be turned in first as a rough draft and returned with comments in preparation for the final draft. We will also peer edit essays in the class.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

34905 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 105
HU

Instructor:  García, P            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  34905            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008.

Requirements & Grading: Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Plus/minus grades will be awarded. See schedule for dates of all assignments. Reading quizzes (unannounced, 6 total): 20% of final grade. Major Exams (4 total): 80% of final grade Please note: to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+. A = 94-100, A- = 90-93, B+ = 87-89, B = 84-86, B- = 80-83, C+ = 77-79, C = 74-76 C- = 70-73, D+ = 67-69, D = 64-66, D- = 60-63.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

34990 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.122
HU

Instructor:  García, P            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  34990            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  Longhorn Scholars

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008.

Requirements & Grading: Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Plus/minus grades will be awarded. See schedule for dates of all assignments. Reading quizzes (unannounced, 6 total): 20% of final grade. Major Exams (4 total): 80% of final grade Please note: to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+. A = 94-100, A- = 90-93, B+ = 87-89, B = 84-86, B- = 80-83, C+ = 77-79, C = 74-76 C- = 70-73, D+ = 67-69, D = 64-66, D- = 60-63.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35090 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 210
HU

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Course Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008.

Grading: Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Plus/minus grades will be awarded. See schedule for dates of all assignements. Weekly quizzes (8 total): 20% of final grade. Major Exams (4 total): 80% of final grade Please note: to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+. A = 94-100, A- = 90-93, B+ = 87-89, B = 84-86, B- = 80-83, C+ = 77-79, C = 74-76 C- = 70-73, D+ = 67-69, D = 64-66, D- = 60-63.

E 321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

35390 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 105
GC C2

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: This course studies selected plays of William Shakespeare, one of the most important and widely read writers of the English early modern period. We will read to develop our comprehension and analytical skills in both reading and writing, and we will also examine Shakespeare in performance through film and, hopefully, live theater. A tentative reading schedule follows: A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Twelfth Night; The Tempest; Antony and Cleopatra; Hamlet; 1 Henry IV; Henry V

Texts: David Bevington, The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Pearson-Longman, publishers).

Grading: Informal Response Essays (10%); 4 Major Essays (90%).

MAS 319 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

36279 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 304
(also listed as WGS 301)

Please check back for updates.

E 314V • Mexican American Lit And Cul

33910 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 304
CDWr (also listed as MAS 314)

Cross-listed with MAS 314

Course Description: This course will consider the relationship between Mexican-American literature and the social conditions of its production, mainly concentrating on novels written between 1967 and the present. Topics will include: literary form and cultural nationalism during the Chicano Renaissance, post-movement critiques of nationalist aesthetics, and the impact of immigration in the shaping of the Mexican-American experience.

Texts: Borderlands/La Frontera by Gloria Anzaldúa; House on Mango Street and Woman Hollering Creek by Sandra Cisneros; …y no se low tragó la tierra/…and the earth did not swallow him by Tomás Rivera; Brownsville by Oscar Casares; Crazy Loco by David Rice.

Grading: Quizzes 15%; 3 Short Critical Essays (2-4 pages each) 30%; Research Essay (6-8 pages) 30%; Midterm and Final Exam 25%. Please note that at least 2 of the short critical essays will undergo a substantial revision process and the research essay will be turned in first as a rough draft and returned with comments in preparation for the final draft. We will also peer edit essays in the class.

Prerequisites:
E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A. 

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

34260 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 103
HU
Restricted to students in the Longhorn Scholars Program.


Course Description:
This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. While we will examine the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these works in brief, we will focus on close readings and analyses of literary works to develop critical thinking skills. Moreover, we will reflect upon our own experience as readers and the ways in which these texts, both historical and contemporary, challenge and relate to us today. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Donne, Shakespeare, Browning, and Woolf among others.

Texts: Masters of British Literature: Volumes A&B; Pearson Longman, 2008.

Grading:
Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Plus/minus grades will be awarded. See schedule for dates of all assignements. Weekly quizzes (8 total): 20% of final grade. Major Exams (4 total): 80% of final grade Please note: to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+. A = 94-100, A- = 90-93, B+ = 87-89, B = 84-86, B- = 80-83, C+ = 77-79, C = 74-76 C- = 70-73, D+ = 67-69, D = 64-66, D- = 60-63.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

E S321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

83265 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 105

Course Description: This course studies selected plays of William Shakespeare, one of the most important and widely read writers of the English early modern period. We will read to develop our comprehension and analytical skills in both reading and writing, and we will also examine Shakespeare in performance through film and, hopefully, live theater. A tentative reading schedule follows: A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Much Ado about Nothing; The Tempest; Antony and Cleopatra; Richard III.

Texts: David Bevington, The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Pearson-Longman, publishers).

Grading: 4 exams (25% each). Attendance is required, and excessive absences (more than 3) will result in a letter grade deduction (10 points). 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

MAS 314 • Mexican American Lit And Cul

35827 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 308

Description:  Gloria Anzaldúa famously called the border between México and the United States a “1,950 mile-long open wound,” “una herida abierta,” where “a third country—a border culture” has arisen on either side of the Rio Grande/Río Bravo and beyond.  In this course, we will traverse the borders of language(s), geography, history, and identity negotiated by Mexican-American artists from Texas in a variety of literary genres, visual art, and film.  Our methods will be intersectional—attending to class, gender, sexuality, religion, etc., in addition to race—as we explore these (re)definitions of what it means to be, in Cherríe Moraga’s words, American “con acento.”

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts:  Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (nonfiction, memoir, theory); Alonzo, Jotos del Barrio (play); Silva, Flesh to Bone (short stories).

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 formal writing assignments, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted (70% of the final grade in total).  Excluding the final project (critical or creative), the second assignment may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor.  Students will also have the opportunity to practice writing in a variety of other genres, including reading journals (or the occasional quiz), creative writing exercises, and in-class presentations (30% of the final grade).

MAS 319 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

36154 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 1

Please check back for updates.

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