Department of English

Cody Jarman


MA in Irish Writing & Film, University College Cork

PhD Candidate
Cody Jarman

Contact

Interests


Irish literature; African-American literature; Global modernism; Postcolonial theory; Cultural revivalism; Critical Whiteness studies

Biography


Cody Jarman is a PhD student in the department of English. He holds an MA in Irish Writing and Film from University College Cork, which he completed while studying on a Fulbright fellowship in 2017. His master's thesis explored the significance of the American minstrel show in the works of James Joyce, reading it against existing traditions of racialized performance in Irish literature. Cody’s current research builds on the theoretical underpinnings of this work, focusing more broadly on the aesthetic and social forms taken by cultural revivalist projects, particularly the Irish Literary Revival and the Harlem Renaissance. His work on the impact of revivalist attitudes on Irish culture during WWII was featured in the Autumn 2018 issue of The New Hibernia Review. In addition to Irish and African American Literature, Cody is particularly interested in writing pedagogy.

Courses


E 314J • Literature And Film

35820 • Fall 2021
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 0.128
Wr

E 314J  l  1-Literature and Film

Instructor:  Jarman, C

Unique #:  35820

Semester:  Fall 2021

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

Description:  Crowds of people, giant buildings, tourist traps and monuments.  Cities have always been treated as places to see.  Filmmakers and authors have not been immune to the visual appeal and vibrancy of the city, but they have also been challenged by its scope.  How does one represent the lives of millions on the page?  How can a camera capture the chaos of a bustling city street?  In this class, we'll study fiction and films of urban life, paying special attention to the formal devices they use to depict the city.  We’ll also work to identify how the historical and cultural contexts of particular cities affect the stories we tell about them.  In addition to learning more about artistic representations of the city, students in this class will develop both textual and visual analysis skills as well as a robust critical vocabulary for discussing literature and film.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course carries a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will constitute a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Reading List: 

Fiction: NW by Zadie Smith, Milkman by Anna Burns, and other readings to be provided by the instructor.

Film: Berlin: Symphony of a Great City dir. by Walter Ruttman, Bicycle Thieves dir. by Vittorio De Sica, Slacker dir. by Richard Linklater, and Do The Right Thing dir. by Spike Lee.

Requirements & Grading:  Close Reading Essay: 15% (with required revision); Literature Review: 15%; Terminology of Film Analysis Group Research Project: 15%; Research Paper: 25%; Reflection Responses and in Class Assignments: 20%; Attendance: 10%.  In addition to the required revision of the Close Reading Essay, students will have opportunities to revise all essays and papers for a higher grade.

E 314V • African American Lit/Cul-Wb

35565 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
CDWr (also listed as AFR 315T)

E 314V  l  1-African American Literature and Culture-WB

 

Instructor:  Jarman, C

Unique #:  35565

Semester:  Spring 2021

Cross-lists:  AFR 315T, 31040

 

Prerequisite:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  “Revolution is based on land. Land is the basis of all independence. Land is the basis of freedom, justice, and equality.” --Malcolm X

 

In 1963, Malcolm X outlined a vision for American Black nationalism that centered the importance of land to Black liberation.  However, his observations invite as many questions as they answer:  What is land in the Black American imagination? How does the history of chattel slavery impact the meaning of a land marked by oppression? What kinds of freedom are made possible by land ownership? Are any kinds of freedom made impossible?  In this course, we’ll address these questions as they appear across twentieth and twenty-first century African-American literature and film, focusing particular on the significance of rural and ‘natural’ spaces.  While the class is centered on the topic of land, we will also be exploring histories of racial oppression and black resistance, and we will consider the ways that literary works create meaning.  We will read, analyze, and discuss traditional literary forms such as the novel, poem, and short story as well as essays and works of nonfiction, and we will engage thoughtfully with Critical Race Theory and literary theory.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other writing-focused disciplines.  Close-reading skills will be emphasized.  Students will also gain familiarity with online research tools such as the OED, JSTOR, and other important databases and resources.

 

This course contains a Cultural Diversity and Writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Potential Texts:  Cane by Jean Toomer, Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison, Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward, and Get Out directed by Jordan Peele.  Supplementary essays and speeches by W.E.B. Du Bois, Fannie Lou Hamer, Malcolm X and others will be also be assigned

 

Requirements & Grading:  Close-Reading Essay (15%); Annotated Bibliography (15%); Reading Responses (10%); Critical Response Essay (15%); OED Diary (10%); Final Essay (15%); Final Essay Revision (20%)

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of The New South

42785 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 304
Wr

“Tell about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all.”—William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom

In this course we will consider how southerners have used rhetoric to answer Faulkner’s questions. We will study a variety of mediums, including essays, political speeches, popular music, film, and television and how works in these mediums attempt to define what southerness is. The class will focus on three definitive stages in the development of the ‘idea’ of the south: debates about the future of southern culture in the rapidly industrializing U.S. immediately after World War I, the struggle against racial oppression during the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s, and contemporary depictions of the south, particularly following recent debates regarding confederate flags and monuments. We will discuss works from notable southerners like Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Penn Warren as well as many outspoken voices of the contemporary south like Beyoncé and the southern rock band The Drive-By Truckers. We will devote special attention to the relationship between different versions of the south, discussing how they intersect, comment on one another, and collide.
This course will prepare students to recognize and analyze both the overt argumentation of political speeches and social commentary and the implicit arguments embedded in popular culture. We will work together to better understand the ways the south is mobilized in our national discourse and develop the necessary persuasive and analytical writing skills to contribute to that conversation.
NOTE: This course will address challenging topics. We will be discussing problematic and even blatantly racist perspectives. Students in this class should be prepared to engage with these texts critically and with one another respectfully.
Texts:
  • Everything’s an Argument
  • W.E.B. DuBois, Black Reconstruction (excerpts)
  • Martin Luther King Jr., “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”
  • Robert Penn Warren, Segregation (excerpts)
  • Duck Dynasty, selected scenes
  • OutKast, selected songs
  • The Drive by Truckers, selected songs
  • Beyoncé, selected songs and music videos
  • Queer Eye, selected scenes
Grade Distribution:
  • Participation: 5%
  • Research Summaries: 10%
  • Rhetorical Analysis: 15%
  • Comparative Rhetorical Analysis: 20%
  • Final essay 1: 10%
  • Final essay 2 (revision): 20%
  • Semester blog: 20% (Must produce 5 posts. The blog will be graded for completion at 4% a post)

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of The New South

42485 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 206
Wr

“Tell about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all.”—William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom

In this course we will consider how southerners have used rhetoric to answer Faulkner’s questions. We will study a variety of mediums, including essays, political speeches, popular music, film, and television and how works in these mediums attempt to define what southerness is. The class will focus on three definitive stages in the development of the ‘idea’ of the south: debates about the future of southern culture in the rapidly industrializing U.S. immediately after World War I, the struggle against racial oppression during the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s, and contemporary depictions of the south, particularly following recent debates regarding confederate flags and monuments. We will discuss works from notable southerners like Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Penn Warren as well as many outspoken voices of the contemporary south like Beyoncé and the southern rock band The Drive-By Truckers. We will devote special attention to the relationship between different versions of the south, discussing how they intersect, comment on one another, and collide.

This course will prepare students to recognize and analyze both the overt argumentation of political speeches and social commentary and the implicit arguments embedded in popular culture. We will work together to better understand the ways the south is mobilized in our national discourse and develop the necessary persuasive and analytical writing skills to contribute to that conversation.

NOTE: This course will address challenging topics. We will be discussing problematic and even blatantly racist perspectives. Students in this class should be prepared to engage with these texts critically and with one another respectfully.

Texts:

  • Everything’s an Argument
  • W.E.B. DuBois, Black Reconstruction (excerpts)
  • Martin Luther King Jr., “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”
  • Robert Penn Warren, Segregation (excerpts)
  • Duck Dynasty, selected scenes
  • OutKast, selected songs
  • The Drive by Truckers, selected songs
  • Beyoncé, selected songs and music videos
  • Queer Eye, selected scenes

Grade Distribution:

  • Participation: 5%
  • Research Summaries: 10%
  • Rhetorical Analysis: 15%
  • Comparative Rhetorical Analysis: 20%
  • Final essay 1: 10%
  • Final essay 2 (revision): 20%
  • Semester blog: 20% (Must produce 5 posts. The blog will be graded for completion at 4% a post)

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