Department of English

Megan Snell


Ph.D. Candidate, University of Texas at Austin

Megan Snell

Contact

Interests


Early modern literature; drama

Biography


Megan Snell is a PhD candidate in English at the University of Texas at Austin, specializing in drama and early modern literature. Her dissertation articulates how babies in drama reframe violence, materiality, temporality, and realism on stage. Her work has been published in the edited collection Shakespeare’s Things: Shakespearean Theatre and the Non-Human World in History, Theory, and Performance and in Shakespeare Quarterly.

Publications and awards:

“Shakespeare’s Babies: ‘Things to Come at Large.’” In Shakespeare’s Things: Shakespearean Theatre and the Non-Human World in History, Theory, and Performance, edited by Brett Gamboa and Lawrence Switzky, 79-90. New York: Routledge, 2020.

"Chaucer's Jailer's Daughter: Character and Source in The Two Noble Kinsmen." Shakespeare Quarterly 69, no. 1 (2018): 35-56. 

University Graduate School Continuing Fellowship, 2018-19

Outstanding Assistant Instructor Award, Dept. of English, UT Austin, 2017-18

Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award, Dept. of English, UT Austin, 2014-15

Courses


E 314J • Literature And Film

34935 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CMA 5.190
Wr

E 314J  l  1-Literature and Film

 

Instructor:  Snell, M

Unique #:  34935

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Texts:  Ishiguro's Remains of the Day, Stoppard's Arcadia, Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad, selected short stories,

Films: Hitchcock's Rebecca, Iñárritu's Birdman, Jenkins's Moonlight 

Description: 

With a few words or a cut of film, a work can vault us forward or backward in time. Or, with rich description or a well-crafted shot, we can linger in a moment with our characters. Taking up a variety of texts that are ghosted and energized by connections to the past, this course will develop strategies for close reading and contextualizing literature on the page and on film (analog and digital). You will acquire a vocabulary to label the details you notice in these medias, and you will articulate and refine written and verbal arguments for the significance of your observations. Our texts also share something else in common: at some point, they were deemed “the best” of their form, by some metric. While we won’t take these awards as definitive proof of their merit (as we’ll discuss, they have a complicated cultural history), they do offer us a place to start thinking about innovative and “traditional” strategies within literature and film, and how different forms can enable and restrict different methods of storytelling. Our final assignment will compare works that are rarely put into conversation, encouraging you to generate unique analysis from such pairings. Ultimately, this course hopes to haunt you (benevolently) by equipping you to savor and critique the different kinds of literature you will consume long after the course ends.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of three essays, with both optional and mandatory revision assignments (70% of the final grade).  There will also be short reading quizzes, and class discussion-leading (30% of the final grade).

E 314L • Texts And Contexts

33865 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 302
Wr

E 314L  l  4-Texts and Contexts

Instructor:  Snell, M

Unique #:  33865

Semester:  Spring 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description:

Is great literature “timeless”? What changes when we study a work in its particular historical situation, or in relation to our own current moment? This course asks how literary texts can reflect, explain, challenge, evade, or even adapt to the culture and power structures of their contemporary surroundings. We will focus particularly on how this might happen in the theatre, a medium that blurs the line between text and context. Multiple visits to the Harry Ransom Center will help us visualize the material relationships between these texts and their contexts. 

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Texts: Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (75% of the final grade).  There will also be short quizzes and in-class presentations (25% of the final grade).

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