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James P Pope


Professor

Clinical Professor

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Courses


GOV 360N • Intel And National Security

38075 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SRH 3.122

Please check back for updates.

T C 358 • Intelligence And Statecraft

41410 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SRH 3.212

Description: Intelligence has been called “the hidden dimension” of statecraft.   Based on the principle that intelligence has value only when it contributes to wise decision-making, this course is intended to benefit all students interested in foreign affairs and national security policy, with its focus on intelligence “performance,” vs. intelligence “process.”  The course addresses intelligence methods; how intelligence succeeds and fails; inherent ethical tensions and dilemmas; as well as the components, activities, authorities, structure and oversight of the Intelligence Community.  Student research will focus on intelligence performance in historical cases (from 1941 to the present).  Current events will also be used to introduce students to the written and oral communication techniques used by intelligence professionals.

Texts/Readings:

Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy, 6th edition, Mark Lowenthal. 
Additional readings will be available on Electronic Reserve.

Assignments:

Book reviews (two short reviews): 30%; Analysis of a historical intelligence success or failure: 30%; Three “Presidential Daily Brief “(PDB) Exercises (of about 1-1/2 pages, some of which will be done in teams and in class): 30%; Class participation 10%.

About the Professor:  James “Paul” Pope is a Clinical Professor in the LBJ School of Public Affairs and a Senior Fellow in the Intelligence Studies Project, which is sponsored by the Strauss and Clements Centers.   Mr. Pope retired from the CIA after multiple foreign tours, service as Chief of Station, and assignments as a Chief, Deputy Chief, and Chief of Operations in three of the Directorate of Operations largest components.  As Chief of the Training and Tradecraft Division, he was responsible for DO training, capture of “lessons learned,” and adapting training and tradecraft to emerging technical challenges and mission imperatives.  He was acting Assistant Director of National Intelligence for Partner Engagement for an extended period and Head of Delegation to NATO’s Civilian Intelligence Committee.  Pope was DNI/DCIA Representative to Commander, US Pacific Command and his component commands.  Prior to the NCS, he served on the National Intelligence Council for the Near East and South Asia and led an analytic branch in the Directorate of Intelligence.  Pope was an Army officer, with service on the Army General Staff after twice commanding at the company level, including command of the only active firebase in the Army on the Korean DMZ.  He received his M.A. With Distinction from the Naval Postgraduate School and BS from the United States Military Academy at West Point.  He is a Distinguished Graduate of Command and General Staff College and a graduate of the National War College’s CAPSTONE course. 

GOV 360N • Intel And National Security

38335 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SRH 3.122

Please check back for updates.

GOV 360N • Intel And National Security

38310 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SRH 3.122

Please check back for updates.

T C 358 • Intelligence And Statecraft

42900 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SRH 3.316

Description: Intelligence has been called “the hidden dimension” of statecraft.   Based on the principle that intelligence has value only when it contributes to wise decision-making, this course is intended to benefit all students interested in foreign affairs and national security policy, with its focus on intelligence “performance,” vs. intelligence “process.”  The course addresses intelligence methods; how intelligence succeeds and fails; inherent ethical tensions and dilemmas; as well as the components, activities, authorities, structure and oversight of the Intelligence Community.  Student research will focus on intelligence performance in historical cases (from 1941 to the present).  Current events will also be used to introduce students to the written and oral communication techniques used by intelligence professionals.

Texts/Readings:

Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy, 6th edition, Mark Lowenthal.  Additional readings will be available on Electronic Reserve.

Assignments:

Book reviews (two short reviews): 30%; Analysis of a historical intelligence success or failure: 30%; Three “Presidential Daily Brief “(PDB) Exercises (of about 1-1/2 pages, some of which will be done in teams and in class): 30%; Class participation 10%.

About the Professor:  James “Paul” Pope is a Clinical Professor in the LBJ School of Public Affairs and a Senior Fellow in the Intelligence Studies Project, which is sponsored by the Strauss and Clements Centers.   Mr. Pope retired from the CIA after multiple foreign tours, service as Chief of Station, and assignments as a Chief, Deputy Chief, and Chief of Operations in three of the Directorate of Operations largest components.  As Chief of the Training and Tradecraft Division, he was responsible for DO training, capture of “lessons learned,” and adapting training and tradecraft to emerging technical challenges and mission imperatives.  He was acting Assistant Director of National Intelligence for Partner Engagement for an extended period and Head of Delegation to NATO’s Civilian Intelligence Committee.  Pope was DNI/DCIA Representative to Commander, US Pacific Command and his component commands.  Prior to the NCS, he served on the National Intelligence Council for the Near East and South Asia and led an analytic branch in the Directorate of Intelligence.  Pope was an Army officer, with service on the Army General Staff after twice commanding at the company level, including command of the only active firebase in the Army on the Korean DMZ.  He received his M.A. With Distinction from the Naval Postgraduate School and BS from the United States Military Academy at West Point.  He is a Distinguished Graduate of Command and General Staff College and a graduate of the National War College’s CAPSTONE course. 

GOV 360N • Intel And National Security

38713 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 4.122

Please check back for updates.

T C 357 • Intelligence And Statecraft

42045 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.122

FULL TITLE: "Intelligence: The Hidden Dimension of Statecraft"

Description:

Intelligence has been called “the hidden dimension” of statecraft.   Based on the principle that intelligence has value only when it contributes to wise decision-making, this course is intended to benefit all students interested in foreign affairs and national security policy, with its focus on intelligence “performance,” vs. intelligence “process.”  The course addresses intelligence methods; how intelligence succeeds and fails; inherent ethical tensions and dilemmas; as well as the components, activities, authorities and structure of the present U.S. Intelligence Community.  Student research, writing and briefings will focus on intelligence performance in historical cases (from 1941 to the present).  Historical cases and current events will also be used to introduce students to the written and oral communication techniques used by intelligence professionals.

Texts/Readings:

Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. 6th edition, Mark Lowenthal.

Additional readings to be determined and made available on Electronic Reserve.

Assignments:

  • Book reviews (two short reviews): 20%
  • Analysis of a historical intelligence success or failure: 25%
  • Oral Briefing (on the analysis asignment listed above): 15%
  • Three Presidential Daily Brief (PDB) Exercises (of about 1-1/2 pages, some of which will be done in teams and in class): 30%
  • Attendance and Class participation 10%. 

 

About the Professor:

James “Paul” Pope is CIA’s Officer-in-Residence at the LBJ School.   In his last assignment, Mr. Pope served on the Directorate of Operation’s leadership team responsible for training and tradecraft.   Mr. Pope has had multiple overseas tours, including as Chief of Station, and run geographic and functional intelligence programs, particularly for counter-terrorism, counter-proliferation and cyber threats.  He also led an analytic branch in the Directorate of Intelligence and repeatedly served in senior representative and coordinating roles to the National Security Council, with senior officials of foreign intelligence services, and to international organizations.  He was Deputy National Intelligence Officer for the Near East and South Asia on the National Intelligence Council and Assistant Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Strategic Partnership, where he also served as the first U.S. Head of Delegation to NATO’s Civilian Intelligence Committee.  He worked closely with senior military leaders in many assignments including a tour as the DCIA and DNI Representative to the Commander, US Pacific Command.  He has been awarded the National Intelligence Superior Service Medal, the National Intelligence Reform Medal, and the Directorate of Operations’ Donovan Award for Excellence.  As an Army officer, his service ranged from the Army staff to command of the only active firebase in the Army on the Korean DMZ.   He holds an M.A. With Distinction from the Naval Postgraduate School and a BS from West Point.   He is an Honor Graduate of the Field Artillery Advanced Course, a Distinguished Graduate of Command and General Staff College, and a graduate of the National War College’s CAPSTONE course. 

 

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  • Center for European Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
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