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STEPHEN SLICK


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T C 358 • Intelligence/Natl Sec Policy

42560 • Fall 2018
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM CRD 007A

Description:

This seminar will examine the history and modern practice of intelligence in the U.S., focusing on the role intelligence plays shaping America’s foreign and national security policies.  Through selected readings, lectures, class discussions, and research, participants will have the opportunity to learn how U.S. intelligence agencies collect information, evaluate it, and prepare finished assessments for policymakers.  Using case studies such as the 9/11 terrorist attacks and (flawed) pre-war assessments of Iraq’s unconventional weapons programs, the seminar will identify factors that contribute to intelligence failures - - and, less heralded, successes.  The seminar will also consider why and to what effect U.S. policymakers call upon the Central Intelligence Agency to influence conditions abroad through the controversial instrument of covert action.

Building on a foundational understanding of the core intelligence disciplines (collection, analysis, and covert action) and bureaucratic structures, the seminar will turn to the more challenging question of how to define  - - and enforce - - an appropriate role for secret intelligence agencies in an open, democratic society.   This will include a review of major external investigations into intelligence excesses during the Cold War and, more recently, in combatting terrorism as well as the executive, legislative, judicial, and non-governmental mechanisms that have evolved to oversee U.S. intelligence.

In addition to traditional texts and journal articles, students will be exposed to primary public policy sources including statutes, executive orders, presidential directives, and national strategies related to U.S. intelligence.  Intelligence and national security debates (that are certain to be) underway during the seminar will be discussed in class.  Students will also be required to select, actively monitor, and provide periodic updates on a national security challenge that is under active public debate during the semester.  Seminar participants will have the opportunity to engage current and former senior intelligence officials who visit Austin in connection with Intelligence Studies Project events    

Texts/Readings:

Mark M. Lowenthal, Intelligence: from Secrets to Policy, 4th ed. (2008)

Christopher Andrew, For the President’s Eyes Only: Secret Intelligence and the American Presidency from Washington to Bush (1995)                                    

John Prados, Safe for Democracy: the Secret Wars of the CIA (2006)

Michael Sulick, American Spies – Espionage against the United States from the Cold War to the Present (2013)

James M. Olsen, Fair Play - The Moral Dilemmas of Spying (2006)

Michael Allen, Blinking Red - Crisis and Compromise in American Intelligence after 9/11 (2013)

The 9/11 Commission Report (2004) and The Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction, Report to the President of the United States (2005).

 

Assignments:

Weekly comment on reading(s)                                                          20%

Written/oral issue briefings (3-4)                                                        20%

Informed class participation                                                               20%

Research paper (12-15 pages)                                                                        40%    

 

Biography:

Stephen Slick is the Director of UT-Austin’s Intelligence Studies Project and a Clinical Professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs.  Before moving to Austin, he served 28 years in CIA's clandestine service including five assignments abroad.  Between 2005 and 2009, he was a special assistant to the president and the Senior Director for Intelligence Programs and Reform on the staff of the National Security Council.  He received a B.A. from the Pennsylvania State University, J.D. from the UCLA School of Law, and Master in Public Policy from Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.          

T C 358 • Intelligence In Amer Socty

42980 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CRD 007B

Description:

This seminar will examine the history and modern practice of intelligence in the U.S., focusing on the role intelligence plays shaping America’s foreign and national security policies.  Through selected readings, lectures, class discussions, and research, participants will have the opportunity to learn how U.S. intelligence agencies collect information, evaluate it, and prepare finished assessments for policymakers.  Using case studies such as the 9/11 terrorist attacks and (flawed) pre-war assessments of Iraq’s unconventional weapons programs, the seminar will identify factors that contribute to intelligence failures - - and, less heralded, successes.  The seminar will also consider why and to what effect U.S. policymakers call upon the Central Intelligence Agency to influence conditions abroad through the controversial instrument of covert action.

 

Building on a foundational understanding of the core intelligence disciplines (collection, analysis, and covert action) and bureaucratic structures, the seminar will turn to the more challenging question of how to define  - - and enforce - - an appropriate role for secret intelligence agencies in an open, democratic society.   This will include a review of major external investigations into intelligence excesses during the Cold War and, more recently, in combatting terrorism as well as the executive, legislative, judicial, and non-governmental mechanisms that have evolved to oversee U.S. intelligence.

 

In addition to traditional texts and journal articles, students will be exposed to primary public policy sources including statutes, executive orders, presidential directives, and national strategies related to U.S. intelligence.  Intelligence and national security debates (that are certain to be) underway during the seminar will be discussed in class.  Students will also be required to select, actively monitor, and provide periodic updates on a national security challenge that is under active public debate during the semester.  Seminar participants will have the opportunity to engage current and former senior intelligence officials who visit Austin in connection with Intelligence Studies Project events    

 

Texts/Readings:

Mark M. Lowenthal, Intelligence: from Secrets to Policy, 4th ed. (2008)

 

Christopher Andrew, For the President’s Eyes Only: Secret Intelligence and the American Presidency from Washington to Bush (1995)

                                        

John Prados, Safe for Democracy: the Secret Wars of the CIA (2006)

 

Michael Sulick, American Spies – Espionage against the United States from the Cold War to the Present (2013)

 

James M. Olsen, Fair Play - The Moral Dilemmas of Spying (2006)

 

Michael Allen, Blinking Red - Crisis and Compromise in American Intelligence after 9/11 (2013)

 

The 9/11 Commission Report (2004) and The Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction, Report to the President of the United States (2005).

 

Assignments:

Weekly comment on reading(s)                                                          20%

Written/oral issue briefings (3-4)                                                        20%

Informed class participation                                                               20%

Research paper (12-15 pages)                                                                        40%    

 

Biography:

Stephen Slick is the Director of UT-Austin’s Intelligence Studies Project and a Clinical Professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs.  Before moving to Austin, he served 28 years in CIA's clandestine service including five assignments abroad.  Between 2005 and 2009, he was a special assistant to the president and the Senior Director for Intelligence Programs and Reform on the staff of the National Security Council.  He received a B.A. from the Pennsylvania State University, J.D. from the UCLA School of Law, and Master in Public Policy from Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.          

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