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Yitskhok (Itzik) N. Gottesman


Senior LecturerPh.D., University of Pennsylvania

Yitskhok (Itzik) N. Gottesman

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Courses


ANT 325L • Jewish Folklore

31704 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GEA 127
GCWr (also listed as GSD 360, J S 363, R S 357)

Dybbuks, golems, evil eye are just some of the more well-known aspects of Jewish folklore, but this course will also examine the folklife of the Jews, their world view, their folk beliefs and fears. Call it folk religion if you will; many of these practices were dismissed by the "offical" Jewish religion as unJewish, but the "folk" persisted and eventually the practice became Judaized and accepted.

Using literary sources, ethnographic memoirs, historical documents, films (among them "The Dybbuk" 1939), folklore collections and field trips (among them - to the oldest Austin Jewish cemetery), we will focus on what makes Jewish folklore Jewish. Among the folklore genres to be examined -folktale, legend, folksong, folk music, custom, belief and of course, Jewish humor.

YID 612 • Accelerated Second-Yr Yiddish

37780 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM BUR 232

A continuation of Yid 604, an intensive language class that satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year.

In this course the students will complete the grammatical overview of Yiddish and will be introduced to Yiddish literature in Yiddish, poetry and prose. We will continue our exploration of Yiddish culture in Eastern Europe and America through film, audio and archival materials. By the end of the semester, students will be able to converse freely with native Yiddish speakers and write short essays.

Grading Policy

Prerequisite: Yid 604 or equivalent knowledge of Yiddish of first 12 chapters of College Yiddish. 

Attendance and class participation: 25%

Weekly quizzes: 50%

Weekly homework: 25%

Texts:

College Yiddish, Uriel Weinreich

Comprehensive Yiddish Dictionary

Antologye fun der yiddisher literature far yugnt.

UGS 303 • Jewish Humor

61220-61230 • Fall 2019
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM BUR 220
ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

YID 604 • Accelerated First-Year Yiddish

37345 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM BUR 234

Course Description

An introduction to spoken and written Yiddish with an emphasis on active communication, this course will cover basic grammar and vocabulary. By the end of the semester you should be able to read short texts with some ease and to carry on a conversation with a native speaker.  

The course will also introduce students to Yiddish culture, the background of most American Jews. We will view some classic Yiddish films, learn Yiddish songs and delve into the diverse history of YIddish in America including the Hasidic world, the Jewish labor movement, and Yiddish literature. 

Yiddish 604 is the first part of a two-semester accelerated course which satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year. The first semester covers the basics of Yiddish grammar and vocabulary. In the second semester the class will read short stories from Yiddish literature and by the end, students will be able to converse freely with native Yiddish speakers.

Grading Policy

Attendance and class participation: 25%

Weekly quizzes: 30%

Weekly homework: 20%

Mid-term and final: 25%

Texts:

Der oynheyber,   Dovid Bridger

College Yiddish, Uriel Weinreich

Comprehensive Yiddish English Dictionary,  Beinfeld/Bochner

UGS 303 • The Jewish-American Underdog

62075-62085 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 220
ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

YID 612 • Accelerated Second-Yr Yiddish

38035 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM BUR 232

A continuation of Yid 604, an intensive language class that satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year.

In this course the students will complete the grammatical overview of Yiddish and will be introduced to Yiddish literature in Yiddish, poetry and prose. We will continue our exploration of Yiddish culture in Eastern Europe and America through film, audio and archival materials. By the end of the semester, students will be able to converse freely with native Yiddish speakers and write short essays.

Grading Policy

Prerequisite: Yid 604 or equivalent knowledge of Yiddish of first 12 chapters of College Yiddish. 

Attendance and class participation: 25%

Weekly quizzes: 50%

Weekly homework: 25%

Texts:

College Yiddish, Uriel Weinreich

Comprehensive Yiddish Dictionary

Antologye fun der yiddisher literature far yugnt.

ANT 325L • Jewish Folklore

31750 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GDC 5.304
GCWr (also listed as GSD 360, J S 363, R S 357)

Dybbuks, golems, evil eye are just some of the more well-known aspects of Jewish folklore, but this course will also examine the folklife of the Jews, their world view, their folk beliefs and fears. Call it folk religion if you will; many of these practices were dismissed by the "offical" Jewish religion as unJewish, but the "folk" persisted and eventually the practice became Judaized and accepted. The influence of the Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism, also led to the introduction of many customs.

Using literary sources, ethnographic memoirs, historical documents, films (among them "The Dybbuk" 1939), folkore collections and field trips (among them - to the oldest Austin Jewish cemetery), we will focus on what makes Jewish folklore Jewish. For example, the high literacy rate among Jews over the centuries and the people's close connection to the written word led to the development of specifically Jewish interpretations of internationally disseminated beliefs. Folklore genres -folktale, legend, folksong, folkmusic, custom, belief and, of course, Jewish humor will be included.

 

Grading Policy

  • Attendance, homework and class participation: 30%
  • Four short papers 30%
  • Midterm and final paper: 40%

 

Reading List

  • Joshua Trachternberg   Jewish Magic and Superstition
  • Joachim Neugroschel   Great Tales of Jewish Fantasy and the Occult
  • Moses Gaster    Maaseh Book
  • I. B. Singer    The Satan in Goray
  • Elizabeth Herzog/Mark Zborowski   Life is With People

YID 604 • Accelerated First-Year Yiddish

38225 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM BUR 232

Course Description

An introduction to spoken and written Yiddish with an emphasis on active communication, this course will cover basic grammar and vocabulary. By the end of the semester you should be able to read short texts with some ease and to carry on a conversation with a native speaker.  

The course will also introduce students to Yiddish culture, the background of most American Jews. We will view some classic Yiddish films, learn Yiddish songs and delve into the diverse history of YIddish in America including the Hasidic world, the Jewish labor movement, and Yiddish literature. 

Yiddish 604 is the first part of a two-semester accelerated course which satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year. The first semester covers the basics of Yiddish grammar and vocabulary. In the second semester the class will read short stories from Yiddish literature and by the end, students will be able to converse freely with native Yiddish speakers.

Grading Policy

Attendance and class participation: 25%

Weekly quizzes: 30%

Weekly homework: 20%

Mid-term and final: 25%

Texts:

Der oynheyber,   Dovid Bridger

College Yiddish, Uriel Weinreich

Comprehensive Yiddish English Dictionary,  Beinfeld/Bochner

AFR 317D • Ethnc Humor/Multiculturl Us

29629 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 1
CD (also listed as AMS 315, J S 311, MAS 319)

What is meant by Jewish humor? African-American humor? This course will examine ethnic jokes from a variety of perspectives: sociological, psychological, folkloric and literary. We will explore racial and ethnic stereotypes in popular culture which serve as the basis for much of the humor. Among the questions we will address is: how do jokes migrate and change from one ethnic group to another?  What makes a joke funny and what makes a good joke teller, from the amateur to the professional comic? How do today's comics differ from previous generations? In addition to our readings we will screen weekly comedic material in film, TV and the web. 

Readings

  • Freud, Sigmund, The Joke and its Relation to the Unconscious
  • Watkins, Mel. On the Real Side: A History of African American Comedy. Chicago: Chicago Review Press.
  • Davies, Christie   Ethnic Humor around the World: A Comparative Analysis
  • Mahadev Apte, Humor and Laughter: An Anthropological Approach (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press

AMS 315 • Amer Jews: The Yiddish Exp

30190 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GDC 2.402
CDWr (also listed as GSD 310, J S 311, R S 316K)

Topic 9 

Course Description: Using literature, film and critical essays this course will examine the immigrant Jewish experience namely the Jews who came to the United States from Eastern Europe beginning in the late 19th century. We will study in particular the culture of the immigrants and the influence they had on American history and popular culture (for example: tin pan alley, garment industry, worker's unions, Hollywood, television and Jewish humor). The language that these Jews brought with them was Yiddish and we will look at the Yiddish theater in American, the press, literature, Yiddish films. But no knowledge of Yiddish is required. Other topics include Jews in smaller communities (including Galveston).

Textbooks: These books will be available for purchase at the University Coop. 

  •  World of our Fathers by Irving Howe
  • Jews Without Money Michael Gold
  • Bread Givers  novel by Anzia Yezierska
  • Yekl  novel by Abraham Cahan

There will be no packet but articles assigned on Canvas.

Grading: There will be two short papers (3 - 4 pages) 30% of grade, and a longer paper (8 - 10 pages)  40% of grade, attendance and participation 30%.

 

YID 612 • Accelerated Second-Yr Yiddish

37980 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM BUR 232

A continuation of Yid 604, an intensive language class that satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year.

In this course the students will complete the grammatical overview of Yiddish and will be introduced to Yiddish literature in Yiddish, poetry and prose. We will continue our exploration of Yiddish culture in Eastern Europe and America through film, audio and archival materials. By the end of the semester, students will be able to converse freely with native Yiddish speakers and write short essays.

Grading Policy

Prerequisite: Yid 604 or equivalent knowledge of Yiddish of first 12 chapters of College Yiddish. 

Attendance and class participation: 25%

Weekly quizzes: 50%

Weekly homework: 25%

Texts:

College Yiddish, Uriel Weinreich

Comprehensive Yiddish Dictionary

Antologye fun der yiddisher literature far yugnt.

ANT 325L • Jewish Folklore

31500 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GDC 5.304
GCWr (also listed as GSD 360, J S 363, R S 357, REE 325)

Course Description

Dybbuks, golems, evil eye are just some of the more well-known aspects of Jewish folklore, but this course will also examine the folklife of the Jews, their world view, their folk beliefs and fears. Call it folk religion if you will; many of these practices were dismissed by the "offical" Jewish religion as unJewish, but the "folk" persisted and eventually the practice became Judaized and accepted. The influence of the Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism, also led to the introduction of many customs.

Using literary sources, ethnographic memoirs, historical documents, films (among them "The Dybbuk" 1939), folkore collections and field trips (among them - to the oldest Austin Jewish cemetery), we will focus on what makes Jewish folklore Jewish. For example, the high literacy rate among Jews over the centuries and the people's close connection to the written word led to the development of specifically Jewish interpretations of internationally disseminated beliefs. Folklore genres -folktale, legend, folksong, folkmusic, custom, belief and, of course, Jewish humor will be included.

 

Grading Policy

  • Attendance, homework and class participation: 30%
  • Four short papers 30%
  • Midterm and final paper: 40%

 

Reading List

  • Joshua Trachternberg   Jewish Magic and Superstition
  • Joachim Neugroschel   Great Tales of Jewish Fantasy and the Occult
  • Moses Gaster    Maaseh Book
  • I. B. Singer    The Satan in Goray
  • Elizabeth Herzog/Mark Zborowski   Life is With People

YID 604 • Accelerated First-Year Yiddish

38470 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM BUR 232

Course Description

An introduction to spoken and written Yiddish with an emphasis on active communication, this course will cover basic grammar and vocabulary. By the end of the semester you should be able to read short texts with some ease and to carry on a conversation with a native speaker.  

The course will also introduce students to Yiddish culture, the background of most American Jews. We will view some classic Yiddish films, learn Yiddish songs and delve into the diverse history of YIddish in America including the Hasidic world, the Jewish labor movement, and Yiddish literature. 

Yiddish 604 is the first part of a two-semester accelerated course which satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year. The first semester covers the basics of Yiddish grammar and vocabulary. In the second semester the class will read short stories from Yiddish literature and by the end, students will be able to converse freely with native Yiddish speakers.

Grading Policy

Attendance and class participation: 25%

Weekly quizzes: 30%

Weekly homework: 20%

Mid-term and final: 25%

Texts:

Der oynheyber,   Dovid Bridger

College Yiddish, Uriel Weinreich

Comprehensive Yiddish English Dictionary,  Beinfeld/Bochner

AMS 315 • Amer Jews: The Yiddish Exp

30725 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GDC 2.402
CDWr (also listed as GSD 310, J S 311, R S 316K)

Please check back for updates.

YID 612 • Accelerated Second-Yr Yiddish

38390 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM BUR 232

A continuation of Yid 604, an intensive language class that satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year.

In this course the students will complete the grammatical overview of Yiddish and will be introduced to Yiddish literature in Yiddish, poetry and prose. We will continue our exploration of Yiddish culture in Eastern Europe and America through film, audio and archival materials. By the end of the semester, students will be able to converse freely with native Yiddish speakers and write short essays.

Grading Policy

Prerequisite: Yid 604 or equivalent knowledge of Yiddish of first 12 chapters of College Yiddish. 

Attendance and class participation: 25%

Weekly quizzes: 50%

Weekly homework: 25%

Texts:

College Yiddish, Uriel Weinreich

Comprehensive Yiddish Dictionary

Antologye fun der yiddisher literature far yugnt.

ANT 325L • Jewish Folklore

31295 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GDC 2.402
GCWr (also listed as GSD 360, J S 363, R S 357, REE 325)

Course Description

Dybbuks, golems, evil eye are just some of the more well-known aspects of Jewish folklore, but this course will also examine the folklife of the Jews, their world view, their folk beliefs and fears. Call it folk religion if you will; many of these practices were dismissed by the "offical" Jewish religion as unJewish, but the "folk" persisted and eventually the practice became Judaized and accepted. The influence of the Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism, also led to the introduction of many customs.

Using literary sources, ethnographic memoirs, historical documents, films (among them "The Dybbuk" 1939), folkore collections and field trips (among them - to the oldest Austin Jewish cemetery), we will focus on what makes Jewish folklore Jewish. For example, the high literacy rate among Jews over the centuries and the people's close connection to the written word led to the development of specifically Jewish interpretations of internationally disseminated beliefs. Folklore genres -folktale, legend, folksong, folkmusic, custom, belief and, of course, Jewish humor will be included.

 

Grading Policy

  • Attendance, homework and class participation: 30%
  • Four short papers 30%
  • Midterm and final paper: 40%

 

Reading List

  • Joshua Trachternberg   Jewish Magic and Superstition
  • Joachim Neugroschel   Great Tales of Jewish Fantasy and the Occult
  • Moses Gaster    Maaseh Book
  • I. B. Singer    The Satan in Goray
  • Elizabeth Herzog/Mark Zborowski   Life is With People

YID 604 • Accelerated First-Year Yiddish

38245 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM BUR 232

Course Description

An introduction to spoken and written Yiddish with an emphasis on active communication, this course will cover basic grammar and vocabulary. By the end of the semester you should be able to read short texts with some ease and to carry on a conversation with a native speaker.  

The course will also introduce students to Yiddish culture, the background of most American Jews. We will view some classic Yiddish films, learn Yiddish songs and delve into the diverse history of YIddish in America including the Hasidic world, the Jewish labor movement, and Yiddish literature. 

Yiddish 604 is the first part of a two-semester accelerated course which satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year. The first semester covers the basics of Yiddish grammar and vocabulary. In the second semester the class will read short stories from Yiddish literature and by the end, students will be able to converse freely with native Yiddish speakers.

Grading Policy

Attendance and class participation: 25%

Weekly quizzes: 30%

Weekly homework: 20%

Mid-term and final: 25%

Texts:

Der oynheyber,   Dovid Bridger

College Yiddish, Uriel Weinreich

Comprehensive Yiddish English Dictionary,  Beinfeld/Bochner

AMS 315 • Amer Jews: The Yiddish Exp

29827 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GDC 2.402
CDWr (also listed as GSD 310, J S 311, R S 316K)

American Jews: The Yiddish Experience

Writing FlagCultural Diversity Flag

 Course Description:

This course introduces students to the history and creativity of the Jewish immigrants who arrived in the United State from 1880 to 1925. These Yiddish speaking Jews from Eastern Europe became the largest segment of American Jewry and left an indelible stamp on the character of the nation. Their grandchildren and great-grandchildren continue to do so.

Using memoirs, films, novels, poetry, short stories and historical analysis the material will include: daily life on the Lower East Side, the  NY Yiddish theater; Jews in the Labor movement,  Jews in Hollywood, Jewish humor; Jewish American literature,  Jewish immigrants in the West and the South.

Required Textbooks: These books will be available for purchase at the University Coop.

  • My Future Is In America: Autobiographies of Eastern European Jewish Immigrants  Ed. Jocelyn Cohen
  • Jews Without Money Michael Gold
  • Bread Givers  novel by Anzia Yezierska
  • Yekl  novel by Abraham Cahan
  • A Fire in Their Hearts: Yiddish Socialists in New York by Tony Michels
  • Tales of the Yiddish Rialto: Reminiscences of Playwrights and Players in New York's Jewish Theatre in the Early 1900's  by Lous Lipsky

Grading: Semester Grades will be determined as follows.

  1. 2 short papers (2-3 pages) , 2 long papers (7 – 9 pages)   55%
  2. In Class Participation and Attendance (30%) If you miss 5 or more classes you will drop one letter  grade.
  3. Oral presentations and reaction papers.  (15%)

Class Restrictions: Laptop use is forbidden unless you have prior approval from the professor in order to take notes on your computer. 

YID 612 • Accelerated Second-Yr Yiddish

37610 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM BUR 232

A continuation of Yid 604, an intensive language class that satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year.

In this course the students will complete the grammatical overview of Yiddish and will be introduced to Yiddish literature in Yiddish, poetry and prose. We will continue our exploration of Yiddish culture in Eastern Europe and America through film, audio and archival materials. By the end of the semester, students will be able to converse freely with native Yiddish speakers and write short essays.

Grading Policy

Prerequisite: Yid 604 or equivalent knowledge of Yiddish of first 12 chapters of College Yiddish. 

Attendance and class participation: 25%

Weekly quizzes: 50%

Weekly homework: 25%

Texts:

College Yiddish, Uriel Weinreich

Comprehensive Yiddish Dictionary

Antologye fun der yiddisher literature far yugnt.

ANT 325L • Jewish Folklore

30560 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GDC 2.402
GCWr (also listed as GSD 360, J S 363, R S 357, REE 325)

FLAGS:  Wr  |  GC 

Course Description

Dybbuks, golems, evil eye are just some of the more well-known aspects of Jewish folklore, but this course will also examine the folklife of the Jews, their world view, their folk beliefs and fears. Call it folk religion if you will; many of these practices were dismissed by the "offical" Jewish religion as unJewish, but the "folk" persisted and eventually the practice became Judaized and accepted. The influence of the Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism, also led to the introduction of many customs.

Using literary sources, ethnographic memoirs, historical documents, films (among them "The Dybbuk" 1939), folkore collections and field trips (among them - to the oldest Austin Jewish cemetery), we will focus on what makes Jewish folklore Jewish. For example, the high literacy rate among Jews over the centuries and the people's close connection to the written word led to the development of specifically Jewish interpretations of internationally disseminated beliefs. Folklore genres -folktale, legend, folksong, folkmusic, custom, belief and, of course, Jewish humor will be included.

Grading Policy

Attendance, homework and class participation: 30%

Four short papers 30%

Midterm and final paper: 40%

Reading List

Joshua Trachternberg   Jewish Magic and Superstition

Joachim Neugroschel   Great Tales of Jewish Fantasy and the Occult

Moses Gaster    Maaseh Book

I. B. Singer    The Satan in Goray

Elizabeth Herzog/Mark Zborowski   Life is With People

YID 604 • Accelerated First-Year Yiddish

37515 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM BUR 232

Course Description

An introduction to spoken and written Yiddish with an emphasis on active communication, this course will cover basic grammar and vocabulary. By the end of the semester you should be able to read short texts with some ease and to carry on a conversation with a native speaker.  

The course will also introduce students to Yiddish culture, the background of most American Jews. We will view some classic Yiddish films, learn Yiddish songs and delve into the diverse history of YIddish in America including the Hasidic world, the Jewish labor movement, and Yiddish literature. 

Yiddish 604 is the first part of a two-semester accelerated course which satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year. The first semester covers the basics of Yiddish grammar and vocabulary. In the second semester the class will read short stories from Yiddish literature and by the end, students will be able to converse freely with native Yiddish speakers.

Grading Policy

Attendance and class participation: 25%

Weekly quizzes: 30%

Weekly homework: 20%

Mid-term and final: 25%

Texts:

Der oynheyber,   Dovid Bridger

College Yiddish, Uriel Weinreich

Comprehensive Yiddish English Dictionary,  Beinfeld/Bochner

YID 612 • Accelerated Second-Yr Yiddish

37685 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM BUR 234

A continuation of Yid 604, an intensive language class that satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year.

In this course the students will complete the grammatical overview of Yiddish and will be introduced to Yiddish literature in Yiddish, poetry and prose. We will continue our exploration of Yiddish culture in Eastern Europe and America through film, audio and archival materials. By the end of the semester, students will be able to converse freely with native Yiddish speakers and write short essays.

Grading Policy

Prerequisite: Yid 604 or equivalent knowledge of Yiddish of first 12 chapters of College Yiddish. 

Attendance and class participation: 25%

Weekly quizzes: 50%

Weekly homework: 25%

Texts:

College Yiddish, Uriel Weinreich

Comprehensive Yiddish Dictionary

Antologye fun der yiddisher literature far yugnt.

ANT 325L • Jewish Folklore

31535 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 116
GC (also listed as GSD 360, J S 363)

Please check back for updates.

YID 604 • Accelerated First-Year Yiddish

38615 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1:00PM-3:00PM BUR 232

Course Description

An introduction to spoken and written Yiddish with an emphasis on active communication, this course will cover basic grammar and vocabulary. By the end of the semester you should be able to read short texts with some ease and to carry on a conversation with a native speaker.  

The course will also introduce students to Yiddish culture, the background of most American Jews. We will view some classic Yiddish films, learn Yiddish songs and delve into the diverse history of YIddish in America including the Hasidic world, the Jewish labor movement, and Yiddish literature. 

Yiddish 604 is the first part of a two-semester accelerated course which satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year. The first semester covers the basics of Yiddish grammar and vocabulary. In the second semester the class will read short stories from Yiddish literature and by the end, students will be able to converse freely with native Yiddish speakers.

Grading Policy

Attendance and class participation: 25%

Weekly quizzes: 30%

Weekly homework: 20%

Mid-term and final: 25%

Texts:

Der oynheyber,   Dovid Bridger

College Yiddish, Uriel Weinreich

Comprehensive Yiddish English Dictionary,  Beinfeld/Bochner

YID 612 • Accelerated Second-Yr Yiddish

34020 • Spring 2000
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BEN 210

A continuation of Yid 604, an intensive language class that satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year.

In this course the students will complete the grammatical overview of Yiddish and will be introduced to Yiddish literature in Yiddish, poetry and prose. We will continue our exploration of Yiddish culture in Eastern Europe and America through film, audio and archival materials. By the end of the semester, students will be able to converse freely with native Yiddish speakers and write short essays.

Grading Policy

Prerequisite: Yid 604 or equivalent knowledge of Yiddish of first 12 chapters of College Yiddish. 

Attendance and class participation: 25%

Weekly quizzes: 50%

Weekly homework: 25%

Texts:

College Yiddish, Uriel Weinreich

Comprehensive Yiddish Dictionary

Antologye fun der yiddisher literature far yugnt.

Curriculum Vitae


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