Department of Geography and the Environment

Summer 2011 Courses

Tue, May 24, 2011
Summer 2011 Courses

The Department of Geography and The Environment offers a wealth of classes over the summer sessions.  These courses are historically difficult to get into during the fall and spring semesters. We welcome current UT-Austin students from all colleges, and also invite non UT-Austin students, to take advantage of the many summer courses available.

Note: Specific information about class meeting times, cross-listings, Flags, and other course-related requirements are published via the University Registrar Online Course Schedule.

First Summer Session

  • GRG 305 - This Human World - Unique: 84660

    We all know that geography means learning where things are but more importantly it means understanding how things got where they are, and why they are there. Beyond simply memorizing place names we need to inquire deeply into the processes behind spatial patterns, into roots that include religion, language, politics, and the built environment. Geographical processes also reflect and modify the inherent opportunities and constraints offered by the natural environment. This course therefore focuses on the patterns and flows that make culture spatial, while a secondary focus is human-environment interactions. In regard to both foci we take the time to think intensely about what is involved in responsible citizenship.
  • GRG 306C - Conservation - Unique: 84665

    Interested in conservation? Want to know more about environmental ethics, environmental history, and principles of ecology and biogeography that underpin conservation science and natural resource management? Do you wonder how these things actually fit together in the real world?  Register for GRG 306C spend your summer exploring conservation.  Course information: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/geography/faculty/lyp57 This course will trace a history of conservation ideas in order to understand how environment is conceived of and managed. We will examine a range of conservation topics including ideas of wilderness and sustainable development, environmental justice, problems such as habitat loss and climate change, and approaches to natural resource management. We will view these ideas in the contexts of developed and developing countries, and consider how specific conservation approaches emerge from, and impact, human populations differently in different places.
  • GRG 360G - Environmental Geographic Information Systems - Unique: 84670

    Geographic Information Science is a process through which analysis of spatial attributes can be performed with the aid of computers. GIS processes include project design, project management, spatial query design, data collection, data management, quality control, spatial analysis, and product generation. This course is an introduction to Environmental GIS designed to provide the student with an understanding of GIS principles, the current state of GIS development, an overview of typical GIS applications, and a familiarity with several GIS platforms. This course will combine lectures on the fundamentals of GIS with laboratory demonstrations of specific platforms and processe

Second Summer Session

  • GRG 304E - Environmental Science: A Changing World - Unique: 84740

    Surveys the major global environmental concerns affecting the Earth and its residents from the perspectives of the environmental sciences.
  • GRG 319 - Geography Latin America - Unique: 84745

    A general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, climate, plants and animals, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, globalization, population and migration, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival. The  class serves as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching.
  • GRG 337 - The Modern American City - Unique: 84750

    This course will explore a range of issues facing the modern city in the United States and will be divided into four subject areas: race and ethnicity, suburbanization, smart growth, and inner-city revitalization. The class will emphasize the role economic and political forces play in shaping cities.  Moreover, it will pay special attention to how the globalization of production and consumption has changed urban spaces.  Concepts like power, class, space, growth, decline, competition, and governance will be used to understand contemporary forces that are affecting cities.   The class combines lectures, discussions, and field-work in Austin.
  • GRG 356T/URB 354 - Race Ethnicity and Place - Unique: 84755

    The purpose of this course is to provide you with a geographical perspective on the dynamics and processes of racialization in various North American urban contexts.  We will be exploring a range of topics, such as 1) how categories of race/ethnicity are created; and 2) how place shapes and reinforces racial/ethnic identities and differences among various groups. We will focus on case studies of particular racial/ethnic groups in specific communities and landscapes.  Throughout the course we will explore 1) how place is more than a passive backdrop for the negotiation of racial/ethnic identities; 2) social issues associated with racial/ethnic diversity, particularly spatial segregation and social stratification; and 3) the importance of race and ethnic formations in the political landscape.  The class combines lectures, in-class discussions, journals, and films.
  • GRG 360G - Environmental Geographic Information Systems - Unique: 84760

    Geographic Information Science is a process through which analysis of spatial attributes can be performed with the aid of computers. GIS processes include project design, project management, spatial query design, data collection, data management, quality control, spatial analysis, and product generation. This course is an introduction to Environmental GIS designed to provide the student with an understanding of GIS principles, the current state of GIS development, an overview of typical GIS applications, and a familiarity with several GIS platforms. This course will combine lectures on the fundamentals of GIS with laboratory demonstrations of specific platforms and processe
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  • Department of Geography and the Environment

    The University of Texas at Austin
    305 E. 23rd Street, A3100
    RLP 3.306
    Austin, TX 78712
    512-471-5116