The Department of Government
The Department of Government

GOV 303D • Mid East: Adj/Chg Mdrn Time

37835 • Di-Capua, Yoav
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM RLP 0.102
(also listed as HIS 306J, MES 301L)
show description

This is an introductory class to the history of the Middle East in the 20th century. The main question for consideration is which forces and what sort of developments transformed this region from a relatively peaceful region to a radicalized environment and a source for opposition against the “West.” By exploring critical political, social, intellectual and economic themes such as colonialism, Arab nationalism, secular modernism, the impact of Zionism and military conflict, the rise of political Islam, the status of women and the oil revolution, we would identify the main internal and external forces, as well as the critical processes, that shaped the region during the last century.

 

  • James Gelvin, The Modern Middle East; A History (Oxford: Oxford 

                 University Press, 2004).

  • James Gelvin, The Israel-Palestine Conflict : One Hundred Years of War

                  (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005).


GOV 310L • American Government

37875 • Albertson, Bethany
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM • Two-way Interactive Video
GO
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

37860 • Prindle, David
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CAL 100
GO
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

37865 • O'Brien, Shannon
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM JES A121A
GO
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

37850 • Zug, Charles
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.102
GO
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

37870 • McIver, John
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM RLP 0.126
GO
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government

37845 • Williams, Avery
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ B0.306
GO
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 310L • American Government-Wb

37879 • Shaw, Daron
GO
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.


GOV 312L • Iss & Policies Amer Gov-Ut/Dc

37880 • Cobb, Joel
GO
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Iss & Policies In Amer Gov-Hon

37885 • Roberts, Brian
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 2.124
GO
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Iss & Policies In Amer Gov-Wb

37890 • Moser, Robert
GO
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37920 • Weyland, Kurt
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JES A121A
GO
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37905 • Barany, Zoltan
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.306
GO
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37895 • Brownlee, Jason
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.306
GO
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37900 • Phillips, Julie
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 4.122
GO
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37924 • Sandoval-Rojas, Nathalia
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM UTC 3.110
GO
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37915 • Russell, Peter
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.122
GO
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.


GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

37930 • Abramson, Jeffrey
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GDC 2.210
CDE GO
show description

Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.


GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

37925 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WCP 5.102
CDE GO
show description

Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.


GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

37935 • Tulis, Jeffrey
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 302
CDE GO
show description

Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.


GOV 337M • Intnatl Politics Latin Amer

37970 • Weyland, Kurt
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ B0.306
GC (also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 337M • Mex Amer Political Thought

37960 • Vasquez, Antonio
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 112
CDGCWr (also listed as MAS 374)
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 337M • Pol/Eco/Socty Cont Brazil

37975 • Hunter, Wendy
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.120
GC (also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 337M • Politics Of Mexico

37965 • Greene, Kenneth
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CAL 100
GC (also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 347K • Gov And Politics Of South Asia

37980 • Liu, Xuecheng
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A303A
GC (also listed as ANS 347K)
show description

check back for updates


GOV 350K • Statistical Anly In Polit Sci

37985 • Lin, Tse
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 1
QR
show description

This course introduces basic concepts and methods of statistics. Unlike the typical elementary statistical courses you may have taken, the emphasis here will be on applications in political science. The objective of this course is to help students acquire the literacy for understanding political science literatures based on the scientific approach, as well as to prepare interested students for more advanced methods courses.

Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, sampling, sampling distribution, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, contingency tables, and other statistical procedures. Computing will be an integral part of this course. You will use SPSS or R to analyze data from Gallup Survey, General Social Survey, and National Election Study in homework assignments. In particular, you will be asked to replicate results reported in journal articles and book chapters. You are also encouraged to develop and work out your own research problems.


GOV 355J • Human Behav Rational Action

38015 • Lin, Tse
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ 1.120
QRWr
show description

The term “rational action” as used in the economic approach is generally equated with maximizing behavior. Individual human agents are assumed to have consistent and stable preferences over alternatives each of which is assigned some “utility.” Maximization entails choosing the course of action that yields the highest expected utility. One is rational to the extent one uses the best means to achieve one’s goals.

In this course we will learn a variety of social and political models based on such a notion of individual rationality and to investigate the collective consequences that can be logically inferred from its assumptions. In particular, we will find through the “Prisoner’s Dilemma,” the “Tragedy of the Commons,” and the “Free-Rider Problem” a contrast between rational man and irrational society. Self-serving behavior of individuals does not usually lead to collectively satisfactory results.

So this course is about the stories of the Prisoners, the Herdsmen, and the Free-Riders. As a matter of fact, we will show that the Dilemma, the Tragedy, and the Problem share essentially the same mathematical structure, and hence they are essentially the same story - a story about human destiny. We will also introduce the various approaches that have been proposed for the escape from such a destiny.


GOV 357M • Civil Liberties

38060 • Perry Jr, H
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 4.112
(also listed as CTI 326)
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 357M • Structure Of Indiv Liberties

38065 • Jacobsohn, Gary
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 130
(also listed as CTI 326)
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 357M • Supreme Court And Public Pol

38040-38055 • Powe, Lucas
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM TNH 2.114
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 360N • Business And Society

38069 • Jensen, Nathan
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 1.126
Wr (also listed as BGS 370)
show description

 This class explores the relationship between firms and society. This includes the role of regulation and government policy in shaping economic outcomes, firm voluntary contributions to solving social issues, and the harnessing of private capital for foreign aid. The key insights will be to examine how governments can best encourage economic activity that has positive contributions for society.

 


GOV 360N • Defense Policy

38070 • Dorn, Edwin
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 3.221
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 360N • Intel And National Security

38075 • Pope, James
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SRH 3.122
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 360N • Internatl Political Economy

38080 • Wellhausen, Rachel
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CAL 100
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 364C • Islam And Politics

38100 • Ayoub, Samy
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 1
GC (also listed as ISL 373, MES 341, R S 358C)
show description

This course is an introduction to modern Islamic political thought. It seeks to provide both an overview of key ideas and themes that have informed mainstream Muslim politics during the 20th century as well provide an engagement with influential thinkers and texts that have shaped Muslim political behavior during this period. We will examine the way in which modernity was negotiated in the emerging Muslims states, the debate on God's sovereignty versus popular sovereignty and more broadly the moral bases of legitimate political authority. We will also explore how prominent Muslim thinkers have sought to engage with and respond to the rise of nationalism, socialism, capitalism, democracy, human rights, colonialism, imperialism and Zionism.


GOV 365F • Asian Rgnlism/Multilat Coop

38105 • Liu, Xuecheng
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 101
GC (also listed as ANS 361)
show description

check back for updates


GOV 365G • Military In Politics

38110 • Barany, Zoltan
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.210
show description

check back for updates


GOV 365L • Ethnic Polit In Taiwan/Asia

38115 • Liu, Amy
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 303
GC (also listed as ANS 361)
show description

Students must have taken a foundational course in government or Asian studies. The course also assumes basic knowledge of world history.

 

Course Description

This course is primarily about ethnic politics in Taiwan. We begin with a study of different theories of ethnic politics. Then we will draw on these theories to understand how the Taiwanese state transitioned from being an authoritarian regime – where an ethnic minority repressed the majority – to one that is democratic and accommodating of even the most marginalized minorities. We will conclude by situating the Taiwanese experience against those of its neighbors.

 

Grading Criteria

25%     Weekly Quiz

25%     Midterm Examination

25%     Final Examination

25%     Data-Based Paper


GOV 365N • Capitalism, Socialism, Democ

38120 • Brownlee, Jason
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ B0.302
EIIWr
show description

What economic and political systems are most likely to provide people a meaningful chance for a life of happiness, meaning, and decency? Since the time of the American and French Revolutions, the leading answers to this question have circled around the ideas of capitalism, socialism, and democracy. Capitalism is a system based on private owners controlling the productive establishments and workers pursuing wage labor to purchase the essentials of life. By contrast, socialism entails workers controlling production and distributing the material necessities throughout the population. Historically and currently, both the proponents of capitalism and the advocates of socialism have had trouble aligning their visions with the idea of democracy as rule by the people.

This class will investigate these tensions by considering the interdependence of economics and politics. For big ideas, we will draw on a range of philosophers and activists, including Karl Marx, Frederic Hayek, Joseph Schumpeter, Rosa Luxembourg, Angela Davis, Naomi Klein, Robert Jensen, Thomas Piketty, and Vivek Chibber. For empirical case studies, we will consider major historical moments, such as mid-19th century Europe (especially the year 1848), the United States during the Great Depression (1929-1939), and the United States the decade of and after the Great Recession (2007-2017).


GOV 365N • Immigration And Compar Polit

38130 • Leal, David
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM MEZ B0.306
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 365N • Security/Policy E Eur/Rus

38124 • Avramov, Kiril
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BUR 136
GC (also listed as REE 335)
show description

Description:

This course will examine key contemporary security issues and policy dilemmas through the perspective of post-communist Eastern European countries from 5th and 6th EU enlargement waves, in the framework of their membership in supranational organizations. It will survey the existing and emerging internal policy debates concerning the challenges that Central and Eastern European states face vis-à-vis resurgent Russia’s grand strategy and interventions, Chinese foreign policy outreach, energy security, as well as the challenges posed by terror, migration and the pressures and uncertainties originating in EU’s Eastern and Southern neighborhoods. The course is designed to examine the transformation of regional states’ national security strategies, threat perception and priorities transitioning from former Warsaw pact to full-fledged EU and NATO membership in shaping their respective national security priorities. The course is designed thematically and will focus on interpreting the respective countries’ policy shifts and responses within the framework of changing global security environment through the theories and concepts of EU security policy. Specific accent will be put on the “borderlands” threat perception, issue securitization, prioritization and subsequent policy formation of the small states within the framework of the EU and NATO’s strategies in response to contemporary external challenges. The aims of this survey include the provision of students with conceptual tools in examining the role and place of Central and Eastern European states in formation and adoption of EU’s security policy, critical analysis of their contemporary key foreign and security policy dilemmas, as well as an opportunity for interpretation of the national interests, policy responses, interactions and foreign policy and security contexts of the respective countries in focus.


GOV 365N • Soc Justice/Sec Policy-Pol

38125 • Liu, Amy
GC (also listed as EUS 348, REE 335)
show description

Course Description

This course is a study abroad program in Poland in June 2020. While in Poland, students will

have the opportunity to specialize in one of two themes: democratization or security. Both

themes involve classroom lectures with in-country experts, extracurricular activities throughout

Warsaw, and cultural excursions to other Polish cities. For their final assignment, students will

submit a revised mock Fulbright application (or something comparable). The proposal will allow

students to situate Poland (or Central-Eastern Europe more broadly) as a case study of a

substantive topic of their interest.

 

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for the course. Note, however, that students wishing to enroll in this

class must simultaneously enroll in LA 119 (Maymester Seminar: Poland) – a course designed

to prepare students for their trip to Poland.

 

Grading Policy

The final grade is composed of the following five parts:

  1. In-country course assessment (varies by theme): 20%
  2. In-country extra-curricular activities: 20%
  3. Cultural excursions: 20%
  4. Mock Fulbright application (inclusive of meetings with professor and in-country

experts): 30%

  1. Appropriate behavior (per university and sponsor guidelines): 10%

GOV 370L • News Media As Pol Institutn

38174 • Sparrow, Bartholomew
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CAL 22
show description

Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370L • Policy Formatn/Implementatn

38155 • Craig, Alison
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLP 0.128
show description

Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370L • Public Opinion/Representation

38165 • Wlezien, Christopher
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 420
show description

Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 370L • The United States Congress

38170 • Theriault, Sean
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM MEZ 1.306
show description

Please check back for updates.

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 


GOV 379S • Citizens In Democratic Pol

38195 • Luskin, Robert
Meets M 3:30PM-6:30PM MEZ 1.206
show description

Please check back for updates.


GOV 379S • Pope Francis's Cath Church-Ita

38200 • Theriault, Sean
IIWr (also listed as LAH 350, T C 358)
show description

Maymester Program - Application Deadline November 15, 2019

More information here!


GOV 380R • Math Methods For Pol Analysis

38205 • Lin, Tse
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM MEZ 1.118
(also listed as SDS 381)
show description

This course introduces the mathematical concepts and methods essential for multivariate statistics and data science techniques. Mathematical topics include reviews of basic calculus and linear algebra, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, vector and matrix differentiation, unconstrained optimization, and constrained optimization. Applications in statistics and data science include matrix representation of multiple regression, OLS and MLE in matrix form, factor analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), singular value decomposition (SVD), etc.

 


GOV 382M • Politics/Law/Moral Character

38234 • Budziszewski, J
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM BAT 1.130
(also listed as PHL 387)
show description

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing

Course Description

We will consider the ethical foundations of law and politics, focusing on the moral virtues.  The questions we consider are of interest to philosophers of politics and jurisprudence, constitutional scholars, political scientists, legislators, and jurists.  The approach is partly historical, partly contemporary.

Most of our ancestors took for granted that it was impossible to organize a decent legal and political order without a certain kind of character on the part of the citizens and the rulers.  Some thought we inevitably get the government we deserve; others thought that certain constitutional devices could ‘stretch’ virtue, so that it might be possible to get a somewhat better government than we deserve (for example, with the help of checks and balances).  Not until Hume did it became common to suppose that a well-designed regime is not particularly reliant on virtue at all.  On this view, arguably, it should have been easier than it has been to promote republican government in countries that are not accustomed to it.

I am primarily an ethical and political theorist, rather than a jurisprude, a historian, or a number cruncher.  However, I invite students who identify with a variety of approaches.

Grading Policy

One third:  Vigorous class participation.

Two-thirds:  Term paper.

Texts

  1. A packet, available at the McCombs location of the UT Copy Services (GSB 3.136), including a readings by Alschuler, Anscombe, Pieper, MacIntyre, Langdon, Sherry, Solum, and Duff.

 

  1. Online readings from Aristotle, Cicero, the Bible, Augustine, Hume, Madison, Hamilton, and “Centinal.”

 

  1. J. Budziszewski, Commentary on Thomas Aquinas’s Virtue Ethics (Cambridge, 2017). You may use either a hardcover or an electronic version.

GOV 390L • British Hist, Lit, & Politics

38315 • Louis, William
Meets F 4:30PM-7:30PM HRC 3.304
(also listed as E 392M, HIS 384K, MES 385)
show description

This seminar is designed as a reading course in the history, literature, and politics of the nonwestern world as well as the British Empire, and as a class in professional writing. The theme is the Cold War in Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. In addition to the required reading, each student draws up an individual reading list in consultation with the professor.  Books may be chosen in Hindi, Chinese, Arabic, and Farsi as well as English.           

 

The subject has literary, political, and historical dimensions with an emphasis on professional writing, not only assessments that might appear in such newspapers as the New York Times or Wall Street Journal but also especially in policy papers and critical evaluations that are made in government agencies and businesses as well as academic journals. I use my own experience as a former Chairman of the State Department’s Committee on Publication of Historical Records (The Foreign Relations of the United States) to give students guidance on technical as well as analytical methods. 

 

Literature is a prominent theme along with history and politics.  One book to be read in common is Graham Greene, The Quiet American (Greene’s anti-American novel set in Indochina). Others include: on India, Sarvapalli Gopal’s biography, Jawaharlal Nehru; and Paul Scott, The Raj Quartet (on the partition of India and the beginning of the Cold War in Asia); on the Middle East, Mark Gasiorowski, The 1953 Coup in Iran (for the toppling of the Iranian Prime Minister in 1953 by the British and American secret services); and, for Africa, Crawford Young, Politics in the Congo (for radical leadership and decolonization in Africa in the Cold War era).

 

On the Cold War itself, students have the opportunity to pursue reading on such themes as the Soviet Union’s attempt to expel the Western powers from Berlin, leaving the world on the edge of nuclear conflagration; the Soviet shipping of nuclear weapons to Cuba; and President Kennedy’s assassination in 1963.

 

The main requirements of the course are met by students reading a book or its equivalent each week and by submitting a one-page weekly critique of the reading. (Students are reminded of President Eisenhower’s dictum: ‘Get it on one page or I will not read it.’) Each of the weekly critiques is circulated to other members of the class who make annotations on style as well as substance.  In this way the class emphasizes succinct professional writing as one of the key skills to be acquired in graduate school.

 

Grades are determined by attendance and participation in seminar discussion (25%) and quality of the weekly critiques (75%).

 



Reading List—The following works are required: Lytton Strachey, Eminent Victorians; Hermione Lee, Virginia Woolf; Norman Davies, The Isles

Grades are determined by attendance and participation in seminar discussion (25%) and quality of the weekly critiques (75%).



  •   Map
  • Department of Government

    The University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st ST STOP A1800
    Batts Hall 2.116
    Austin, TX 78712-1704
    512-471-5121