Kristine Hopkins


Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Kristine Hopkins

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Courses


SOC 310S • Wmns Reprod Hlth Nonsci Maj

44470 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 4.110
(also listed as N 307, WGS 301)

Description 

To study women’s reproductive health is to study biology, chemistry, anatomy, physiology, endocrinology, female sexuality, and the social meaning of gender.  This course provides non-science majors with the scientific and social scientific knowledge needed to understand the basis of women’s reproductive health and the medical, cultural, and even political issues surrounding women’s reproductive health.  Students will learn about female reproductive health across the lifespan.  Students will also learn about some of the ways that social, economic, and cultural factors influence a woman’s reproductive health.

SOC 310S • Wmns Reprod Hlth Nonsci Maj

44925 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM ART 1.120
(also listed as N 307, WGS 301)

Description

To study women’s reproductive health is to study biology, chemistry, anatomy, physiology, endocrinology, female sexuality, and the social meaning of gender.  This course provides non-science majors with the scientific and social scientific knowledge needed to understand the basis of women’s reproductive health and the medical, cultural, and political issues surrounding women’s reproductive health.  Students will learn about female reproductive health across the lifespan.  Students will also learn about some of the ways that social, economic, and cultural factors influence a woman’s reproductive health.

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

45065 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.128

Description:

Using lectures, documentaries, and class discussions as well as reflections of your own and others’ health and illness and representations of health and illness in the media, this course will critically examine the distribution of mortality and morbidity, how health and illness are defined and socially constructed, the experiences of illness, training and hierarchies of health care workers, interactions between health care providers and patients, alternative medicine, ethical issues, and health care financing. The majority of the course will focus on health and illness in the United States. 

SOC 308 • Wom's Reprod Hlth Nonsci Maj

46320 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.112
(also listed as N 307, WGS 301)

Description

This course provides non-science majors with the scientific and social scientific knowledge needed to understand the basis of women’s reproductive health and the medical, cultural, and even political issues that surrounding women’s reproductive health.  Students will learn about female reproductive health across the lifespan, from birth through menopause.  Students will also learn about some of the ways that social, economic, and cultural factors influence a woman’s reproductive health.

 

Course Evaluation

  1. Three exams (25% each).  Format is multiple choice, labeling figures, definitions, and short answer. 
  2. One 3-5 page literature review of a women’s reproductive health topic (15%).
  3. Classroom component (10%); measured with iClicker assessments and small group in-class discussions.

 

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

46495 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.102

Descripton

 Using lectures, documentaries, and class discussions as well as reflections of your own and others’ health and illness and representations of health and illness in the media, this course will critically examine the distribution of mortality and morbidity, how health and illness are defined and socially constructed, the experiences of illness, training and hierarchies of health care workers, interactions between health care providers and patients, alternative medicine, ethical issues, and health care financing. The majority of the course will focus on health and illness in the United States.

Course Evaluation

  1. Exams; 75% of grade. The lowest score of the first three exams will be dropped. The 4th exam is required. The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, and short answer questions based on the readings, lectures, and documentaries. 
  2. Two assignments; 15% of grade.
  3. Classroom component; 10% of grade; measured with iClicker assessments and small group in-class discussions. 

 

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

45845 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.102

 Description

Using lectures, documentaries, and class discussions as well as reflections of your own and others’ health and illness and representations of health and illness in the media, this course will critically examine the distribution of mortality and morbidity, how health and illness are defined and socially constructed, the experiences of illness, training and hierarchies of health care workers, interactions between health care providers and patients, alternative medicine, ethical issues in health care, and health care financing. The majority of the course will focus on health and illness in the United States but will make some references to health in other countries and regions.

Reading Materials

  1. The Sociology of Health, Healing, and Illness, 7th Edition by Gregory L. Weiss and Lynne E. Lonnquist
  2. Readings on Blackboard
  3. 30 or so three inch by five inch (3x5) note cards.

Course Evaluation

  1. Exams; 75% of grade. The lowest score of the first three exams will be dropped. The 4th exam is REQUIRED. The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, and short/medium answer based on the readings, lectures, documentaries and other media. 
  2. Journal “mini-papers”; 20% of grade. 3 typewritten journal “mini-papers.”  Each journal entry is a very short paper (400-550 words) chronicling your experiences with and reflections about health, illness, and health care. 
  3. Classroom component; 5% of grade. The in-class component will be measured with impromptu small group in-class discussions.  This also gives me a very rough idea of attendance.  You’ll be able to drop at least 2 of the in-class discussions.

 

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

45455 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 212

Course Organization & Objectives

Using lectures, documentaries, and class discussions as well as reflections of your own and others’ health and illness and representations of health and illness in the media, this course will critically examine the distribution of mortality and morbidity, how health and illness are defined and socially constructed, the experiences of illness, training and hierarchies of health care workers, interactions between health care providers and patients, alternative medicine, ethical issues, and health care financing. The majority of the course will focus on health and illness in the United States.

Reading Materials to Buy/Download

1.     The Sociology of Health, Healing, and Illness, 6th Edition by Gregory L. Weiss and Lynne E. Lonnquist, available at the University Co-op or online.   

2.     Readings are available in PDF on Blackboard. Additional required readings may also be posted on Blackboard throughout the semester.

3.     15 or so three inch by five inch (3x5) note cards.

Course Evaluation

1.     Exams; 75% of grade. The lowest score of the first three exams will be dropped. The 4th exam is REQUIRED. The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, and short/medium answer based on the readings, lectures, and documentaries.  Each exam is a maximum of 100 points and the highest three scored exams each count 25% of your final grade. If you do not take the 4th exam, the zero you receive for it will count as one of your three exams. See course schedule below for scheduled exam dates.

2.     Journal “mini-papers”; 15% of grade. 2 typewritten journal “mini-papers.”  Each journal entry is a very short paper (400-550 words) chronicling your experiences with and reflections about health, illness, and health care, using a sociological perspective. 

3.     Classroom component; 10% of grade. The in-class component will be measured with impromptu small group in-class discussions.  This also gives me a rough idea of attendance. 

SOC 308 • Wom's Reprod Hlth Nonsci Maj

46025 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PHR 3.106
(also listed as N 307, WGS 301)

SOC 308: Women’s Reproductive Health for NonScience Majors

Course Description

To study women’s reproductive health is to study biology, chemistry, anatomy, physiology, endocrinology, female sexuality, and the social meaning of gender.  This course provides non-science majors with the scientific and social scientific knowledge needed to understand the basis of women’s reproductive health and the medical, cultural, and even political issues surrounding women’s reproductive health.  Students will learn about female reproductive health across the lifespan, from birth through menopause.  Students will also learn about some of the ways that social, economic, and cultural factors influence a woman’s reproductive health.

Required Texts & Materials

  1. Course packet at Paradigm Books, 407 W. 24th Street, just west of Guadalupe (abbrev. PKT)
  2. Robert Hatcher, et al., ed., Contraceptive Technology, 19th ed., 2007, (abbrev. CT).  Available in PDF in the “Course Documents” folder on Blackboard.
  3. Readings in PDF in the “Course Documents” folder on Blackboard (abbrev. BB).
  4. Approximately 20 three inch by five inch (3x5) note cards.

Course Evaluation

1.     Three exams.  Format is multiple choice, labeling figures, definitions, and short answer. 

2.     One 3-5 page literature review of a women’s reproductive health topic, due date April 12th; see “Paper Assignment” on Blackboard for more information.

3.     Classroom component.  In small groups, you’ll answer a question or questions I put to the class; then, as a class, we will share and discuss points made in the smaller groups. 

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

46185 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 116

SOC 354: Sociology of Health and Illness

Course Organization & Objectives

Using lectures, documentaries, and class discussions as well as reflections of your own and others’ health and illness and representations of health and illness in the media, this course will critically examine the distribution of mortality and morbidity, how health and illness are defined and socially constructed, the experiences of illness, training and hierarchies of health care workers, interactions between health care providers and patients, alternative medicine, ethical issues, and health care financing. The majority of the course will focus on health and illness in the United States.

Reading Materials to Buy/Download

1.     The Sociology of Health, Healing, and Illness, 6th Edition by Gregory L. Weiss and Lynne E. Lonnquist, available at the University Co-op or online.   

2.     Readings are available in PDF on Blackboard. Additional required readings may also be posted on Blackboard throughout the semester.

3.     15 or so three inch by five inch (3x5) note cards.

Course Evaluation

1.     Exams; 75% of grade. The lowest score of the first three exams will be dropped. The 4th exam is REQUIRED. The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, and short/medium answer based on the readings, lectures, and documentaries.  Each exam is a maximum of 100 points and the highest three scored exams each count 25% of your final grade. If you do not take the 4th exam, the zero you receive for it will count as one of your three exams. See course schedule below for scheduled exam dates.

2.     Journal “mini-papers”; 15% of grade. 2 typewritten journal “mini-papers.”  Each journal entry is a very short paper (400-550 words) chronicling your experiences with and reflections about health, illness, and health care, using a sociological perspective. 

3.     Classroom component; 10% of grade. The in-class component will be measured with impromptu small group in-class discussions.  This also gives me a rough idea of attendance. 

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

45625 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 212

Description:

Using lectures, documentaries, and class discussions as well as reflections of your own and others’ health and illness and representations of health and illness in the media, this course will critically examine the distribution of mortality and morbidity, how health and illness are defined and socially constructed, the experiences of illness, training and hierarchies of health care workers, interactions between health care providers and patients, alternative medicine, ethical issues in health care, and health care financing. The majority of the course will focus on health and illness in in the United States but will make some references to health in other countries and regions.

Text:


1.    The Sociology of Health, Healing, and Illness, 6th Edition by Gregory L. Weiss and Lynne E. Lonnquist
2.    PDFs of readings on Blackboard
3.    20 or so three inch by five inch (3x5) note cards.


Grading:


1.    Four exams. The lowest score of the first three exams will be dropped. The 4th exam is REQUIRED. The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, and short/medium answer based on the readings, lectures, guest speakers, and videos. Each exam is a maximum of 100 points and the highest three scored exams each count 20% of your final grade. If you do not take the 4th exam, the zero you receive for it will count as one of your three exams. (75% of grade)
2.    Journal. You will keep a typewritten journal chronicling your experiences with and reflections about health, illness, and health care; a total of 5 entries for the semester are expected (400-550 words each). The journal have two parts: an observation and analysis of the observation. Your observations should be drawn from your own life and can include notes on your own or others’ health, past or present contact with providers and facilities, discussions with others about health and health care, as well as observations about the portrayal of health and health care by the media (news, TV, movies, etc.).  Your analysis should use sociological principles that you learn in the course.  (20% of grade)
3.    Classroom component. The in-class component will be measured by small group in-class assignments.  For short in-class assignments I will ask you to get into groups of 2 or 3 people to discuss a question I put to the class; one member of the group will write a short summary of your discussion on a 3x5 card. I’ll do enough of these so that you’ll be able to drop at least 2 of them. (5% of grade)

WGS 301 • Wom's Reprod Hlth Nonsci Maj

48360 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CPE 2.216

Introductory Topics in Women's and Gender Studies.  Check cross-listings for originating field of study.

WGS 301 • Wom's Reprod Hlth Nonsci Maj

47825 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM NOA 1.102

Introductory Topics in Women's and Gender Studies.  Check cross-listings for originating field of study.

WGS 301 • Wom's Reprod Hlth Nonsci Maj

48750 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM NOA 1.102

Introductory Topics in Women's and Gender Studies.  Check cross-listings for originating field of study.

WGS 301 • Wom's Reprod Hlth Nonsci Maj

48275 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM NOA 1.102

Introductory Topics in Women's and Gender Studies.  Check cross-listings for originating field of study.

LAS 325 • Population And Society

36130 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 1

Please check back for updates.

Research


"Oral Contraceptive Use on the U.S.-Mexico Border: A Qualitative Study." R03 HD047507

Women in many countries can purchase OCs over-the-counter (OTC) but in the US a prescription is required, potentially creating a barrier to contraceptive access. This qualitative study in El Paso, Texas, provides a unique "natural experiment":  residents can take advantage of the differing medical practices on either side of the border and obtain oral contraceptives either with or without clinician involvement.

This study seeks to produce an in-depth understanding of the contraceptive experiences of low-income Mexican-origin women who live on the US-Mexico border and answers:

  • how they experience and negotiate health services;
  • how and why they make decisions about where to obtain their pills;
  • where and to whom they turn when something goes wrong;
  • how their partners and close family members support or hinder their pill use;
  • attitudes about the timing of childbearing and marital relationships.

Below are the in-depth interview guides used in the study.  Includes guides done at enrollment and those done approximately 1 year later.  Each second round in-depth interview was tailored to the participant's specific situation so I provide two examples below.  Feel free to contact me for more examples.

Curriculum Vitae


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