Robert A. Hummer


Ph.D., Florida State University

Robert A. Hummer

Contact

Courses


SOC 319 • Intro To Social Demography

44974 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.112

Description:

This course provides an introduction to the study of demography from a sociological perspective. The course focuses most centrally on understanding the core population processes – fertility, mortality, and migration – as well as linkages between the core population processes and social change and stratification. The course also focuses on issues of population structure, particularly age, sex, and race/ethnicity.

Required Texts:

Yaukey, David, Douglas L. Anderton, and Jennifer Hickes Lundquist. 2014. Demography: The Study of Human Population, 4th Edition. Waveland Press, Inc.

Grading Policy:

Exam 1: 20%

Exam 2: 20%

Exam 3: 20%

Exam 4: 20%

Daily Assignments: 20%

 

SOC 319 • Intro To Social Demography

46155 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.102

Description:

This course provides an introduction to the study of public health from a sociological perspective. The course focuses most centrally on understanding the national, state, county/city, and neighborhood level social contexts that are so important for the health of individuals and populations. A substantial portion of the course will be geared toward understanding how social contexts operate to produce health disparities across subgroups of the U.S. population, particularly those defined by race/ethnicity, nativity, and socioeconomic status.

Required Texts:

Yaukey, David, Douglas L. Anderton, and Jennifer Hickes Lundquist. 2014. Demography: The Study of Human Population, 4th Edition. Waveland Press, Inc.

Grading Policy

Exam 1: 25%

Exam 2: 25%

Exam 3: 25%

Exam 4: 25%

SOC 368D • Social Context Of Public Hlth

46295 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.128

Description:

This course provides an introduction to the study of public health from a sociological perspective. The course focuses most centrally on understanding the national, state, county/city, and neighborhood level social contexts that are so important for the health of individuals and populations. A substantial portion of the course will be geared toward understanding how social contexts operate to produce health disparities across subgroups of the U.S. population, particularly those defined by race/ethnicity, nativity, and socioeconomic status.

 Required Texts 

Holmes, Seth M. 2013. Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Klinenberg, Eric. 2002. Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

 National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2013.. U.S. Health in International Perspective: Shorter Lives, Poorer Healt, edited by Steven H. Woolf and Laudan Aron. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

 Grading Policy

Exam 1: 25%

Exam 2: 25%

Exam 3: 25%

Exam 4: 25%

 

 

 

SOC 368D • Social Context Of Public Hlth

46505 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 0.102
(also listed as PBH 368D)

Cross listed with PBH 368D

Description

This course provides an introduction to the theories and research findings that characterize the study of public health from a sociological perspective. The course will focus most centrally on understanding health disparities across subgroups of the U.S. population, including those defined by age, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, nativity, and socioeconomic status. The family/household, neighborhood, community, and state level contexts of health will also be examined.    

Required Texts 

Cockerham, William C. 2007. Social Causes of Health and Disease. Malden, MA: Polity Press.

Klinenberg, Eric. 2002. Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Christakis, Nicholas A., and James H. Fowler. 2009. Connected: How Your Friends’ Friends’ Friends Affect Everything You Feel, Think, and Do.  

Grading Policy

Three exams 25% each; one paper 25%

 

SOC 389K • Gen Approach To Study Of Pop

46570 • Spring 2014
Meets T 12:00PM-3:00PM CLA 1.302A

DESCRIPTION  

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of social demography. We cover the basic processes of population change: mortality, fertility, and migration, as well as population distribution. The two main goals of this course are to 1) introduce students to both classic and current literature in social demography, 2) teach students to critically assess the major theories associated with population change. Note that, for those of you who plan a career in social demography, this course provides only a starting point. Students should keep abreast of developments in the literature by reading the leading journals (Demography, Population and Development Review, Population Studies, Population Research and Policy Review, and Demographic Research).    

READINGS  

Readings for the course will be posted on Blackboard.   

GRADING

There will be mid-term and final exams in the course, both take home.

Midterm exam  40%

Final exam 40% 

Class participation 20%

SOC 389K • Human Mortality

46345 • Fall 2013
Meets T 12:00PM-3:00PM CLA 0.124

Description

A social demographic perspective on human mortality can be defined as the study of how social stratification and social processes are associated with trends and differentials in cause and age at death between and among meaningful social groups.  The specific aims of this seminar are:

1)    To introduce the study of human mortality from the perspective of social demography.

2)    To further the understanding of how social processes and stratification during life can be better understood by investigating trends and differentials in human mortality between and among meaningful social groups.

3)    To promote the enhancement of student research skills by actively working on, and developing, an empirical research paper on this topic during the semester of the seminar.

Required Texts 

None

Grading Policy

Participating in Class Discussion          10%

Leading Class Discussion                    15%

Empirical Research Paper                    75%

 

SOC 368D • Social Context Of Public Hlth

45855 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 0.102
(also listed as PBH 368D)

Cross listed with PBH 368D

Description

This course provides an introduction to the theories and research findings that characterize the study of public health from a sociological perspective. The course will focus most centrally on understanding health disparities across subgroups of the U.S. population, including those defined by age, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, nativity, and socioeconomic status. The family/household, neighborhood, community, and state level contexts of health will also be examined.    

Required Texts 

Cockerham, William C. 2007. Social Causes of Health and Disease. Malden, MA: Polity Press.

Klinenberg, Eric. 2002. Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Christakis, Nicholas A., and James H. Fowler. 2009. Connected: How Your Friends’ Friends’ Friends Affect Everything You Feel, Think, and Do.  

Grading Policy

Three exams 25% each; one paper 25%

 

SOC 389K • Gen Approach To Study Of Pop

45930 • Spring 2013
Meets T 12:00PM-3:00PM CLA 1.302F
    DESCRIPTION   The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of social demography. We cover the basic processes of population change: mortality, fertility, and migration, as well as population distribution. The two main goals of this course are to 1) introduce students to both classic and current literature in social demography, 2) teach students to critically assess the major theories associated with population change. Note that, for those of you who plan a career in social demography, this course provides only a starting point. Students should keep abreast of developments in the literature by reading the leading journals (Demography, Population and Development Review, Population Studies, Population Research and Policy Review, and Demographic Research).    READINGS   Readings for the course will be posted on Blackboard.   GRADING

There will be mid-term and final exams in the course, both take home.

Midterm exam  40%

Final exam 40% 

Class participation 20%

SOC 368D • Social Context Of Public Hlth

45645 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BUR 216
(also listed as PBH 368D)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the theories and research findings that characterize the study of public health from a sociological perspective. The course will focus most centrally on understanding health disparities across subgroups of the U.S. population, including those defined by age, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, nativity, and socioeconomic status. The family, household, neighborhood, community, and state level contexts of health will also be examined.    

Required Texts 

Cockerham, William C. 2007. Social Causes of Health and Disease. Malden, MA: Polity Press.

Klinenberg, Eric. 2002. Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Christakis, Nicholas A., and James H. Fowler. 2009. Connected: How Your Friends’ Friends’ Friends Affect Everything You Feel, Think, and Do.  

Grading Policy

Four exams 25% each

 

SOC 389K • Human Mortality

45715 • Spring 2012
Meets T 12:00PM-3:00PM BUR 214

Description

A social demographic perspective on human mortality can be defined as the study of how social stratification and social processes are associated with trends and differentials in cause and age at death between and among meaningful social groups.  The specific aims of this seminar are:

1)    To introduce the study of human mortality from the perspective of social demography.

2)    To further the understanding of how social processes and stratification during life can be better understood by investigating trends and differentials in human mortality between and among meaningful social groups.

3)    To promote the enhancement of student research skills by actively working on, and developing, an empirical research paper on this topic during the semester of the seminar.

Required Texts (the Dean’s Office will not accept “Course Packet” or “TBA”):

 None

Grading Policy

Participating in Class Discussion          10%

Leading Class Discussion                    15%

Empirical Research Paper                    75%

 

SOC 389K • Human Mortality

46550 • Spring 2010
Meets T 12:00PM-3:00PM BUR 231

See attached

AFR 317D • Difficult Dialogs: Race/Policy

36448 • Fall 2007
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM FAC 4
(also listed as AAS 310, MAS 319)

Please check back for updates.

AFR 317D • Difficult Dialogs: Race/Policy

35945 • Fall 2006
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM MAI 220
(also listed as AAS 310, MAS 319)

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Population And Society-W

32093 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RLM 6.112

Please check back for updates.

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