History Department
History Department

Robert Icenhauer-Ramirez


LecturerPh.D., 2014, University of Texas at Austin,

Robert Icenhauer-Ramirez

Contact

  • Office: GAR 1.104
  • Office Hours: Fall 2018: T 2:00-3:00 p.m. or by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Interests


The American Civil War, Lincoln, The Politics of Slavery, The American Revolution, British History

Courses


HIS 345L • Amer Civ War/Reconstr, 1861-77

38230 • Fall 2019
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM BUR 212
CD HI

This course investigates the political, military, constitutional, diplomatic, and social aspects of the American Civil War and Reconstruction.  The emphasis will be on the military and political facets of the war while also focusing on how the war resulted in the destruction of slavery.  The goal is to provide students with an understanding of the major events and leaders of the war and its aftermath.  The end of slavery will be examined with an eye toward the actions of the free African-Americans and slaves themselves in moving emancipation to the forefront of the debate about the war’s objectives.  The history of Reconstruction will be considered during the last several class sessions. 

    

The Grand Design: Strategy and the U. S. Civil War, by Donald Stoker

The Civil War, Library of America (4 vol.) (excerpts from these volumes will be assigned).

Reconstruction: A Concise History, by Allen C. Guelzo  

In addition to the final examination (which will be comprehensive), there will be two midterm exams.  Each of the midterms will count 25% of the course grade.  The final examination will count 40% of the course grade.  The exams will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor).  Quizzes and attendance will count for the final 10%.  

HIS 334L • Amer Rev/Fnd Of Us, 1763-1800

39135 • Fall 2018
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM JGB 2.218
HI

This course investigates the creation of the United States from the thirteen colonies to 1800, with a focus on several events: the origins of the conflict between the colonists and Great Britain; the resulting American Revolution; the Articles of Confederation; the Constitutional Convention and the launching and implementation of the new government.  The goal is to provide students with an understanding of the major events and leaders during the last third of the eighteenth century.   
Classes will usually consist of both a lecture and discussion. Unless authorized by SSD, no laptop computers or similar devices may be used or open during class. The use--any use--of phones in class is not permitted.
The following books should be purchased:

1. Alan Taylor, American Revolutions: A Continental History, 1750-1804
2. Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America’s Independence
Primary source materials, and other articles, will be assigned for additional readings during the semester.

There will be two exams.  The first will be a mid-term and the second will be a final exam during the last scheduled class period.  Each of the tests will count 30% of the course grade.  The exams will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor).  Enrollment in this course constitutes a commitment on your part to be present at both of these examinations.  Exams will not be given ahead of schedule, nor will any make-ups be given, for any reason.  There will be a paper of 6-8 pages in length that will count 30% of the course grade.  In addition to the two exams, unannounced short, objective-question quizzes will be given frequently at the beginning of class, testing mastery of recent course material. These quizzes will constitute 10% of a student’s course grade.

HIS 345L • Amer Civ War/Reconstr, 1861-77

39155 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM JGB 2.218
CD HI

OVERVIEW. This course investigates the political, military, constitutional, diplomatic, and social aspects of the American Civil War and Reconstruction. The emphasis will be on the military and political facets of the war while also focusing on how the war resulted in the destruction of slavery. The goal is to provide students with an understanding of the major events and leaders of the war and its aftermath. The end of slavery will be examined with an eye toward the actions of the free African-Americans and slaves themselves in moving emancipation to the forefront of the debate about the war’s objectives. The history of Reconstruction will be considered during the last several class sessions.
COURSE BOOKS. The following books should be purchased:

The Grand Design: Strategy and the U. S. Civil War, by Donald Stoker
A Short History of Reconstruction: Updated Edition, by Eric Foner

Primary source materials, and other articles, will be assigned for additional readings during the semester.

There will be two exams.  The first will be a mid-term and the second will be a final exam during the last scheduled class period.  Each of the tests will count 30% of the course grade.  The exams will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor).  Enrollment in this course constitutes a commitment on your part to be present at both of these examinations.  Exams will not be given ahead of schedule, nor will any make-ups be given, for any reason.  There will be a paper of 6-8 pages in length that will count 30% of the course grade.  In addition to the two exams, unannounced short, objective-question quizzes will be given frequently at the beginning of class, testing mastery of recent course material. These quizzes will constitute 10% of a student’s course grade.

HIS 345L • Amer Civ War/Reconstr, 1861-77

39510 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 214
CD HI

OVERVIEW.  This course investigates the political, military, constitutional, diplomatic, and social aspects of the American Civil War and Reconstruction.  The emphasis will be on the military and political facets of the war while also focusing on how the war resulted in the destruction of slavery.  The goal is to provide students with an understanding of the major events and leaders of the war and its aftermath.  The end of slavery will be examined with an eye toward the actions of the free African-Americans and slaves themselves in moving emancipation to the forefront of the debate about the war’s objectives.  The history of Reconstruction will be considered during the last several class sessions.

COURSE BOOKS. The following books should be purchased:

The Grand Design: Strategy and the U. S. Civil War, by Donald Stoker

The Confederate War, by Gary W. Gallagher

The War that Forged a Nation: Why the Civil War Still Matters, by James McPherson

A Short History of Reconstruction: Updated Edition, by Eric Foner

There will be two exams during the semester as well as a final exam.  Each of the tests will count 30% of the course grade.  The exams will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor).  There will be quizzes given during class.  Quizzes will count 10%.

HIS 355S • Us Constitutional History

39650 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM JGB 2.202
CD HI

OVERVIEW.  This lecture course will examine the history and political development of the United States Constitution from the decade preceding the drafting of the Constitution through the beginning of the Jefferson presidency.  The States that fought for independence from Great Britain were led by the Continental Congress and united by the Articles of Confederation.  A focus will be on the experiences of the leaders during the American Revolution and under the Articles of Confederation that gave rise to the idea that the Articles needed to be replaced by a new, stronger national government.  The Constitutional Convention and the ratification process will be closely examined.  The need for and passage of the Bill of Rights will also be examined.  After the new government is formed, the emphasis will be on the question of how the three branches of government gave shape to the theory that the Constitution had given form.  The presidencies of Washington, Adams and beginning of Jefferson’s will be studied, along with the role of the legislative branch and the rise of an independent judiciary and the concept of judicial review and supremacy.    

COURSE BOOKS. The following books should be purchased:

 

Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787-1788. by Pauline Maier

Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789. by Joseph J. Ellis

George Washington, Nationalist. by Edward J. Larson

There will be two exams during the semester as well as a final exam.  Each of the tests will count 30% of the course grade.  The exams will consist of short-answer and essay questions on the material from the classes and readings (including any handouts that may come your way from the instructor).  There will be quizzes given during class.  Quizzes will count 10%.

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