History Department
History Department

William Kramer


Lecturer

Contact

  • Office: UTC 4.132
  • Office Hours: Fall 2018 - M 12:00 - 3:00 pm

Interests


Early Modern Ireland, Early Modern Religious History, Early Modern Britain and Scotland, The European Witch-Hunts

Courses


HIS 375L • Stuart England, 1603-1689

39135 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JGB 2.202
GC (also listed as EUS 346)

This lecture course explores the most significant political, religious, social, economic and cultural developments in seventeenth-century England. The unifying theme of the course is the problem of revolution, and the lectures investigate the causes, nature, and development of the two revolutions of the seventeenth century—the Puritan Revolution of the 1640s and the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89. The lectures are topical and therefore do not follow a strict chronological order.

Roger Lockyer, Tudor and Stuart Britain (3rd ed., 2005)
Brian Levack, Witch-Hunting in Scotland (208)
Barry Coward, Oliver Cromwell  (1991)
Peter Laslett (ed.), John Locke's Two Treatises of Government (2nd ed., 1989)



HIS 375K • Tudor England, 1485-1603

39362 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 4.132
GC

Description: This course explores the most significant political, religious, social, economic and cultural developments in sixteenth-century England. The main themes of the course are the development of the modern state, the Protestant Reformation, the emergence of a capitalist society, and the growth of political and religious divisions during the reigns of Queen Mary I (1553-1558) and Queen Elizabeth I (1558-1603). While the course primarily focuses on England, it also examines England’s place within Western Europe as well as the connections between England and Ireland during this period.  The lectures are topical and therefore do not follow a strict chronological order.

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing

Reading:

R. Lockyer, Tudor and Stuart Britain

C. Herrup, A House in Gross Disorder

 L. Stone, The Crisis of the Aristocracy

M. Gaskill, Witchfinders

B. Coward, Oliver Cromwell

J. Locke, Two Treatises of Government

W. Speck, Reluctant Revolutionaries

Assignments: Three exams (75%) and one final essay or term paper (25%)

HIS 301F • Premodern World

39180 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.112
GC (also listed as AHC 310)

“Premodern World” is a lower-division, lecture course that provides an overview of global development from roughly 30,000 BCE to 1500 CE. It introduces students to the main political, social, and cultural trends in a variety of societies while at the same time stressing the global perspective. Considerable emphasis is thus paid to comparative history and the study of cross-cultural encounters. This entry-level course aims to teach historical thinking as well as historical content, impart a basic grasp of the premodern past, and  stimulate the development of large-scale frameworks for historical analysis.

-- Robert W. Strayer, Ways of the World, A Brief Global History with Sources

                                                                        Vol.1: To 1500, Bedford/ St. Martins.

-- Neil MacGregor, A History of the World in 100 Objects, Viking Press.

-- numerous essays and book chapters provided on course website

Exams (2x25%, 1x33%) =80%; In-class assignments =10%; on-line assignment =10%.  

HIS 301F • Premodern World

38950 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM JGB 2.218
GC (also listed as AHC 310)

“Premodern World” is a lower-division, lecture course that provides an overview of global development from roughly 30,000 BCE to 1500 CE. It introduces students to the main political, social, and cultural trends in a variety of societies while at the same time stressing the global perspective. Considerable emphasis is thus paid to comparative history and the study of cross-cultural encounters. This entry-level course aims to teach historical thinking as well as historical content, impart a basic grasp of the premodern past, and  stimulate the development of large-scale frameworks for historical analysis.

Texts (provisional):

-- Robert W. Strayer, Ways of the World, A Brief Global History with Sources

                                                                        Vol.1: To 1500, Bedford/ St. Martins.

-- Neil MacGregor, A History of the World in 100 Objects, Viking Press.

-- numerous essays and book chapters provided on course website

Grading:

Exams (3 x 25% each) = 75%; reading worksheets (4 x 5% each) = 20%; attendance & participation = 5%.

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