Humanities Institute

Faculty Consultants

2016-2017 Faculty Consultants

Dr. Theodor Held

Dr. Ted Held is the Director of Reproductive Health at People’s Community Clinic, an FQHC based in Austin, and is on Faculty at the Dell Medical School. In this role he is responsible for the care of approximately 1200 pregnancies a year in a predominantly underserved population.  His research interests include social and economic determinants of health, with an emphasis on health behavior as a driver of health outcomes. He has an adjunct appointment at the UT Population Research Center where he collaborates on research around contraceptive access in underserved an Hispanic populations.  

Dr. Held is a practicing OB/GYN who has been involved with the care of the underserved in Austin since 1996.  He has held various local leadership positions, including Medical Director of Austin Women’s Hospital, Director of Women’s Health for the CommunityCare clinic system, and the Associate CMO for the Community Care Collaborative, a public private partnership which aims to redesign the delivery system for the underserved in Travis county. He is interested in the interplay of health policy, social and economic factors in the production of health outcomes; especially around contraception access; he has published in collaboration with the UT Population Research Center.  His clinical interests include contraception access and care for vulnerable patients; in 2010 he co-founded the first interdisciplinary clinic for victims of human trafficking in Texas, in collaboration with the UT school of Social Work’s Institute on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault. Dr. Held was also the medical director for Women's Health and Family Planning Association of Texas (WHFPT), the state'Title X provider, and helped establish the Hope Through Health Clinic, the first interdisciplinary clinic in Texas to treat victims of sex trafficking. 

Dr. Held graduated from UTMB in 1992, and completed his residency in OB/GYN at the University of Kentucky in 1996.  He completed his MPH in 2013 at the UT School of Public Health, Austin Regional Campus.

Dr. Angela Valenzuela

Angela Valenzuela is a professor in both the Educational Policy and Planning Program within the Department of Educational Administration at the University of Texas at Austin and holds a courtesy appointment in the Cultural Studies in Education Program within the Department of Curriculum & Instruction.  She also serves as the director of the University of Texas Center for Education Policy. 

A Stanford University graduate, her previous teaching positions were in Sociology at Rice University in Houston, Texas (1990-98), as well as a Visiting Scholar at the Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Houston (1998-99). She is also the author of  Subtractive Schooling: U.S. Mexican Youth and the Politics of Caring  and  Leaving Children Behind: How "Texas-style" Accountability Fails Latino YouthShe also founded and operates an education blog titled  Educational Equity, Politics, and Policy in Texas. 

She served as co-editor of the Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, as well as the Anthropology and Education Quarterly. A recent Fulbright Scholar, Valenzuela spent her 2007-08 academic year in Mexico where she taught in the College of Law at the University of Guanajuato in Guanajuato, Guanajuato and conducted research in the areas of immigration, human rights, and binational relations. She has also been a Cissy McDaniel Parker and Haskew Fellow. Valenzuela's research and teaching interests are in the sociology of education, minority youth in schools, educational policy, and urban education reform. 

Valenzuela is also the new director of the  National Latino Education Research Agenda Project (NLERAP)  that aims to create a teacher education pipeline for Latino/a youth, nationally. With support from a grant from the Ford Foundation, this work builds on the efforts and advocacy of Latino/a education and business leaders nationwide. NLERAP has been housed at the University of Texas at Austin since November 6, 2009.

2015-2016 Faculty Consultants

Dr. Megan Alrutz

Dr. Megan Alrutz heads the Drama and Theatre for Youth and Communities area in the Department of Theatre and Dance. She works nationally as a scholars, dramaturg, director and teaching artist in the areas of applied theatre and theatre with and for youth. Before coming to The University of Texas at Austin in 2009, she led the M.F.A. in Theatre for Young Audiences at the University of Central Florida. Her creative and scholarly work focuses on ethical representation and youth agency in applied theatre, theatre with and for youth and digital storytelling. Dr. Alrutz has a Ph.D. in Theatre from Arizona State University and a B.A. in Theatre from Rutgers University.

She was recently awarded the Harold Oaks Award in Theatre for Young Audiences (TYA/USA 2016), the Branson Ward Endowed Excellence Award (UT Austin 2016), the Foxworth Fellowship (UT Austin 2012), Grace Hill Milam Centennial Fellowship in Fine Arts (UT Austin 2011), Excellence in Graduate Teaching (UCF 2008) and the Service Learning Faculty Excellence Award (UCF 2007). She was also awarded the prestigious Winifred Ward Fellowship in 2003. Dr. Alrutz is a two-term board member of TYA/USA, and an active member of AATE, PSi and ATHE.

Dr. Alrutz currently co-directs the Performing Justice Project (PJP), an applied performance program that invited young people to devise new work about identity-based inequities and stories from their lives. She also co-directs Patchwork Stories, an on-going community-engaged performance project in partnership with the University of Exeter.

Dr. Elaine Horwitz

Dr. Elaine Horwitz studies second language acquisition from the perspective of language leaners. She wants to understand the experience of second language learning and what learners bring to the language learning process. Her publications have focused on individual differences in second language acquisition including cognitive abilities, language anxiety, student belief systems, and conceptual development. She is especially interested in English language learners, anxiety in language teachers, improving second/foreign language teaching, and language teacher education.

Dr. Sonia Seeman

Dr. Seeman’s interests focus on the music of modern Turkey, the Ottoman Empire, and Southeastern Europe, specializing in Rom (“Gypsy”) communities. She has done field research in Macedonia and Southeastern Europe (1985-87; 1989) and in Turkey (1995-1999; 2003) on Rom, Turkish, and transnational musical practices. She received her Phd from UCLA in 2002. Her dissertation,“‘You’re Roman!’ Music and Identity in Turkish Roman Communities,” investigates the relationship between cultural practices and Rom social identity by exploring the tension between music as lived experience and as socially and politically constructed from the Byzantine and Ottoman periods through the present. She taught at UCSB for 4 years on a post-doctoral faculty fellowship and as a lecturer. Courses taught at UCSB and UCLA include: the music of Turkey, Ottoman communities, Roma communities, and Southeastern Europe, as well as seminars on ethnomusicological theory, world popular music, and the anthropology of music. Her theoretical interests include: transnationalism and cosmopolitanism; minority communities; recording industry; post-structuralism; phenomenological hermeneutics. Seeman has articles in Middle East Studies Association Bulletin, Ethnomusicology Forum, and Music and Anthropology. She has also written several sets of liner notes, and co-produced an ethnographic recording with clarinetist Selim Sesler, “Roads to Kesan”, released by Kalan Muzik. Her recent research interests explore emergent Turkish cultural expressions and ongoing configuration of ethnic and gendered identities in the wake of the European Union accession processes.

2009-2011 Faculty Consultants

Dr. Mike Conroy

Dr. Elizabeth Englehardt

I joined the Department of American Studies as the John Shelton Reed Distinguished Professor of Southern Studies in January 2015. My most recent book project, The Larder: Food Studies Methods from the American South (2013, co-edited with John T. Edge and Ted Ownby), is an anthology that thinks about diverse ways we can write and talk about southern cultures through food. I am the author of A Mess of Greens: Southern Gender and Southern Food (2011), a monograph that investigates the changing food story of the US South. I am also the lead author of Republic of Barbecue: Stories Beyond the Brisket (2009); editor of Beyond Hill and Hollow: Original Readings in Appalachian Women’s Studies (2005); author of The Tangled Roots of Feminism, Environmentalism, and Appalachian Literature (2003); and editor of The Power and the Glory: An Appalachian Novel (2003, a reprint of a 1910 novel by Grace MacGowan Cooke).

Throughout my research, I draw from letters, diaries, cookbooks, novels, photographs, government records, short stories, and material objects. I work to collect and build alternative archives as well, especially in terms of oral histories with living subjects, and, increasingly, the seeds, heritage ingredients, tastes, and even sounds of the communities whose stories I aim to document and analyze. Archival analysis, informed by critical race theory, ecological, feminist ethnographic, and oral history practices, helps me to expand my range and my responsibilities as a humanities scholar. While my recent work has coalesced around southern food studies, my commitment to Appalachian studies and the intersectionality of region, race, gender, and class continues to motivate me as a scholar.

I serve on the board of the Southern Foodways Alliance, an organization dedicated to the documentation and celebration of the complicated stories of food in diverse communities of the US South. During my previous ten years at the University of Texas at Austin, I helped to found and served on the board of Foodways Texas, a similar organization working to understand the multi-racial, multi-ethnic cultures and foods of the state. I also am one of the book series editors for the Southern Foodways Alliance Studies in Culture People and Place through the University of Georgia Press (http://www.ugapress.org/index.php/series/SFA).

Dr. Loriene Roy

Dr. Roy’s writing, research, and service are centered on indigenous cultural heritage development. In addition, she advocates for the inclusion and study of formal and informal service learning opportunities for graduate students. She is founder and director of “If I Can Read, I Can Do Anything,” a national reading club for American Indian students. She was the 1997-1998 President of the American Indian Library Association (AILA) and the 2007-2008 President of the American Library Association (ALA). Her professional awards include the 2009 Leadership Award from the National Conference Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums; 2007 State of Texas Senate Proclamation No. 127; 2006 ALA Equality Award; 2007 Library Journal Mover & Shaker”; Outstanding 2002 Alumna from the University of Arizona’s School of Information Resources and Library Services; the 2001Joe and Bettie Branson Ward Excellence Award for Research, Teaching, or Demonstration Activities that Contribute to Changes of Positive Value to Society, two Texas Exes Teaching Awards; and two James W. Vick Texas Excellence Awards for Academic Advisors. She is Anishinabe, enrolled on the White Earth Reservation, a member of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe. She is the 2012-2013 Chair of ALA's International Relations Round Table and the 2008-2013 Convener of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institution's (IFLA's) Special Interest Group on Indigenous Matters. She is a Trustee Emeritus of the LeRoy C. Merritt Humanitarian Fund. She teaches graduate courses in basic reference, library instruction and information literacy, reader’s advisory, indigenous librarianship, and information in social and cultural context. She has written widely and delivered over 500 formal presentations in venues around the world. 

Dr. Pauline T. Strong

Pauline Strong received her bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Colorado College and graduate degrees in sociocultural anthropology from the University of Chicago.  She has published on the representation of Native American cultures and identities in North American literature, scholarship, film, art, museums, sports events, legislation, social movements, and youth organizations. Her current research concerns the role that 20th-century youth organizations played in the development of racialized and gendered U.S. citizens.

She is the author of American Indians and the American Imaginary: Cultural Representation Across the Centuries (2012) and Captive Selves, Captivating Others: The Politics and Poetics of Colonial American Captivity Narratives (1999). She is also co-editor (with Sergei Kan) of New Perspectives on Native North America: Cultures, Histories, Representations (2006). Her articles appear in journals and anthologies in the fields of American Studies, cultural studies, history, media studies, Native American Studies, and sports studies as well as anthropology.

She currently directs the Humanities Institute at the University of Texas at Austin, which offers a variety of programs  for interdisciplinary intellectual engagement across the campus and community. Previously she served as President of the Society for Cultural Anthropology and Councilor of the American Society for Ethnohistory.  Her community service includes serving as President and Director of the Board of the Balcones Council of Camp Fire USA.

Dr. David Warner

David Warner’s major research and teaching interests are in health finance, health policy and economics. A graduate of Princeton University and Syracuse University, he previously taught at Wayne State University and Yale University and was deputy director of the Office of Program Analysis at the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. In addition to his courses in health care finance and state health policy, he has directed a number of student policy research projects on issues as diverse as the health of Mexican Americans in South Texas, diabetes policy in Texas, cross border health insurance and mental health policy. Professor Warner has served as a consultant to a number of organizations in the health sector and for six years served on the board of Brackenridge Hospital in Austin and was chairman of the Texas Diabetes Council. At UT Austin and the LBJ School, he has served as acting director of the Center for Health and Social Policy, as a member of the advisory board of the Hogg Foundation, as chair of the Student Health Center Advisory Board, and as a member of many committees and study groups. Professor Warner’s publications include an edited volume “Toward New Human Rights” and several monographs.

2008-2009 Faculty Consultants

Dr. James P. Barufaldi

James P. Barufaldi, Ruben E. Hinojosa Regents Professor in Education and director of the Center for Science and Mathematics Education Center at The University of Texas at Austin, earned a bachelor&rsquos degree in the biological sciences, Marietta College (Ohio), a master’s degree in biology and education, Kent State University (Ohio), and a Ph. D. degree in science education, the University of Maryland, College Park, MD. He has directed numerous federally funded projects such as the U. S. Department of Education Project-General Science Content and Inquiry Skills Improvement Program, the Title II funded Coordinated Thematic Science Inservice Program, the Science Content Improvement Program, and the Texas Elementary Science Inservice Program. Barufaldi currently serves as Principal Investigator for the Texas Regional Collaboratives for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching, the NSF Chautauqua-Type Short Courses for College Science Teachers, and Co-PI for the NSF funded project, Instrument Development for Exploring Professional Growth Continuum. He served as co-director of the UTeach Secondary Science and Mathematics Teacher Preparation Program and has supervised more than 50 dissertations and theses in science education.

In 2003 Barufaldi was selected as a member of the Academy of Distinguished Teachers at The University of Texas at Austin. He was named a Minnie Stevens Piper Professor, 2002, for “dedication to the teaching profession” as well as “outstanding academic, scientific, and scholarly achievement”. He also received the 2002 Outstanding Scholar in Education Award presented by the Alumni Association, College of Education, at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and served as chair of Section Q, Education.

Barufaldi was named the 1988 Outstanding Science Educator of the Year, by the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science (AETS) for his dedication to teaching and his exemplary work in science curriculum development and research, and for his leadership in the education community. Barufaldi received an honorary Doctor of Science degree from Marietta College and the Texas Excellence Teaching Award in the College of Education at The University of Texas. He was also a recipient of the YWCA Mentors and Allies Award in recognition of extraordinary support of Women, Austin, Texas, and received the Outstanding Service Award of the Science Teachers Association of Texas (STAT). He received the Honorary Membership Award, the highest honor given by STAT and was awarded the Rebecca Sparks Elementary Science Award by the Texas Council of Elementary Science.

Barufaldi served on the boards of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) and the National Science Teachers Association. He also served as president of NARST, AETS and the Texas Association of Biology Teachers.

Barufaldi has served as a consultant for the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) and writer for BSCS programs such as the Elementary School Sciences Program and the Me in the Future Program. He served on the BSCS advisory board for Science for Life and Living: Integrating Science, Technology, and Health. He was also major writer for the NSF funded high school biology program, Biology: A Community Context.

Barufaldi authored or co-authored more than 60 articles, books, chapters, and book reviews and has presented more than 300 workshops, papers, and seminars throughout the U. S., and in countries such as Portugal, Russia, Japan, Israel, Bermuda, Iran, Barbados, Bahamas, Costa Rica, Mexico, Australia, Belize, Canada, Iceland, Finland, Korea, Panama, Honduras, Taiwan, Guatemala, Thailand, Saudi Arabia, and Trinidad. He has served as editors of monographs and yearbooks published by AETS and the School Science and Mathematics Association. He served as senior author of Science, an elementary school textbook series published by D. C. Heath & Co. and published by Longman, Inc. Barufaldi’s special areas of interests include professional development, curriculum design, instructional strategies, implementation, evaluation, and science teacher education. He is currently investigating the process of building successful collaboratives in the science education community and variables, which may contribute to high intensity, sustained collaboration.

Dr. Elizabeth Danze

Elizabeth Danze is a principal with Blood and Danze Architects, an award-winning Austin firm named associate architects for the UT Campus Master Plan. Danze was co-editor with Kevin Alter of Center #9, regarding the proper, and a founding editor of the Yale Journal of Architecture and Feminism. As part of her graduate design studio, Professor Danze coordinated and implemented the design and building of a house in Austin for the Habitat for Humanity program, an effort that formed an ongoing community contribution. Danze’s design work continues to win awards and was included in the Texas Fine Arts Association exhibition, “Memory & Desire - The Window.”

Dr. Louise Harpman

Louise Harpman is an Associate Professor of Architecture at the School of Architecture. She served as Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs from 2003-2008. Specializing in architectural design, she teaches elective and required studio courses, as well as seminar courses, to both undergraduate and graduate students.

As a nationally-known, award-winning architectural educator, Harpman is a passionate advocate for good and sustainable design. She taught for eight years at the Yale School of Architecture and five years at the University of Texas at Austin’s School of Architecture. At both schools, she led many community-based, public design projects including partnerships with the Blanco Library, the Austin Children’s Museum, Housing Works and the Austin Fire Department.

Harpman maintains a commitment to teaching as well as practice. Louise is a partner at Specht Harpman, an architecture and planning firm with offices in New York and Austin, Texas. With 15 years of professional experience, Louise has been involved in the programming, project development, and design of numerous public, institutional and residential projects. Work of the firm may be seen at http://www.spechtharpman.com.

Harpman received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard University. She holds a Master of Philosophy degree from Cambridge University and received her Master of Architecture degree from Yale University, where she was awarded the AIA Henry Adams Certificate and the Janet Cain Sielaff Prize.

Harpman is the author of the Brooklyn Public Library Design Guidelines (1996). She is the co-editor of Perspecta 30: Settlement Patterns (1999). She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Austin Foundation for Architecture and a Senior Fellow of the Design Trust for Public Space.

Dr. Steven A. Moore

Steven A. Moore teaches design and courses related to the philosophy, history, and application of sustainable technology. In 1999 Moore was appointed Director of the Sustainable Design Program, in 2002 was appointed Co-director of the University of Texas Center for Sustainable Development, and in 2006 he became Bartlett Cocke Professor of Architecture and Planning. Moore received his undergraduate degree in architecture from Syracuse University, his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University, and is a Loeb Fellow of the Harvard Graduate School of Design. He has practiced as the design principal of Moore/Weinrich Architects in Maine and has received numerous regional and national awards for design distinction. He has recently published articles in Center, the Journal of Architectural Education (JAE), and the Journal of Architecture (JOA). His book, Technology and Place: Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farm, was published by the University of Texas Press in 2001 and received the EDRA/Places award for research in 2002. Sustainable Architectures, co-edited with Simon Guy, was published by Routledge/Spon in 2005 and Alternative Routes to the Sustainable City: Austin, Curitiba, and Frankfurt (Rowman & Littlefield) will appear in 2006. Moore’s research interests are broadly interdisciplinary and focus upon the social construction of sustainable technologies, buildings, and cities.

Dr. Suanne Davis Roueche

Suanne Davis Roueche is a senior lecturer in the Department of Educational Administration at The University of Texas at Austin and is editor of publications for the National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development (NISOD), an international Consortium of more than 500 colleges committed to excellence in professional development for the ultimate improvement of teaching and learning.

Roueche is a graduate of North Texas State University, where she received both her B.A. and M.A. in English. She received her Ph.D. in educational administration from The University of Texas at Austin in 1976. Her major program of work was completed in the Community College Leadership Program. Prior to beginning her graduate work, she taught for nine years at El Centro College (Dallas, Texas), developing and implementing a nationally recognized developmental studies writing program.

She has been recognized for her contributions to higher education and to the professional growth and development of community college educators including: American Association of Community Colleges’ National Leadership Award (1997); Distinguished Research Award, presented by the AACC Council of Universities and Colleges, for Strangers in Their Own Land: Part-Time Faculty in American Community Colleges (Roueche, Roueche, and Milliron, 1995); Distinguished Research Award, presented by the AACC Council of Universities and Colleges, for Between a Rock and a Hard Place: The At-Risk Student in the Open-Door College (Roueche and Roueche, 1993); Outstanding Research Publication Award, presented by the AACJC Council of Universities and Colleges, for College responses to Low-Achieving Students: A National Study (Roueche, Baker, and Roueche, 1984); CCLP Distinguished Graduate Award (presented by the College of Education, The University of Texas at Austin, 1990); The Great Seal of Florida (presented by the Governor and Legislature of Florida, and St. Petersburg Junior College, for outstanding contributions to higher education in Florida, 1989); A Celebration of Ten Years of NISOD Service at The University of Texas at Austin (presented by the Dean of the College of Education and UT, 1988); Individual Merit Award for Research and Writing (presented by the National Council for Staff, Program, and Organizational Development, 1987-88); recognized for Outstanding Contributions to St. Petersburg Junior College’s Staff Development (1988); Outstanding Research Publication Award (presented by the AACJC Council of Colleges and Universities, 1984); named Yellow Rose of Texas (by Governor Mark White, designated for native Texas women providing meritorious service to the State, 1983); named Kentucky Colonel (by the Governor and Legislature of Kentucky for outstanding contributions to Kentucky higher education, 1979); member, Editorial Board, AACC Journal (1993-present).

Roueche is the author of 14 books and more than 50 articles and chapters focused on teaching and learning in American colleges and universities. Her most recent publications are: The Creative Community College: Leading Through Innovation (with John E. Roueche, Melissa Richardson, and Phil Neal, 2008), Practical Magic: On the Front Lines of Teaching Excellence (with Mark D. Milliron and John E. Roueche, 2003), In Pursuit of Excellence: The Community College of Denver (with John E. Roueche and Eileen E. Ely, 2001), High Stakes, High Performance: Making Remedial Education Work (with John E. Roueche, 1999), Embracing the Tiger: The Effectiveness Debate and the Community College (with John E. Roueche and Laurence F. Johnson, 1997), Strangers in Their Own Land: Part-Time Faculty in American Community Colleges (with John E. Roueche and Mark Milliron, 1995) and The Company We Keep: Collaboration in the Community College(with John E. Roueche and Lynn Sullivan Taber, 1995). Strangers in Their Own Land is being featured as an hour long special telecast, as part of the Public Broadcast System’s 1996-97 Adult Learning Series, Author! Author! As well, Between a Rock and a Hard Place: The At-Risk Student in the Open Door College (with John E. Roueche, 1993) was selected by the Public Broadcasting System as its education book for 1994 and featured in an hour long special telecast that continues to air nationally. She directed a national research project—Literacy in Development at the Community College—at The University of Texas at Austin, for the National Institute of Education, from 1979-1981. From 1977-1979, she directed the Community College Teaching Internship Program at UT.

2007-2008 Faculty Consultants

Dr. Holly Bell

Dr. Barbara Hines

Barbara Hines is an Adjunct Professor of Law. She is a former Clinical Professor of Law and directed the law school’s immigration clinic from January 1999 until December 2014. She is currently a Senior Fellow at the Emerson Collective in Palo Alto, California. She has practiced and taught in the field of immigration law since 1975.

Professor Hines has received numerous teaching and professional awards for her work including the Spirit of CHLSA Award, 2015 Chicano/Hispanic Law Students Association (CHLSA); University of Texas School of Law; 2014 University of Texas School of Law Massey Award for Teaching; the 2014 Tower Award for Outstanding Service-Learning Professor; the 2007 American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) Elmer Fried Excellence in Teaching Award and the 2002 Texas Law Fellowships Excellence in Public Interest Award. Her professional recognition includes the 2015 National Women’s Political Caucus Women of Courage Award; the 2010 National Lawyers Guild Carol King Award; the 2009 MALDEF Excellence in Legal Services Award; the 1993 AILA Texas Chapter Litigation Award; and the 1992 AILA Jack Wasserman Award for Excellence in Litigation. In 2000, she was named one of the 100 best lawyers in the state by the Texas Lawyer publication.

Professor Hines has litigated issues relating to the constitutional and statutory rights of immigrants in federal and immigration courts, including the lawsuit leading to the closure of the Hutto immigrant family detention center. She was a Fulbright scholar in Argentina in 1996 and 2004 and continues to collaborate on immigration issues in Argentina. Professor Hines received her B.A. with honors in Latin American Studies from the University of Texas at Austin. She attended the University of Texas School of Law and Northeastern University School of Law, where she received her J.D. in 1975.

Dr. Martha Norkunas

Martha Norkunas is Professor of Oral and Public History in the Public History Program at Middle Tennessee State University. She holds a Ph.D. in Folklore from Indiana University’s Folklore Institute. She is the author of The Politics of Public Memory: Tourism, History and Ethnicity in Monterey, California (SUNY Press, 1993) and Monuments and Memory: History and Representation in Lowell, Massachusetts (Smithsonian Institution Press, 2002/ Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 2006). Her recent articles include, ““Narrating the Racialization of Space in Austin, Texas and Nashville, Tennessee,” Colloquia HumanisticaNeighborhood as a Cultural and Social Problem (2015) and “Teaching to Listen: Listening Exercises and Self-Reflexive Journals,” Oral History Review (2011).  Norkunas’s work examines how cultural memory is represented in narrative and on the landscape, and how those representations intersect with race, gender, class and power. From 1999-2009 Norkunas directed the Project in Interpreting the Texas Past (ITP) at the University of Texas at Austin. She taught interdisciplinary teams of graduate students to think critically about memory, history, and culture and to create more diverse and inclusive interpretations at Texas historic sites. ITP produced award winning films, exhibits, educational materials, posters, brochures, oral history booklets, an in-depth oral history project with African Americans in Texas, and an oral history project exploring race and identity among college students.  Since joining the History Department at MTSU in 2009 Norkunas has created a concentration in Oral History, and broadened the African American Oral History Project include life histories with African American in Tennessee. She continues to create community-based public history projects, involving students with people of color, immigrants and refugees, women, global workers, climate change, inequality and student debt, challenging students to ask how historical and cultural knowledge can address important social issues. Her current research examines issues associated with empathic listening in oral history, and narrating racialized space.  Norkunas is the recipient of fellowships and grants from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Houston Endowment, and many other state and regional foundations. She served as a board member of the National Council on Public History, was the Program Co-Chair of the 2015 Oral History Association Conference and in 2016 was elected to the board of the International Oral History Association.

Dr. Margaret Syverson

Margaret Syverson is the Director of the Computer Writing and Research Lab in the Division of Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Texas at Austin. She teaches graduate level and undergraduate courses such as "Virtual Worlds," "Computers and Controversy," "Knowledge Ecology," and "Information Architecture" in well-equipped networked classrooms, where students have the opportunity to create Web sites, standalone hypertexts, multimedia projects, and MOO spaces (in text-based environments online). These classes also develop students' skills and experience with email, Web research, and real-time conferencing.  You can find information about Dr. Syverson and her recent classes at http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/~syverson.

The Online Learning Record, a portfolio based assessment system developed by Professor Syverson is used for student evaluation in all of her courses, and was the subject of a Carnegie Scholars project. Information about the Online Learning Record is available at http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/~syverson/olr.  Professor Syverson's dissertation research, conducted at the University of California, San Diego, focused on the application of complex systems theories and distributed cognition in composition studies. Her recent book, The Wealth of Reality: An Ecology of Composition, was published by Southern Illinois University Press. She is Chair of the Board of Directors for the Center for Language in Learning, and Editor of Computers and Composition Journal's online site. Her work on evaluating learning in MOOs and MUDs has been supported through a CAETI grant. Recently, her collaborative online composition Worlds Fair received an Innovations in Instructional Technology Award from The University of Texas.

Dr. Shirley Thompson

Professor Thompson is Associate Professor of American Studies. She currently serves as the the Associate Director of the John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies. She received her Ph.D. in the History of American Civilization (2001) and her A.M. in History (2000) from Harvard University. She received her A.B. degree in History (1992) from Harvard College.

She is currently researching a book project entitled "No More Auction Block for Me: African Americans and the Problem of Property" which traces out some of the legacies of slavery for African American encounters with property and ownership. Specifically, it explores the interwoven concepts of race and property value from the vantage point of African American historical memory, political economy, and expressive culture. Situated at the intersection of legal and economic discourses, the notion of property also finds expression in literature and performance, material and expressive cultures. Thus, the project draws on the methodologies of cultural history, literary criticism, performance studies, ethnography, and critical theory. Her first book, Exiles at Home: The Struggle to Become American in Creole New Orleans is a cultural history of New Orleans' French-speaking free people of color over the middle decades of the nineteenth century. The dissertation on which it is based was awarded the Ralph Henry Gabriel Dissertation Prize by the American Studies Association in 2001. Her work has been supported by fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the American Association of University Women.

2006-2007 Faculty Consultants

Dr. Marilyn Armour

Marilyn Armour, Ph.D., is a University Distinguished Teaching Professor, and director of the Institute for Restorative Justice and Restorative Dialogue (IRJRD). Armour holds a master’s and a Ph.D. in social work from the University of Minnesota’s School of Social Work. Prior to becoming an academic, she was a psychotherapist with an emphasis on violent death, trauma, and family relationships.

Armour’s work focuses on the healing of victims, offenders and the community related to crime and wrongdoing. In that regard, she has conducted studies on the effectiveness of restorative justice interventions for violent crime, in the prison system, in schools, for domestic violence and community restoration as well as the mechanisms of action in the interventions that lead to change. Armour’s research also emphasizes the experiences and healing of family members of homicide victims specific to meaning-making in the aftermath of tragedy, the impact of the offender’s sentence on survivor well-being, the remaining family members after domestic fatalities, and the process of meaning-making for Holocaust survivors during and after the war.

In addition to her research, Armour is the Director of Defense-Initiated Victim Outreach (DIVO), a statewide program that provides a bridge between victim-survivors and defense teams, especially in capital cases.Armour is the author of books, journal articles and book chapters on these topics.  She serves as a consultant to numerous agencies and organizations that are developing and using restorative practices. She is a founding member of and officer for the National Association of Community and Restorative Justice.

Dr. Noel Busch

Noël Bridget Busch-Armendariz, Ph.D., is full professor and director of the Institute on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (IDVSA), a collaboration of the UT Austin’s School of Social Work, School of Nursing, School of Law, and the Bureau of Business Research, with over a 150 affiliate community organizations. Bush-Armendariz is also associate vice president for research at UT Austin’s Office of the Vice President for Research.

Busch-Armendariz’s areas of specialization are interpersonal violence, refugees, victims of human trafficking and asylees, and international social work. Since joining UT Austin, Busch-Armendariz has directed research for the federal National Institute of Justice, Office of Victims of Crime, Office of Violence Against Women, Texas Office of the Attorney General, the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault, and the Texas Health and Human Service Commission.

Prior to moving to Austin, Busch-Armendariz was director of research and special projects and interim director of the South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault. Busch-Armendariz has years of experience working to end violence against women and their children and has worked as a battered woman’s advocate, support group leader, program director, and registered lobbyist. She has worked directly with incarcerated battered women who killed their batterers and regularly facilitates therapeutic support groups. She also regularly trains professionals on issues of violence against women and their children at local, state, and national meetings and conferences and has published many articles on the topic. She regularly teaches child welfare workers about the links between child maltreatment and domestic violence and adult protective service workers about sexual abuse of vulnerable adults.

Busch-Armendariz has served as an expert witness in dozens of criminal, civil, and immigration cases involving domestic violence and sexual assault. She co-directs a national training on how to be an ethical and effective expert witness. She also is called upon regularly to serve as an expert to Texas House and Senate committees.

In addition to her work in the area of interpersonal violence, Busch-Armendariz began working with refugees and immigrants in 1986 as an immigrant assistant and previously served as principal investigator of the Green Leaf Project, which provides intensive health and mental health services to refugees, victims of trafficking, asylees, and other immigrants in Central Texas. She is also principal investigator of several research projects exploring the needs of refugee and asylee families and victims of human trafficking by interviewing victims of these crimes.

Busch-Armendariz has many peer-reviewed publications in her areas of expertise. Over the past twenty years, she has traveled extensively throughout the world and has lived and worked in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, Romania, Albania, South Korea and most recently in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Busch-Armendariz serves on the program committee of SafePlace, Inc. and served for five years on the board of directors for the Political Asylum Project of Austin (now American Gateways) and the policy committee of the Texas Council on Family Violence. She participates in several other statewide task forces and other initiatives related to interpersonal violence including Project Connect, a program of the national program Futures Without Violence. She is formerly a volunteer with the Victim Services of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice in the Victim Offender Mediated Dialog (VOMD) program. She is the Co-Editor-In-Chief of AFFILIA: The Journal of Women and Social Work and serves on the editorial board of The Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies: International, National, and Regional Theory, Research, and Practice, and Social Work Review Romania.

Busch-Armendariz is a licensed social work and a returned Peace Corps volunteer. She has been recognized for her contributions to social work as the Recent Most Distinguished Contributions to Social Work Education by the Council on Social Work Education and she has been recognized by her students and colleagues with several teaching awards.

Dr. Charlotte Canning

Dr. Charlotte Canning received her doctorate from the University of Washington. She is the author of Feminist Theaters In The USA: Staging Women's Experience (Routledge, 1996) and The Most American Thing in America: Circuit Chautauqua as Performance (Iowa, 2005) which won the 2006 Barnard Hewitt Award for Outstanding Research in Theatre History. This award is given each year to the best member of the UT faculty to receive this prestigious award. Her most recent books include Representing the Past: Essays in Performance Historiography, co-edited with Tom Postlewait (University of Iowa Press, 2010) and On the Performance Front: US Theatre and Internationalism (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), the latter of which won the Joe A. Calloway Prize. 

She has published in many journals, including Theatre Topics, Theatre Research International, Theatre Survey, Theatre Journal, Theatre Annual, Theatre and LIT: Literature Interpretation TheoryHer work has also been included in such anthologies as Staging International Feminisms, Restaging the Sixties: Radical Theatres and their Legacies, Women Writing Plays: The New Historiographies, Twentieth Century American Drama and Virtual Gender: Fantasies of Embodied Space and Subjectivity.

Dr. Franchelle Stewart Dorn

Franchelle Stewart Dorn has been an actress for more than 40 years having played leading roles at the Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington D.C, Arena Stage, The American Conservatory Theater, Yale Repertory theater, Long Wharf, Great Lakes Theater Company, Cleveland Playhouse, Arizona State theatre, Chautauqua Theatre, the Guthrie and at both The State, ZACH and Austin Shakespeare theaters in Austin. She spent the 2014 season at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and spring 2015 off-Broadway in 'Tis a Pity She's a Whore.

Dorn has also been seen on Law and Order and in such films as Die Hard With a Vengeance, Chances Are and Raise the Titanic. She can be seen on one of PBS' longest-running series, Literary Visions. She fondly remembers her role as "Dr. Rita Madison" on NBC's Another World. Dorn has been nominated for seven Helen Hayes Awards and has been the recipient of three. She has also won the Austin Critics' Circle Award for her performances in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Mrs. Warren's Profession and The Edge of PeaceShe has more than 400 voice-overs and on-camera appearances to her credit.

Dorn received her acting training at the Yale School of Drama. She has been named both an Academy Distinguished Teacher and Regents' Outstanding Teacher. She is also a past recipient of the College of Fine Arts' Outstanding Teacher award.

Dr. Laura Lein

Laura Lein, Ph.D., was appointed Dean and Katherine Reebel Collegiate Professor at the School of Social Work at the University of Michigan in 2009, as well as Professor in the Department of Anthropology.  She came to Michigan from the University of Texas at Austin School of Social Work where she taught for 24 years. She has taught in the areas of social policy, social work research, and community organization and participatory research.  Her research has concentrated on the interface between families in poverty and the institutions that serve them.  Her research on families in poverty has extended over three decades. She recently co-authored (with Ron Angel, Holy Bell, and Julie Beausoleil) Community Lost(Cambridge University Press, 2012) about Hurricane Katrina survivors, and also has written  (with Ronald Angel and Jane Henrici) Poor Families in America’s Health Care Crisis (Cambridge University Press, 2006) and Life After Welfare (with Deanna Schexnadyer, University of Texas Press, 2007).  She is the author, with Kathryn Edin, of Making Ends Meet: How Single Mothers Survive Welfare and Low-Wage Work  (New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1997).

She is currently working on projects related to low-income women and health (funded by the Nokomis Foundation), homelessness, and low-income non-residential fathers.

Dr. Elizabeth Mueller

Elizabeth Mueller is an Associate Professor of Community and Regional Planning and has a faculty appointment in the School of Social Work. She holds masters and doctoral degrees in city and regional planning from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Mueller is primarily interested in questions of social equity in cities and regions. She teaches courses on affordable housing policy, community development, urban politics, and qualitative research methods. Prior to coming to U.T., Dr. Mueller was Assistant Professor of Urban Policy at the Milano Graduate School at New School University where she was also a Senior Research Associate in the Community Development Research Center.

Her research focuses on social and political inclusion in cities, and how city planning and development policies shape the quality of life and opportunities available to historically vulnerable residents and communities. Her current work focuses on these topics through investigation of tensions between the goals and policies of local planning agencies and local housing agencies, as seen in current thinking about strategies for building sustainable cities. She pursues her research on several, complementary levels: funded academic research; class projects in partnership with community partners; and, research with or for community organizations or local government. For more information on her current research, consult the Texas Housing Lab website.

Her work has been published in the Journal of the American Planning Association, the Journal of Planning Education and Research, the Journal of Planning Literature, Community Development, Economic Development Quarterly, Policy Studies Journal, The Journal of Migration and Ethnicity, Berkeley Planning Journal and Planning Forum. Past funders of her work include the Pew Charitable Trusts, Rockefeller Foundation, Lilly Endowment, the New York Community Trust, the Ford Foundation, the Aspen Institute, the Fannie Mae Foundation, the Meadows Foundation, the Lincoln Land Institute and the US Department of Housing and Urban Development.

She is also an active participant in state and local affordable housing policy discussions, serving on various state and local task forces concerned with housing issues. She was an appointed member of Austin’s Community Development Commission and currently sits on the board of the Texas Low Income Housing Information Service and of local civic organization LiveableCity.

2005-2006 Faculty Consultants

Dr. Noël Busch

Noël Bridget Busch-Armendariz, Ph.D., is full professor and director of the Institute on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (IDVSA), a collaboration of the UT Austin’s School of Social Work, School of Nursing, School of Law, and the Bureau of Business Research, with over a 150 affiliate community organizations. Bush-Armendariz is also associate vice president for research at UT Austin’s Office of the Vice President for Research.

Busch-Armendariz’s areas of specialization are interpersonal violence, refugees, victims of human trafficking and asylees, and international social work. Since joining UT Austin, Busch-Armendariz has directed research for the federal National Institute of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, Office on Violence Against Women, Texas Office of the Attorney General, the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault, and the Texas Health and Human Service Commission.

Prior to moving to Austin, Busch-Armendariz was director of research and special projects and interim director of the South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault. Busch-Armendariz has years of experience working to end violence against women and their children and has worked as a battered woman’s advocate, support group leader, program director, and registered lobbyist. She has worked directly with incarcerated battered women who killed their batterers and regularly facilitates therapeutic support groups. She also regularly trains professionals on issues of violence against women and their children at local, state, and national meetings and conferences and has published many articles on the topic. She regularly teaches child welfare workers about the links between child maltreatment and domestic violence and adult protective service workers about sexual abuse of vulnerable adults.

Busch-Armendariz has served as an expert witness in dozens of criminal, civil, and immigration cases involving domestic violence and sexual assault. She co-directs a national training on how to be an ethical and effective expert witness. She also is called upon regularly to serve as an expert to Texas House and Senate committees.

In addition to her work in the area of interpersonal violence, Busch-Armendariz began working with refugees and immigrants in 1986 as an immigrant assistant and previously served as principal investigator of the Green Leaf Project, which provides intensive health and mental health services to refugees, victims of trafficking, asylees, and other immigrants in Central Texas. She is also principal investigator of several research projects exploring the needs of refugee and asylee families and victims of human trafficking by interviewing victims of these crimes.

Busch-Armendariz has many peer-reviewed publications in her areas of expertise. Over the past twenty years, she has traveled extensively throughout the world and has lived and worked in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, Romania, Albania, South Korea and most recently in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Busch-Armendariz serves on the program committee of SafePlace, Inc. and served for five years on the board of directors for the Political Asylum Project of Austin (now American Gateways) and the policy committee of the Texas Council on Family Violence. She participates in several other statewide task forces and other initiatives related to interpersonal violence including Project Connect, a program of the national program Futures Without Violence. She is formerly a volunteer with the Victim Services of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice in the Victim Offender Mediated Dialog (VOMD) program. She is the Co-Editor-In-Chief of AFFILIA: The Journal of Women and Social Work and serves on the editorial board of The Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies: International, National, and Regional Theory, Research, and Practice, and Social Work Review Romania.

Busch-Armendariz is a licensed social work and a returned Peace Corps volunteer. She has been recognized for her contributions to social work as the Recent Most Distinguished Contributions to Social Work Education by the Council on Social Work Education and she has been recognized by her students and colleagues with several teaching awards.

Eden Harrington

Ms. Harrington is Associate Dean for Experiential Education, Director of the William Wayne Justice Center for Public Interest Law, and a Clinical Professor at the Law School. She teaches internship courses linked to nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and legislative offices. Prior to joining the faculty in 2000, she taught clinics and served as Director of Public Interest Programs at St. Mary's University School of Law.

Harrington previously was the Executive Director of the Texas Resource Center, a federally-funded community defender organization representing death-sentenced inmates in post-conviction appeals. She also worked with the ACLU Fifth Circuit Death Penalty Project, Texas Rural Legal Aid, and the Medicare Advocacy Project in Los Angeles.

Dr. Bruce Kellison

Dr. Kellison has been responsible for strategic planning and research for the Bureau of Business Research of the The IC² Institute since 1998. IC² is an interdisciplinary research unit of The University of Texas at Austin which works to advance the theory and practice of entrepreneurial wealth creation. Under Dr. Kellison's leadership, the Bureau has won a number of research grants and contracts from a variety of sponsors, including the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the State of Texas. He is former editor of Texas Business Review and comments frequently in the press about Texas economic conditions. He has a doctorate in government from The University of Texas at Austin and wrote on the political economy of the Russian oil industry.

Dr. Orlando Kelm

Orlando R. Kelm (Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, 1989) is an Associate Professor of Hispanic Linguistics whose professional interests center on the use language and culture for professional purposes, such as Business Spanish and Portuguese. His current research focuses on the creation of instructional materials, including the use of innovative technologies in foreign language instruction. He also frequently teaches courses, both in Spanish and Portuguese, in phonetics and phonology.  He currently serves as the Associate Director of Business Language Education for the Center for International Business Education and Research at UT, Austin.

Dr. Kevin Mooney

Kevin Mooney, Ph.D. (Senior Lecturer, musicology) holds both a bachelor’s degree in music performance (guitar) and a master’s degree in music education from the University of Nebraska at Omaha and a doctor of philosophy degree in musicology/ethnomusicology from The University of Texas at Austin. His current research focuses on jazz history with particular emphasis on the music and careers of vocalist Louise Tobin and clarinetist Peanuts Hucko. Much of his research and writings consider music and identity issues related to American nationalism and southern regionalism. In addition to articles and reviews published in Journal of the Society for American MusicGrove Dictionary of American Music, 2nd edition, NotesSouthwestern Historical QuarterlyThe Journal of Texas Music History, the Bulletin of the Society for American MusicGreat Plains QuarterlyThe New Mexico Historical Review, and the Handbook of Texas Music, Dr. Mooney authored the Instructor’s Manual for the past four editions of American Music: A Panorama (New York: Thomson-Wadsworth, 2004, 2006, 2010, and 2013). He also currently serves on the editorial boards of the South Central Music Bulletin (College Music Society) and The Journal of Texas Music History (Texas State University). 


Dr. Mooney is a three-time recipient of the “Favorite Professor” award of the Alfred H. Nolle Chapter of the Alpha Chi National College Honor Society (2012, 2014, and 2015). In Fall 2015 Dr. Mooney launched his 100-percent-online version of MU 5334 Introduction to Graduate Studies in Music and has since added MU 5330A Music History to the School of Music’s 100-percent online course offerings. Prior to his arrival at Texas State University (2007), Dr. Mooney taught a wide range of courses at College of St. Mary, Omaha, Nebraska, Southwest Texas State University, and at The University of Texas at Austin, where he was Associate Chair of the Center for American Music as well as founder and director of the Texas Music Oral History Project.

Dr. Mooney is Secretary-Treasurer of the American Musicological Society—Southwest Chapter, and from 2008-2011 he served as Director of Graduate Studies in Music at Texas State University. As a classical and jazz guitarist, Dr. Mooney has performed in concert with Dizzy Gillespie and David Amram, and has recorded several jazz tracks on Novak and Haar—Old Friends (Ware House Productions, Inc.: Omaha, Nebraska, 2005). He performs regularly with his church group, “The Original Sinners.”

Dr. Elizabeth Mueller

Elizabeth Mueller is an Associate Professor of Community and Regional Planning and has a faculty appointment in the School of Social Work. She holds masters and doctoral degrees in city and regional planning from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Mueller is primarily interested in questions of social equity in cities and regions. She teaches courses on affordable housing policy, community development, urban politics, and qualitative research methods. Prior to coming to U.T., Dr. Mueller was Assistant Professor of Urban Policy at the Milano Graduate School at New School University where she was also a Senior Research Associate in the Community Development Research Center.

Her research focuses on social and political inclusion in cities, and how city planning and development policies shape the quality of life and opportunities available to historically vulnerable residents and communities. Her current work focuses on these topics through investigation of tensions between the goals and policies of local planning agencies and local housing agencies, as seen in current thinking about strategies for building sustainable cities. She pursues her research on several, complementary levels: funded academic research; class projects in partnership with community partners; and, research with or for community organizations or local government. For more information on her current research, consult the Texas Housing Lab website.

Her work has been published in the Journal of the American Planning Association, the Journal of Planning Education and Research, the Journal of Planning Literature, Community Development, Economic Development Quarterly, Policy Studies Journal, The Journal of Migration and Ethnicity, Berkeley Planning Journal and Planning Forum. Past funders of her work include the Pew Charitable Trusts, Rockefeller Foundation, Lilly Endowment, the New York Community Trust, the Ford Foundation, the Aspen Institute, the Fannie Mae Foundation, the Meadows Foundation, the Lincoln Land Institute and the US Department of Housing and Urban Development.

She is also an active participant in state and local affordable housing policy discussions, serving on various state and local task forces concerned with housing issues. She was an appointed member of Austin’s Community Development Commission and currently sits on the board of the Texas Low Income Housing Information Service and of local civic organization LiveableCity.

Dr. Russel Pinkston

Russell Pinkston, Professor of Composition, Director, Electronic Music Studios, holds degrees in music composition from Dartmouth College (BA) and Columbia University (MA, DMA). He has written music in a wide variety of different media, ranging from concert works and sacred anthems to computer generated tape pieces and live electronic music for dance. His compositions have been played throughout Europe, South America and the United States, including recent performances by such noted ensembles as the Smith Quartet (London), the Kansas City Symphony Orchestra, and the Danish Royal Ballet Company. Dr. Pinkston has received numerous awards for his compositions, including two prizes from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters and a senior Fulbright Fellowship in Composition and Computer Music to Brazil. Dr. Pinkston is also active in computer music research. His work in the area of real-time performance interfaces for modern dance has recently attracted international attention, leading to interviews on BBC radio and NPR, as well as a feature article in New Scientist magazine. Dr. Pinkston's music is recorded on Boston Skyline, Centaur, Finnadar, Folkways, and Summit Records and published by Galaxy Music, E. C. Schirmer, and Columbia University Press.

Dr. Sarah Jane Rehnborg

Sarah Jane Rehnborg, Associate Director for Planning and Development with the RGK Center for Philanthropy and Community Service and Lecturer at the LBJ School, received her undergraduate degree from Denison University and her Master's and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Pittsburgh. In addition to establishing a program of volunteerism and community education at the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in Pittsburgh in the 1970s, Rehnborg established the Institute for Volunteerism at the Community College of Allegheny County in Pennsylvania and was Associate Administrator of Human Resources at Pittsburgh's John J. Kane Hospital, a 1200 bed extended care facility with 14 bargaining units. She has worked as a consultant for the Points of Light Foundation and the Comptroller's Office of the State of Texas, where she participated in the state performance review system examining the role of citizen participation in state government. She has also worked with the Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation and as a consultant to the Texas Commission on Volunteerism and Community Service, where she was the architect of the first state plan to bring national service funding to Texas.

Prior to joining the RGK Center for Philanthropy and Community Service, Rehnborg was Director of Community Engagement for the Charles A. Dana Center at UT Austin. She has written numerous articles and documents in the field and is the author of "Starter Kit for Mobilizing Ministry," published by the Leadership Network, and "Volunteer Youth Training and Leadership," a comprehensive high school curriculum in service and volunteerism that was later adopted by the state of Maryland.

Rehnborg's research interests include public sector volunteerism, assessment of organizations engaging volunteers and national service participants, and the effective management of volunteers in all settings. She is frequently called upon to facilitate groups and to work with organizations in conflict. Rehnborg teaches courses at the LBJ School in the areas of volunteerism, board governance, and civil society issues.