Institute of Urban Policy

Edwin Dorn, PhD


Faculty Fellow
Edwin Dorn, PhD

Contact

Interests


Defense policy; race and immigration policy

Courses


GOV 360N • Defense Policy

38070 • Spring 2020
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 3.221

Please check back for updates.

AMS 391 • Race/Immigration/Citizenshp

31212 • Spring 2019
Meets T 9:00AM-12:00PM SRH 3.360

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.

GOV 360N • Defense Policy

38330 • Spring 2019
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 3.221

Please check back for updates.

GOV 360N • Defense Policy

38305 • Spring 2018
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 3.221

Please check back for updates.

GOV 360N • Defense Policy

38712 • Spring 2017
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 3.221

Please check back for updates.

LAH 350 • Defense Policy

29190 • Spring 2016
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 3.221
(also listed as P A 325)

                  The course will follow a logical progression from the articulation of national security strategy through decisions about DoD organization and resources.  Because most students are not familiar with the military, the seminar will begin with an overview of military terms and organizing principles.  Students will be introduced to essential policy documents such as Title X of the US Code and the National Security Strategy.

                  The Defense Department, like all organizations, must succeed at several key things: it must decide on its basic purposes or policies, obtain the resources (money, people, equipment and information) needed to carry out those purposes, and hire or develop good leaders. These six topics – policy, personnel, acquisition, budget, intelligence and leadership – will be the “meat” of the course.  We will devote one or two sessions to each of the following topics:

 

  1. Background.  Overview of DoD; the difference between war fighters and resource providers; the roles of the key leaders such as the Secretary of Defense, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the combatant commanders.
  2. Purposes: What are we defending ourselves against (or fighting for)?
    1. National Security Strategy.  Who writes it, what influences it.
    2. National Defense Strategy. Threat-based versus capability-based approaches.
  3. People: recruiting, training and rewarding the Force.
    1. From conscription to the all-volunteer force.
    2. Who should serve, and who shouldn’t?
    3. Pay and benefits.
  4. Things: acquisition and logistics.
    1. Figuring out what to buy and how to buy.
    2. Maintaining the industrial base.
  5. Money: The Defense budget.
    1. Defense Planning Guidance.
    2. Budget trends.
  6. Information: command, control, communications, intelligence.
    1. Internal communications and coordination
    2. Public information
    3. Intelligence.
  7. Leadership:  developing the officer corps.
  8. Thinking About The Future: anticipating threats, defining roles and missions.

 

Texts and Works:

  • Amos A. Jordan, Willliam J. Taylor, Jr. and Michael J. Mazarr, American National Security (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009). Buy.
  • Lawrence J. Korb, et al, Building a Military for the 21st Century, E-res
  • Barbara A. Bicksler, Curtis L. Gilroy and John T. Warner, eds., The All-Volunteer Force: Thirty Years of Service (Dulles, VA, Brassey’s, 2004).  Copies on reserve in the Benson Latin American Collection. SRH 1.108

Grading Policy:

Students will be expected to contribute to class discussions, to write a short paper describing their interests in defense issues (i.e., why they are taking the class), to review a book about an issue they choose, and to take a mid-term and a final examination.

  1. Class attendance and participation – 10%
  2. Short paper – 10%
  3. Mid-term examination – 20%
  4. Book review and discussion – 30%
  5. Final examination – 30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

GOV 360N • Defense Policy

39260 • Spring 2014
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM SRH 3.221
(also listed as LAH 350, P A 325)

The course will follow a logical progression from the articulation of national security strategy through decisions about DoD organization and resources.  Because most students are not familiar with the military, the seminar will begin with an overview of military terms and organizing principles.  Students will be introduced to essential policy documents such as Title X of the US Code and the National Security Strategy

 The Defense Department, like all organizations, must succeed at several key things: it must decide on its basic purposes or policies, obtain the resources (money, people, equipment and information) needed to carry out those purposes, and hire or develop good leaders. These six topics – policy, personnel, acquisition, budget, intelligence and leadership – will be the “meat” of the course.  We will devote one or two sessions to each of the following topics:

   1. Background.  Overview of DoD; the difference between war fighters and resource providers; the roles of the key leaders such as the Secretary of Defense, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the combatant commanders.

   2. Purposes: What are we defending ourselves against (or fighting for)?

                a.  National Security Strategy.  Who writes it, what influences it. 

                b. National Defense Strategy. Threat-based versus capability-based approaches.

   3. People: recruiting, training and rewarding the Force.

                a. From conscription to the all-volunteer force.

                b. Who should serve, and who shouldn’t?

                c. Pay and benefits.

   4. Things: acquisition and logistics.

                a. Figuring out what to buy and how to buy.

                b. Maintaining the industrial base.

   5. Money: The Defense budget.

                a. Defense Planning Guidance.

                b. Budget trends.

   6. Information: command, control, communications, intelligence.

                a. Internal communications and coordination

                b. Public information

                c. Intelligence.

   7. Leadership:  developing the officer corps.

   8. Thinking About The Future: anticipating threats, defining roles and missions.

TEXTS:

 -Amos A. Jordan, Willliam J. Taylor, Jr. and Michael J. Mazarr, American National Security (Baltimore: Johns    Hopkins University Press, 2009). Buy.

-Lawrence J. Korb, et al, Building a Military for the 21st Century, E-res

-Barbara A. Bicksler, Curtis L. Gilroy and John T. Warner, eds., The All-Volunteer Force: Thirty Years of Service (Dulles, VA, Brassey’s, 2004).  Copies on reserve in the Benson Latin American Collection. SRH 1.108

Grading Policy:

Students will be expected to contribute to class discussions, to write a short paper describing their interests in defense issues (i.e., why they are taking the class), to review a book about an issue they choose, and to take a mid-term and a final examination.

   1. Class attendance and participation – 10%

   2. Short paper – 10%

   3. Mid-term examination – 20%

   4. Book review and discussion – 30%

   5. Final examination – 30%

HMN 350 • American Race Policy

40385 • Fall 2013
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 3.212
(also listed as LAH 350, P A 325)

This upper division honors seminar traces the evolution of race policy in the United States from the development of the color line, through the current policy of equal opportunity, to alternative forecasts about the role of race in America’s future.  Emphasis will be placed on understanding the circumstances that led to particular policies.  Students will be encouraged to read and develop their own interpretations of primary sources such as Supreme Court cases, rather than to rely solely on the interpretations of scholars.  

Texts

Taylor Branch, Parting The Waters: America in the King Years, 1954 – 63, (New York, Simon and Schuster, 1988).

W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk, any edition

James Madison, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, The Federalist Papers, any edition.

Melvin Oliver and Thomas Shapiro, Black Wealth, White Wealth (New York: Routledge, 1997)

Edward Telles, Race in Another America: The Significance of Skin Color in Brazil (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004).

Requirements

Engagement is important.  I expect students to be active participants in a process of discovery, not passive recipients of “the truth” as one professor sees it.  My responsibilities include getting the conversation started, guiding students to existing knowledge and points of view, and assessing students’ contributions to the class.  I place great value on clear, concise writing and speaking, so students will be given ample opportunities to work on their communications skills.

GOV 360N • Defense Policy

38910 • Spring 2013
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM SRH 3.221
(also listed as LAH 350, P A 325)

Course Description 

The course will follow a logical progression from the articulation of national security strategy through decisions about DoD organization and resources.  Because most students are not familiar with the military, the seminar will begin with an overview of military terms and organizing principles.  Students will be introduced to essential policy documents such as Title X of the US Code and the National Security Strategy

The Defense Department, like all organizations, must succeed at several key things: it must decide on its basic purposes or policies, obtain the resources (money, people, equipment and information) needed to carry out those purposes, and hire or develop good leaders. These six topics – policy, personnel, acquisition, budget, intelligence and leadership – will be the “meat” of the course.  We will devote one or two sessions to each of the following topics:

   1. Background.  Overview of DoD; the difference between war fighters and resource providers; the roles of the key leaders such as the Secretary of Defense, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the combatant commanders.

   2. Purposes: What are we defending ourselves against (or fighting for)?

                a.  National Security Strategy.  Who writes it, what influences it. 

                b. National Defense Strategy. Threat-based versus capability-based approaches.

   3. People: recruiting, training and rewarding the Force.

                a. From conscription to the all-volunteer force.

                b. Who should serve, and who shouldn’t?

                c. Pay and benefits.

   4. Things: acquisition and logistics.

                a. Figuring out what to buy and how to buy.

                b. Maintaining the industrial base.

   5. Money: The Defense budget.

                a. Defense Planning Guidance.

                b. Budget trends.

   6. Information: command, control, communications, intelligence.

                a. Internal communications and coordination

                b. Public information

                c. Intelligence.

   7. Leadership:  developing the officer corps.

   8. Thinking About The Future: anticipating threats, defining roles and missions.

Texts

 -Amos A. Jordan, Willliam J. Taylor, Jr. and Michael J. Mazarr, American National Security (Baltimore: Johns    Hopkins University Press, 2009). Buy. 

-Lawrence J. Korb, et al, Building a Military for the 21st Century, E-res

-Barbara A. Bicksler, Curtis L. Gilroy and John T. Warner, eds., The All-Volunteer Force: Thirty Years of Service (Dulles, VA, Brassey’s, 2004).  Copies on reserve in the Benson Latin American Collection. SRH 1.108

Grading

Students will be expected to contribute to class discussions, to write a short paper describing their interests in defense issues (i.e., why they are taking the class), to review a book about an issue they choose, and to take a mid-term and a final examination.

   1. Class attendance and participation – 10%

   2. Short paper – 10%

   3. Mid-term examination – 20%

   4. Book review and discussion – 30%

   5. Final examination – 30%

GOV 360N • Defense Policy

38765 • Spring 2012
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM SRH 3.221
(also listed as LAH 350, P A 325)

The course will follow a logical progression from the articulation of national security strategy through decisions about DoD organization and resources.  Because most students are not familiar with the military, the seminar will begin with an overview of military terms and organizing principles.  Students will be introduced to essential policy documents such as Title X of the US Code and the National Security Strategy.     The Defense Department, like all organizations, must succeed at several key things: it must decide on its basic purposes or policies, obtain the resources (money, people, equipment and information) needed to carry out those purposes, and hire or develop good leaders. These six topics – policy, personnel, acquisition, budget, intelligence and leadership – will be the “meat” of the course.  We will devote one or two sessions to each of the following topics:  

1. Background.  Overview of DoD; the difference between war fighters and resource providers; the roles of the key leaders such as the Secretary of Defense, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the combatant commanders.  

2. Purposes: What are we defending ourselves against (or fighting for)?a.  National Security Strategy.  Who writes it, what influences it. b. National Defense Strategy. Threat-based versus capability-based approaches.  

3. People: recruiting, training and rewarding the Force. a. From conscription to the all-volunteer force. b. Who should serve, and who shouldn’t? c. Pay and benefits.  

4. Things: acquisition and logistics. a. Figuring out what to buy and how to buy. b. Maintaining the industrial base.  

5. Money: The Defense budget. a. Defense Planning Guidance. b. Budget trends.  

6. Information: command, control, communications, intelligence. a. Internal communications and coordination b. Public information c. Intelligence.  

7. Leadership: developing the officer corps.  

8. Thinking About The Future: anticipating threats, defining roles and missions.

Texts

-Amos A. Jordan, Willliam J. Taylor, Jr. and Michael J. Mazarr, American National Security (Baltimore: Johns    Hopkins University Press, 2009). Buy.

-Lawrence J. Korb, et al, Building a Military for the 21st Century, E-res

-Barbara A. Bicksler, Curtis L. Gilroy and John T. Warner, eds., The All-Volunteer Force: Thirty Years of Service (Dulles, VA, Brassey’s, 2004).  Copies on reserve in the Benson Latin American Collection. SRH 1.108

GOV 388L • Shaping Defense Policy

38940 • Fall 2011
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM SRH 3.355
(also listed as P A 388K)

Description coming...

HMN 350 • American Race Policy

39810 • Fall 2011
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM SRH 3.212
(also listed as LAH 350, P A 325)

This upper division honors seminar traces the evolution of race policy in the United States from the development of the color line, through the current policy of equal opportunity, to alternative forecasts about the role of race in America’s future.  Emphasis will be placed on understanding the circumstances that led to particular policies.  Students will be encouraged to read and develop their own interpretations of primary sources such as Supreme Court cases, rather than to rely solely on the interpretations of scholars. 

 

Texts:

Taylor Branch, Parting The Waters: America in the King Years, 1954 – 63, (New York, Simon and Schuster, 1988).W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk, any editionJames Madison, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, The Federalist Papers, any edition.Melvin Oliver and Thomas Shapiro, Black Wealth, White Wealth (New York: Routledge, 1997)Edward Telles, Race in Another America: The Significance of Skin Color in Brazil (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004).

 

Requirements:

Engagement is important.  I expect students to be active participants in a process of discovery, not passive recipients of “the truth” as one professor sees it.  My responsibilities include getting the conversation started, guiding students to existing knowledge and points of view, and assessing students’ contributions to the class.  I place great value on clear, concise writing and speaking, so students will be given ample opportunities to work on their communications skills.1. Class attendance and participation – 10%2. Short paper (2 pages) about expectations for class – 10%3. Lead discussion of class readings – 10%4. Book review – 20%5. Mid-term examination – 20%6. Final examination – 30%

GOV 360N • Defense Policy

38975 • Spring 2011
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM SRH 3.221
(also listed as LAH 350, P A 325)

The course will follow a logical progression from the articulation of national security strategy through decisions about DoD organization and resources.  Because most students are not familiar with the military, the seminar will begin with an overview of military terms and organizing principles.  Students will be introduced to essential policy documents such as Title X of the US Code and the National Security Strategy.

    The Defense Department, like all organizations, must succeed at several key things: it must decide on its basic purposes or policies, obtain the resources (money, people, equipment and information) needed to carry out those purposes, and hire or develop good leaders. These six topics – policy, personnel, acquisition, budget, intelligence and leadership – will be the “meat” of the course.  We will devote one or two sessions to each of the following topics:

   1. Background.  Overview of DoD; the difference between war fighters and resource providers; the roles of the key leaders such as the Secretary of Defense, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the combatant commanders.
   2. Purposes: What are we defending ourselves against (or fighting for)?
                a.  National Security Strategy.  Who writes it, what influences it.
                b. National Defense Strategy. Threat-based versus capability-based approaches.
   3. People: recruiting, training and rewarding the Force.
                a. From conscription to the all-volunteer force.
                b. Who should serve, and who shouldn’t?
                c. Pay and benefits.
   4. Things: acquisition and logistics.
                a. Figuring out what to buy and how to buy.
                b. Maintaining the industrial base.
   5. Money: The Defense budget.
                a. Defense Planning Guidance.
                b. Budget trends.
   6. Information: command, control, communications, intelligence.
                a. Internal communications and coordination
                b. Public information
                c. Intelligence.
   7. Leadership:  developing the officer corps.
   8. Thinking About The Future: anticipating threats, defining roles and missions.

HMN 350 • American Race Policy

39760 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 228
(also listed as LAH 350, P A 325)

Description:

This upper division honors seminar traces the evolution of race policy in the United States from the development of the color line, through the current policy of equal opportunity, to alternative forecasts about the role of race in America’s future.  Emphasis will be placed on understanding the circumstances that led to particular policies.  Students will be encouraged to read and develop their own interpretations of primary sources such as Supreme Court cases, rather than to rely solely on the interpretations of scholars.  

 

Texts:

Taylor Branch, Parting The Waters: America in the King Years, 1954 – 63, (New York, Simon and Schuster, 1988).

W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk, any edition

James Madison, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, The Federalist Papers, any edition.

Melvin Oliver and Thomas Shapiro, Black Wealth, White Wealth (New York: Routledge, 1997)

Edward Telles, Race in Another America: The Significance of Skin Color in Brazil (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004).

 

Requirements:

Engagement is important.  I expect students to be active participants in a process of discovery, not passive recipients of “the truth” as one professor sees it.  My responsibilities include getting the conversation started, guiding students to existing knowledge and points of view, and assessing students’ contributions to the class.  I place great value on clear, concise writing and speaking, so students will be given ample opportunities to work on their communications skills.

1. Class attendance and participation – 10%

2. Short paper (2 pages) about expectations for class – 10%

3. Lead discussion of class readings – 10%

4. Book review – 20%

5. Mid-term examination – 20%

6. Final examination – 30%

GOV 360N • Defense Policy

38895 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SRH 3.216

Please check back for updates.

GOV 360N • Defense Policy

38355 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SRH 3.103

Please check back for updates.

GOV 360N • Defense Policy

39355 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SRH 3.103

Please check back for updates.

GOV 360N • Defense Policy

38853 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SRH 3.108

Please check back for updates.

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