Institute of Urban Policy

The State of Black Lives in Texas: Criminal Justice

Fri, May 3, 2019
The State of Black Lives in Texas: Criminal Justice
IUPRA’s latest State of Black Lives in Texas report presents the current state of juvenile justice in Texas and how it negatively and disproportionately affects Black youth.

Every year, an estimated 250,000 youth under the age of 18 are prosecuted, sentenced, and incarcerated in the adult criminal justice system, with roughly 100,000 housed in adult jails and prisons. Black people have historically been overrepresented in the criminal justice system, and the same goes for Black youth at every state of the juvenile justice system. Additionally, Texas is one of only four states in the United States that define 17-year-olds as adults in terms of criminal responsibility.

IUPRA’s latest State of Black Lives in Texas report presents the current state of juvenile justice in Texas and how it negatively affects youth’s educational, psychological, and emotional development, as well as disproportionately affects Black youth and communities. It’s the fourth in a series that looks at various policy issues in Texas through a racial equity lens, with the goal of influencing policymakers to improve the lives of Black people in Texas.

This report uses a mixed methods approach to better understand the issue, from both a micro and macro perspective. Legal analysis, historical narrative, descriptive statistics, and demographic analysis all help illuminate the issue of raising the age for adult criminal responsibility in Texas.

Read or download the report here!

 

The State of Black Lives in Texas report series examines social issues affecting the Black population in Texas and provides research and policy recommendations to address those issues. The 2018-19 iteration covers education, income and poverty, housing, health, and criminal justice. Want to be the first to hear when we have events and new reports in the series? Sign up for IUPRA’s newsletter: bit.ly/IUPRA-news.

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