Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies
Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies

MALS Plática: Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellows

Wed, February 17, 2016 | GWB 2.206 (Gordon-White Building Multi-Purpose Room)

12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellows
Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellows

The Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies (MALS) welcomes Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellows, Lorgia García-Peña and Armando García.

Dr. García-Peña will present a talk entitled, "Almost Citizens: Racial Translations, National Belonging and the Global 'Immigration Crisis.'" This talk examines some of the ways in which racialized immigrants and their descendants translate hegemonic ethnoracial terms to assert belonging and citizenship in the nation. Through a comparative analysis of the use of “black” and “Latino” in the United States and Italy, García-Peña proposes Latino/a Studies as a lens for investigating how the discourses of immigration and the discourses of race jointly operate to violently exclude and silence racialized people from the nation. Setting off from the premise that Latinidad emerges out of the circularity of immigration, blackness, and coloniality, this presentation examines how black Latin American migrants grapple with different—and often oppositional—racial systems to assert belonging and representation within the nation(s) that exclude them. Black Latinidad becomes a productive category of global contestation, but one that remains connected to racially restrictive national immigration policies, political disenfranchisement, state violence and poverty.

Dr. García will present, "The Traffic in Conquest: Nao Bustamante’s Decolonial Performance." His talk studies a 16th-century scene of colonial violence (el Requerimiento) and a 20th-century scene of queer erotics (Nao Bustamante’s Indig/urrito) to reflect on the constitution of race, freedom and native subjectivity in the Americas. Echoing the Spanish regime of law and its interpellation of death-ready Indians in the terrain of colonialism, Indig/urrito theorizes native subjectivity and the temporality of race by placing Bustamante’s own flesh at the center of freedom.  Fiercely utopist, her decolonial performance is a radical reordering of race and sociality that can produce an emancipatory future beyond the colony.

Sponsored by: The Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies (MALS)

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