Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies
Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies

Elena Perez-Zetune


Graduate Student
Elena Perez-Zetune

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Biography


Elena Perez-Zetune is from Pennsylvania. She attended Gettysburg College and double majored in English Literature and Spanish/Latin American Studies. Her independent undergraduate research theses were titled, “The Outcast in Stephen Crane’s Work” and “La línea materna: La mujer y la Literatura en la Revolución Cubana”. Her interests are Chicana/Latina identity through literature and Mexican immigration in the Northeast.

Courses


MAS 307 • Intro To Mexican Amer Cul Stds

40810 • Fall 2021
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 3.116
CD

This course introduces students to a variety of theoretical and substantive issues covered under the interdisciplinary rubric of Cultural Studies. Focusing primarily on the Mexican American historical, cultural, literary, and social experience, students will read and discuss a wide range of materials that explore and represent the general framework of Cultural Studies. A partial listing of this framework includes literary production, cultural critique, historical analysis, media studies and ways of knowing. This course focuses on distinct ways of “thinking” within cultural criticism, and their utility in the study of Mexican America and LatinX experience. A particular focus of this class is the relationship between representation and the production of difference: racial, gender, class, and other forms of social cleavage.

MAS 311 • Ethncty/Gendr: La Chicana-Wb

40625 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
CD SB (also listed as SOC 308D, WGS 301)

Description:

The purpose of this course is to examine various experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas and Mexican American women in the United States, which vary according to gender, sexuality, race, class, citizenship, (dis)ability, region, and language. The term “Chicana” is situated historically within the Chicano Movement but is ever evolving and contested. We will begin this course with a historical and theoretical examination of Chicana feminisms through an intersectional approach, and interact with a variety of materials including ethnographic writings, novels, manifestos, podcasts, and films.

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