Plan II Honors Logo
Plan II Honors

KENNETH I SHINE


Courses


T C 358 • Plagues/History/Ethics/Lit

41755 • Spring 2022
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CRD 007B

Course Number: T C 358 

Course Title: Plagues, History, Ethics and Literature 

Semester/Year: Spring 2022   

Instructor: Kenneth I. Shine, M.D., Plan II Adjunct Professor, Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Dell Medical School and Former Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs of the UT System. 

Description: 

The history of plagues will be examined from antiquity to the HIV epidemic. The recurrent themes which characterize society’s responses to these outbreaks will be identified, as well as those which made a particular plague unique. The interactions between the biology of an epidemic, the social conditions under which it occurred, and the economic, behavioral, and ethical responses will be explored. The longer term consequences of plague upon trade, travel, intellectual life, religion, legal constructs, gender, art and literature will be studied. The impact of plague upon the roles of physicians, patients and other health providers as well as on the behavior of workers, business, social and religious leaders will be identified. These will include ethical issues which influence individual behavior, scapegoating, communications, secrecy and misinformation. The relevance of knowledge from these naturally occurring events to those that might be created by a terrorist will be examined. Students will read literature in which plagues have been featured as metaphor or as key plot elements. The goal of the course is an understanding of the profound effects that these major biologic events have had upon history and society, the lessons which might be gleaned from these events, and the usefulness these lessons might have to inform public health and public policy. Students with a broad diversity of interests will contribute to the richness of perspectives that this seminar offers.   

Texts/Readings: 

Stuart Borsch, The Black Death

Albert Camus, The Plague      

Marilyn Chase, The Barbary Plague

Molly Caldwell Crosby, The American Plague    

Daniel Defoe, A Journal of the Plague Year

William Rosen, Justinian’s Flea

Herlihy, The Black Death and the Transformation of the West   

Assignments: 

The seminar will consist of brief lectures combined with interactive discussion. Each student will prepare two short (3-5) page papers and a final (approximately 15 page) paper. The first short paper will discuss the ethical conundra presented by plagues in history. The second paper will be on any aspect of the social consequences of plague that the student wishes to address. The final paper should involve the student’s research of a plague in which the biology of the epidemic and its consequences are explored in order to make public policy recommendations on the management of a future plague. For the seminar grade each short paper will count 15%, the long paper 40% and class discussion 30%. 

T C 358 • Plagues/History/Ethics/Lit

41745 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CRD 007B

Description:

The history of plagues will be examined from antiquity to the HIV epidemic. The recurrent themes which characterize society’s responses to these outbreaks will be identified, as well as those which made a particular plague unique. The interactions between the biology of an epidemic, the social conditions under which it occurred, and the economic, behavioral, and ethical responses will be explored. The longer term consequences of plague upon trade, travel, intellectual life, religion, legal constructs, gender, art and literature will be studied. The impact of plague upon the roles of physicians, patients and other health providers as well as on the behavior of workers, business, social and religious leaders will be identified. These will include ethical issues which influence individual behavior, scapegoating, communications, secrecy and misinformation. The relevance of knowledge from these naturally occurring events to those that might be created by a terrorist will be examined. Students will read literature in which plagues have been featured as metaphor or as key plot elements. The goal of the course is an understanding of the profound effects that these major biologic events have had upon history and society, the lessons which might be gleaned from these events, and the usefulness these lessons might have to inform public health and public policy. Students with a broad diversity of interests will contribute to the richness of perspectives that this seminar offers.  

Texts/Readings:

Stuart Borsch, The Black Death                                                        

Albert Camus, The Plague    

Marilyn Chase, The Barbary Plague                  

Molly Caldwell Crosby, The American Plague  

Daniel Defoe, A Journal of the Plague Year

Jared Diamond, Guns Germs and Steel                          

William Rosen, Justinian’s Flea    

Abraham Verghese, My Own Country

     

Assignments:

The seminar will consist of discussions of the readings and the issues that they raise. The evening before each class meeting each student will email 2-3 questions about the reading assignment to Professor Shine. The questions will provide the initial basis for discussion.  Each student will prepare two short (3-5) page papers and a final (approximately 15 page) paper. The first short paper will discuss the ethical conundra presented by plagues in history. The second paper will be on any aspect of the social consequences of plague that the student wishes to address. The final paper should involve the student’s research of a plague in which the biology of the epidemic and its consequences are explored in order to make public policy recommendations on the management of a future plague. For the seminar grade each short paper will count 15%, the long paper 40% and class discussion 30%.

About the Professor: Kenneth Irwin Shine is Professor of Medicine at the Dell Medical School of the University of Texas (UT). He recently completed a ten year term as Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs at UT with responsibility for the six health campuses of the University and establishment of new medical schools in Austin and South Texas.  Professor Shine's full bio can be found here: 
https://dellmed.utexas.edu/team-profile/ken-shine

T C 358 • Plagues/History/Ethics/Lit

42500 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CRD 007A

Description:

The history of plagues will be examined from antiquity to the HIV epidemic. The recurrent themes which characterize society’s responses to these outbreaks will be identified, as well as those which made a particular plague unique. The interactions between the biology of an epidemic, the social conditions under which it occurred, and the economic, behavioral, and ethical responses will be explored. The longer term consequences of plague upon trade, travel, intellectual life, religion, legal constructs, gender, art and literature will be studied. The impact of plague upon the roles of physicians, patients and other health providers as well as on the behavior of workers, business, social and religious leaders will be identified. These will include ethical issues which influence individual behavior, scapegoating, communications, secrecy and misinformation. The relevance of knowledge from these naturally occurring events to those that might be created by a terrorist will be examined. Students will read literature in which plagues have been featured as metaphor or as key plot elements. The goal of the course is an understanding of the profound effects that these major biologic events have had upon history and society, the lessons which might be gleaned from these events, and the usefulness these lessons might have to inform public health and public policy. Students with a broad diversity of interests will contribute to the richness of perspectives that this seminar offers.  

Texts/Readings:

Stuart Borsch, The Black Death                                                        

Albert Camus, The Plague    

Marilyn Chase, The Barbary Plague                  

Molly Caldwell Crosby, The American Plague  

Daniel Defoe, A Journal of the Plague Year

Jared Diamond, Guns Germs and Steel                          

William Rosen, Justinian’s Flea    

Abraham Verghese, My Own Country

     

Assignments:

The seminar will consist of discussions of the readings and the issues that they raise. The evening before each class meeting each student will email 2-3 questions about the reading assignment to Professor Shine. The questions will provide the initial basis for discussion.  Each student will prepare two short (3-5) page papers and a final (approximately 15 page) paper. The first short paper will discuss the ethical conundra presented by plagues in history. The second paper will be on any aspect of the social consequences of plague that the student wishes to address. The final paper should involve the student’s research of a plague in which the biology of the epidemic and its consequences are explored in order to make public policy recommendations on the management of a future plague. For the seminar grade each short paper will count 15%, the long paper 40% and class discussion 30%.

About the Professor: Kenneth Irwin Shine is Professor of Medicine at the Dell Medical School of the University of Texas (UT). He recently completed a ten year term as Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs at UT with responsibility for the six health campuses of the University and establishment of new medical schools in Austin and South Texas.  Professor Shine's full bio can be found here: 
https://dellmed.utexas.edu/team-profile/ken-shine

T C 357 • Plagues, History, Ethics, Lit

42095 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CRD 007A

Instructor: Kenneth I. Shine, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine at UTMB, Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs of the UT System.

 

Description:

The history of plagues will be examined from antiquity to the HIV epidemic. The recurrent themes which characterize society’s responses to these outbreaks will be identified, as well as those which made a particular plague unique. The interactions between the biology of an epidemic, the social conditions under which it occurred, and the economic, behavioral, and ethical responses will be explored. The longer term consequences of plague upon trade, travel, intellectual life, religion, legal constructs, gender, art and literature will be studied. The impact of plague upon the roles of physicians, patients and other health providers as well as on the behavior of workers, business, social and religious leaders will be identified. These will include ethical issues which influence individual behavior, scapegoating, communications, secrecy and misinformation. The relevance of knowledge from these naturally occurring events to those that might be created by a terrorist will be examined. Students will read literature in which plagues have been featured as metaphor or as key plot elements. The goal of the course is an understanding of the profound effects that these major biologic events have had upon history and society, the lessons which might be gleaned from these events, and the usefulness these lessons might have to inform public health and public policy. Students with a broad diversity of interests will contribute to the richness of perspectives that this seminar offers.  

Texts/Readings:

Stuart Borsch, The Black Death                                                        

Albert Camus, The Plague    

Marilyn Chase, The Barbary Plague                  

Molly Caldwell Crosby, The American Plague  

Daniel Defoe, A Journal of the Plague Year                             

William Rosen, Justinian’s Flea    

D. Herlihy, The Black Death and the Transformation of the West  

     

Assignments:

The seminar will consist of brief lectures combined with interactive discussion. Each student will prepare two short (3-5) page papers and a final (approximately 15 page) paper. The first short paper will discuss the ethical conundra presented by plagues in history. The second paper will be on any aspect of the social consequences of plague that the student wishes to address. The final paper should involve the student’s research of a plague in which the biology of the epidemic and its consequences are explored in order to make public policy recommendations on the management of a future plague. For the seminar grade each short paper will count 15%, the long paper 40% and class discussion 30%.

T C 357 • Plagues, Hist, Ethics, And Lit

43501 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CRD 007A

Plagues, History, Ethics and Literature

 

Description:

The history of plagues will be examined from antiquity to the HIV epidemic. The recurrent themes which characterize society’s responses to these outbreaks will be identified, as well as those which made a particular plague unique. The interactions between the biology of an epidemic, the social conditions under which it occurred, and the economic, behavioral, and ethical responses will be explored. The longer term consequences of plague upon trade, travel, intellectual life, religion, legal constructs, gender, art and literature will be studied. The impact of plague upon the roles of physicians, patients and other health providers as well as on the behavior of workers, business, social and religious leaders will be identified. These will include ethical issues which influence individual behavior, scapegoating, communications, secrecy and misinformation. The relevance of knowledge from these naturally occurring events to those that might be created by a terrorist will be examined. Students will read literature in which plagues have been featured as metaphor or as key plot elements. The goal of the course is an understanding of the profound effects that these major biologic events have had upon history and society, the lessons which might be gleaned from these events, and the usefulness these lessons might have to inform public health and public policy. Students with a broad diversity of interests will contribute to the richness of perspectives that this seminar offers.  

 

Texts/Readings:

Stuart Borsch, The Black Death  

Albert Camus, The Plague    

Marilyn Chase, The Barbary Plague        

Molly Caldwell Crosby, The American Plague  

Daniel Defoe, A Journal of the Plague Year   

D. Herlihy, The Black Death and the Transformation of the West  

William Rosen, Justinian’s Flea    

     

Assignments:

The seminar will consist of brief lectures combined with interactive discussion. Each student will prepare two short (3-5) page papers and a final (approximately 15 page) paper. The first short paper will discuss the ethical conundra presented by plagues in history. The second paper will be on any aspect of the social consequences of plague that the student wishes to address. The final paper should involve the student’s research of a plague in which the biology of the epidemic and its consequences are explored in order to make public policy recommendations on the management of a future plague. For the seminar grade each short paper will count 15%, the long paper 40% and class discussion 30%.

 

 

Biography:

Kenneth I. Shine, M.D. Is Clinical Professor of Medicine at UTMB, Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs of the UT System and Founding Director of the RAND Center for Domestic and International Health Security. For 10 years he was President of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He received a number of teaching awards from student groups at the UCLA School of Medicine. His current interests include Public Health infrastructure, Medical ethics, Patient Safety and health policy.    

Profile Pages



  •   Map
  • Plan II Honors Program

    University of Texas at Austin
    305 East 23rd St
    RLP 2.102
    Austin, Texas, 78712-1250
    512-471-1442