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Plan II Honors

Michael Johnson


Assistant ProfessorPhD, Emory University

Michael Johnson

Contact

Interests


Classical and medieval rhetoric, Medieval European literature and culture, Sexuality and Gender Studies, Critical Theory, Psychoanalysis, European comics

Biography


I am an assistant professor of medieval French literature with a research focus on medieval grammar and rhetoric.

Current project: The Medieval Erotics of Grammar. This book-length study aims to account for the persistent use of grammatical terminology in reflections about and debates on sex in high medieval literature. The principal claim put forward in the Medieval Erotics of Grammar is that medieval grammatical discourse played a central role in shaping and regulating Western views of sex, particularly in the cultural elevation of the male-female couple hailed by courtly literature. A great deal of medieval writers harnessed grammatical discourse both to the end of celebrating heterosexual erotic love and in condemnations of same-sex eroticism. I examine both of these instances in a large corpus of writing, ranging from a selection of erotic poems in Latin and the vernaculars –– including Goliardic writings, some of the Carmina Burana, an erotic parody of Alexander of Villedieu’s Doctrinale, and troubadour lyric –– to debates that call upon contemporaneous grammatical theories to condemn homoerotic sex, including, most notably, the anonymous but hugely popular Altercatio Ganimedis et Helene, Alain de Lille’s De planctu Naturae and Gautier de Coinci’s Seinte Léocade.

I have also published on Lacan and the troubadour excremental, on euphemism and desire in the Romance of the Rose, and on sex and reading in Alan of Lille's Plaint of Nature. My secondary research focus is on sexuality in twentieth-century French writing, to which end I have published on André Gide, Claude Louis-Combet, Fabrice Neaud and Jacques Derrida.

Courses


FR F317C • Enhancing French Skills

84175 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM BUR 228

FR 317C. Enhancing French Skills. An advanced intermediate course which serves to
continue the development of your communication abilities in French by practicing the four basic skills of speaking, listening, writing and reading.  In this course, you will expand your knowledge of the French language and culture through the daily use of authentic documents, such as songs, movie clips, comic strips, journalistic and literary readings, internet videos, and websites.  Meets the prerequisite requirements for French 320E or 324L.  Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: French 611C with a grade of at least C.

FR 320E • Advanced French I

36800 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 306

Description of FR320E

 

FR 320E • Advanced French I

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 320E • Advanced French I

36805 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 1.216

Description of FR320E

 

FR 320E • Advanced French I

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 326K • Intro Fr Lit I: Mid Ages-18c

36775 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM HRH 2.112

This course introduces students to early French literary culture from the Middle Ages to the Revolution. A significant portion of the course is devoted to developing the fundamentals of writing literary analysis in French of poetry, theater, and literary prose, through short writing assignments, in-class writing workshops, and guided revisions. The final unit introduces students briefly to French literary criticism through Roland Barthes's Sur Racine.

Prerequisites:FR 320E or the equivalent.

II. Course Materials

Orizet, Jean, ed. Anthologie De La Poésie Française. Larousse, 2010.

Racine, Jean. Phèdre. Hachette Education, 2002.

De Graffigny, Françoise. Lettres D’Une Péruvienne. MLA Publications, 1993.

Barthes, Roland. Sur Racine. Seuil, 1979.

All other course readings will be posted on Blackboard

III. Course Work:

Grading Policy:

Three short papers (drafts)                   30%

Three short papers (final)                     30%    

Two exams                                           30%

One oral presentation                           10%

FR 326K • Intro Fr Lit I: Mid Ages-18c

36780 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM HRH 2.112

This course introduces students to early French literary culture from the Middle Ages to the Revolution. A significant portion of the course is devoted to developing the fundamentals of writing literary analysis in French of poetry, theater, and literary prose, through short writing assignments, in-class writing workshops, and guided revisions. The final unit introduces students briefly to French literary criticism through Roland Barthes's Sur Racine.

Prerequisites:FR 320E or the equivalent.

II. Course Materials

Orizet, Jean, ed. Anthologie De La Poésie Française. Larousse, 2010.

Racine, Jean. Phèdre. Hachette Education, 2002.

De Graffigny, Françoise. Lettres D’Une Péruvienne. MLA Publications, 1993.

Barthes, Roland. Sur Racine. Seuil, 1979.

All other course readings will be posted on Blackboard

III. Course Work:

Grading Policy:

Three short papers (drafts)                   30%

Three short papers (final)                     30%    

Two exams                                           30%

One oral presentation                           10%

FR 381M • Critical Approaches To Lit

36750 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM HRH 2.106C

FR381M: Critical Approaches

Michael Johnson

 

Course Description:

This course introduces students to major critical approaches to literature and culture, with emphasis on twentieth-century French writing. In class discussion and in writing assignments, students will consider the ways in which literature encodes and reflects––but can also influence, shape, or even erode––the culture in which it is produced. Although much discussion will focus on how criticism makes possible new readings of literature, the final goal of the course will be to move beyond applied theory to what might be called a poetics and politics of literary criticism. For if twentieth-century criticism has taught us anything it is that critical writing, like any literary text, can be analyzed formally and rhetorically, and can thus also be historicized and read in relation to the various axes of power, race, class, nation, and gender out of which it is produced. 

The course is organized as a series of units that include the following: 1) formalism and structuralism [Jakobson, Todorov, Genette, Barthes, Lévi-Strauss], 2) existentialism and phenomenology [Heidegger, Sartre, Poulet], 3) post-structuralism and deconstruction [Derrida, DeMan, Culler, Johnson], 4) Marxist criticism and cultural studies [Marx, Althusser, Jameson, Adorno/Horkheimer, Bourdieu], 5) historicism and historical approaches [Foucault, Jauss, Greenblatt], 6) feminist and queer criticism [Irigaray, Cixous, Wittig, De Beauvoir, Sedgwick, Showalter, Bulter], 7) psychoanalytic theory [Freud, Lacan, Felman, Gallop], 8) critical race theory and post-colonial criticism [Fanon, Hooks, Senghor, Chamoiseau/Bernabé/Confiant, Memmi, Spivak, Said] and 9) film theory [Metz, Bazin, Mulvey]. Students will choose the content of the last unit of the course based on their own interests, which may include eco-criticism, cognitive approaches, cyborg theory, the “animal turn,” genre theory, archive theory, affect studies, etc.

Course Texts:

Readings will be available on Blackboard

Course Grade:

Participation               10%

2 presentations           20%

3 short papers             30%

1 final paper                40%

EUS 347 • Intro Fr Lit I: Mid Ages-18c

36330 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.212
(also listed as FR 326K)

FR 326K – Introduction to French Literature I: Middle Ages to the 18th Century

 

I. Course Description and Objectives:

Ce cours offre un survol de la littérature française d’Ancien Régime. Le but de notre cours sera d’ancrer une série de textes-clefs dans leurs contextes sociaux et historiques. Parmi les thèmes récurrents se trouvent les suivants: l’émergence l’individu ; les transformations de la conception de la différence sexuelle, celles-ci intimement liées aux transformations du discours sur l’amour ; l’évolution de la notion de l'« auctoritas », c’est-à-dire, l’autorité de l’écrivain conféré par le Roi, dans la société française prérévolutionnaire. 

This course introduces students to early French literary culture from the Middle Ages to the Revolution. We will examine the changing social and cultural contexts in which the literature was produced. Recurrent lines of inquiry include: the emergence and evolution of discourses on the individual in relationship to the social order and to the divine; the evolving relationship between notions of romantic love and conceptions of gender roles; changing notions of auctoritas within pre-Revolutionary French society.

Prerequisites:

FR 320E or the equivalent.

 

Grading Policy:

Two tests                                             30%

Three short papers                               30%                

One oral presentation                           10%

Class participation                                30%

(Participation includes attendance, writing exercises, weekly reading blog participation, quizzes, etc.)

FR 390K • Medieval French Literature

36710 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM HRH 2.106C

FR390K: Love, Sex and Friendship in Medieval French Literature

Michael Johnson

 

Course Description:

A number of the discourses that shape our understanding of friendship, love and sexuality in the West emerged in a form recognizable to us during the medieval period, from romantic love and marriage, to virginity and celibacy. This course looks at a variety of literary works that reflect medieval conceptions of friendship, love and sexuality and that treat such themes as sodomy, clerical sexuality, the iuvenis, sexual violence, misogyny, passionate friendship, and female sexuality. A wide range of literary genres will be represented including lyric poetry, epic, fabliaux, romance, breton lays, and high allegory. Students will gain a broad understanding of medieval French literature––including genres, historical context, and critical issues––in addition to developing focused specialization on medieval love and sexuality. Over the course of the semester students will give one presentation on the readings, and will write one short textual analysis and one seminar paper engaging questions raised in the course.

 

Course Texts:

Selected French and Occitan love lyric

André le chapelain, Traité de l’amour courtois

Béroul et Thomas d’Angleterre, Tristan et Iseult

Desgrugillers-Billard (ed.), Ami et Amile

Chrétien de Troyes, Yvain ou Le Chevalier au lion

Marie de France, Lais

Rossi et Straub (eds.), Fabliaux Érotiques

Roche-Mahdi (ed.), Le Roman de Silence

Alain de Lille, De planctu Naturae

Altercatio ganimedis et helene

Guillaume de Lorris et Jean de Meun, Roman de la Rose

 

Course Grade:

Participation                10%

Presentation                20%

Short paper                  20%

Final paper                  50%

F C 345 • New Trends French Graphic Nov

37075 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 1

FC345: The New French Graphic Novel

Michael A. Johnson

Course Description:

Called the “ninth art” in France, the comic strip has been considered a culturally relevant art form much longer in France than in the US. However, it is only in the past two decades that the comic-strip medium has moved beyond traditionally escapist comic book genres (fantasy, adventure, sci-fi) to encompass more reality-oriented genres such as autobiography, documentary, historical fiction, and travelogue, and to also address such serious and pressing questions as France’s colonial legacy, civil unrest in the French banlieu (suburban ghettos), immigration, and war. This course looks at works from the new wave of the French graphic novel with special emphasis on innovations with the comic strip medium. We will study a variety of works, themes, and graphic styles from the raw punk aesthetic of Julie Doucet’s autobiographical New York Diary to the childlike expressionism of David B.’s Epileptic, from Appollo’s & Lewis Trondheim’s faux-naif use of animal characters to reimagine France’s colonial history to Emmanuel Guibert’s experimentation with mixed-media in his stark testimony of war in Afghanistan. Our readings will be guided by a set of related questions: What is the expressive potential of the medium? What can the comic strip express that a painting, a novel or a film might not be able to? And which of these graphic works exploit most fully the expressive potential of the medium? 

Course readings:

Ann Miller, Reading Bande Dessinée: Critical Approaches to the French-language Comic Strip (Intellect Ltd., 2008)

David B., Epileptic (Pantheon, 2006)

Julie Doucet, My New York Diary (Drawn & Quarterly, 2004)

Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis (Pantheon, 2004)

Jean-Pierre Stassen, Deogratias: a Tale of Rwanda (First Second, 2006)

Appollo & Lewis Trondheim, Bourbon Island 1730 (First Second, 2008)

Manu Larcenet, Ordinary Victories (ComicsLit, 2005)

Marguerite Abouet, Aya (Drawn & Quarterly, 2007)

Joann Sfar, The Rabbi’s Cat (Pantheon, 2007)

Guy Delisle, Burma Chronicles (Drawn & Quarterly, 2008)

Emmanuel Guibert, The Photographer: Into War-Torn Afghanistan with Doctors Without Borders (First Second, 2009)

Christophe Blain, Isaac the Pirate (ComicsLit, 2003)

Course grade:

3 short papers (45%)

1 final project (30%)

participation (15%)

group presentation (10%)

FR 320E • Advanced French I

36840 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM HRH 2.112

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FR 320E • Advanced French I

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2006. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 1-4130-0449-0; workbook 1-4130-6837-5): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 0-658-01799-5: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 0-19-861071-8: Recommended

FR 320E • Advanced French I

36395 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BEN 1.106

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.


Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2006. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 1-4130-0449-0; workbook 1-4130-6837-5): Required



Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 0-658-01799-5: Recommended



Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 0-19-861071-8: Recommended

FR 326K • Intro Fr Lit I: Mid Ages-18c

36435 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 2.202

FR326K: Introduction to French Literature I : Middle Ages to the 18th Century

Prerequisites :

FR 320E or the equivalent.

Course Description :

This course introduces students to early French literary culture from the Middle Ages to the Revolution. We will examine the changing social and cultural contexts in which the literature was produced. Recurrent lines of inquiry include: the emergence and evolution of discourses on the individual in relationship to the social order and to the divine; the evolving relationship between notions of romantic love and conceptions of gender roles; changing notions of kingship and authority within pre-Revolutionary French society.

Assignments:

two tests, three short papers (3-4 pages), one oral presentation, weekly Blackboard reading questions

Grade :

2 tests: 30%

3 papers: 30%

1 oral presentation: 10%

Class participation (including attendance, reading questions, quizzes, etc.): 30%

Texts :

R.-J. Berg, Littérature française: texts et contextes, Vol. 1

Other readings will be posted on Blackboard

 

FR F320E • Advanced French I

83770 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM HRH 2.112

First Session

 

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.


Course Description

This course will be taught in French.



The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%



Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts


Oukada, Larbi. 2006. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 1-4130-0449-0; workbook 1-4130-6837-5): Required



Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 0-658-01799-5: Recommended



Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 0-19-861071-8: Recommended

T C 603A • Compositn & Read In World Lit

43745 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CRD 007A

Michael A. Johnson
HRH 3.112C, 471-7470
Office Hours: Tue 12-2pm and by appointment
mjohnson@mail.utexas.edu

TC603A: Composition and Reading in World Literature
Unique: 43745
TTH 2:00-3:30
CRD 007A

DESCRIPTION
This course presents a broad survey of world literature from the classical tradition to the present, with special focus on the theme of metamorphosis. In our readings of epics, poetry, prose essays, plays, novels, graphic novels, and films, we will look at gods and monsters in their various incarnations, and consider the ideas of transformation, development, change, and revolution as they are manifested in literary representations of self and other, male and female, body and soul, human and animal, nature and society. The emphasis in the course is on close textual readings as well as contextual interpretation as we analyze the ways in which form as well as content can reflect these ideas of change and revolution; special attention will also be paid to the questions of gender, power, and identity.

REQUIRED COURSE TEXTS
In the Co-op:
Homer, The Odyssey. Trans. Robert Fagles (New York: Penguin, 1996)
Ovid, Metamorphoses. Trans. Charles Martin (New York: Norton, 2004)
The Book of Chuang Tzu. Trans. Martin Palmer (New York: Penguin, 2006)
R.K. Narayan, The Ramayana (New York: Penguin, 2006)
Popol Vuh. Trans. Dennis Tedlock (New York: Touchstone, 1985)
William Shakespeare, The Tempest (New Haven: Yale UP, 2006)
Aimé Césaire, A Tempest. Trans. Richard Miller (New York: TGC Translations, 2002)
On Blackboard:
    Selected lyric poems
    Plato, The Republic (excerpt)
    Marie de France, Bisclavret
    Jean d’Arras, Romance of Melusine (excerpt)

COURSE EXPECTATIONS & ASSIGNMENTS
This course will be conducted as a seminar; therefore students will be expected to attend every class fully prepared to participate in discussion of the texts. For each class meeting, students are required to post at least one question or comment on that day’s reading assignment on the course blog. Class participation, including blog postings, individual and group presentations, will count for a substantial portion of the final grade. There will be four formal papers assigned during the course of each semester, along with various more informal writing assignments both in and outside of class. The formal papers will cover four different kinds of approaches: thematic analysis; textual analysis; stylistic analysis or pastiche; and comparative analysis. The first three short papers (3-5 pp) may be rewritten once. A longer, 8-10 page paper will be due at the end of each semester.

Writing Assignments
Writing assignments must be typed out and submitted in hard copy. No late work accepted.

Paper 1 (3-5 pp)
A creative adaptation and/or pastiche of either Popol Vuh or The Odyssey adapted to life in the USA circa 2009. Due 9/24.
Paper 2 (3-5 pp)
A thematic analysis of any text read in class from Popol Vuh to Metamorphoses. Students may discuss such themes such as piety, monstrosity, sexual violence, coming-of-age, desire, gender, the divine, animal-human relations, or a theme of the student’s choosing to be approved by instructor. Due 10/22.
Paper 3 (3-5 pp)
A textual analysis of any of the lyric poems read in class. Students will be asked to pay attention to the formal properties of the text (stylistic and rhetorical) and to explore and explain the relationship between form and content. Due 11/19.
Paper 4 (8-10 pp)
A comparative analysis of any two texts, or films, in the class. Due 12/11.

Grading Policy on Rewrites
The first three short papers may be rewritten once each. All rewrites are due within a week from the date I return graded and corrected papers to the class. The final grade will be the average of the first and second grades received (for example: an 80% on the first paper and a 90% on the rewrite will result in a final grade of 85%).

Course Blog
Reading questions are posted on the course blog by noon the day before a reading assignment. Students are expected to respond to one or more of the reading questions and/or to post their own reading questions for their peers. Students are also encouraged to use the blog to share any helpful information, websites, images, contextual or historical background, etc. that will contribute to a fuller understanding of the reading assignments. Participation in the course blog counts for half of the final participation grade.

Presentations
Students will give one formal graded presentation relating, in some way, to the reading assignment for that day. The formal presentation must follow the constraints of the pecha-kucha format. (20 slides, 20 seconds apiece, for a total of 6 minutes and 40 seconds. I will provide examples of pecha-kucha on our Blackboard course site). The formal presentation counts for 10% of the final grade. Students may also be asked to give less formal presentations on various subjects throughout the semester. These informal presentations will be included in the participation grade.

Course Grade Breakdown
30%    Short papers (3)   
30%    Long paper (1)
30%    Class participation & regular participation in course blog
10%    Formal Presentation


Grading system
This course will use a plus/minus system for grading. The following table illustrates the correspondences between letter grade, GPA points and percentage grade.

Letter Grade    GPA Points    Percentage Grade
A    4.0    93%-100%
A-    3.67    90%-92%
B+    3.33    87%-89%
B    3.0    83%-86%
B-    2.67    80%-82%
C+    2.33    77%-79%
C    2.0    73%-76%
C-    1.67    70%-72%
D+    1.33    67%-69%
D    1.0    63%-66%
D-    0.67    60%-62%
F    0    Less than 60

Mid-semester evaluations
Although students are encouraged to take advantage of my office hours to meet with me and discuss their work, students will be required to meet individually with me once during the semester to discuss their progress and performance in the class. Meetings (approx. 15 minutes) will be set for the week of 11/3–11/5.

CLASS AND UNIVERSITY POLICIES

Religious holidays
By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

Use of Blackboard
In this class, I use Blackboard, a Web-based course management system with password-protected access at http://courses.utexas.edu, to distribute some course materials. You can find support in using Blackboard at the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., so plan accordingly.

Academic Integrity
University of Texas Honor Code
The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community. Each student in this course is expected to abide by the University of Texas Honor Code.



Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty
Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced. For further information, visit the Student Judicial Services web site http://www.utexas.edu/depts/dos/sjs/. This site offers excellent resources on how to cite sources and paraphrase. Copying materials from other people or from sources on the Internet, for example, or having your work edited by somebody else, constitutes a fraudulent submission. Any work submitted by a student in this course for academic credit will be the student’s own work and will acknowledge others’ work as appropriate (e.g., citing sources).

OTHER UNIVERSITY NOTICES AND POLICIES

Use of E-mail for Official Correspondence to Students
It is the student’s responsibility to keep the University informed as to changes in his or her e-mail address. Students are expected to check e-mail on a frequent and regular basis in order to stay current with University-related communications, recognizing that certain communications may be time-critical. It is recommended that e-mail be checked daily, but at a minimum, twice per week. The complete text of this policy and instructions for updating your e-mail address are available at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.html.

Documented Disability Statement
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. If you require special accommodations, you must obtain a letter that documents your disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (471-6259 voice or 471-4641 TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). Present the letter to me at the beginning of the semester so we can discuss the accommodations you need. You should remind me of any testing accommodations you will need no later than five business days before an exam. For more information, visit http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/.

Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL)
If you are worried about someone who is acting differently, you may use the Behavior Concerns Advice Line to discuss by phone your concerns about another individual’s behavior. This service is provided through a partnership among the Office of the Dean of Students, the Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC), the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), and The University of Texas Police Department (UTPD). Call 512-232-5050 or visit http://www.utexas.edu/safety/bcal.

Critical Dates
Please note the following critical dates for class administration:
—September 11: Last day to add a class or drop a class for possible refund; payment for added classes due
    —September 23: Last day to drop a class without academic penalty
    —October 21: Last day to withdraw or drop a class with approval


COURSE CALENDAR

Thu 8/27

I. Shaping & transforming the world

Tue 9/1 Popol Vuh (Parts 1–3, pp. 63-142)
Thu 9/3 Popol Vuh (Parts 4 & 5, pp. 145-198)

Tue 9/8 The Odyssey (Books 1–6, pp. 77-178)
Thu 9/10 The Odyssey (Books 7–12, pp. 179-285)

Tue 9/15 The Odyssey (Books 13–18, pp. 286-389)
Thu 9/17 The Odyssey (Books 19–24, pp. 390-485)

Tue 9/22 The Republic (on Blackboard)
Thu 9/24 The Book of Chuang Tzu (Chapters 1–11, pp. 1-90)

First Paper Due 9/24

Tue 9/29 The Book of Chuang Tzu (Chapters 12-22, pp. 92-197)
Thu 10/1 Discussion and review

Screening 9/30 8pm: Oh Brother Where Art Thou?
Joynes Reading Room (CRD 007)


II. Metamorphoses of Love & Desire

Tue 10/6 The Ramayana (Chapters 1–6, pp. 3-105)
Thu 10/8 The Ramayana (Chapters 7–epilogue, pp. 106-157)

Tue 10/13 Metamorphoses (Books 1–3, pp. 15-119)
Thu 10/15 Metamorphoses (Books 4–6, pp. 123-220)

Tue 10/20 Metamorphoses (Books 8 & 10, pp. 263-300; 341-366)
Thu 10/22 Selected love lyric (on Blackboard)

Second Paper Due 10/22

Tue 10/27 Selected love lyric (on Blackboard)
Thu 10/29 Selected love lyric (on Blackboard)

Tue 11/3 Selected love lyric (students present a poem of their choosing)
Thu 11/5 Discussion and review

Screening 11/4 8pm: Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence
Joynes Reading Room (CRD 007)




III. The Monstrous and the Inhuman

Tue 11/10 Bisclavret (on Blackboard)
Thu 11/12 Romance of Melusine (on Blackboard)

Tue 11/17 The Tempest (Acts 1 & 2, pp. 2-73)
Thu 11/19 The Tempest  (Acts 3–5, pp. 74-136)

Third Paper Due 11/19

Tue 11/24 A Tempest (7-66)
Thu 11/26 Thanksgiving holiday

Tue 12/1 Discussion and review
Thu 12/3 Discussion and review

Fourth Paper Due 12/11

C L 385 • Theories Of Literary Criticism

32800 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 214

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Spring, 2018

C L 385 (33220): Foundation of Literary Theory and Criticism

COURSE LOCATION: BUR 232, TTh 15:30: to 17:00

Katherine Arens (arens@austin.utexas.edu)

Germanic Studies (office: Burdine 320; hours tbd)

Course Title (ALT):  Building Comparative Literature in Theory: From Eden to Arcadia

Comparative Literature (CL) has, from its modern origins as a field in the 20th century, defined itself vis-à-vis its visions of various "theory projects": models of how literature, texts, writers and readers exist, work, circulate, and intervene in their environments.  To study CL's canon of theory, then, means to study the ideological interventions by means of which the discipline has defined itself and to recover its strategies for constructing and legitimating its core ideologies through canonical discussions and textual sources. 

This course will trace the projects that CL has used to define itself and its work with literature and culture; it will take up the "epochs" of theory as historical reconstructions that must be understood in terms of their original historical contexts, not just and the contemporary uses to which they have been put.  Literary scholars in general and CL ones in particular have expropriated  "theory texts" from historical disciplinary forms, including rhetoric, philosophical exegesis/hermeneutics, poetics, ethics, and philosophical ontology/epistemology, then repurposed them as canonical texts supporting their own activities in the service of various ideologies of art, nation, identity, culture, and society. The source eras to be studied include, in rough outline:

  • The Classical Era (Plato, Aristotle, Greek and Roman discussions of rhetorical and dramatic literature):  literature, modalities of communication as performatives;  its function as public understandingfor the audience and the polis
  • Medieval Era (including Middle Eastern commentary traditions):  the question of textual authority, exegesis, the "arts of reading," and the status of texts as revelation
  • Renaissance:  the historicity of texts and the science of reading; art and taste
  • Early Modern era (late 18th to late 19th centuries):  the correlations of textuality with aesthetics, and the philosophy of art and the genius (focus on the reader and on education of the mind)
  • The Dawn of Modern Theory (late 19th century to end of WW I):  From Philology to the Science of Literature (a study of the ethics of scholarship). 

Post-World War II CL theory emerged out of a brew of these sources, whose urgency often gets lost as the background to today's debates about culture, literature, and the privileges that had grown up around them.  As acts of reading and interpretation were embedded by CL scholars into the universities as a master theory discipline, and as CL now moves into its third or fourth generation, it is time to recover these models for cultural and literary knowledge production that often refute the naturalizing claims made about them.  Class discussion will focus on the disciplinary frameworks that CL codified as its historical canon and legitimation, and on what assumptions about texts, writers, readers, and cultural processed have to be recovered.

By the end of the semester, students will be able to:

  • identify, define, and exemplify major arguments / issues / debates that have been hallmarks of CL theory, both as used in the modern discipline and at their origins
  • use particular theories to construct interpretations of texts (both as a précis and in essay form)
  • understand and exemplify how the theory project is used in their own area(s) of specialization (and in terms of language use in that specialization)-- how an essentially Eurocentric reconstruction of aesthetic-critical thought could itself be coopted for new ideologies of understanding texts and cultures.

 READINGS (all available on CANVAS):

  • Wellek and Warren, A Theory of Literature (various)
  • Hazard Adams' Critical Theory Since Plato (3rd ed), and small parts of Critical Theory since 1965
  • Supplemental materials:
    • Comparative Literature: A Critical Introduction,  Susan Bassnett (1993)
    • First edition of Critical Theory since Plato

 ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING:

  • 2 (depending on size of class, might end up being group projects) 5-minute introductions to assigned theory readings (oral presentation and 1-page summative handout); strict time limits will be imposed, because these are intended to start class discussions (5% each)
  • 3 analytic précis (1 page / 5 % each), aimed at uncovering the epistemological premises of chosen theory texts
  • 2 short (5 page) systematic interpretations of a short story or poem guided by a particular interpretive optic (parallel to those required in the CL QE; 15% each)
  • Final class project, done in stages (total 45% of the grade, allowing individual students to track how the CL canon has affected, is or is not parallel to the theory use and issues foregrounded within their own disciplinary/national contexts: annotated bibliography with prose commentaries as reflecting the ideologies of the US university literature-culture projects. The final section will be a short essay (ca. 1000 words) on how these texts cause or relieve problems of Eurocentrism or the evaluation of other regional cultural interpretive projects, marginalization, essentialization, reification, (dis)empowerment of interpretive communities, and manipulations of cultural power reified in institutions -- an individual stock-taking of the relevance of the CL history project for today's literary and cultural studies.

 

 

 

EUS 347 • Love/Sexuality In Medieval Lit

35644 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM HRH 2.112

Please check back for updates.

FR 320E • Adv French I: Written Emphasis

37125 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.106

Description of FR320E

 

FR 320E • Advanced French I

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 371L • Adv Written And Oral Compos

37250 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.106

FLAGS:   Wr
DESCRIPTION:
The objective of this course is to hone advanced listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French.  The communicative tasks of the course are built around a semester-long “channel surfing” of French television designed to introduce the class to authentic topics, genres, vocabulary and levels of discourse.  Students will reprise these elements in their own production, which will consist mainly of writing scripts for various genres of programs, and recording short television shows, both scripted and spontaneous.  The goal of these exercises is to help students review, expand and combine individual language skills into a new relationship with French as a living and lively language.

FR F322E • Adv French II: Oral Emphasis

84980 • Summer 2008
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM HRH 2.112

Ce cours de langue avancée a pour but principal d’améliorer vos compétences linguistiques en français (i.e., la compréhension auditive, l’expression orale, la lecture, et l’expression écrite) ainsi que votre connaissance de la grammaire et du lexique. Dans ce cours, vous aurez l’occasion de discuter des controverses sociales dans le monde francophone et aux Etats-Unis (e.g, la mondialistion, l’immigration, le système éducatif, etc.). A l’aide des textes contemporains, vous allez apprendre à mieux communiquer vos pensées en français en comparant les cultures francophones avec la nôtre.

FR 322E • Adv French II: Oral Emphasis

36965 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.106

Description of FR322E

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 326K • Intro Fr Lit I: Mid Ages-18 C

37640 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.106

coming

Publications


Johnson, Michael A. "Post-Queer Autobiography: Placing/Facing Fabrice Neaud." Contemporary French and Francophone Studies 12.1 (2008): 27-39. MLA International Bibliography.

download

Johnson, Michael A. "Sodomy, Allegory, and the Subject of Pleasure." Queer Sexualities in French and Francophone Literature and Film. 1-12. Amsterdam, Netherlands: Rodopi, 2007. MLA International Bibliography.

download

Johnson, Michael A. "Translatio Ganymedis: Reading the Sex out of Ovid in Alan of Lille's The Plaint of Nature." Florilegium 22.(2005): 171-190. MLA International Bibliography. EBSCO.

download

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