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Plan II Honors

Stephen Sonnenberg


ProfessorM.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Stephen Sonnenberg

Contact

Interests


Medical Humanities and Medical Ethics

Biography


Stephen Sonnenberg was educated at Princeton University, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, where he earned his medical degree and also received his training in psychiatry, The University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he was an intern in the Department of Internal Medicine, the National Institute of Mental Health, where he was trained as a researcher, and The Baltimore-DC Institute for Psychoanalysis. He has served as Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, and is currently Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland, where he served as Clinical Professor before moving to Texas. At The University of Texas at Austin he is Adjunct Professor in the School of Architecture, Core Faculty of the Human Dimensions of Organizations Program, Fellow-in-Residence at the Humanities Institute, Fellow of the Trice Professorship in the Plan II Honors Program, and Principal Investigator of the National Endowment for the Humanities funded “Patients, Practitioners, and Cultures of Care” Project, a research and development effort to create a new undergraduate Bridging Disciplines Program emphasizing the relationship of healthcare and the humanities. He is also Faculty Fellow of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, and Affiliate Faculty of the Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice. His most important committee assignments at The University of Texas include The Rhodes, Marshall and Truman Scholarships Selection Committee and the Chairmanship of the Hamilton Book Awards Selection Committee in 2017.  

Dr. Sonnenberg has and continues to serve on numerous editorial boards and peer review panels of leading journals in the fields of psychiatry and psychoanalysis, has contributed scholarly articles to the leading journals in those fields, is the co-author of a textbook Psychodynamic Psychotherapy, (American Psychiatric Press, 1991, 1998, 2004), which has been translated into Russian, Mandarin, Taiwanese, Persian, and Japanese, and the co-author of chapters in important textbooks of psychiatry. He is the co-editor of The Trauma of War: Stress and Recovery in Vietnam Veterans (American Psychiatric Press, 1985). Early in 2013 his co-edited book, CENTER 17: Space & Psyche, was published by the Center for American Architecture and Design, School of Architecture, The University of Texas at Austin. It has received two awards, the Bronze Medal for Architecture in the 2014 Independent Publisher IPPY Book Awards Competition and second place in the Publications Division of the American Institute of Graphic Arts Texas Show.

His research interests focus on the points of intersection of psychoanalysis, psychiatry, medical education, and other areas of scholarly inquiry. His subjects of study include war, violence, national security, law, decision-making, architecture and design, psychic trauma and post traumatic psychological disorders, addiction and the treatment of addiction, education and effective teaching methods, medical humanities and the doctor-patient relationship, and health and human rights. In the past he has served as Co-Principal Investigator of The Psychology of Deterrence Project at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Director of Research of the Project on the Vietnam Generation at the National Museum of American History of the Smithsonian Institution, and Research Scholar at the Center for Psychology and Social Change, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School at Cambridge Hospital.

In 1987 and 1988 he was honored as the Distinguished Visiting Professor of Psychiatry at Wilford Hall United States Air Force Medical Center in San Antonio, in 1997 as Master Educator Clinical Consultant at the 150th Annual Meeting of the American Psychiatric Association, in 2006 as The Charles Brenner Visiting Professor of Psychoanalysis at The Medical College of Wisconsin, and in 2014 he received the Distinguished Service Award of The American Psychoanalytic Association for his service to psychoanalysis and lasting contributions to the field.

Dr. Sonnenberg has practiced medicine for more than fifty years, and he still maintains a small practice of psychiatry, psychoanalysis, and educational consultation with mid-career psychiatrists.


Courses


T C 358 • Humanities/Healthcare/Advocacy

41735 • Spring 2020
Meets MW 1:30PM-3:00PM CRD 007A
EWr

Humanities Based Healthcare Research in the Service of Advocacy

Course Description and Objective:
You are finishing your Junior Years in Plan II, and aspire to careers as healthcare providers. But it is important to know that our healthcare system is broken, and that physician leaders must develop advocacy skills to help reshape it. Clearly, the best advocacy regarding healthcare is based on careful research. Much of this research follows the evidence based pathway, and involves using computing power to analyze large population samples with regard to the demographics of health, illness, and treatment. From the perspective of research ethics, this kind of investigation lends itself to institutional review board compliance. Your teacher for this course, Professor Stephen Sonnenberg, M.D., is trained to conduct this kind of research. But he is also a trained non-quantitative, humanities based healthcare researcher, and in this course he will teach you how to engage in that kind of research, and explain its value. He believes that non-quantitative research illuminates an important component of the total picture of illness and health, that population health and clinical research experts must work to construct. He has experienced non-quantitative humanities based research as a source of creative and innovative hypothesis formation, a conduit to deep and self-reflective thinking, functioning as a critical part of overall research and treatment strategies. At the same time he is mindful of the challenge of conducting this form of research ethically, especially when it is in the service of advocacy. This course offers you a chance to develop the skill of conducting ethical non-quantitative research, and the writing of white papers based on your findings, in the service of advocacy. As opposed to the typical paper that appears in a medical journal, white papers are authoritative reports based on research that propose solutions for challenging issues. In this course you will learn to be public intellectual healthcare providers.

The course will focus on experiential learning. You will work as a consultant to an organization that identifies a healthcare challenge to be investigated, researching a healthcare problem first using information derived from humanities disciplinary sources as the foundation and cornerstone of your investigation. That will then be supplemented by available demographic data. After that you will define the scope of the problem, and write a white paper advocating for a plan to allow your client organization to further address, research, and solve that problem, meet that challenge, accomplish that task.

Here are some examples. Let’s start with the Vaccination Challenge. There are many people in America who decide against vaccinating their young children because of misinformation and superstition. One reason that misinformation takes hold is that healthcare providers lack the skills to communicate empathetically, and convincingly, as regards the truth about vaccine safety, as opposed to the false beliefs based on superstitions to which many adhere. A good starting point for an humanities based non-quantitative researcher to write a white paper about this situation would be a careful reading of Henrik Ibsen’s 1882 play An Enemy of the People. Another is reading Mark Twain’s 1884/5 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Writing this white paper would be at the request of a branch of City of Austin government, and with Ibsen and Twain as cornerstones in this situation a student team would define the scope of the problem locally, and create a document advocating for certain changes in public policy that would prevent a local Vaccination Crisis. Another example concerns obesity and diabetes in Austin’s high school students. Again, working for a City of Austin governmental entity, you would research the scope of that problem and write an advocacy document suggesting certain remedies. You would start by watching the 2009 film Precious. A third example might involve the adequacy of mental health counseling in Austin’s public schools. Your work would be for the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health and your report would define inadequacies in the schools’ counseling efforts, and advocate for a range of changes. You could start by watching the 2013 film Geography Club, and also reading Shakespeare’s 1597 play Romeo and Juliet.

There are ten sites that will create research questions for you to explore. They are City of Austin Innovation Office, City of Austin Performance Office, Office of Austin Mayor Pro Tem Kathie Tovo, Office of Austin Councilperson Alison Alter, Office of Austin Mayor Steve Adler, Office of Texas State Senator Kirk Watson, The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health, The Waller Creek Conservancy, The Merck Tech Hub Innovation Office, and The Veterans Community Park and Pavilion Foundation. The class will be capped at eighteen, before the start of the semester the class will divide itself into nine teams of two, at the start of the semester the research topics will be available, and there will be a matching plan so that each team will have its topic in mind when the semester starts.

Plan II is a Liberal Arts major, and this course will employ the lenses of history, literature, drama, and film to explore how humanities based healthcare research can be conducted with the goal of advocacy. Among the liberal arts, history is touted as a way of avoiding the repetition of mistakes of the past in the present, but exactly how to use history as a way of doing that is often a slippery slope. We will read two important books that look at the history of healthcare organizations. Circuit Riders for Mental Health: The Hogg Foundation in Twentieth Century Texas by William Bush, tells the story of the Hogg Foundation, which has as its goal the improvement of mental health care in Texas. Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America’s Most Storied Hospital by David Oshinsky, tells the story of one of America’s oldest public hospitals, tracing the many challenges it has faced and successfully met over centuries. A third book we will read is Mark Twain’s 1884/5 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. In this wonderful story Twain offers abundant information of the way health and healthcare in nineteenth century America was significantly based on folklore, superstition, and culture, and reading it we will consider how in modern America many people continue to employ the same unfortunate perspective on illness and healing. We will also read Herman Melville’s 1853 short story, Bartleby the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street, to explore how this humanities contribution teaches the healthcare provider how to listen carefully to the patient. A play we will read is Henrik Ibsen’s 1882 play An Enemy of the People, in order to consider how a doctor might act effectively or ineffectively as a public advocate. Finally, we will explore two films to see how this humanities medium can contribute to explorations that offer insights into a population health problem: PTSD. We will watch Nancy Schiesari’s 2008 film Tattooed Under Fire, and Gillies MacKinnon’s 1997 film adaptation of Pat Barker’s book Regeneration (film of the same name as the book), exploring how these offer insight into the trauma of war. Then, we will read Jonathan Shay’s Achilles in Vietnam: Combat Trauma and the Undoing of

Character. This book blends humanities based literary and historical research, as it is the product of Shay’s discovery that Homer’s Iliad contained insights into the roots in combat of the problems experienced by Vietnam veterans.

During the course we will benefit from Guest Teaching experiences with the historian William Bush, the historian David Oshinsky, who will join us using FaceTime, and UT professors Beto Lopez, Joy Penticuff, Nancy Schiesari, and Paul Woodruff. These guests will explore research ethics, or describe the way they use their medium to explore a topic involving healthcare, or teach us about the use of design techniques in conducting research.

During the semester will have the opportunity to interact in class with Austin Mayor Steve Adler, Mayor Pro Tem Kathie Tovo, Councilperson Alison Alter, and other Austin City Government officials, to discuss the way they will use your research in developing sound policies. They will bear witness to the usefulness of your non-quantitative humanities based research, as they work as health minded public officials.

Grading Policy (Grades will include Pluses and Minuses):

* Seminar attendance, general participation, and participation in specific written and oral exercises is mandatory (50% of grade).

* Your white paper (50% of the grade).

About the Professor:

Stephen Sonnenberg is well known to Plan II as a Junior Seminar teacher and senior thesis supervisor. He is a practicing physician with more than fifty years of clinical experience, and an interdisciplinary scholar whose affiliations with UT include the Dell Medical School, School of Architecture, Plan II, the School of Undergraduate Studies, and the Humanities Institute, where he previously served as Fellow-in-Residence. His most recent major work is the award winning CENTER 17: Space & Psyche (2012, The Center for American Architecture and Design) in which he and his co-editor, Professor Elizabeth Danze, explore the relationship of psychoanalysis and architecture. In 2014 he won the Distinguished Service Award of the American Psychoanalytic Association, the highest award the Association can bestow.

UGS 303 • Healer-Patient Relationship

59915-59940 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM RLP 0.130
E ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

UGS 303 • The Dr/Patient Relationship

62115-62155 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 0.102
E ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

T C 358 • Humanities/Healthcare/Advocacy

42290 • Spring 2019
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM CRD 007B
EWr

Humanities Based Healthcare Research in the Service of Advocacy

Course Description and Objective:
You are finishing your Junior Years in Plan II, and aspire to careers as healthcare providers. But it is important to know that our healthcare system is broken, and that physician leaders must develop advocacy skills to help reshape it. Clearly, the best advocacy regarding healthcare is based on careful research. Much of this research follows the evidence based pathway, and involves using computing power to analyze large population samples with regard to the demographics of health, illness, and treatment. From the perspective of research ethics, this kind of investigation lends itself to institutional review board compliance. Your teacher for this course, Professor Stephen Sonnenberg, M.D., is trained to conduct this kind of research. But he is also a trained non-quantitative, humanities based healthcare researcher, and in this course he will teach you how to engage in that kind of research, and explain its value. He believes that non-quantitative research illuminates an important component of the total picture of illness and health, that population health and clinical research experts must work to construct. He has experienced non-quantitative humanities based research as a source of creative and innovative hypothesis formation, a conduit to deep and self-reflective thinking, functioning as a critical part of overall research and treatment strategies. At the same time he is mindful of the challenge of conducting this form of research ethically, especially when it is in the service of advocacy. This course offers you a chance to develop the skill of conducting ethical non-quantitative research, and the writing of white papers based on your findings, in the service of advocacy. As opposed to the typical paper that appears in a medical journal, white papers are authoritative reports based on research that propose solutions for challenging issues. In this course you will learn to be public intellectual healthcare providers.

The course will focus on experiential learning. You will work as a consultant to an organization that identifies a healthcare challenge to be investigated, researching a healthcare problem first using information derived from humanities disciplinary sources as the foundation and cornerstone of your investigation. That will then be supplemented by available demographic data. After that you will define the scope of the problem, and write a white paper advocating for a plan to allow your client organization to further address, research, and solve that problem, meet that challenge, accomplish that task.

Here are some examples. Let’s start with the Vaccination Challenge. There are many people in America who decide against vaccinating their young children because of misinformation and superstition. One reason that misinformation takes hold is that healthcare providers lack the skills to communicate empathetically, and convincingly, as regards the truth about vaccine safety, as opposed to the false beliefs based on superstitions to which many adhere. A good starting point for an humanities based non-quantitative researcher to write a white paper about this situation would be a careful reading of Henrik Ibsen’s 1882 play An Enemy of the People. Another is reading Mark Twain’s 1884/5 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Writing this white paper would be at the request of a branch of City of Austin government, and with Ibsen and Twain as cornerstones in this situation a student team would define the scope of the problem locally, and create a document advocating for certain changes in public policy that would prevent a local Vaccination Crisis. Another example concerns obesity and diabetes in Austin’s high school students. Again, working for a City of Austin governmental entity, you would research the scope of that problem and write an advocacy document suggesting certain remedies. You would start by watching the 2009 film Precious. A third example might involve the adequacy of mental health counseling in Austin’s public schools. Your work would be for the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health and your report would define inadequacies in the schools’ counseling efforts, and advocate for a range of changes. You could start by watching the 2013 film Geography Club, and also reading Shakespeare’s 1597 play Romeo and Juliet.

There are ten sites that will create research questions for you to explore. They are City of Austin Innovation Office, City of Austin Performance Office, Office of Austin Mayor Pro Tem Kathie Tovo, Office of Austin Councilperson Alison Alter, Office of Austin Mayor Steve Adler, Office of Texas State Senator Kirk Watson, The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health, The Waller Creek Conservancy, The Merck Tech Hub Innovation Office, and The Veterans Community Park and Pavilion Foundation. The class will be capped at eighteen, before the start of the semester the class will divide itself into nine teams of two, at the start of the semester the research topics will be available, and there will be a matching plan so that each team will have its topic in mind when the semester starts.

Plan II is a Liberal Arts major, and this course will employ the lenses of history, literature, drama, and film to explore how humanities based healthcare research can be conducted with the goal of advocacy. Among the liberal arts, history is touted as a way of avoiding the repetition of mistakes of the past in the present, but exactly how to use history as a way of doing that is often a slippery slope. We will read two important books that look at the history of healthcare organizations. Circuit Riders for Mental Health: The Hogg Foundation in Twentieth Century Texas by William Bush, tells the story of the Hogg Foundation, which has as its goal the improvement of mental health care in Texas. Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America’s Most Storied Hospital by David Oshinsky, tells the story of one of America’s oldest public hospitals, tracing the many challenges it has faced and successfully met over centuries. A third book we will read is Mark Twain’s 1884/5 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. In this wonderful story Twain offers abundant information of the way health and healthcare in nineteenth century America was significantly based on folklore, superstition, and culture, and reading it we will consider how in modern America many people continue to employ the same unfortunate perspective on illness and healing. We will also read Herman Melville’s 1853 short story, Bartleby the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street, to explore how this humanities contribution teaches the healthcare provider how to listen carefully to the patient. A play we will read is Henrik Ibsen’s 1882 play An Enemy of the People, in order to consider how a doctor might act effectively or ineffectively as a public advocate. Finally, we will explore two films to see how this humanities medium can contribute to explorations that offer insights into a population health problem: PTSD. We will watch Nancy Schiesari’s 2008 film Tattooed Under Fire, and Gillies MacKinnon’s 1997 film adaptation of Pat Barker’s book Regeneration (film of the same name as the book), exploring how these offer insight into the trauma of war. Then, we will read Jonathan Shay’s Achilles in Vietnam: Combat Trauma and the Undoing of

Character. This book blends humanities based literary and historical research, as it is the product of Shay’s discovery that Homer’s Iliad contained insights into the roots in combat of the problems experienced by Vietnam veterans.

During the course we will benefit from Guest Teaching experiences with the historian William Bush, the historian David Oshinsky, who will join us using FaceTime, and UT professors Beto Lopez, Joy Penticuff, Nancy Schiesari, and Paul Woodruff. These guests will explore research ethics, or describe the way they use their medium to explore a topic involving healthcare, or teach us about the use of design techniques in conducting research.

During the semester will have the opportunity to interact in class with Austin Mayor Steve Adler, Mayor Pro Tem Kathie Tovo, Councilperson Alison Alter, and other Austin City Government officials, to discuss the way they will use your research in developing sound policies. They will bear witness to the usefulness of your non-quantitative humanities based research, as they work as health minded public officials.

Grading Policy (Grades will include Pluses and Minuses):

* Seminar attendance, general participation, and participation in specific written and oral exercises is mandatory (50% of grade).

* Your white paper (50% of the grade).

About the Professor:

Stephen Sonnenberg is well known to Plan II as a Junior Seminar teacher and senior thesis supervisor. He is a practicing physician with more than fifty years of clinical experience, and an interdisciplinary scholar whose affiliations with UT include the Dell Medical School, School of Architecture, Plan II, the School of Undergraduate Studies, and the Humanities Institute, where he previously served as Fellow-in-Residence. His most recent major work is the award winning CENTER 17: Space & Psyche (2012, The Center for American Architecture and Design) in which he and his co-editor, Professor Elizabeth Danze, explore the relationship of psychoanalysis and architecture. In 2014 he won the Distinguished Service Award of the American Psychoanalytic Association, the highest award the Association can bestow.

UGS 303 • The Dr-Patient Relationship

62045-62070 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM RLP 0.130
E ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

T C 358 • Dr/Patient/Society/Culture

42555 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CRD 007A
E

Description:

You are a premedical student at UT, but do you think you really know what it’s like to be a doctor? This course will try to put you into the shoes of a physician in today’s world, addressing such issues as the doctor as mediator between the scientific and the non-scientific worlds; the practice of medicine in a multicultural society; the doctor as societal and cultural insider or alien; patient autonomy, collaborative decision-making involving patient and healthcare provider, and informed consent; the doctor practicing in a world where issues of gender, sexuality, and reproductive health are fluid and delicate; the doctor as advocate for health as a human right and environmentally based health and healthcare; the whole of society as the doctor’s patient in a world with healthcare disparities; an awareness of war and violence as concerns of the physician; the physician as ethicist; the physician as advocate for nutritional awareness and change; the role of the doctor as a team leader vs. a person with an intimate relationship with a patient; the physician treating the dying patient; a changing health care system, a Medical-Industrial Complex, and government regulation of clinical practice. Throughout we will keep a focus on the role of the humanities in the practice of medicine, the conduct of medical research, and the self-care of the doctor.      

The course instructor has practiced medicine for more than fifty years, and class discussions will always include real life examples from his clinical experiences and the experiences of his colleagues and students.

A Sample of Texts/Readings:

Introduction:

The Hippocratic Oath

The Declaration of Geneva

The Two Cultures and The Scientific Revolution by Snow

The Future and Team Leadership:

Physicians of the Future by Weed, New England Journal of Medicine

How Doctors Think by Groopman

Complications by Gawande

Ethics:

How Ethical Systems Change: Tolerable Suffering and Assisted Dying by Ekland-Olson and Aseltine

Images in Psychiatry by Gorman, American Journal of Psychiatry

Treatment of Depression by Maimonides by Gesundheit, Or, Gamliel, Rosner and Steinberg, American Journal of Psychiatry

Maimonides and Depression by Pies, American Journal of Psychiatry

Accommodating Bigotry by Lane-Fall, Journal of the American Medical Association

War and Violence:

The Repression of War Experience by Rivers, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine, Section of Psychiatry

PTSD Congressional Testimony by Dr. Sonnenberg, Before the United States Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, 1981, 1988

Our Wounds, Our Duty from The Austin American-Statesman by Palaima and Sonnenberg

Psychoanalytic Aspects, Aftermath of War in Violence in America-An Encyclopedia by Orsak and Sonnenberg

Government and Healthcare:

Affordable Care Act

Explore the website www.lbjlibrary.org/

Check out this link about President Johnson and Medicare: http://www.lbjlibrary.org/50th-anniversary-of-medicare-and-medicaid

How Ethical Systems Change: Abortion and Neonatal Care by Ekland-Olson and Aseltine

The Medical-Industrial Complex:

Eisenhower on Military-Industrial Complex—His Farewell Address to the Nation, January 17, 1961, from Public Papers of the Presidents   

How CVS Quit Smoking and Became a Health Care Giant from The New York Times by Tabuchi

Modern Doctors’ House Calls: Skype Chat and Fast Diagnosis from The New York Times by Goodnough

Specialty Pharmacies Proliferate, Along With Questions by Thomas and Pollack, from The New York Times

EpiPen by Thomas, from The New York Times

ADHD and the Medical-Industrial Complex by Silberman, from The New York Times

Psychiatry’s Identity Crisis by Friedman, from The New York Times

Trusted With Their Own Pregnancy Tests? by Kennedy, The New York Times

Harnessing The Immune System to Fight Cancer by Grady, The New York Times

In Cancer Trials, Minorities Face Extra Hurdles by Grady, The New York Times

Global and Local Health Awareness:

Fassin, Humanitarianism As a Politics of Life, Public Culture

Fassin, The Parallel Lives of Philosophy and Anthropology, in The Ground Between, Das, Jackson, Singh, eds.

Shlomi Eldar Video, Precious Life

Nutritional Awareness and Global Health:

R. Patel, et al., Cook, Eat, Man, Woman

R. Patel, Food Sovereignty

Seriously Ill Patients, Mortality:

Being Mortal, Readings and Video, by Gawande

The Emperor of All Maladies by Mukherjee

Healthcare Disparities, The Whole World as The Doctor’s Patient:

Pathologies of Power: Rethinking Health and Human Rights by Farmer, American Journal of Public Health

The Importance of the Humanities in the Studies and Life of the Doctor:

A Short Course in Why Doctors Need a Longer Education by Sonnenberg, Austin American Statesman

 

Grading Policy (Grades will include Pluses and Minuses):

 

  • Seminar attendance and participation in specific exercises is mandatory (30% of grade).
  • Writing two essays reflecting critical thinking and analysis of aspects of the doctor-patient relationship (each 15% of grade, a total of 30%, with the option of revising each essay after initial scrutiny by Professor Sonnenberg).

There will be no “final examination,” as such. The third essay will be your response to viewing the Instructor's Fall 2013 UT Institute for Historical Studies lecture, thinking about it critically, analyzing it, and reacting to it.

 

  • Writing a third essay analyzing his Institute for Historical Studies argument (30% of grade).
  • General class participation will be part of the course grade (10%).

 

About the Professor: 

 

Stephen Sonnenberg is well known to Plan II as a Junior Seminar teacher and senior thesis supervisor. He is a practicing physician with more than fifty years of clinical experience, and an interdisciplinary scholar whose affiliations with UT include the Dell Medical School, School of Architecture, Plan II, the School of Undergraduate Studies, and the Humanities Institute, where he previously served as Fellow-in-Residence. His most recent major work is the award winning CENTER 17: Space & Psyche  (2012, The Center for American Architecture and Design) in which he and his co-editor, Professor Elizabeth Danze, explore the relationship of psychoanalysis and architecture. In 2014 he won the Distinguished Service Award of the American Psychoanalytic Association, the highest award the Association can bestow.

UGS 303 • The Dr/Patient Relationship

63890-63930 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 0.102
E ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

HDO 379 • Applying Human Dimens Of Orgs

39475 • Spring 2018
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 112

This course is your opportunity to put into practice what you have learned majoring in the Human Dimensions of Organizations. It will consist of experiential learning, where you will spend five hours each week working as a consultant to an organization, studying a problem or challenge or task defined by that organization, and developing a plan to address and solve that problem, meet that challenge, accomplish that task. Since the HDO program has a special focus on preparing you to work in philanthropic and public service/government/military settings, and the private sector, and embraces the use of the liberal arts as a prism for solving problems, this course will employ the lens of history. Among the liberal arts, history is touted as a way of avoiding the repetition of mistakes from the past in the present, but exactly how to do that is often a slippery slope.

We will read two important books that look at the history of organizations that have their foundations in philanthropy, public service, and healthcare.

Circuit Riders for Mental Health: The Hogg Foundation in Twentieth Century Texas [College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2016] by William Bush, tells the story of the Hogg Foundation, which has as its goal the improvement of mental health care in Texas.

Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America’s Most Storied Hospital [New York: Doubleday, 2016] by David Oshinsky, tells the story of one of America’s oldest public hospitals, tracing the many challenges it has faced over centuries. Both books have a UT connection: The Hogg Foundation is actually a part of UT and the author of its history earned his Ph.D. in American Studies at UT. The author of Bellevue is a former UT history professor.

UGS 303 • The Dr-Patient Relationship

62890-62915 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.130
E ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

UGS 303 • The Dr/Patient Relationship

63605-63630 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.126
E ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

T C 358 • Doctor/Patient/Society/Cul

42970 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CRD 007B
E

Description:

You are a premedical student at UT, but do you think you really know what it’s like to be a doctor? This course will try to put you into the shoes of a physician in today’s world, addressing such issues as the doctor as mediator between the scientific and the non-scientific worlds; the practice of medicine in a multicultural society with class based health and health care disparities; a world in which matters of health are not local, but global; the doctor as societal and cultural insider or alien; the doctor practicing in a world where issues of gender and sexuality are fluid and delicate; the doctor as advocate for health as a human right, environmentally based health and health care, and an awareness of war and violence as concerns of the physician; the physician as ethicist; the physician as advocate for nutritional awareness and change; the role of the doctor as a team leader vs. a person with an intimate relationship with a patient; the physician treating the dying patient; a changing health care system and government regulation of clinical practice; and the doctor as a recent graduate with enormous educational debt and under enormous pressure. We will keep a focus on the role of the humanities in the practice of medicine, the conduct of medical research, and the self-care of the doctor.

           

The course instructor has practiced medicine for fifty years, and class discussions will always include real life examples from his clinical experiences and the experiences of his colleagues and students.

 

Texts/Readings:

We will begin with an introductory reading by the course instructor, and two of his colleagues: A. ursano, S. Sonnenberg, R. Ursano’s Physician-Patient Relationship in Psychiatry, A. Tasman, J. Kay, J. Lieberman, M. First, M. Maj, eds. (entire chapter)

 

From there readings will consist of sections of books and entire essays, including, by category:

 

mediator between scientific and non-scientific worlds:

 

A. Gawande’s The Checklist Manifesto, and Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science (sections from both)

 

J. Groopman’s Second Opinions: Stories of Intuition and Choice in a Changing World of Medicine, and How Doctors Think  (sections from both)

 

C.P. Snow’s The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution (sections)

 

S. Sonnenberg’s A short course in why doctors need a longer education, Austin American Statesman D1, 8, August 21, 2011 (entire article)

 

Video: S. Sonnenberg’s Seduction and Rape: Dora Revisited and the Social Construction of Trauma, online at http://soa.utexas.edu/events/inaugural-lecture-institute-historical-studies-annual-workshop-2013 (42 minutes viewing time)

 

the practice of medicine in a multicultural society with class based health and health care disparities:

 

L. Jones’s  Eliminating Cancer Disparities Through Legislative Action (entire article)

 

A. McAlister’s Moral Disengagement and Tolerance for Health Care Inequality in Texas (entire article)

 

a world in which matters of health are not local, but global:

 

D. Fassin’s  Humanitarianism as a Politics of Life (entire article)

 

the doctor as societal and cultural insider or alien:

 

D. Fassin’s The Parallel Lives of philosophy and Anthropology (entire article)

 

the doctor practicing in a world where issues of gender and sexuality are fluid and delicate:

 

S. Gruskin, S. Ravidran’s Realising ICPD 20 Years Later: Shifting Paradigms for Research and Education  (entire article)

 

the doctor as advocate for health as a human right, environmentally based health and health care, and an awareness of war and violence as concerns of the physician:

 

M. Katz, T. Brigham’s Transforming a Traditional Safety Net Into a Coordinated Care System: Lessons From a Healthy San Francisco (entire article)

 

P. Farmer’s Pathologies of Power: Rethinking Health and Human Rights (entire article)

 

M. Katz’s  Structural Interventions for Addressing Chronic Health problems (entire article)

 

T. Palaima, S. Sonnenberg’s Our Wounds, Our Duty, Austin American Statesman F1, 4, December 6, 2009 (entire article)

 

Video: T. Palaima, S. Sonnenberg’s Podcast: Debating the Cultural Evolution of War, The University of Texas at Austin Know, January, 2010, online at http://www.utexas.edu/know/2010/01/20/cultural_evolution_of_war/ (39 minutes viewing time)

 

the physician as ethicist:

 

G. Annas’s Worst Case Bioethics (sections)

 

S. Ekland-Olson’s How Ethical Systems Change: Lynching and Capital Punishment (sections)

 

the physician as advocate for nutritional awareness and change:

 

R. Patel, et al.’s Cook, Eat, Man, Woman (entire article)

 

R. Patel’s Food Sovereignty (entire article)

 

the role of the doctor as a team leader vs. a person with an intimate relationship with a patient:

 

P. Kramer’s Should You Leave?: A Psychiatrist Explores Intimacy and Autonomy—and the Nature of Advice (sections)

 

L. Weed’s Physicians of the Future (entire article)

 

the physician treating the dying patient:

 

Video: A. Gawande’s Being Mortal, online at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/being-mortal/ (54 minutes viewing time)

 

a changing health care system and government regulation of clinical practice:

 

S. Gruskin, L. Ferguson’s  Government Regulation of Sex and Sexuality: In Their Own Words (entire article)

 

S. Ekland-Olson’s Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Decides?: Abortion, Neonatal Care, Assisted Dying, and Capital Punishment (sections)

 

the doctor as a recent graduate with enormous educational debt and under enormous pressure:

 

P. Sinha’s Why Do Doctors Commit Suicide? (entire article)

 

Assignments:

There will be two five-page reaction papers to the readings, with the option to rewrite each, each 20% of the course grade.

 

Each student will lead the class discussion once, that will include a summary of the week’s reading and introducing questions for the class to consider, that accounting for 10% of the course grade.

 

Class participation will account for 15% of the course grade.

 

A final ten-fifteen page paper, and final paper class presentation, will account for 35% of the course grade. Because of the variable interplay of every student’s written and oral work, the weighting of these two components will remain flexible.

About the Professor: 

Stephen Sonnenberg is well known to Plan II as a Junior Seminar teacher and senior thesis supervisor. He is a practicing physician

with fifty years of clinical experience, and an interdisciplinary scholar whose affiliations with UT include the School of Architecture, the School of Law, Plan II, the School of Undergraduate Studies, and the Humanities Institute, where he is Fellow-in-Residence. His most recent major work is the award winning CENTER 17: Space & Psyche  (2012, The Center for American Architecture and Design) in which he and his co-editor, Professor Elizabeth Danze, explore the relationship of psychoanalysis and architecture. In 2014 he won the Distinguished Service Award of the American Psychoanalytic Association, the highest award the Association can bestow.

 

 

 

 

UGS 303 • The Dr-Patient Relationship

63320-63360 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WEL 2.246
E ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

UGS 303 • The Dr/Patient Relationship

63855-63895 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GSB 2.124
E ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

UGS 303 • The Dr/Patient Relationship

63170-63195 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.130
E ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.


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  • Plan II Honors Program

    University of Texas at Austin
    305 East 23rd St
    RLP 2.102
    Austin, Texas, 78712-1250
    512-471-1442