Plan II Honors Logo
Plan II Honors

Brian Doherty


LecturerPhD, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Contact

Courses


E 360L • Global Short Story

35584 • Spring 2020
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 103
GC

E 360L l The Global Short Story

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  35584

Semester:  Spring 2020

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Description: This course will explore issues of identity and culture in three global areas—the continent of Africa, the English-Speaking Caribbean, and South Asia (India and Pakistan.  Because we use three collections of short stories from writers who now reside in the U.S., some of the experiences the writers address may be in part from an American perspective.  A substantial course reader will provide the primary texts for much of the course. 

 

Some interrogatory elements that we will use to dissect the texts are: what role does religion and religious strife play in the construction of identity?  How does the colonial experience continue to affect the national character of the regions we study?  Has a distinct role evolved for women in the national cultures, whether put into place by the colonial conquerors or pre-dating conquest?  How do material conditions (urban/rural, impoverished/middle class) affect identity?  Other inquiries will be specific to individual texts.

 

Required Texts: Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie, That Thing Around Your Neck; Edwidge Danticat, Everything Inside: Stories; Jhumpa Lahiri, The Interpreter of Maladies; Course Reader with primary texts.

 

Requirement & Grading: Research paper and presentation on aspects of the Caribbean, India, and Africa, or on specific writers (biography and influence (15%); Test on terms, author biographies, knowledge of texts: 15%; Two short (2-3-page) papers on individual stories: 20%; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 5 of 7 taken for grade): 10%; Participation in class discussion analyzing the stories: 10%; Final paper (6-8 pages): 30%.

 

This is a discussion-based format (which includes listening).  Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen.  Excessive absences (more than 5) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 5).

 

UGS 302 • Enriched Reading: Orhan Pamuk

59580 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM MAI 220A
Wr ID

"No novel is created in a vacuum-every writer takes a network of influences from other writers, their own history, personal life, tastes, the political climate in which they write, etc., and shapes these elements into their final product. This course proposes to examine a single novel through the multiplicity of artistic and cultural elements that have been instrumental in the composition of the novel, and will be instrumental in the reader's appreciation of this novel. The Nobel prize winner Orhan Pahmuk's 1998 novel My Name is Red is a work through which a reader gains a greater understanding of a great many cultural treasures of the Persian World and the Ottoman Empire. Among the visual and literary text we will examine in the course are:  

  • Miniaturist painting (mostly as used for manuscript illustrations).
  • The 'workshop' system of this type of painting.
  • The epic Shahnama, especially the tragic story of Sohrab and Rostum.
  • The Story of Layla and Majun, by the Persian poet Nizami.
  • The career of Pahmuk, with his influences from three continents and the censorship rules he must endure.

The novel opens up an antique and Islamic world, but is written with modern styles and themes. It is at its foundation a mystery novel, a sophisticated and elaborate who-done-it."

E 324C • The Graphic Novel

34980 • Fall 2019
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 103
Wr

E 324C  l  The Graphic Novel

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  34980

Semester:  Fall 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: Some of the more exciting forms of literary expression in the past decades have come from Graphic Novels. We will look at a sample of the graphic novels that have had a great impact on readers here and abroad.  A special focus of this edition of the Graphic Novel class will be on global offerings and on understanding different cultures through the Graphic Novel.  Aside from some assigned readings in common, students will be required to do independent reading in a region of their choice: Asia, Africa, Latin America, or Eastern Europe.

 

Reading the GN as literature, we will identify several kinds of genres:  historical novels, world culture in the graphic novel, speculative, socially engaged novels, and novels that work as queries into the intensely personal.  Our analysis will involve the combination of prose and graphic, as well as the sequencing, that defines the graphic novel against other kinds of literature. 

 

Texts(A partial list, subject to change):  Bechdel, Allison. Fun Home; Castré, Genevieve.Susceptible; Coates, Ta-Nisi. Black Panther #1; Samanci, Ozge. Dare to Disappoint: Growing up in Turkey; Satouff, Riad. The Arab of the Future, volume One.

 

Students will be expected to attend a screening of the Ryan Coogler film, Black Panther.

 

Requirements & Grading: Participation in Class discussion, 15%; Quizzes on Reading, 15%; Bookstore or Library Review, 10%; Two short papers, 30%; Final Paper (8-10 pages), 30%.

E 348 • The Short Story

35065 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 105
Wr

E 348  l  The Short Story

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  35065

Semester:  Fall 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: An accurate sub-title for this course would be “World Literature through the Short Story.” In many instances, the world will come home to the U.S.  For instance, we will read the most influential Chinese writer of the 20thcentury, Lu Xun, with some mid-century Chinese writers from Taiwan, and expatiates like Zhang Ailing.  To finish the China segment, we will look at some stories from Chinese American writers Maxine Hong Kingston and Yiyun Li.  Early Indian short stories by pioneers such as Premchand, Rabindranath Tagore, and R.K. Narayan will precede modern masters like Jhumpa Lahiri and Salman Rushdie.  A variety of short stories from African countries will be featured, as well as home-grown writers with African roots like Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie and E.C. Osondu.  One might imagine the course as three mini-courses in the three cultures and traditions, with some of the work being read in the best translations that are available.

 

Students will be expected to read 40-50 pages of fairly dense texts for each class period.

 

Texts: Course reader(s) will act as our anthology.

 

Requirement & Grading: Research paper and presentation on aspects of China, India, and Africa, or on specific writers (biography and influence (15%); Creative response journal to the stories (creative interaction with 6 stories from the semester) (15%); Two short (2-3-page) papers on individual stories: 20%; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 5 of 7 taken for grade): 10%; Participation in class discussion analyzing the stories: 10%; Final paper (6-8 pages): 30%.

 

This is a discussion-based format (which includes listening).  Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen.  Excessive absences (more than 4) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 4).

E F349S • Bob Dylan

80625 • Summer 2019
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM SZB 278

E f349S  l  Bob Dylan

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  80625

Semester:  Summer 2019, first session

Cross-lists:  n/a

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: Bob Dylanis admired by many as a poetic troubadour who forever transformed the way we think of popular music.  Others are less appreciative of his contributions to culture, and emphasize his enigmatic imagery, gravelly voice, and chameleonic nature.  This course is open to those of both persuasions, but we will try to support the first point of view in our study of Dylan’s music, poetry, and memoir.

 

Reading for the class will come primarily from the lyric sheets from some of Dylan’s albums, especially Highway 61 Revisited, Blonde on Blonde, and Blood on the Tracks.  Some days, students will be asked to read and evaluate the song/poems in a personal, somewhat casual fashion; other days we will take the same poems and read them through their commentators, like critic Sean Wilentz, Ellen Willis, and the punk-poet Patti Smith.  Along the way, we will be attentive to the “myth of Dylan” and what that says about the United States.  Fridays will be “film day” with a mandatory discussion post on the film text. Required film texts will be D.A. Pennbaker’s Don’t Look Back, Martin Scorcese’s No Direction Home, and Todd Haynes’ portrait of the artist played by six different actors, I’m Not There.  Since Dylan didn’t live and work in a vacuum, we’ll take a few forays into work by contemporaries Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen, and The Band.

 

Texts: Bob Dylan. Chronicles: Volume One. Simon and Schuster, 2005. Dylan albums: Highway 61 Revisited; Blonde on Blonde; Blood on the Tracks.

 

Other Dylan pieces will be read using the miracle of modern media technology, but students should be prepared to have the complete album of work from these three titles.

 

Course Reader with analytical essays, interviews, reviews, sections from Woody Guthrie’s Bound for Glory, and other readings on Dylan.

 

Requirements & Grading: An extended portfolio on a Bob Dylan classic composition (3-4 sections, about 8 pages total), 25%; In-class quizzes (best 4 of 6 taken for grade), 10%; Participation in classroom discussion, 10%; two short (2-3 page) reviews, analysis, or comparison on selected topics, 20%; Either a formal paper(7-9 pages) on Dylan as literary artist or a personal, thoughtful, analyticaljournal(at least twelve 2-3 page entries) of your journey through Bob Dylan’s work and career 35%.

E 348 • The Short Story

35550 • Spring 2019
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM GAR 0.128
Wr

E 348  l  The Short Story

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  35550

Semester:  Spring 2019

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction: No

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: A accurate sub-title for this class would be “The Short Story in the 21stCentury” or even “in the Twenty-Teens.”  We will read The O’Henry Prize Stories: 2018, and students will get a short-term subscription to The New Yorker, in order to read the current selections published by that weekly magazine.  It is likely that we will a couple of collections, for instance by Joseph O’Neill, George Saunders, or Karen Russell, as well as some short story work in translation or written in English from African, India, or the Caribbean.  Since what we are investigating is the way narrative form has been creatively transformed by contemporary writers, and this is a work in progress, some of our readings will be decided upon and assigned “on the fly.”  There will be some assignments that involve visiting writers and readings, and many of the texts will be in course readers.

 

Students will be expected to read 40-50 pages of fairly dense texts for each class period.

 

Texts: Course reader(s) will act as our anthology.  The O’Henry Prize Stories: 2018, edited by Laura Furman.  Good Trouble: Stories, Joseph O’Neill.  See above for additional possibilities for exploration.

 

Requirement & Grading: Weekly submission of “notes of a reader,” or an accessible blogpost with a similar title; 20%; Two short (2-3-page) papers on individual stories: 20%; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 5 of 7 taken for grade): 10%; Participation in class discussion analyzing the stories: 10%; 2 short (2 page) reviews of local readings or new film adaptations of short stories: 10%; Final paper (6-8 pages): 30%.

 

This is a discussion-based format (which includes listening).  Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen.  Excessive absences (more than 4) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 4).

UGS 302 • Enriched Reading: Orhan Pamuk

61275 • Spring 2019
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 210
Wr ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

E 348 • The Short Story

35735 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 204
Wr

E 348  l  The Short Story

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  35735

Semester:  Fall 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This foray into the short story as a form of literature will go as deeply into the 21st century as one can at this point, reading authors who use formal innovations and new approaches to language and memory to create a different kind of narrative (George Saunders, Karen Russell, Kelly Link, etc.).  Some historical precedent for this occurs in modernism, with writers like Luigi Pirandello, Franz Kafka, and, well, Virginia Woolf; it reaches its heyday with what has come to be known as postmodern writing (and we will explore Jorge Luis Borges, Italo Calvino, Donald Barthelme, Kathy Acker).  Since what we are investigating is the way narrative form has been creatively transformed by contemporary writers, and this is a work in progress, some of our readings will be decided upon and assigned “on the fly.”  There will be some assignments that involve visiting writers and readings, and many of the texts will be in course readers.

 

Students will be expected to read 30-40 pages of fairly dense texts for each class period.

 

Texts:  Course reader(s) will act as our anthology.  George Saunders, Tenth of December.  Ivan Vladislavic, 101 Policemen.  There may be one or two other collections assigned.

 

Requirement & Grading:  [This is a Writing flag course.]  Test on classic experimenters:  Author biographies, literary periods, plot points: 20%; Two short (2-3-page) papers on individual stories: 20%; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 5 of 7 taken for grade): 10%; Participation in class discussion analyzing the stories: 10%; 2 short (2 page) reviews of local readings or new film adaptations of short stories: 10%; Final paper (6-8 pages): 30%.

 

This is a discussion-based format (which includes listening).  Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen.  Excessive absences (more than 4) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 4).

E 360L • The Nobel Prize

35795 • Fall 2018
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 210
(also listed as LAH 350)

E 360L  l  The Nobel Prize-HONORS

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  35795

Semester:  Fall 2018

Cross-lists:  LAH 350

Restrictions:  English Honors & Plan I Honors

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Course Overview:  Since 1901, the most prestigious international prize for literature has been the Nobel.  Quite a few winners have come from the English-speaking world that at one time was considered to be part of the British Commonwealth.  The survey of these writers and their concerns will bring us to five continents and into various historical and social terrains. Reading will consist of poetry, drama, novels and short stories, as well as non-fiction (notably the acceptance speeches of the authors covered.)

 

Reading List:  Poems by Rabindranath Tagore, W.B. Yeats, Seamus Heaney, and Derek Walcott available in course reader, along with some essays and short stories; J.M. Coetzee.  Waiting for the Barbarians; Nadine Gordimer.  July’s People; Alice Munro.  Open Secrets; V.S. Naipaul. Miguel Street; Wole Soyinka. Aké: The Years of Childhood and Death and the King’s Horseman; Derek Walcott.  Selected Poems; Patrick White. Voss.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Research Project on author, 30%; Presentation of Research Project, 10%; Quizzes on Readings, 10%; Class Participation, 10%; 2 short (2-3 pages) papers, 20%; One longer (6-8 pages) paper, 20%.

E F379R • Lit & Culture Of The 1960s

81304 • Summer 2018
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM MEZ 2.118
IIWr

E f379R  l  7-Literature and Culture of the 1960s

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  81304

Semester:  Summer 2018, first session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  The class will share a good number of short readings, with each student choosing an area of specialization to investigate through in-depth research.  We’ll use The Portable Sixties Reader to kick off some of the subject areas available for your in-depth research (such as Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, the Woman’s Movement, Environmental Studies, Beat, Post-Modern and Black Humor Writers, the Black Arts Movement, etc. Students will choose a focus for their study very early in the semester, and build toward a work of literary or rhetorical analysis by the end of the semester.  They should be able to demonstrate what holdings there are in Austin for their chosen writer or topic, and the progression of work published by the chosen author.  We will discuss a wide range of issues and writers during the semester; by the second half of the course, students who have chosen a writer who is in our class for the day should be able to lead part of the conversation.

 

Fridays will be “Sixties film day” in which we view selected feature films and documentaries made in or about the sixties.  Examples will be Don’t Look Back (a film about Bob Dylan’s tour of England in 1965); Berkeley in the Sixties (a film about the Free Speech Movement in the mid-sixties); a segment of Eyes on the Prize, etc. Maybe Dr. Strangelove.

 

Texts:  The Portable Sixties Reader, Anne Charters, editor; Readings on Canvas (pdf version); Course Reader available at Jenn’s.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Periodic, required submission to the Blackboard discussion board, (including reaction to Friday films) 15%; Quizzes on daily reading (best 6 of 8 taken for grade), 10%; Three updates on research topic, including notes on reading, annotated bibliography, and thoughts for final paper, 10% each; Final paper (8-12 pages), 30%; Attendance, class participation, 15%.

E S324C • The Graphic Novel

81415 • Summer 2018
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 204

E s324C  l  The Graphic Novel

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  81415

Semester:  Summer 2018, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  Some of the more exciting forms of literary expression in the past decades have come from Graphic Novels.  We will look at a sample of the graphic novels that have had a great impact on readers here and abroad.  In our reading, we will identify several kinds of genres:  historical novels, world culture in the graphic novel, speculative, socially engaged novels, and novels that work as queries into the intensely personal.  Since it is summer, there may be a “capes and masks” book or two.  Our analysis will involve the combination of prose and graphic, as well as the sequencing, that defines the graphic novel against other kinds of literature.  A substantial component of the class will be in independent reading, where students choose a series to read and follow (like Y: The Last Man by Brian Vaughn, Echo by Terry Moore, DMZ by Brian Wood, Love and Rockets by Los Bros Hernandez, etc.)

 

Texts:  Alan Moore. V for Vendetta • Brian K Vaughan. beginnings of Saga or of Y, the Last ManUnterzakhn, by Leela Corman • Ms. Marvel. G Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona • And several other thought-provoking, dazzling titles.

 

Students will write one paper on a series of their choosing, subject to approval.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Participation in Class discussion, 15%; Quizzes on Reading, 15%; Bookstore or Library Review, 10%; Reading Journal (submitted weekly), 30%; Final Paper (8-10 pages), 30%.

AAS 320 • Global Indian Literature

35472 • Spring 2018
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM JES A218A
CDGC (also listed as ANS 361, E 360L)

E 360L  l  Global Indian Literature

 

Instructor:  Shingavi, S

Unique #:  35060

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  AAS 320, ANS 361

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  Two important historical trends have marked the development and recognition of “Indian literature” as a global (rather than a strictly national) phenomenon.  First, the patterns of migration of South Asians since the beginning of the Raj moved Indians to various parts of the British Empire and created a network of ambassadors and webs of affiliation throughout the world for South Asian culture; the fact of colonial schools which produced English-speaking Indians is not incidental.  Second, the celebrity of Rushdie as the premiere Indian writer helped to produce a niche market within the publishing world for books about and by South Asians (usually represented by the big, national novel).  To this must also be added the contemporary rise of India as a leading world economy which has raised the demand for and curiosity about Indian culture within the global marketplace.  This course will investigate the production of a “global Indian literature” – paradoxically cosmopolitan and national – as made up of the intersecting experiences of Indians outside of India and the demands of the literary market (international publishing houses and the big literary prizes).  All of the writers that we will consider have won major national and international prizes (the Nobel, Man Booker, Commonwealth Writers, Pulitzer, etc.), and this will allow to think about what kinds of issues, what kinds of histories, and what kinds of forms tend to predominate in this body of writing.

 

Texts:  Tagore, Home and the World; Rushdie, The Golden House; Roy, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness; Mistry, A Fine Balance; Lahiri, Interpreter of Maladies; Naipaul, House for Mr. Biswas; Chatterjee, The Mammaries of the Welfare State; Ghosh, Sea of Poppies; Seth, Golden Gate; Desai, Clear Light of Day.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Weekly blog posts, 250 words (20%); Midterm (20%); Final (30%); Paper, 6-7 pages (20%); Participation (10%).

C L 315 • Masterworks Of World Lit

33150-33185 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CMA 2.306
GC HU (also listed as E 316N)

E 316N  l  World Literature

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  34860-34895

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  Please refer to the course schedule for course days, time, and room location: http://registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/.

 

Global Modern Literature—

The course will be focused on the 20th century.  We begin with writers considered to be Modernists—we will focus on two very different German language modernists—Thomas Mann and Franz Kafka.  In the same time period, writers from diverse areas of the globe were experimenting in form, and analyzing a society that in crisis.  We will read writers from China, Japan, India and South America in the ways they might be considered to follow the principles of Modernism.  Another thread in the course will trace some thematic and stylistic elements of literature of North Africa and the Middle-East, followed by a series of texts from sub-Saharan Africa. 

 

The bulk of the reading will consist of substantial shorter works, from poems to short stories, shorter novels and plays.  From the canon of literature to which the students will be exposed, perceptive readers will gain an appreciation of why literature is an essential response to the global modern world.  It is hoped that the course will be an incitement to a lifetime of sustained literary engagement on a high level.

 

Texts:  The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Puchner, Martin, ed. Third Edition, Volumes F. (It is essential that students have the Third Edition.)

A course reader with supplemental texts will be required.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance, participation in TA led discussions: 10%; Test one: Modernism, Mann, Kafka: 25%; Essay on second set of readings (3-4 pages): 25%; Final exam covers all material since first test: 35%.

E 303D • Plan II World Lit Part II

34240 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CRD 007A
Wr HU

Description:
The two semester course will be run as several mini-courses each semester.  Here are some of the sections. 

  • Greek Drama will use at least one play by the three most well-known tragedians and at least one of the full cycles of plays (Orestia or Oedipus cycle).  We will examine texts by Freud and Nietzsche that were directly influenced by tragic heroes, and work with an Actor from the London Stage on an interpretive staging of one scene from one play.
  • A mini-course on Odysseus will prepare us for a play from the UT Theater Department based on the Odyssey, and another mini-course on Arthur Miller’s The Crucible will prepare us for another production.  Invitations will be sent to the director/actors to attend one of our classes to discuss the performance.
  • A section on Indian literature will explore a recent translation of the ancient epic, The Ramayana, and will present a contemporary novel, Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things.
  • A final section will study significant work by the 2017 recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature—TBA.

 

The second semester will feature a long session on The 1001 Nights and the influences of this masterwork on contemporary theories and practices of the story.  One definite text will be Egyptian writer Naguib Mahfouz’s modern re-telling of the tales in his novel Arabian Nights and Days.  Postmodern writers John Barth and Salman Rushdie are also heavily indebted to this collection of stories, as are women writers from North Africa and the Middle East.

Students will have some voice in what happens in the second and third parts of the Spring semester, as a December vote will choose between sample syllabi in the literature of (A) Ireland, (B) China, or the (C) the Caribbean.

  A tradition of Doherty world literature courses is to end with a lengthy novel—in past semesters this has included David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas, Haruki Murakami’s Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun.  We have never had the nerve, so far, to approach James Joyce’s Ulysses (but stranger things have happened).  Gunther Grass’s The Tin Drum and Marlon James’ A Brief History of Seven Killings are under consideration.

 

Texts (for Fall):
Classical Tragedy Greek and Roman: Eight Plays with Critical Essays.

The Crucible, Arthur Miller.

The Ramayana: A New Retelling of Valmiki’s Ancient Epic.  Linda Egenes.

The God of Small Things.  Arundhati Roy.

(other books listed in description will be required either first or second semester).

(A novel or collection of poems or short stories will accompany our study of the Nobel Prize winner.)


Assignments:
Three short papers (2-3 pages)                                                               25%                

Two reviews of live theater events (2 pages)                                          20%

In-class presentation                                                                              10%

Quizzes on assigned readings                                                               15%

Seminar discussion/ participation                                                          15%

Assorted short assignments                                                                   10%


About the Professor:
Brian Doherty is a senior lecturer in the English Department. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1994. Courses taught in Masterworks of World Literature have led to an interest in the newly developing canon of global world literature. Currently at work revising some unconventional literary/critical pieces for publication (Borges is not real, but a collectively created entity.  A young scholar discovers the reason for Gregor Samsa’s metamorphosis—it was the chees.  Etc.).

E 324C • The Graphic Novel

34935 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 206
Wr

E 324C  l  The Graphic Novel

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  34935

Semester:  Spring 2018

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  Some of the more exciting forms of literary expression in the past decades have come from Graphic Novels.  We will look at a sample of the graphic novels that have had a great impact on readers here and abroad.  A special focus of this edition of the Graphic Novel class will be on global offerings and on understanding different cultures through the Graphic Novel.  Aside from some assigned readings in common, students will be required to do independent reading in a region of their choice: Asia, Africa, Latin America, or Eastern Europe.

 

Reading the GN as literature, we will identify several kinds of genres:  historical novels, world culture in the graphic novel, speculative, socially engaged novels, and novels that work as queries into the intensely personal.  Our analysis will involve the combination of prose and graphic, as well as the sequencing, that defines the graphic novel against other kinds of literature. 

 

Texts (A partial list, subject to change):  Bechdel, Allison. Fun Home; Castré, Genevieve. Susceptible; Coates, Ta-Nisi. Black Panther #1; Samanci, Ozge. Dare to Disappoint: Growing up in Turkey; Satouff, Riad. The Arab of the Future, volume One.

 

Students will be expected to attend a screening of the Ryan Coogler film, Black Panther.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Participation in Class discussion, 15%; Quizzes on Reading, 15%; Bookstore or Library Review, 10%; Two short papers, 30%; Final Paper (8-10 pages), 30%.

C L 315 • Masterworks Of World Lit

33690-33705 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 4.132
GC HU (also listed as E 316N)

E 316N  l  World Literature

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  35420-35435

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Flags:  Global Cultures

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  Global Modern Literature—

The course will be run in four sections.  The first will be reading in literary periods from The Enlightenment through Romanticism and Realism.  The second will continue the historical sequence into Modernism, then do some reading in how modernism can be thought of as a global phenomenon.  Early in the semester students will choose the cultures we will read for the second half of the course.  Choices will include Africa, India (South Asia), East Asia (China, Japan, Vietnam, South Korea), and North Africa and the Modern Middle East.

 

The bulk of the reading will consist of substantial shorter works, from poems to short stories, shorter novels and plays.  From the canon of literature to which the students will be exposed, perceptive readers will gain an appreciation of why literature is an essential response to the modern world.  It is hoped that the course will be an incitement to a lifetime of sustained literary engagement on a high level.

 

Texts:  The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Puchner, Martin, ed. Third Edition, Volumes D-E-F. (It is essential that students have the Third Edition.)

 

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance, participation in TA led discussions: 10%; Test one: Enlightenment through Realism: 15%; Test Two: Global Modernisms: 20%; Essay on second set of readings (3-4 pages): 20%; Final exam covers all material since first test: 35%.

E 348 • The Short Story

35560 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BEN 1.124
Wr

E 348  l  The Short Story

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  35560

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This foray into the short story as a form of literature will go as deeply into the 21st century as one can at this point, reading authors who use formal innovations and new approaches to language and memory to create a different kind of narrative (George Saunders, Karen Russell, Kelly Link, etc.).  Some historical precedent for this occurs in modernism, with writers like Luigi Pirandello, Franz Kafka, and, well, Virginia Woolf; it reaches its heyday with what has come to be known as postmodern writing (and we will explore Jorge Luis Borges, Italo Calvino, Donald Barthelme, Kathy Acker).  Since what we are investigating is the way narrative form has been creatively transformed by contemporary writers, and this is a work in progress, some of our readings will be decided upon and assigned “on the fly.”  There will be some assignments that involve visiting writers and readings, and many of the texts will be in course readers.

 

Students will be expected to read 30-40 pages of fairly dense texts for each class period.

 

Texts:  Course reader(s) will act as our anthology.  George Saunders, Tenth of December.  Ivan Vladislavic, 101 Policemen.  There may be one or two other collections assigned.

 

Requirement & Grading:  This is a Writing flag course.  Test on classic experimenters:  Author biographies, literary periods, plot points: 20%; Two short (2-3-page) papers on individual stories: 20%; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 5 of 7 taken for grade): 10%; Participation in class discussion analyzing the stories: 10%; 2 short (2 page) reviews of local readings or new film adaptations of short stories: 10%; Final paper (6-8 pages): 30%.

 

This is a discussion-based format (which includes listening).  Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen.  Excessive absences (more than 4) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 4).

E F324C • The Graphic Novel

81615 • Summer 2017
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM NOA 1.116

E f324  l  Themes in the Graphic Novel

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  81615

Semester:  Summer 2017, first session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  Some of the more exciting forms of literary expression in the past decades have come from Graphic Novels.  We will look at a sample of the graphic novels that have had a great impact on readers here and abroad.  In our reading, we will identify several kinds of genres:  historical novels, world culture in the graphic novel, speculative, socially engaged novels, and novels that work as queries into the intensely personal.  Our analysis will involve the combination of prose and graphic, as well as the sequencing, that defines the graphic novel against other kinds of literature.  A substantial component of the class will be in independent reading, where students choose a series to read and follow (like Y: The Last Man by Brian Vaughn, Echo by Terry Moore, DMZ by Brian Wood, Love and Rockets by Los Bros Hernandez, etc.)

 

Texts (A partial list, subject to change):  Bechdel, Allison. Fun Home • Castré, Genevieve. Susceptible • Coates, Ta-Nisi. Black Panther #1 • Vaughn, Brian. Pride of Baghdad • Shafee, Magdy el. Metro: A Story of Cairo.

 

Students will write one paper on a series of their choosing, subject to approval.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Participation in Class discussion, 15%; Quizzes on Reading, 15%; Bookstore or Library Review, 10%; Reading Journal.  (submitted weekly). 30%; Final Paper (8-10 pages), 30%.

AAS 314 • Asian American Lit & Culture

35900 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.212
CDWr (also listed as E 314V)

E 314V  l  2-Asian American Literature and Culture

 

Instructor:  Shingavi, S

Unique #:  34820

Semester:  Spring 2017

Cross-lists:  AAS 314

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  Yes

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

 

Description:  As a worldwide refugee crisis continues, hateful rhetoric in the US is directed toward recent and potential immigrants, despite immigration’s central role in the nation’s identity.  Considering contemporary and historical debates about immigration through the lens of 20th and 21st century Asian American novels and short stories, this course will focus on conceptions of nationhood, ethnicity, race, gender, and sexuality, and ask the following questions:  What has it—and does it—mean to be “Asian American”? How does Asian American literature navigate oppression, politics, and culture?

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and/or Asian American Studies.  They will also learn historical contexts, critical debates, and the relationship between “home” countries and the diasporas.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

This course contains a Cultural Diversity flag.

 

Tentative Texts:  Bulosan, America is in the Heart; Chang-Rae Lee, Native Speaker; Eddie Huang, Fresh off the Boat; Jhumpa Lahiri, Interpreter of Maladies; Karen Tei Yamashita, I-Hotel; lê thi diem thuy, The Gangster We Are All Looking For; Mohsin Hamid, Reluctant Fundamentalist; Suji Kwock Kim, Notes from the Divided Country, among other short stories and secondary sources.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be two mid-term papers (25% each) and a final paper (35%).  There may also be short quizzes, reaction papers, blog posts, and/or in-class presentations (15% of the final grade).

C L 315 • Masterworks Of World Lit

33675 • Spring 2017
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM JES A218A
GC HU (also listed as E 316N)

E 316N  l  World Literature

 Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  35315

Semester:  Spring 2017

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Flags:  Global Cultures

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

 

Description:  Please refer to the course schedule for course days, time, and room location:  http://registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/.

 

Global Modern Literature—

The course will be run in four sections.  The first will be reading in literary periods from The Enlightenment through Romanticism and Realism.  The second will continue the historical sequence into Modernism, then do some reading in how modernism can be thought of as a global phenomenon.  Early in the semester students will choose the cultures we will read for the second half of the course.  Choices will include Africa, India (South Asia), East Asia (China, Japan, Vietnam, South Korea), and North Africa and the Modern Middle East.

 

The bulk of the reading will consist of substantial shorter works, from poems to short stories, shorter novels and plays.  From the canon of literature to which the students will be exposed, perceptive readers will gain an appreciation of why literature is an essential response to the modern world.  It is hoped that the course will be an incitement to a lifetime of sustained literary engagement on a high level.

 

Texts:  The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Puchner, Martin, ed. Third Edition, Volumes D-E-F.  (It is essential that students have the Third Edition.)

 

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance, participation 10%; Test one: Enlightenment through Realism: 15%; Test Two: Global Modernisms: 20%; Essay on second set of readings (3-4 pages): 20%; Final exam covers all material since first test: 35%.

E 303D • Plan II World Lit Part II

34740 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CRD 007A
Wr HU

Description:

Writers have always been inspired by their predecessors. Homer found his source material in the stories that were told for generations; Shakespeare’s Hamlet would not have taken shape if he had not known Thomas Kidd’s The Spanish Tragedy, and Joyce’s Ulysses owes much of its structure to Homer’s Odyssey.

Contemporary literature often approaches classic texts with an eye and ear to the modern. The guiding principle for our year-long literary exploration will be “Classic to Contemporary: Revising the Classics.”

Some match-ups. Homer’s Iliad and David Malouf’s Ransom, as well as Christa Wolf’s Cassandra, a feminist revisiting of the Trojan War. The Indian epic The Mahabharata and Peter Brook’s 1985 stage version of the epic. Jean Rhys’ prequel to Jane Eyre, The Wide Sargasso Sea (perhaps we can remind ourselves of the original through the excellent 2011 film with Mia Wasikowska in the title role). Albert Camus’ The Stranger with the widely acclaimed revision by French/Algerian writer Kamel Daoud’s The Meursault Investigation. There may be a unit on DeFoe’s Robinson Crusoe and postcolonial re-writes such as J.M. Coetzee’s Foe and Derek Walcott’s reworkings of the Crusoe story. In the second semester, there is sure to be a lengthy unit on The 1001 Nights as paradigmatic for the storyteller.


Assignments:

Three short papers (2-3 pages) - 25%
Two reviews of live theater events (2 pages) - 20%
In-class presentation - 10%
Quizzes on assigned readings - 15%
Seminar discussion/participation - 15%
Assorted short assignments - 15%


About the Professor:

Brian Doherty is a senior lecturer in the English Department. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1994. Courses taught in Masterworks of World Literature have led to an interest in the newly developing canon of global world literature. Currently at work revising some unconventional literary/ critical pieces for publication. 

AAS 314 • Asian American Lit & Culture

35813 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 302
CDWr

Check back for updates.

E 303C • Plan II World Lit Part I

34535 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CRD 007A
GC C1

Description:
Writers have always been inspired by their predecessors.  Homer found his source material in the stories that were told for generations; Shakespeare’s Hamlet would not have taken shape if he had not known Thomas Kidd’s The Spanish Tragedy, and Joyce’s Ulysses owes much of its structure to Homer’s Odyssey.

Contemporary literature often approaches classic texts with an eye and ear to the modern.  The guiding principle for our year-long literary exploration will be “Classic to Contemporary: Revising the Classics.”

 

Some match-ups.  Homer’s Iliad and David Malouf’s Ransom, as well as Christa Wolf’s Cassandra, a feminist revisiting of the Trojan War.  The Indian epic The Mahabharata and Peter Brook’s 1985 stage version of the epic.  Jean Rhys’ prequel to Jane Eyre, The Wide Sargasso Sea  (perhaps we can remind ourselves of the original through the excellent 2011 film with Mia Wasikowska in the title role).  Albert Camus’ The Stranger with the widely acclaimed revision by French/Algerian writer Kamel Daoud’s The Meursault Investigation.  There may be a unit on DeFoe’s Robinson Crusoe and postcolonial re-writes such as J.M. Coetzee’s Foe and Derek Walcott’s reworkings of the Crusoe story.  In the second semester, there is sure to be a lengthy unit on The 1001 Nights as paradigmatic for the storyteller.

 

In the first semester, we will take advantage of the residency of the actors from the London Stage to visit versions of what is called “Ricardian Literature” to see how the historical figure of Richard III is imagined and re-imagined in literature.

 

Texts (for Fall):
William Shakespeare.  Richard III.

Homer.  Illiad.  (Stanley Lombardo translation).

Wolf, Christa.  Cassandra: A Novel and Four Essays.

Malouf, David.  Ransom.

R. K. Narayan.  The Mahabharata

Daniel DeFoe.  Robinson Crusoe.

J.M. Coetzee.  Foe.

(other books listed in description will be required either first or second semester).


Assignments:
Three short papers (2-3 pages)                                                          25%                

Two reviews of  live theater events (2 pages)                                      20%

In-class presentation                                                                         10%

Quizzes on assigned readings                                                            15%

Seminar discussion/ participation                                                        15%

Assorted short assignments                                                               15%


About the Professor:
Brian Doherty is a senior lecturer in the English Department. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1994. Courses taught in Masterworks of World Literature have led to an interest in the newly developing canon of global world literature. Currently at work revising some unconventional literary/critical pieces for publication.

E 348 • The Short Story

35400 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 302
Wr

E 348  l  The Short Story

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  35400

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  This foray into the short story as a form of literature will go as deeply into the 21st century as one can at this point, reading authors who use formal innovations and new approaches to language and memory to create a different kind of narrative (George Saunders, Karen Russell, Kelly Link, etc.).  Some historical precedent for this occurs in modernism, with writers like Luigi Pirandello, Franz Kafka, and, well, Virginia Woolf; it reaches its heyday with what has come to be known as postmodern writing (and we will explore Jorge Luis Borges, Italo Calvino, Donald Barthelme, Kathy Acker).  Since what we are investigating is the way narrative form has been creatively transformed by contemporary writers, and this is a work in progress, some of our readings will be decided upon and assigned “on the fly.”  There will be some assignments that involve visiting writers and readings, and many of the texts will be in course readers.

Students will be expected to read 30-40 pages of fairly dense texts for each class period.

Texts:  Course reader(s) will act as our anthology.  George Saunders, Tenth of December.  Ivan Vladislavic, 101 Policemen.  There may be one or two other collections assigned.

Requirement & Grading:  [This is a Writing flag course.]  Test on classic experimenters:  Author biographies, literary periods, plot points: 20%; Two short (2-3-page) papers on individual stories: 20%; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 5 of 7 taken for grade): 10%; Participation in class discussion analyzing the stories: 10%; 2 short (2 page) reviews of local readings or new film adaptations of short stories: 10%; Final paper (6-8 pages): 30%.

This is a discussion-based format (which includes listening).  Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen.  Excessive absences (more than 4) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 4).

E 348 • The Short Story

35407 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM JES A305A

E 348  l  The Short Story

 

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  35407

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  This foray into the short story as a form of literature will go as deeply into the 21st century as one can at this point, reading authors who use formal innovations and new approaches to language and memory to create a different kind of narrative (George Saunders, Karen Russell, Kelly Link, etc.).  Some historical precedent for this occurs in modernism, with writers like Luigi Pirandello, Franz Kafka, and, well, Virginia Woolf; it reaches its heyday with what has come to be known as postmodern writing (and we will explore Jorge Luis Borges, Italo Calvino, Donald Barthelme, Kathy Acker).  Since what we are investigating is the way narrative form has been creatively transformed by contemporary writers, and this is a work in progress, some of our readings will be decided upon and assigned “on the fly.”  There will be some assignments that involve visiting writers and readings, and many of the texts will be in course readers.

Students will be expected to read 30-40 pages of fairly dense texts for each class period.

Texts:  Course reader(s) will act as our anthology.  George Saunders, Tenth of December.  Ivan Vladislavic, 101 Policemen.  There may be one or two other collections assigned.

Requirement & Grading:  Test after 4 weeks: Author biographies, literary periods, plot points: 20%; Test after 8 weeks: 20%; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 4 of 6 taken for grade): 10%; Participation in class discussion analyzing the stories: 10%; 2 short (2 page) reviews of local readings or new film adaptations of short stories: 10%; Final exam/ objective and essay: 30%.

This is a discussion-based format (which includes listening).  Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen.  Excessive absences (more than 4) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 4).

C L S315 • Masterworks Of World Lit

81457 • Summer 2016
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM GAR 3.116
GC (also listed as E S316N)

E s316N  l  World Literature

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  82082

Semester:  Summer 2016, second session

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description:  Please refer to the course schedule for course days, time, and room location: http://registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/.

Global Modern Literature—

The course will be run in three sections.  A first, short section will have us read some user friendly texts, to help reacquaint us with the joys of reading.  A second section will explore Modernism in Europe, and some global writing from the same time period.  A final section will explore a range of texts from Sub-Saharan Africa.

The bulk of the reading will consist of substantial shorter works, from poems to short stories, shorter novels and plays.  From the canon of literature to which the students will be exposed, perceptive readers will gain an appreciation of why literature is an essential response to the modern world.  It is hoped that the course will be an incitement to a lifetime of sustained literary engagement on a high level.

Texts:  The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Puchner, Martin, ed., Third Edition, Volumes F.  (ISBN:  978-0393913347) (It is essential that students have the Third Edition.)

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance, participation in discussion: 10% • 2-3-page review of World Culture Film or Live Cultural Event: 10% • Quiz on Readings (best 5 of 7 taken for grade): 10% • Test one (After 7 discussion Days): 20% • Essay on second set of readings (3-4 pages): 20% • Final exam covers all material since first test: 30%.

E F349S • Bob Dylan

81920 • Summer 2016
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 303

E f349S  l  Bob Dylan

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  81920

Semester:  Summer 2016, first session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  Bob Dylan is admired by many as a poetic troubadour who forever transformed the way we think of popular music.  Others are less appreciative of his contributions to culture, and emphasize his enigmatic imagery, gravelly voice, and chameleonic nature.  This course is open to those of both persuasions, but we will try to support the first point of view in our study of Dylan’s music, poetry, and memoir.

Reading for the class will come primarily from the lyric sheets from some of Dylan’s albums, especially Highway 61 Revisited, Blonde on Blonde, and Blood on the Tracks.  Some days, students will be asked to read and evaluate the song/poems in a personal, somewhat casual fashion; other days we will take the same poems and read them through their commentators, like critic Sean Wilentz.  Along the way, we will be attentive to the “myth of Dylan” and what that says about the United States.  Required film texts will be D.A. Pennbaker’s Don’t Look Back, Martin Scorcese’s No Direction Home, and Todd Haynes’ portrait of the artist played by six different actors, I’m Not There.  Since Dylan didn’t live and work in a vacuum, we’ll take a few forays into work by contemporaries Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen, and The Band.

Texts:  Bob Dylan. Chronicles: Volume One. Simon and Schuster, 2005.  Dylan albums: Highway 61 Revisited; Blonde on Blonde; Blood on the Tracks.

Other Dylan pieces will be read using the miracle of modern media technology, but students should be prepared to have the complete album of work from these three titles.

Course Reader with analytical essays, interviews, reviews, sections from Woody Guthrie’s Bound for Glory, and other readings on Dylan.

Requirements & Grading:  An extended portfolio on a Bob Dylan classic composition (3-4 sections, about 8 pages total), 25%; In-class quizzes (best 4 of 6 taken for grade), 10%; Participation in classroom discussion, 10%; two short (2-3 page) reviews, analysis, or comparison on selected topics, 20%; Either a formal paper (7-9 pages) on Dylan as literary artist or a personal, thoughtful, analytical journal (at least twelve 2-3 page entries) of your journey through Bob Dylan’s work and career 35%.

C L 315 • Masterworks Of World Lit

32765-32810 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 1.316
GC HU (also listed as E 316N)

E 316N  l  World Literature

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  34340-34380

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Flags:  Global Cultures

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Please refer to the course schedule for course days, time, and room location: http://registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/.

Global Modern Literature—

The course will be run in four sections. The first will be reading in literary periods from The Enlightenment through Romanticism and Realism. The second will continue the historical sequence into Modernism, then do some reading in how modernism can be thought of as a global phenomenon. Early in the semester students will choose the cultures we will read for the second half of the course. Choices will include Africa, India (South Asia), East Asia (China, Japan, Vietnam, South Korea), and North Africa and the Modern Middle East.

The bulk of the reading will consist of substantial shorter works, from poems to short stories, shorter novels and plays. From the canon of literature to which the students will be exposed, perceptive readers will gain an appreciation of why literature is an essential response to the modern world. It is hoped that the course will be an incitement to a lifetime of sustained literary engagement on a high level.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Puchner, Martin, ed. Third Edition, Volumes D-E-F. (It is essential that students have the Third Edition.)

Requirements & Grading: Attendance, participation in TA led discussions: 10%; Test one: Enlightenment through Realism: 15%; Test Two: Global Modernisms: 20%; Essay on second set of readings (3-4 pages): 20%; Final exam covers all material since first test: 35%.

C L 315 • Masterworks Of World Lit

32815 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GEA 403
GC HU (also listed as E 316N)

E 316N  l  World Literature

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  34385

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Flags:  Global Cultures

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Please refer to the course schedule for course days, time, and room location: http://registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/.

Global Modern Literature—

The course will be run in four sections. The first will be reading in literary periods from The Enlightenment through Romanticism and Realism. The second will continue the historical sequence into Modernism, then do some reading in how modernism can be thought of as a global phenomenon. Early in the semester students will choose the cultures we will read for the second half of the course. Choices will include Africa, India (South Asia), East Asia (China, Japan, Vietnam, South Korea), and North Africa and the Modern Middle East.

The bulk of the reading will consist of substantial shorter works, from poems to short stories, shorter novels and plays. From the canon of literature to which the students will be exposed, perceptive readers will gain an appreciation of why literature is an essential response to the modern world. It is hoped that the course will be an incitement to a lifetime of sustained literary engagement on a high level.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Puchner, Martin, ed. Third Edition, Volumes D-E-F. (It is essential that students have the Third Edition.)

Requirements & Grading: Attendance, participation 10%; Test one: Enlightenment through Realism: 15%; Test Two: Global Modernisms: 20%; Essay on second set of readings (3-4 pages): 20%; Final exam covers all material since first test: 35%.

E 324C • The Graphic Novel

34430 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CAL 323
Wr (also listed as LAH 350)

E 324C  l  The Graphic Novel-HONORS

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  34430

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  LAH 350

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  English Honors; Liberal Arts Honors

Computer Instruction:  No

E 324 (Topic: Themes in the Graphic Novel) and 324C may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Some of the more exciting forms of literary expression in the past decades have come from Graphic Novels. We’ll look at some theories and examples of the emergence of the Graphic Novel, possibly through the career of Art Spiegelman, and discuss basic graphic novel literacy. We will look at a sample of the graphic novels that have had a great impact on readers here and abroad. In our reading, we will identify several kinds of themes: historical novels, speculative, socially engaged novels, and novels that work as queries into the intensely personal. Our analysis will involve the combination of prose and graphics, as well as the sequencing that defines the graphic novel against other kinds of literature. Some specific topics be literature into graphic novel and the graphic novel as world literature.

Texts (A partial list, subject to change): Bechdel, Allison. Are You My Mother • Crumb, R. Kafka • Hergé. The Adventures of Tintin • Kafka, Franz (and others). The Castle: A Graphic Novel • Lutes, Jason. Berlin, City of Stones and Berlin: City of Smoke • Satrapi, Marjane. Persepolis, I and II • Spiegelman, Art. Maus I and II • Vaughn, Brian. Pride of Baghdad.

Students will write one paper on a series of their choosing, subject to approval.

Requirements & Grading: Participation in Class discussion, 10%; Quizzes on Reading, 10%; Independent reading paper (politics, history, and culture), 15%; Independent reading paper (literature into graphic novel), 15%;Occasional Writing: Canvas posts, short assignments, 10%; Prospectus, bibliography for final paper, 10%; Final Paper (8-10 pages), 30%.

C L S315 • Masterworks Of World Lit

82035 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 208
GC (also listed as E S316N)

E s316N  l  World Literature

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  82735

Semester:  Summer 2015, second session

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Flags:  Global Cultures

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Please refer to the course schedule for course days, time, and room location: http://registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/.

Global Modern Literature—

We will use the Norton Anthology to discuss a wide variety of Twentieth Century Texts from around the globe. There will be three interconnected contexts for our reading: (1) Literary periods and approaches European (Modernism (Kafka, Joyce, Woolf); World Modernism (Lu, Chang); Post-modernism (Beckett and Lispecter), Romanticism (Tagore), Realism (Munro, Lessing), Surrealism (Cesaire); orality (Diop, Peynetsa); (2) Intellectual and cultural movements (Marxism, Psychoanalysis); and literary and testimonial responses to historical events such as Stalin’s Russia (Akhmatova) the concentration camps and the Holocaust (Borowski, Bachman); the modern Middle East (Amichai, Darwish, al-Shayk).

The bulk of the reading will consist of substantial shorter works, from poems to short stories, shorter novels and plays. From the canon of literature to which the students will be exposed, perceptive readers will gain an appreciation of why literature is an essential response to the modern world. It is hoped that the course will be an incitement to a lifetime of sustained literary engagement on a high level.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of World Literature, volume F; Supplementary Material Available on Electronic Reserves. Some Film Texts will be required.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance, participation in class discussion: 15%; 2-3-page review of World Culture Film: 10%; Test one (Modernism in Europe and the World): 25%; Essay on second set of readings (3-4 pages): 15%; Final exam covers all material since first test: 35%.

E F349S • Bob Dylan

82565 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 105

E f349S  l  Bob Dylan

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  82565

Semester:  Summer 2015, first session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: Bob Dylan is admired by many as a poetic troubadour who forever transformed the way we think of popular music. Others are less appreciative of his contributions to culture, and emphasize his enigmatic imagery, gravelly voice, and chameleonic nature. This course is open to those of both persuasions, but we will try to support the first point of view in our study of Dylan’s music, poetry, and memoir.

Reading for the class will come primarily from the lyric sheets from some of Dylan’s albums, especially Highway 61 Revisited, Blonde on Blonde, and Blood on the Tracks. Some days, students will be asked to read and evaluate the song/poems in a personal, somewhat casual fashion; other days we will take the same poems and read them through their commentators, like critic Sean Wilentz. Along the way, we will be attentive to the “myth of Dylan” and what that says about the United States. Required film texts will be D.A. Pennbaker’s Don’t Look Back, Martin Scorcese’s No Direction Home, and Todd Haynes’ portrait of the artist played by six different actors, I’m Not There.  Since Dylan didn’t live and work in a vacuum, we’ll take a few forays into work by contemporaries Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen, and The Band.

Texts: Bob Dylan. Chronicles: Volume One. Simon and Schuster, 2005. Dylan albums: Highway 61 Revisited; Blonde on Blonde; Blood on the Tracks.

Other Dylan pieces will be read using the miracle of modern media technology, but students should be prepared to have the complete album of work from these three titles.

Course Reader with analytical essays, interviews, reviews, sections from Woody Guthrie’s Bound for Glory, and other readings on Dylan.

Requirements & Grading: Two formal song analyses (2 pages each), 20%; In-class quizzes (best 4 of 6 taken for grade), 10%; Participation in classroom discussion, 10%; Short “homework” assignments, in-class writing, or Blog participation, 15%; Proposal for a formal paper on Dylan as literary artist, 15%; A personal, thoughtful, analytical journal of your journey through Bob Dylan’s work and career 30%.

C L 315 • Masterworks Of World Lit

33005-33025 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM FAC 21
GC (also listed as E 316N)

E 316N  l  World Literature

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  34525-34560

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Global Cultures

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Please refer to the course schedule for course days, time, and room location: http://registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/.

Global Modern Literature—

The course will be run in four sections. The first will be reading in literary periods from The Enlightenment through Romanticism and Realism. The second will continue the historical sequence into Modernism, then do some reading in how modernism can be thought of as a global phenomenon. A third section will explore issues in Africa and the African diaspora. A fourth section will cover texts from South Asia.

The bulk of the reading will consist of substantial shorter works, from poems to short stories, shorter novels and plays. From the canon of literature to which the students will be exposed, perceptive readers will gain an appreciation of why literature is an essential response to the modern world. It is hoped that the course will be an incitement to a lifetime of sustained literary engagement on a high level.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Puchner, Martin, ed.  Third Edition, Volumes D-E-F. (It is essential that students have the Third Edition.)

Requirements & Grading: Attendance, participation in TA led discussions: 10%; Test one: Enlightenment through Realism: 15%; Test Two: Global Modernisms: 20%; Essay on second set of readings (3-4 pages): 20%; Final exam covers all material since first test: 35%.

E 349S • Alice Munro

34785 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 105
Wr

E 349S  l  12-Alice Munro

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  34785

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Writing

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: This course centers on the work of Canadian writer Alice Munro, winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize for literature, and one of the most accomplished and influential living authors. She is often compared to Anton Chekhov, James Joyce, and William Trevor, and her short stories are incisive probes into the deepest and darkest areas of human psychology and behavior.

Reading for the course will consist of stories Munro has written over the last forty-four years; we will explore the nuances of her character development and the elements she uses to craft such powerful tales. Students will be challenged to bring a depth of perception to their analysis of this sophisticated work. Some secondary reading in Munro biography and criticism will be required, as well as an occasional story not included in our required texts. There will be at least two film texts—Away from Her, directed by Sarah Polley from a Munro story, and Hateship, Loveship, directed by Liza Johnson.

Readers will find in Munro’s work great wisdom, astonishing craft, and an unspeakable ability to amaze.

Texts: Munro, Alice. Selected Stories, 1968-1994; Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage (2002); The View From Castle Rock. (2006); and Dear Life: Stories (2013). Two required film texts.  Several essays and interviews will be available in a reader or on pdf copies, or available online.

Requirements & Grading: Participation in Class Discussion, 15%; Quizzes on assigned reading (best 6 of 8 taken for grade), 10%; Assignment on a single story will require the student to make a full, annotated bibliography of secondary sources available on that story; One Short Paper (3-4 pages) on a single story, 20%; Prospectus of the semester paper (2-3 pages), 10%; Semester Paper (7-9 pages), a sustained analysis of a formal and/or thematic element in Munro’s work, 30%.

E 603A • Composition/Reading World Lit

34990 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CAL 419
GC

 

Description: For this version of E603 I would like to start with dessert, so to speak, that is, in the 20th century, with some artists who have changed the way one can think about literature and culture.  This roster of “game-changers” includes Franz Kafka, Jorge Luis Borges, Italo Calvino and Donald Barthelme.  Hopefully, there will be time for a story by Ingeborg Bachmann (Austria), Zhang Ailing (China), Karen Russell and George Saunders.      

Chronologically dyslexic, we’ll have a second mini-class on Greece, but not entirely ancient.  For the Iliad, we’ll read several chapters, and spend a day or two as storytellers—rehearsing the other stories for our classmates as modern-day Homers.  The Iliad, The Bacchae, and The Oresteia will be the backdrop for David Malouf’s Ransom and Christa Wolf’s Cassandra.  Our readings in Greek Drama should coincide with the visit from the Actors from the London Stage, who will help us realize out vision of Greek Theater in the 21st Century.

Dyslexic and schizophrenic, we’ll occasionally break into these sections with cultural events available live in Austin—The Hamlet at the Moody theater at St. Edwards in South Austin, a play at the UT Department of Theater and Dance, readings by visiting writers, a important film premiere, etc.  Students will not be required to attend all of these, but will be expected to attend several.

Finally, the last 5 or 7 reading days are reserved for the work of the 2014 winner of the Nobel Prize winner in literature (whoever that may be).

The 2nd semester will include min-classes on South Asian Literature, African literature, and a geographical reader’s choice (North Africa and the Middle East, Europe, Japan, South America, or?)

Texts:

Course Reader available at Jenn’s Copies

Euripedes, Bacchae (trans. Paul Woodruff.  (Hackett Publishing Co.)

Malouf, David.  Ransom.

Wolf, Christa.  CassandraAssignments: - short papers on three of the four sections

- reviews of a number of cultural events

- periodic quizzes on reading assignments

- in class work, including oral presentations

About the Professor: Brian Doherty is a senior lecturer in the English Department. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1994. Courses taught in Masterworks of World Literature have led to an interest in the newly developing canon of global world literature. Currently at work revising some unconventional literary/critical pieces for publication.

E 348 • The Short Story

35785 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 105
Wr C2

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  35785 and 35790

Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: Let’s have four short courses in the short story, each one centered on a volume of work. The first is Kafka and his descendants, beginning with the master of alienation and including  writers who take up some of Kafka’s concerns and stylistic innovations. A second will take a geographic and cultural foray into literature of China, beginning with the acknowledged master Lu Xun, and moving to more contemporary writers like Wang Meng. A third strain begins with Alice Munro’s deeply psychological and finely crafted stories and read some contemporaries who employ the same kinds of methodology and insight, Like William Trevor and Jhumpa Lahiri. A fourth and final strain will take a very recent collection—Nathan Englander’s What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank—juxtaposed against some powerful contemporary writers. These last may be taken from the weekly selection of writers chosen by The New Yorker during the semester. They may include writers who visit the UT campus or read at Bookpeople during the semester.

Texts: Kafka’s Selected Stories, A Norton Critical Edition, Edited by Stanley Corngold; The Real Story of Ah-Q and Other Tales of China, Penguin Classics; Runaway, Alice Munro; What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank, Nathan Englander.

Requirement & Grading: Two tests, on the Kafka and Lu Xun section. Author biographies, literary periods, plot points: 10% each (20%); Two short (2-3-page) papers on individual stories: 20%; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 5 of 7 taken for grade): 10%; Participation in class discussion analyzing the stories: 10%; Prospectus for sustained analytical paper (2-3 pages): 10%; Final paper (6-8 pages): 30%.

This is a discussion-based format (which includes listening). Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen. Excessive absences (more than 4) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 4).

E 348 • The Short Story

35790 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM PAR 103
Wr

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  35785

Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: Let’s have four short courses in the short story, each one centered on a volume of work. The first is Kafka and his descendants, beginning with the master of alienation and including  writers who take up some of Kafka’s concerns and stylistic innovations. A second will take a geographic and cultural foray into literature of China, beginning with the acknowledged master Lu Xun, and moving to more contemporary writers like Wang Meng. A third strain begins with Alice Munro’s deeply psychological and finely crafted stories and read some contemporaries who employ the same kinds of methodology and insight, Like William Trevor and Jhumpa Lahiri. A fourth and final strain will take a very recent collection—Nathan Englander’s What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank—juxtaposed against some powerful contemporary writers. These last may be taken from the weekly selection of writers chosen by The New Yorker during the semester. They may include writers who visit the UT campus or read at Bookpeople during the semester.

Texts: Kafka’s Selected Stories, A Norton Critical Edition, Edited by Stanley Corngold; The Real Story of Ah-Q and Other Tales of China, Penguin Classics; Runaway, Alice Munro; What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank, Nathan Englander.

Requirement & Grading: Two tests, on the Kafka and Lu Xun section. Author biographies, literary periods, plot points: 10% each (20%); Two short (2-3-page) papers on individual stories: 20%; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 5 of 7 taken for grade): 10%; Participation in class discussion analyzing the stories: 10%; Prospectus for sustained analytical paper (2-3 pages): 10%; Final paper (6-8 pages): 30%.

This is a discussion-based format (which includes listening). Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen. Excessive absences (more than 4) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 4).

E S349S • Bob Dylan

83405 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 301

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  83405

Semester:  Summer 2014, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: Bob Dylan is admired by many as a poetic troubadour who forever transformed the way we think of popular music. Others are less appreciative of his contributions to culture, and emphasize his enigmatic imagery, gravelly voice, and chameleonic nature. This course is open to those of both persuasions, but we will try to support the first point of view in our study of Dylan’s music, poetry, and memoir.

Reading for the class will come primarily from the lyric sheets from some of Dylan’s albums, especially Highway 61 Revisited, Blonde on Blonde, and Blood on the Tracks. Some days, students will be asked to read and evaluate the song/poems in a personal, somewhat casual fashion; other days we will take the same poems and read them through their commentators, like literary critic Chrisopher Ricks or music critic Sean Wilentz. Along the way, we will be attentive to the “myth of Dylan” and what that says about the United States. Required film texts will be D.A. Pennbaker’s Don’t Look Back, Martin Scorcese’s No Direction Home, and Todd Haynes’ portrait of the artist played by six different actors, I’m Not There.  Since Dylan didn’t live and work in a vacuum, we’ll take a few forays into work by contemporaries Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen, and The Band.

Texts: Bob Dylan. Chronicles: Volume One. Simon and Schuster, 2005 • Highway 61 Revisited; Blonde on Blonde; Blood on the Tracks.

Other Dylan pieces will be read using the miracle of modern media technology, but students should be prepared to have the complete album of work from these three titles.

Course Reader with analytical essays, interviews, reviews, sections from Woody Guthrie’s Bound for Glory, and other readings on Dylan.

Requirements & Grading:  Two formal song analyses (2 pages each), 20%; In-class quizzes (best 4 of 6 taken for grade), 10%; Participation in classroom discussion, 10%; Short “homework” assignments, in-class writing, or Blog participation, 15%; Proposal for a formal paper on Dylan as literary artist, 15%; A personal, thoughtful, analytical journal of your journey through Bob Dylan’s work and career 30%.

C L 315 • Masterworks Of Lit: World

34265-34320 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 106
GC (also listed as E 316K)

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  35750-35805

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Please refer to the course schedule for course days, time, and room location: http://registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/.

Global Modern Literature—

The course will be run in three sections. The first will be reading in literary periods from The Enlightenment through Romanticism and Realism, into Modernism. A second section will explore issues in Africa and the African diaspora. A third section will cover texts from East Asia, including China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam.

The bulk of the reading will consist of substantial shorter works, from poems to short stories, shorter novels and plays. From the canon of literature to which the students will be exposed, perceptive readers will gain an appreciation of why literature is an essential response to the modern world. It is hoped that the course will be an incitement to a lifetime of sustained literary engagement on a high level.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Puchner, Martin, ed.  Third Edition, Volumes D-E-F. (It is essential that students have the Third Edition.)

Requirements & Grading: Attendance, participation in TA led discussions: 10%; 2-3-page review of World Culture Film or Live Cultural Event: 10%; Test one (Enlightenment through Modernism in Europe): 25%; Essay on second set of readings (3-4 pages): 20%; Final exam covers all material since first test: 35%.

E 324 • Themes In The Graphic Novel

35875 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.126
Wr

Instructor:  Doherty, B

Unique #:  35875

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: Some of the more exciting forms of literary expression in the past decades have come from Graphic Novels. We will look at a sample of the graphic novels that have had a great impact on readers here and abroad. In our reading, we will identify several kinds of themes: historical novels, speculative, socially engaged novels, and novels that work as queries into the intensely personal. Our analysis will involve the combination of prose and graphic, as well as the sequencing, that defines the graphic novel against other kinds of literature. A substantial component of the class will be in independent reading, where students choose a series to read and follow (like Y: The Last Man by Brian Vaughn, Echo by Terry Moore, DMZ by Brian Wood, Love and Rockets by Los Bros Hernandez, etc.)

Texts (A partial list, subject to change): Bechdel, Allison. Are You My Mother; Gaiman, Neil. Death: Deluxe Edition; Hergé. The Adventures of Tintin; Lutes, Jason. Berlin, City of Stones and Berlin: City of Smoke; Satrapi, Marjane. Persepolis, I and II; Spiegelman, Art. In the Shadow of No Towers; Vaughn, Brian. Pride of Baghdad.

Students will write one paper on a series of their choosing, subject to approval.

Requirements & Grading: Participation in Class discussion, 10%; Quizzes on Reading, 10%; Independent reading paper, 20%; Weekly Reading Responses, 30%; Final Paper (8-10 pages), 30%.

E 348 • 20th-Century Short Story

35810 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 105
C2

Instructor:  Doherty, B            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35810            Flags:  n/a  (non-writing flag)

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: In this short story class we will classic and contemporary texts in the genre. The 40 Short Stories anthology will give us a glimpse into transformative writers like Chekhov, Joyce, Faulkner, Garcia-Marquez, and Carver. We’ll use our Course Reader to go a little more thoroughly into the writer’s styles and concerns—so on Joyce day we will have two Joyce stories, three stories by Carver, etc. We’ll pay some attention to the periods or styles in which the writers are usually placed (realist, modernist, southern gothic, magical realist, etc.) and the historical issues addressed in the work. In a brief departure from the survey course of the short story, we’ll take a sustained look at one of the acknowledged masters, reading most of Alice Munro’s 2002 collection (hoping to time it with the release of the film based on the title story). And we will have some days where we will read the work of writers who are reading in Austin, and writers who are published in the most recent volumes of publications like The New Yorker. The course reader will also introduce students to contemporary writers both American (George Saunders, Karen Russell) and international (Yiyun Lee, Haruki Murakami).

Texts: 40 Short Stories, Beverly Lawn, ed.; Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage, Alice Munro; A course reader.

Requirement & Grading: A test on the classic authors. (Author biographies, literary periods, plot points)  (25%); A test on realist authors and Alice Munro 25%; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 5 of 7 taken for grade): 10%; Participation in class discussion analyzing the stories: 10%; Short essay (3-4 pages) on one story from the course (variable due dates): 20%; Short assignments and blackboard discussion posts: 10%

This is a discussion-based format (which includes listening). Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen. Excessive absences (more than 4) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 4).

E 348 • 20th-Century Short Story

35815 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 103
Wr

Instructor:  Doherty, B            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35815            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: In this short story class we will classic and contemporary texts in the genre. The 40 Short Stories anthology will give us a glimpse into transformative writers like Chekhov, Joyce, Faulkner, Garcia-Marquez, and Carver. We’ll use our Course Reader to go a little more thoroughly into the writer’s styles and concerns—so on Joyce day we will have two Joyce stories, three stories by Carver, etc. We’ll pay some attention to the periods or styles in which the writers are usually placed (realist, modernist, southern gothic, magical realist, etc.) and the historical issues addressed in the work. In a brief departure from the survey course of the short story, we’ll take a sustained look at one of the acknowledged masters, reading most of Alice Munro’s 2002 collection (hoping to time it with the release of the film based on the title story). And we will have some days where we will read the work of writers who are reading in Austin, and writers who are published in the most recent volumes of publications like The New Yorker. The course reader will also introduce students to contemporary writers both American (George Saunders, Karen Russell) and international (Yiyun Lee, Haruki Murakami).

Texts: 40 Short Stories, Beverly Lawn, ed.; Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage, Alice Munro; A course reader.

Requirement & Grading: A test on the classic authors. (Author biographies, literary periods, plot points)  (20%); Two short (2-3-page) papers on individual stories: 20%; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 5 of 7 taken for grade): 10%; Participation in class discussion analyzing the stories: 10%; Prospectus for sustained analytical paper (2-3 pages): 10%; Final paper (6-8 pages): 30%.

This is a discussion-based format (which includes listening). Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen. Excessive absences (more than 4) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 4).

E F316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

83505 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM JGB 2.202
GC

Instructor:  Doherty, B            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  83505            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Summer 2013, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  C L 315            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Please refer to the course schedule for course days, time, and room location: http://registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/.

Global Modern Literature—

We will use the Norton Anthology to discuss a wide variety of Twentieth Century Texts from around the globe. There will be three interconnected contexts for our reading: (1) Literary periods and approaches European (Modernism (Kafka, Joyce, Woolf); World Modernism (Lu, Chang); Post-modernism (Beckett and Lispecter), Romanticism (Tagore), Realism (Munro, Lessing), Surrealism (Cesaire); orality (Diop, Peynetsa); (2) Intellectual and cultural movements (Marxism, Psychoanalysis); and literary and testimonial responses to historical events such as Stalin’s Russia (Akhmatova) the concentration camps and the Holocaust (Borowski, Bachman); the modern Middle East (Amichai, Yehoshua),

The bulk of the reading will consist of substantial shorter works, from poems to short stories, shorter novels and plays. From the canon of literature to which the students will be exposed, perceptive readers will gain an appreciation of why literature is an essential response to the modern world. It is hoped that the course will be an incitement to a lifetime of sustained literary engagement on a high level.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of World Literature, volume F; Supplementary Material Available on Electronic Reserves; Some Film Texts will be required.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance, participation in class discussion: 15%; 2-3-page review of World Culture Film: 10%; Test one (Modernism in Europe and the World): 25%; Essay on second set of readings (3-4 pages): 15%; Final exam covers all material since first test: 35%.

E S349S • Bob Dylan

83748 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WEL 2.256

Instructor:  Doherty, B Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  83748 Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2013, second session Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: Please refer to the course schedule for course days, time, and room location: http://registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/

Description: Bob Dylan is admired by many as a poetic troubadour who forever transformed the way we think of popular music. Others are less appreciative of his contributions to culture, and emphasize his enigmatic imagery, gravelly voice, and chameleonic nature. This course is open to those of both persuasions, but we will try to support the first point of view in our study of Dylan’s music, poetry, and memoir.

Reading for the class will come primarily from the lyric sheets from some of Dylan’s albums, especially Highway 61 Revisited, Blonde on Blonde, and Blood on the Tracks. Some days, students will be asked to read and evaluate the song/poems in a personal, somewhat casual fashion; other days we will take the same poems and read them through their commentators, like literary critic Chrisopher Ricks or music critic Greil Marcus. Along the way, we will be attentive to the “myth of Dylan” and what that says about the United States. Required film texts will be D.A. Pennbaker’s Don’t Look Back, Martin Scorcese’s No Direction Home, and Todd Haynes’ portrait of the artist played by six different actors, I’m Not There.

Texts: Bob Dylan. Chronicles: Volume One.  Simon and Schuster, 2005.

Highway 61 Revisited

Blonde on Blonde

Blood on the Tracks

Other Dylan pieces will be read using the miracle of modern media technology, but students should be prepared to have the complete album of work from these three titles.

Greil Marcus. Like a Rolling Stone: Bob Dylan at the Crossroads. PublicAffairs, 2006.

Course Reader with analytical essays, reviews, sections from Woody Guthrie’s Bound for Glory, and other readings on Dylan.

Requirements & Grading: “Book Report” on a book about Dylan (2-4 pages), 10%; Two song analyses (2 pages each), 20%; In-class quizzes (best 4 of 6 taken for grade), 10%; Participation in classroom discussion, 10%; Short “homework” assignments or Blackboard discussions, 10%; Prospectus on final paper on an aspect of Dylan’s writing/career, 10%; Final paper for the session (5-7 pages), 30%.

E 360L • Global Literature In English

35565 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 204
GCWr

Instructor:  Doherty, B            Areas:  V / G

Unique #:  35565            Flags:  Global Cultures; Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: From Oceania to Jamaica, Canada to South Africa, India to Nigeria, and numerous other lands, English is the language for literary artists. We will engage with the various and diverse products of the range of voices, discovering that literature is a vital tool for understanding cultures, histories, the vastness of human experience and the human imagination. A central question that will guide some of our literary travels is: what happens to the English language as it travels to and interacts with cultures far from London and Oxbridge?  Students will develop an expanded notion of the written world.

Texts: Dohra Ahmad, Rotten English: A Literary Anthology; Helon Habila, Measuring Time; James Kelman, How Late it Was, How Late; Austin Clarke, The Polished Hoe; A course reader with essays and short stories.

Film Texts will include Danny Boyle’s Trainspotting, Mike Leigh’s Riff-Raff, and Michael Thelwell’s The Harder They Come.

Requirements & Grading: Grading will be done on a variety of assignments, including participation in discussions, short papers, a presentation on a historical aspect of some of our reading, a prospectus for a semester’s end paper and the final paper.

E 379R • Lit And Culture Of The 1960s

35735 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 310
IIWr

Instructor:  Doherty, B            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  35735            Flags:  Writing; Independent Inquiry

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

 

Only one of the following may be counted: 679HA (Topic: Literature and Culture of the Sixties), 379N (Topic: Literature and Culture of the 1960s), 379R (Topic: Literature and Culture of the 1960s), 379S (embedded topic: Literature and Culture of the 1960s).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The 60s continues to fascinate: as myth, as reality, as a kind or origin of so much of what has survived today. Our attempt at a productive engagement with the decade will include several forays of independent study and several texts we will read in common. Independent work will be done by students in the print culture of the day—from the glossy photojournalism of Life Magazine to the counterculture literary journalism of Ramparts and The Evergreen Review to the mimeograph produced underground press. Students will also choose a recently published book on the 60s—choosing between memoir, reassessments, or focused histories.

Some authors we will read in common are Donald Barthelme, Bob Dylan, Joan Didion, Amiri Baraka, and Thomas Pynchon. We will take a little time to study some texts by 60s gurus like Timothy Leary, Richard Alpert, and Carlos Casteneda.

It is hoped that by the end of the semester students will have a greater understanding of this turbulent, charged period in American culture, and many more questions about the decade than they had at the beginning of the course.

Texts: Donald Barthelme, Sixty Stories; Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49; Resources in the Perry Casteneda Library; Course Reader.

Requirements & Grading: Report on assigned book, read independently (3-4 pages), 10%; Report on a significant album of 60s music (15-minute presentation and 3-4 pages written), 20%; Report on an underground newspaper (2-3 pages), 10%; Two or three short assignments (2-3 pages each), 10%; Participation in class discussion, 10%; Periodic quizzes on reading material, 10%; Final paper/project, 30%.

C L 315 • Masterworks Of Lit: World

33605-33615 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM WCH 1.120
GC (also listed as E 316K)

Instructor:  Doherty, B            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  35230-35275            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  C L 315            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Global Modern Literature--

We will use the divisions made in our anthology, thus there will be three historical foci: Modernity and Modernism; Postwar and Postcolonial Literature; and Contemporary World Literature. We will examine how history transforms literary values and the impact of individual authors on their literary descendants. Students should acquire a solid idea of what it is that constitutes modernism in literature, as well as an understanding of such terms as postmodernism, postcolonialism, Marxism, realism, etc. It is hoped that from this wide variety of modern and contemporary authors, students will construct the foundation for a lifetime of substantive and enriching literature.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Volume F, Third Edition. (Cover art is a painting called Tamara in the Green Bugatti).

Requirements & Grading: Test #1 (on Modernity and Modernism), 20%; Essay Test (on texts from Postwar writing; take home), 25%; Final Exam (on texts from 2nd and 3rd section of course), 35%; TA Section Participation, 15%; Live World Literary Culture Review, 5%.

E 603A • Comp And Reading In World Lit

34550 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CAL 200

The course is designed in two ways—(1) to show the relevance and vitality of classic and modern culture in the present day, and (2), to explore a range of literature from a variety of western and non-western cultures.

For (1), we will have sequences of reading with a foundation in a live Austin performance.  For the annual reading of translator and performer Stanley Lombardo we will have a classical sequence based on his scheduled readings.  We will deeply explore Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice in preparation for the annual visit of The Actors from the London Stage.  We will read and discuss the relevant play we choose from the Department of Theater or St. Edward’s season.  And we will read from notable authors scheduled to read at UT.   Attendance will be required for the majority of these performances.

For (2), there will be a series of mini-courses, so to speak.  We will have a comparable reading of war epics—from The Iliad to The Mahabharata to the Mali Empire Epic Sundiata.  There will be what might be considered mini-courses—reading in Confucius and Lao Tsu will be followed by T’ang Dynasty poets, then the Chinese turn-of-the-century writer Lu Xun and an important living writer.  Modern India will be explored through short stories by Rabindranath Tagore, Premchand, and R.K. Narayan, and through a major novel like Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things.  Either Africa or South America will be featured in a third mini-course.

For a blend of (1) and (2) we will read a text or texts at the end of the first semester by the 2012 Nobel Prize Winner in Literature.  We will know who that is some time in October.

Film will be an essential component of our course.

Texts:

Shakespeare, William.  The Merchant of Venice.  (Norton Critical Editions, editor, Leah S. Marcus).

Narayan, R.K.  The Mahabharata: A Shortened Modern Prose Version of the Original Epic

Other texts will be ordered by mid-summer, dependent on Austin performances.

A Course Reader and online texts will contain required material.

Assignments:

Three or five short assignments (Library Treasure Hunt, Epic Storytelling, reviews of readings/ performances, etc.)    10%

Oral Presentation on assigned topic to enhance reader understanding of texts.   10%

Active and useful participation in class discussion.                                            10%

Short, objective quizzes on the reading (to encourage preparedness)                 10%

Short Paper on The Merchant of Venice section (3-4 pages).                              20%

Short Paper on Greek or Indian Epic section.                                                    20%

Short Paper on Nobel Winner.                                                                          20%

Papers subject to student revision, except the last paper.  It is hoped that the numerous short assignments allow for growth and the development of good writing practices.

About the Professor:

Brian Doherty is a senior lecturer in the English Department. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1994. Courses taught in Masterworks of World Literature have led to an interest in the newly developing canon of global world literature. He has an essay in progress on ''Three Presentations of Achebe's Things Fall Apart,'' which looks at the novel in context of three different anthologies.

E 348 • 20th-Century Short Story

35445 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 204
Wr C2

Instructor:  Doherty, B            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35445            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: Let’s have four short courses in the short story, each one centered on a volume of work. The first is Kafka and his descendants, beginning with the master of alienation and including  writers who take up some of Kafka’s concerns and stylistic innovations. A second will take a geographic and cultural foray into literature of China, beginning with the acknowledged master Lu Xun, and moving to more contemporary writers like Wang Meng. A third strain begins with Alice Munro’s deeply psychological and finely crafted stories and read some contemporaries who employ the same kinds of methodology and insight, Like William Trevor and Jhumpa Lahiri. A fourth and final strain will take a very recent collection—Nathan Englander’s What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank—juxtaposed against some powerful contemporary writers. These last may be taken from the weekly selection of writers chosen by The New Yorker during the semester. They may include writers who visit the UT campus or read at Bookpeople during the semester.

Texts: Kafka’s Selected Stories, A Norton Critical Edition, Edited by Stanley Corngold; The Real Story of Ah-Q and Other Tales of China, Penguin Classics; Runaway, Alice Munro; What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank, Nathan Englander.

Requirement & Grading: Two tests, on the Kafka and Lu Xun section. Author biographies, literary periods, plot points: 10% each (20%); Two short (2-3-page) papers on individual stories: 20%; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 5 of 7 taken for grade): 10%; Participation in class discussion analyzing the stories: 10%; Prospectus for sustained analytical paper (2-3 pages): 10%; Final paper (6-8 pages): 30%.

This is a discussion-based format (which includes listening). Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen. Excessive absences (more than 4) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 4).

E F379R • Lit And Culture Of The 1960s

83725 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 302
IIWr

Instructor:  Doherty, B            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  83725            Flags:  Writing; Independent Inquiry

Semester:  Summer 2012, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: 679HA (Topic: Literature and Culture of the Sixties), 379N (Topic: Literature and Culture of the 1960s), 379R (Topic: Literature and Culture of the 1960s), 379S (embedded topic: Literature and Culture of the 1960s).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The primary emphasis for this version of the course will be literature, inclusive of short story, novel, song text, poetry, and memoir.  We will have a reader with short stories from the black humorists, American postmodernism, the Black Arts Movement, and women writers who fit none of the above categories.  Students might be expected to have a passing knowledge of some of the primary social and cultural movements of the era, but these will be secondary to evaluating the transformations in literary culture that occurred during the era.  Writers include Barth, Barthelme, Pynchon, Southern, Vonnegut, Didiion, Wakowski, Baraka, Sanchez Giovanni, Walker.

At the end of each week, we will closely evaluate an influential album of 60s music—or two.  Hendrix, The Doors, Janis, Beatles or Rolling Stones, Dylan and The Band, Marvin Gaye, Sly and the Family Stone.  Zappa.

Texts: Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49; also, texts in Course Reader and on Electronic Reserves.

Requirements & Grading: Periodic, required submission to the Blackboard discussion board, 10%; Quizzes on daily reading (best 6 of 8 taken for grade), 15%; 2 short papers on assigned text, 20%; Prospectus for paper or project (2-3 pages), 10%; Paper or alternative project on topic of choice (6-8 pages; due no later than Thursday, July 5.), 30%; Attendance, class participation, 15%.

E S360L • New Brit Voices, 1948-2012-Eng

83890 • Summer 2012

Instructor:  Doherty, B            Areas:  III / G

Unique #:  83890            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2011, second session            Restrictions:  Oxford Summer Program participants

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The end of World War II brought waves of immigrants to England from the far-flung shores of the once mighty British Empire. The rich and varied cultures of the home countries of the South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean have transformed English cuisine, popular culture, and even the language. The new face of England has also produced racial hatred, hooliganism, and social unrest.

Postcolonial British literature since 1948 gives readers a complex, nuanced, and powerful vision of the new England that is rich in history. Sam Selvon’s The Lonely Londoners, written in the vernacular of the immigrant underground, is the indispensable origin text. Andrea Levy takes some of the same experiences and adds multiple perspectives to the travails of the new “arrivants” from Jamaica. Wadham College alumni Monica Ali writes movingly of Bangledeshi immigrants in her novel Brick Lane. We will read the Oxford Experiences of cultural critic Stuart Hall and poet and novelist Dambudzo Marechera, and experience the “dub poetry” of cultural icon Linton Kwesi Johnson.

We will invite one or more of the authors to visit the class in Oxford to discuss their work. Schedule permitting, we’ll attend a theatre production of a work by Kwame Kwei Armah or one of the other rising Black playwrights. We will visit such living spaces as Brick Lane, the Brixton Market, Windrush Plaza (commemorating the first ocean liner to arrive with Caribbean immigrants), and cultural spaces as the Brixton Cultural Center.

Requirements & Grading: Participation in discussion sections: 20%; Oral Research Presentation (author, history, locale): 10%; Quizzes on Reading (best 5 of 6 taken for grade): 10%; Four “homework” assignments, reviews of on-site events: 20%; Short paper on Caliban section (2-3 pages): 10%; Final paper (5-7 pages): 30%.

E 379R • Lit And Culture Of The 1960s

35540 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 204
IIWr

Instructor:  Doherty, B            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  35540            Flags:  Writing; Independent Inquiry

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: 679HA (Topic: Literature and Culture of the Sixties), 379N (Topic: Literature and Culture of the 1960s), 379R (Topic: Literature and Culture of the 1960s), 379S (embedded topic: Literature and Culture of the 1960s).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The 60s continues to fascinate: as myth, as reality, as a kind or origin of so much of what has survived today. Our attempt at a productive engagement with the decade will include several forays of independent study and several texts we will read in common. Independent work will be done by students in the print culture of the day—from the glossy photojournalism of Life Magazine to the counterculture literary journalism of Ramparts and The Evergreen Review to the mimeograph produced underground press. Students will also choose a recently published book on the 60s—choosing between memoir, reassessments, or focused histories.

Some authors we will read in common are Donald Barthelme, Bob Dylan, Joan Didion, Amiri Baraka, and Thomas Pynchon. We will take a little time to study some texts by 60s gurus like Timothy Leary, Richard Alpert, and Carlos Casteneda.

It is hoped that by the end of the semester students will have a greater understanding of this turbulent, charged period in American culture, and many more questions about the decade than they had at the beginning of the course.

Texts: Donald Barthelme, Sixty Stories; Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49; Resources in the Perry Casteneda Library; Course Reader.

Requirements & Grading: Report on assigned book, read independently (3-4 pages), 10%; Report on a significant album of 60s music (15-minute presentation and 3-4 pages written), 20%; Report on an underground newspaper (2-3 pages), 10%; Two or three short assignments (2-3 pages each), 10%; Participation in class discussion, 10%; Periodic quizzes on reading material, 10%; Final paper/project, 30%.

E 349S • Alice Munro

35320 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 308
Wr

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course centers around the work of Canadian writer Alice Munro, one of the most accomplished and influential living authors. She is often compared to Anton Chekhov, James Joyce, and William Trevor, and her short stories are incisive probes into the deepest and darkest areas of human psychology and behavior

Reading for the course will consist of stories Munro has written over the last forty years; we will explore the nuances of her character development and the elements she uses to craft such powerful tales. Students will be challenged to bring a depth of perception to their analysis of this sophisticated work. Some secondary reading in Munro biography and criticism will be required, as well as an occasional story from comparable great writers, or writers who confess a debt to Munro’s influence. There will be at least one film text—Away from Her, directed by Sarah Polley from a Munro story.

Readers will find in Munro’s work great wisdom, astonishing craft, and an unspeakable ability to amaze. 

Texts: Munro, Alice. Carried Away: A Selection of Stories. (2006), The View From Castle Rock. (2006); Course Reader: A Supplementary Selection of Stories from Munro and others, with some secondary texts.

Requirements & Grading: Participation in Class Discussion, 15%; Quizzes on assigned reading (best 5 of 7 taken for grade), 10%; Analysis and evaluation of secondary text (2 pages), 15%; One Short Paper (3-4 pages) on a single story, 20%; Prospectus of the semester paper (2-3 pages), 10%; Semester Paper (7-9 pages), a sustained analysis of a formal and/or thematic element in Munro’s work, 30%.

E F348 • 20th-Century Short Story

83580 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 204

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: We will use our anthology to get a background on influential writers and their short stories

 

The reading will be organized into sections: Realism, Modernism, Postmodernism, etc. Then into geographical sections—focus on India, on Africa, on East Asia, etc.

 

The Course Packet will contain stories by authors in the anthologies, so that we can take an extended view of several of our writers and see the diversity of concerns in their texts.  There will also be some texts in the packet that bring our reading into the 21st century.

 

Texts: Forty Short Stories: A Portable Anthology. Beverly Lawn, editor. Course Packet, available at Jenn’s.

 

Requirement & Grading: Two tests, on author biographies, literary periods, plot points: 20% each; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 6 of 8 taken for grade): 15%; Participation in class discussion; 10%.  Final Exam: 35%

 

Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen. Excessive absences (more than 4) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 4).

E S316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

83770 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM MEZ 1.306
GC HU

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

 

Description: Please refer to the course schedule for course days, time, and room location: http://registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/.

 

Global Modern Literature—

We will use the Norton Anthology to discuss a wide variety of Twentieth Century Texts from around the globe. There will be three interconnected contexts for our reading: (1) Literary periods and approaches European (Modernism (Kafka, Joyce, Woolf); World Modernism (Lu, Chang); Post-modernism (Beckett and Lispecter), Romanticism (Tagore), Realism (Munro, Lessing), Surrealism (Cesaire); orality (Diop, Peynetsa); (2) Intellectual and cultural movements (Marxism, Psychoanalysis); and literary and testimonial responses to historical events such as Stalin’s Russia (Akhmatova) the concentration camps and the Holocaust (Borowski, Bachman); the modern Middle East (Amichai, Yehoshua),

 

The bulk of the reading will consist of substantial shorter works, from poems to short stories, shorter novels and plays. From the canon of literature to which the students will be exposed, perceptive readers will gain an appreciation of why literature is an essential response to the modern world. It is hoped that the course will be an incitement to a lifetime of sustained literary engagement on a high level.

 

Texts: The Norton Anthology of World Literature, volume F; Supplementary Material Available on Electronic Reserves; Some Film Texts will be required.

 

Requirements & Grading: Discussion Section--Attendance, participation, short assignments: 15%; 2-3-page review of World Culture Film: 10%; Test one (Modernism in Europe and the World): 25%; Essay test, on second set of readings (3-4 pages): 15%; Final exam covers all material since first test: 35%.

AFR 374F • Postcol Lit: Diaspora & Exile

35420 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 304
Wr (also listed as ANS 320, E 360L)

Cross-listed with ANS 320; AFR 374F

Course Description: The creation of a new world map and the transformation of ancient cultures is the indisputable legacy of colonialism. From the middle of the twentieth century to the present, there has been a flow of colonial subjects and postcolonial émigrés into the cultural capitals of Europe and North America, causing a secondary global transformation. The struggles of the new “arrivants,” the transformations of cities and cultures, and the generational battles over retaining customs vs. assimilating and modernizing have been a fertile field for writers, theorists, and filmmakers. In this course we will examine a range of texts that struggle with questions of identity, assimilation, racial hatred, cultural transformation, the romance of the great city (Paris, London, New York), and the appropriation of literary and film forms to address these problems.

Texts: Hurricane Hits England: An Anthology of Writing About Black Britain; Nadeem Aslam. Maps for Lost Lovers; Linton Kwesi Johnson. Mi Revalueshunary Fren; Samuel Selvon. The Lonely Londoners. Course Reader with Essays on Identity, Nationality and Exile. Short Stories about exile in England, France, the United States, and Canada.

Possible Film Texts: Dirty Pretty Things. Stephen Frears, director; La Haine. Mathieu Kassovitz. director; Black Girl. Ousmane Sembene, director.

Grading: Periodic quizzes on Reading. A test on terms, histories, geography, and writer biographies.  Participation in class discussion. A final paper which does an in-depth analysis on a text or a comparative paper on selected texts.

E 348 • 20th-Century Short Story

34655 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM PAR 206

Course Description: I have chosen an anthology for this course that allows us to read some influential writers in context of their literary era, their literary influences, and the influence they had on subsequent writers. The anthology is wide-ranging historically and geographically, providing a great diversity of voices and styles of writing.The reading will be organized into sections: Realism, Modernism, Postmodernism, etc. Then into geographical sections—focus on India, on Africa, on East Asia, etc.The Course Packet will contain stories by authors in the anthologies, so that we can take an extended view of several of our writers and see the diversity of concerns in their texts.

Texts: The Story and its Writer: An Introduction to Short Fiction, Anne Charters, editor; Course Packet, available at Jenn’s.

Grading: One test on author biographies, literary periods, plot points after three and a half weeks: 20%; Two short (2-3-page) papers on individual stories: 20%; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 5 of 7 taken for grade): 10%; Participation in class discussion analyzing the stories: 10%; Prospectus for sustained analytical paper (2-3 pages): 10%; Final paper (6-8 pages): 30%. This is a discussion-based format (which includes listening). Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen. Excessive absences (more than 4) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 4).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

E 348 • 20th-Century Short Story

34660 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 204
Wr C2

Course Description: I have chosen an anthology for this course that allows us to read some influential writers in context of their literary era, their literary influences, and the influence they had on subsequent writers. The anthology is wide-ranging historically and geographically, providing a great diversity of voices and styles of writing. The reading will be organized into sections: Realism, Modernism, Postmodernism, etc. Then into geographical sections—focus on India, on Africa, on East Asia, etc. The Course Packet will contain stories by authors in the anthologies, so that we can take an extended view of several of our writers and see the diversity of concerns in their texts.

Texts: The Story and its Writer: An Introduction to Short Fiction, Anne Charters, editor; Course Packet, available at Jenn’s.

Grading: One test on author biographies, literary periods, plot points after 3 and a half weeks: 20%; Periodic quizzes on the day’s reading (best 6 of 8 taken for grade): 10%; Two short papers on assigned reading (2-3 pages): 20%?; Participation in class discussion analyzing the stories: 10%; Test #2 (author biographies, cultural notes, plot points): 20%; Test # 3 (author biographies, cultural notes, plot points): 20%. This is a discussion-based format (which includes listening). Absence from class severely limits your ability to discuss or listen. Excessive absences (more than 4) will detract from your grade (10 points for each class day missed after 4).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

E S316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

83250 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM WEL 1.316
HU

Course Description: Please refer to the course schedule for course days, time, room location, prerequisites and possible cross-listings: http://registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/. Global Modern Literature-- The course will be segmented to work toward several, related approaches to literature. In the first section we will read texts that are representative of several literary periods since the 17h century: Enlightenment, Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, and Postmodernism, with at least a nod toward the impact of Marxism in literature. (Moliere, Wordsworth, Dostoevsky, Joyce, Woolf, Borges, Murakami, Brecht). A second section of the course will be a cross cultural examination of an issue in world literature—for this summer course I anticipate looking at war and conflict in literature from a variety of cultures and contexts. We will call the remaining class sessions a miscellany, using the opportunity to examine some compelling texts and areas of literary culture in the fashion of the "whirlwind world tour." Expect to visit India, China, Africa, and South America. We continue to invoke the role of history, as well as post-colonialism, globalization, and hybrid identities, along with national and regional cultures.

Texts: The Longman Anthology of World Literature, volumes D, E, F; Supplementary Material Available on Electronic Reserves; Some Film Texts will be required.

Grading Policy:
Impromptu Quizzes on Assigned Readings.  Given the Day of the Reading or
In Friday Review Session.  Best 5 of 7 for grade.                    10%
Test One.  July 26.                                                          25%
Test Two.  August 9.                                                        30%
Test Three, Final Exam.  Monday, August 16, 7-10.                 35%

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

AFR 374F • Postcol Lit: Diaspora & Exile

35840 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 105
(also listed as ANS 320, E 360L)

TBD

ANS 320 • Literature Of South Asia

31242 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 103

Please check back for updates.


ANS 372 • Literature Of South Asia-W

30595 • Spring 2007
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 105
C2

Please check back for updates.

ANS 320 • Literature Of South Asia

28910 • Fall 2004
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 105

Please check back for updates.


Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages


External Links



  •   Map
  • Plan II Honors Program

    University of Texas at Austin
    305 East 23rd St
    RLP 2.102
    Austin, Texas, 78712-1250
    512-471-1442