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Frances Champagne


Faculty Research AssociatePh.D., McGill University

Professor, Department of Psychology
Frances Champagne

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Biography


After completing a B.A. in Psychology at Queen’s University (Canada), I delved into the genetic and environmental risk factors in psychopathology at McGill University in the M.Sc. program in Psychiatry.  I then started a Ph.D. in Neuroscience at McGill University examining the role of mother-infant interactions in shaping the brain.  In 2004, I received a fellowship from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to conduct postdoctoral research at Cambridge University (UK), examining the role of imprinted genes in development and social behavior.  From 2006-2017, I was a faculty in the Department of Psychology at Columbia University and established a research group examining the epigenetic influence of early life experiences.  My interests focus on the interplay between genes and environment that shape neural and behavioral outcomes and the implications of this dynamic interplay for inheritance of traits.

Courses


PSY 341K • The Developing Brain-Wb

41439 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM
Internet

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of brain development from embryogenesis through adulthood with an emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.  In addition to lectures, students will have smaller group discussions with the instructor to review and explore topics in more depth.

UGS 302 • Who Do You Think You Are-Wb

60250 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM
Internet
Wr ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

PSY 341K • Ethics, Genetics/The Brain

41989 • Spring 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 203
Wr

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 341K • The Developing Brain

42563 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 203

This lecture course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of braindevelopment from embryogenesis through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the environment in directing this process. Initial lectures will focus on the origins of the central nervous system, including topics such as the organization of the brain, neurogenesis, cellular differentiation, migration and targeting of neurons, synapse formation and refinement of the nervous system. In the second half of the course, lectures will focus on the infant brain and the role of experiences during infancy in modifying brain function. Topics will also include recent advances in our understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions and epigenetic programming and shaping brain development. Finally, the adaptive vs. maladaptive outcomes of environmental modifications to the nervous system will be discussed. Throughout the course, students will be guided through examples of how changes in the developing nervous system lead to behavioral patterns both in infancy and adulthood.

PSY 341K • Ethics, Genetics/The Brain

42800 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SEA 2.108

A lecture course that explores advances in genetics and neuroscience. These advances have expanded our understanding of the biological basis of behavior and risk of psychiatric disorder but may have implications for decision/policy making, legal issues, and society and raise broad ethical concerns. In this course, we will discuss these implications and issues and consider the future challenges that may arise from the evolving study of the genetic and neurobiological determinants of behavior.

Assignments:
40% of the grade is based on class discussion/participation/oral presentation
20% exam
40% on a 10-15 page essay

PSY 341K • Ethics, Genetics/The Brain

43132 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SEA 2.108

A lecture course that explores advances in genetics and neuroscience.  These advances have expanded our understanding of the biological basis of behavior and risk of psychiatric disorder but may have implications for decision/policy making, legal issues, and society and raise broad ethical concerns. In this course, we will discuss these implications and issues and consider the future challenges that may arise from the evolving study of the genetic and neurobiological determinants of behavior.

Publications


Robakis TK, Lee S, Werner E, Liu G, Miller M, Wylie, Champagne FA, Salas M, Dod C, Tycko B, Monk C (2020) DNA methylation patterns in T lymphocytes are generally stable in human pregnancies but CD3 methylation is associated with perinatal psychiatric symptoms Brain, Behavior, & Immunity - Health 3:100044.

Walsh K, McCormack CA, Webster R, Pinto A, Lee S, Feng T, Krakovsky HS, O'Grady SM, Tycko B, Champagne FA, Werner EA, Liu G, Monk C (2019) Maternal prenatal stress phenotypes associate with fetal neurodevelopment and birth outcomes. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 16(48):23996-24005

Champagne FA (2019) Interplay between paternal germline and maternal effects in shaping development: the overlooked importance of behavioural ecology.  Functional Ecology 00:1– 13.

Feldman R, Braun A, Champagne FA (2019) The neural mechanisms and consequences of paternal  caregiving. Nat Reviews Neurosci 20:205–224.

Champagne FA (2018) Beyond the maternal epigenetic legacy. Nat Neurosci 21(6):773-774.

Mashoodh R, Habrylo IB, Gudsnuk KM, Pelle G, Champagne FA (2018) Maternal modulation of paternal effects on offspring development. Proc Biol Sci 285(1874).

Nätt D, Barchiesi R, Murad J, Feng J, Nestler EJ, Champagne FA, Thorsell A (2017) Perinatal Malnutrition Leads to Sexually Dimorphic Behavioral Responses with Associated Epigenetic Changes in the Mouse Brain. Sci Rep 7(1):11082.

Monk C, Feng T, Lee S, Krupska I, Champagne FA, Tycko B (2016) Distress during pregnancy: Epigenetic regulation of placenta glucocorticoid-related genes and fetal neurobehavior. Am J Psychiatry 173(7):705-13.

 


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