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Manuela Angelucci


Faculty Research AssociatePh.D., University College London

Associate Professor, Department of Economics
Manuela Angelucci

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Courses


ECO 334M • Migration Economics/Policy-Wb

34755 • Spring 2021
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM
Internet

Prerequisites: The following with a grade of at least C-: Economics 420K or 421K, and 341K or 441K.

Immigration policy of the United States compared to that of other countries. Determinants of migration. Characteristics of migrants. Effects of migration on the country of origin and the receiving country. Unauthorized immigration to the United States.

ECO 334M • Migration Economics/Policy

33750 • Fall 2019
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 301

Prerequisites: The following with a grade of at least C-: Economics 420K or 421K, and 341K or 441K.

Immigration policy of the United States compared to that of other countries. Determinants of migration. Characteristics of migrants. Effects of migration on the country of origin and the receiving country. Unauthorized immigration to the United States.

ECO 349K • Migration Economics/Policy

34460 • Fall 2018
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 1.106

Economics of Entrepreneurship

This course applies insights from economic theory to the practice of starting a new business or expanding a current business.  The course combines elements of strategy, marketing, and entrepreneurial finance courses as typically taught in a business school and an industrial organization course as taught in an economics department.  We start by examining general issues regarding entrepreneurship, in particular the search for markets that can support entrepreneurial profits.  Then, we turn to specific strategic decisions that entrepreneurs make:  pricing, advertising, product location, entry deterrence, etc.  Finally, we examine practical issues in entrepreneurship, including finding capital, business plans, patent protection, negotiation, employee compensation, and auctions as a transactional mechanism.

 

The Economics of Ethics and Social Justice:

 

This course delves into the history of thought on questions relating to ethics, morality, and social justice. We will identify how, in the history of philosophical and economic thought, these terms are related and how they translate into the practice of law and public policy in the United States. Using the tools of economics, we will scrutinize the different theories of social justice used to justify standards for policy on ethical and moral grounds. We will identify and analyze procedures that can and have been used to ensure that the social welfare maximizing outcome coincides with the “just,” “moral,” and “ethical" outcome. We will apply competing theories to our reading of controversial court opinions, regulations, and legislation.  

 

Law and Economics:

In this course we will discuss economic analysis of laws, legal systems, and court rulings, as well as the theory and practice of the common law system. Students will read and respond to case law and prominent authors in the field. Students will analyze and present a case to the class. While no prior knowledge of the law is required, nor knowledge of Game Theory, the course will cover recent applications of law from the game theoretic perspective. 

ECO 349K • Migration Economics/Policy

34359 • Fall 2017
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 1.106

Economics of Entrepreneurship

This course applies insights from economic theory to the practice of starting a new business or expanding a current business.  The course combines elements of strategy, marketing, and entrepreneurial finance courses as typically taught in a business school and an industrial organization course as taught in an economics department.  We start by examining general issues regarding entrepreneurship, in particular the search for markets that can support entrepreneurial profits.  Then, we turn to specific strategic decisions that entrepreneurs make:  pricing, advertising, product location, entry deterrence, etc.  Finally, we examine practical issues in entrepreneurship, including finding capital, business plans, patent protection, negotiation, employee compensation, and auctions as a transactional mechanism.

 

The Economics of Ethics and Social Justice:

 

This course delves into the history of thought on questions relating to ethics, morality, and social justice. We will identify how, in the history of philosophical and economic thought, these terms are related and how they translate into the practice of law and public policy in the United States. Using the tools of economics, we will scrutinize the different theories of social justice used to justify standards for policy on ethical and moral grounds. We will identify and analyze procedures that can and have been used to ensure that the social welfare maximizing outcome coincides with the “just,” “moral,” and “ethical" outcome. We will apply competing theories to our reading of controversial court opinions, regulations, and legislation.  

 

Law and Economics:

In this course we will discuss economic analysis of laws, legal systems, and court rulings, as well as the theory and practice of the common law system. Students will read and respond to case law and prominent authors in the field. Students will analyze and present a case to the class. While no prior knowledge of the law is required, nor knowledge of Game Theory, the course will cover recent applications of law from the game theoretic perspective. 

Curriculum Vitae


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