prc wordmark
prc logo

Yasmiyn Irizarry, PhD


Faculty ScholarsPh.D., Sociology, Indiana University, Bloomington

Assistant Professor, Department of African and African Diaspora Studies
Yasmiyn Irizarry, PhD

Contact

Biography


Dr. Yasmiyn Irizarry is an Assistant Professor in the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies and Affiliated Faculty in the Department of Sociology. She earned her PhD in Sociology from Indiana University in 2011, after which she spent three years as an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Mississippi State University. Dr. Irizarry is quantitative sociologist by training with research interests in sociology of education, race and ethnicity, and social inequality. In addition to her work on the quantitative measurement of race, her current research also examines inequality in students' educational experiences across the academic pipeline, including the relationships between (1) race and teacher perceptions in primary school, (2) racialized tracking and inequality in math coursetaking at the high school level, and (3) race, identity integration, and perceived discrimination among undergradaute STEM majors.

Courses


AFR 302M • Numbering Race

31340 • Fall 2021
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 1.404
QR MA

I. Course Description and Objectives

In this course, you will learn about quantitative methodology and statistics through the lens of race. You will have the opportunity to examine, analyze, and critique real-world data, quantitative research, and public discourse concerning race in America. Some empirical and quantitative skills you will learn this semester include (1) conceptualization and operationalization in quantitative measurement, (2) the calculation and interpretation of descriptive statistics and statistical relationships, (3) the application of statistical techniques to understand social phenomenon, and (4) techniques for presenting results from quantitative analysis. As we cover various statistical techniques, you will also learn about the origins of the concept race, including the actors (many of whom were scientists and statisticians) and actions that brought race into being and continue to justify racial thinking. We will also discuss how these efforts have impacted our current collective and individual understandings of race, especially as they relate to the quantitative study of race and various social problems. This course satisfies the core math requirement and carries the quantitative reasoning flag.

II. Course Requirements

A. Required Readings/ Materials
Leon-Guerrero, Anna, and Chava Frankfort-Nachmias. 2015. Essentials of Social Statistics for a

Diverse Society. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. (LGFN) Scientific calculator

Additional readings will be available online through Canvas. Some of the readings posted are required for the course. Other readings, exercises, information sheets, and links to websites are posted to assist you in this course and enhance your class experience. I encourage you to look them over.

Numbering Race, Irizarry Fall 2015

B. Assignments and Assessment

Problem Sets

Problem sets include calculation and interpretation questions designed to gauge your understanding of the methodological and statistical concepts covered throughout the semester. Problem sets will be posted on Canvas at least one week prior to their due date. Students will need to show all of their work/calculations to receive full credit. Partial credit will be given to answers that are partially correct.

Reading Quizzes

Almost every week throughout the semester, you will have a short quiz on the material covered in the readings. You will be allowed to refer to your notes while taking the quiz, but not the readings or text. There are no make-ups for quizzes; however, I will drop your lowest quiz grade at the end of the semester.

In-Class Assignments

In-class assignments will offer you the opportunity to practice the mathematical, statistical, and critical thinking concepts covered in class.

Team Lab Assignments

To help familiarize you with quantitative methodology and the interpretation and presentation of quantitative data, there will be two team lab assignments. I will post each lab assignment on Canvas at least one week prior to the deadline. Lab assignments must be done with your team members (team member selections will be made after the final drop/add date).

Essays

Students must complete two essays that summarize/evaluate news articles/stories that present racial comparisons stemming from statistical analysis (due dates are noted on course schedule). Each essay must include a minimum of three news stories on a particular topic. These news stories can be from magazines, newspapers, or credible online news sources (check with your instructor if you have any questions). Essays must (1) be at least three-pages (typed), (2) summarize and critique/evaluate your selected news stories, and (3) incorporate concepts and ideas from class discussion and readings. Note: You may not use advertisements and data highlights (these are usually brief and present no real story or argument), academic articles (articles from peer-reviewed journals), or research articles from course readers to complete this assignment. More details regarding each essay will be provided during the semester.

AFR 386C • Theories Of Race/Ethnicity

31535 • Fall 2021
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM RLP 0.124
(also listed as SOC 395L)

Description

Race and racism are central elements of social stratification—shaping life changes from the womb to the grave. In this course, we will discuss prominent theories/theorists of race and racism in ways that center Blackness and Black experiences in the United States. We will explore the foundations of racial classification and thinking, the nature and persistence of racial categories as meaningful social groupings in society, and the ongoing social significance of these group identities. We will also cover structural theories of race, the history of whiteness as a racial category and social force, Black feminist thought, and race and racism from eugenics through the genomic revolution.

As we proceed in our investigation, we will continuously ask: (1) What are the key assumptions, propositions and concepts of this theory? (2) How is this theory located within the larger theoretical tradition? (3) Does this theory agree or disagree with other views in the field? (4) What is the level of empirical support for this theory? (5) To what extent does this theory help to explain contemporary patterns of race and racism across time and space in the United States? A survey of the development of race and racism in scientific and social thought is an ambitious undertaking. We will cover a large amount of complex material over a relatively short period. In order to be successful, we require maximum commitment and effort from all participants. Since this is a graduate seminar, the format will involve presentations/overviews/summaries of assigned readings followed by a critical discussion of the readings and related source materials. Students are required to play an active role in this process sharing the responsibility of presenting, leading discussions, and critiquing with the instructor.

 

Required Texts (the Dean’s Office will not accept “Course Packet” or “TBA”)

(C = Text available on Canvas; O = Text is available online through UT libraries)

Allen, Theodore W. 1994. The Invention of the White Race, Volume 2. London: Verso. O

Bonilla-Silva, Eduardo. 2003. Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield. O

Collins, Patricia Hill. 2002. Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment. New York: Routledge. O

Mills, Charles W. 1997. The Racial Contract. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Morris, Aldon. 2015. The Scholar Denied: W.E.B. Du Bois and the Birth of Modern Sociology. Oakland, CA: University of California Press. O

Omi, Michael and Howard Winant. 1994. Racial Formation in the United States: From the 1960s to the 1990s. 2nd edition. New York: Routledge. O

Roberts, Dorothy. 2012. Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-Create Race in the Twenty-First Century. New York: The New Press. O

Schor, Paul. 2017. Counting Americans: How the US Census Classified the Nation. New York: Oxford University Press. O

Treitler, Vilna Bashi. 2013. The Ethnic Project: Transforming Racial Fiction into Ethnic Factions. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

Yudell, Michael. 2014. Race Unmasked: Biology and Race in the 20th Century. New York: Columbia University Press. O

Some of the readings posted on Canvas are required for the course. Other readings are posted to assist you in this course and enhance your class experience. When pertinent, I will adjust the reading, and/or suggest additional readings and other types of resources. So be prepared to be flexible with regard to the required readings and course materials.

 

Grading Policy

Leading Class Discussion (25%)

Each student will sign up to lead one seminar discussion. Discussion leaders have two distinct duties:

1.      Provide a Clear and Concise Summary of the Reading(s)

The first and most important obligation of each discussion leader is to put before the rest of the class for discussion the core ideas and evidence contained in the readings for the week. Fulfilling this duty involves: 1) motivating an interest in the specific issue or problems, and 2) reviewing in reasonable detail the core questions and objectives of the research, the central argument and evidence developed, and any major conclusions drawn in the work. Presentations should be no longer than 45 minutes (30 minutes each if more than one person is presenting).

Presentations must provide, as thoroughly as possible, a balance of the following:

Main Questions: An overview of the author’s central concerns in each text. What are the foremost problems? How does the author justify the focus on such questions and concerns?

Methodology: This portion of your presentation must be detailed and precise, and may require a small amount of extra reading in order to provide a well-informed methodological description. Here you must reflect on the author’s database, and how she defines it, gathers it, and makes sense of it. You also need to provide details about how the author actually practices this approach in the text itself: highlight and explain specific passages where the author’s methodology is employed. You should ask yourself: how does the reading’s organization reflect the author’s methodological strategy?

Findings and/or Theoretical Argument: This portion of the presentation is meant to identify and elaborate key findings and theoretical arguments, as well as the main conclusions of each text.

Positives and Negatives: Address what you see as the strengths and weaknesses of the reading(s). Be explicit about the strong points, interesting observations, useful contributions, or provocative insights offered in the work. What are the important contributions of the work and why do you feel that way? Also, be explicit about the shortcomings or failings of the work. The materials included in this section should proceed at two levels of analysis. First, take the material on its own terms. That is, within the confines of the research problem as defined in the work, what does it deliver on well and what does it fail to deliver on? Second, consider how the work bears on the larger questions and themes of the course. Does it make a clear and meaningful contribution to our understanding of race and/or racism?

 

These four points must also be laid out in writing and uploaded to Canvas for distribution by noon on the day of your assigned presentation. Your written summary should not exceed five (5) single-spaced pages.

 

2.      Guide Discussion through Questions

The second obligation is to facilitate class discussion about important aspects of the readings. You may draw upon the cache of discussion questions submitted to Canvas to realize this duty but should also develop additional questions on your own (or with your co-presenter). The challenge is to hit on the main points of the reading(s) and, when relevant, connect the respective articles/books.

While it is tempting to make the “summary” section of the presentation the longest portion of the discussion, we are particularly interested in talking about the main points of the work. Thus, discussion leaders should leave considerable time to talk with the class about various issues brought up in the readings. You may use handouts, tables, figures, illustrations, videos/film clips, and discussion questions (mentioned above) to help facilitate your discussion.

 

Weekly Discussion Questions (9%)

Beginning in Week 2, seminar participants who are NOT facilitating class discussion are required to post at least two (2) discussion questions to Canvas by 5 pm on the day prior to class. Though a single sentence may be sufficient, longer questions are welcome and encouraged. To receive credit, your questions must: 1) demonstrate both effort and thoughtfulness, and 2) be related in some way to the assigned reading(s). Students may skip up to two (2) weeks with no loss of points.

 

Weekly Reaction Papers (21%)

Beginning in Week 2, seminar participants who are NOT facilitating class discussion are also required to submit a brief reaction paper (between one and two pages single-spaced) on a particular topic covered in the assigned reading(s) via canvas by 5 pm on the day prior to class. Reaction papers are not summaries of the reading(s). Rather, they embody your short, scholarly response to a reading of interest. Except for when you are scheduled to lead discussion, reaction papers may be completed on the weeks of your choosing. You must submit seven (7) reaction papers in total over the course of the semester. This means you may skip five (5) weeks with no loss of points.

 

Final Paper (35%)

The final paper should help you integrate topics raised in this seminar with your own research interests. You will have discretion of the format of your final paper. Some of you may choose to write a research proposal (including, but not limited to, a literature review), while others may prefer to use this opportunity to write a dissertation chapter or provide an ongoing research project with the theoretical framework necessary to submit a paper for publication. The length of your paper will vary depending on its purpose, but you should aim for at least 10 single-spaced pages.

 

A two-page prospectus, single-spaced, must be submitted via Canvas by Thursday, October 15. This initial prospectus is worth 5% of your final grade. I will provide written comments by then end of October. Your final paper is due in December, and must be submitted via Canvas.

 

Be A Human (10%)

From the brilliant Tressie McMillan Cottom @tressiemcphd:

“Be A Human – All the standard university guidelines on collegiality and honesty apply. Be generous with each other. Be decent. Don’t plagiarize. Do not derail discussions. Do no gaslight yourself or others. Do not even try to gaslight me… Share your materials and knowledge and insights and be patient as others do the same. Engage in active listening during class. You’ll note that you can be a great scholar based on your other assignments in this course and still get the grad school ‘B’ in my course if you do not execute on being a human. That is intentional. My promise is that I will always do the same for you.”

AFR 302M • Numbering Race-Wb

31000 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
QR MA

I. Course Description and Objectives

In this course, you will learn about quantitative methodology and statistics through the lens of race. You will have the opportunity to examine, analyze, and critique real-world data, quantitative research, and public discourse concerning race in America. Some empirical and quantitative skills you will learn this semester include (1) conceptualization and operationalization in quantitative measurement, (2) the calculation and interpretation of descriptive statistics and statistical relationships, (3) the application of statistical techniques to understand social phenomenon, and (4) techniques for presenting results from quantitative analysis. As we cover various statistical techniques, you will also learn about the origins of the concept race, including the actors (many of whom were scientists and statisticians) and actions that brought race into being and continue to justify racial thinking. We will also discuss how these efforts have impacted our current collective and individual understandings of race, especially as they relate to the quantitative study of race and various social problems. This course satisfies the core math requirement and carries the quantitative reasoning flag.

II. Course Requirements

A. Required Readings/ Materials
Leon-Guerrero, Anna, and Chava Frankfort-Nachmias. 2015. Essentials of Social Statistics for a

Diverse Society. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. (LGFN) Scientific calculator

Additional readings will be available online through Canvas. Some of the readings posted are required for the course. Other readings, exercises, information sheets, and links to websites are posted to assist you in this course and enhance your class experience. I encourage you to look them over.

Numbering Race, Irizarry Fall 2015

B. Assignments and Assessment

Problem Sets

Problem sets include calculation and interpretation questions designed to gauge your understanding of the methodological and statistical concepts covered throughout the semester. Problem sets will be posted on Canvas at least one week prior to their due date. Students will need to show all of their work/calculations to receive full credit. Partial credit will be given to answers that are partially correct.

Reading Quizzes

Almost every week throughout the semester, you will have a short quiz on the material covered in the readings. You will be allowed to refer to your notes while taking the quiz, but not the readings or text. There are no make-ups for quizzes; however, I will drop your lowest quiz grade at the end of the semester.

In-Class Assignments

In-class assignments will offer you the opportunity to practice the mathematical, statistical, and critical thinking concepts covered in class.

Team Lab Assignments

To help familiarize you with quantitative methodology and the interpretation and presentation of quantitative data, there will be two team lab assignments. I will post each lab assignment on Canvas at least one week prior to the deadline. Lab assignments must be done with your team members (team member selections will be made after the final drop/add date).

Essays

Students must complete two essays that summarize/evaluate news articles/stories that present racial comparisons stemming from statistical analysis (due dates are noted on course schedule). Each essay must include a minimum of three news stories on a particular topic. These news stories can be from magazines, newspapers, or credible online news sources (check with your instructor if you have any questions). Essays must (1) be at least three-pages (typed), (2) summarize and critique/evaluate your selected news stories, and (3) incorporate concepts and ideas from class discussion and readings. Note: You may not use advertisements and data highlights (these are usually brief and present no real story or argument), academic articles (articles from peer-reviewed journals), or research articles from course readers to complete this assignment. More details regarding each essay will be provided during the semester.

AFR 321L • Sociology Of Education-Wb

31090 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as SOC 321L, WGS 345)

Please check back for updates.

AFR 381 • Theories Of Race/Ethnicity-Wb

30225 • Fall 2020
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
(also listed as SOC 395L)

Please check back for updates.

AFR 302M • Numbering Race

29990 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLP 1.402
QR MA

I. Course Description and Objectives

In this course, you will learn about quantitative methodology and statistics through the lens of race. You will have the opportunity to examine, analyze, and critique real-world data, quantitative research, and public discourse concerning race in America. Some empirical and quantitative skills you will learn this semester include (1) conceptualization and operationalization in quantitative measurement, (2) the calculation and interpretation of descriptive statistics and statistical relationships, (3) the application of statistical techniques to understand social phenomenon, and (4) techniques for presenting results from quantitative analysis. As we cover various statistical techniques, you will also learn about the origins of the concept race, including the actors (many of whom were scientists and statisticians) and actions that brought race into being and continue to justify racial thinking. We will also discuss how these efforts have impacted our current collective and individual understandings of race, especially as they relate to the quantitative study of race and various social problems. This course satisfies the core math requirement and carries the quantitative reasoning flag.

II. Course Requirements

A. Required Readings/ Materials
Leon-Guerrero, Anna, and Chava Frankfort-Nachmias. 2015. Essentials of Social Statistics for a

Diverse Society. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. (LGFN) Scientific calculator

Additional readings will be available online through Canvas. Some of the readings posted are required for the course. Other readings, exercises, information sheets, and links to websites are posted to assist you in this course and enhance your class experience. I encourage you to look them over.

Numbering Race, Irizarry Fall 2015

B. Assignments and Assessment

Problem Sets

Problem sets include calculation and interpretation questions designed to gauge your understanding of the methodological and statistical concepts covered throughout the semester. Problem sets will be posted on Canvas at least one week prior to their due date. Students will need to show all of their work/calculations to receive full credit. Partial credit will be given to answers that are partially correct.

Reading Quizzes

Almost every week throughout the semester, you will have a short quiz on the material covered in the readings. You will be allowed to refer to your notes while taking the quiz, but not the readings or text. There are no make-ups for quizzes; however, I will drop your lowest quiz grade at the end of the semester.

In-Class Assignments

In-class assignments will offer you the opportunity to practice the mathematical, statistical, and critical thinking concepts covered in class.

Team Lab Assignments

To help familiarize you with quantitative methodology and the interpretation and presentation of quantitative data, there will be two team lab assignments. I will post each lab assignment on Canvas at least one week prior to the deadline. Lab assignments must be done with your team members (team member selections will be made after the final drop/add date).

Essays

Students must complete two essays that summarize/evaluate news articles/stories that present racial comparisons stemming from statistical analysis (due dates are noted on course schedule). Each essay must include a minimum of three news stories on a particular topic. These news stories can be from magazines, newspapers, or credible online news sources (check with your instructor if you have any questions). Essays must (1) be at least three-pages (typed), (2) summarize and critique/evaluate your selected news stories, and (3) incorporate concepts and ideas from class discussion and readings. Note: You may not use advertisements and data highlights (these are usually brief and present no real story or argument), academic articles (articles from peer-reviewed journals), or research articles from course readers to complete this assignment. More details regarding each essay will be provided during the semester.

AFR 381 • Theories Of Race/Ethnicity

30239 • Fall 2019
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM RLP 3.106

Please check back for updates.

AFR 302M • Numbering Race

30435 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM RLP 1.402
QR MA

I. Course Description and Objectives

In this course, you will learn about quantitative methodology and statistics through the lens of race. You will have the opportunity to examine, analyze, and critique real-world data, quantitative research, and public discourse concerning race in America. Some empirical and quantitative skills you will learn this semester include (1) conceptualization and operationalization in quantitative measurement, (2) the calculation and interpretation of descriptive statistics and statistical relationships, (3) the application of statistical techniques to understand social phenomenon, and (4) techniques for presenting results from quantitative analysis. As we cover various statistical techniques, you will also learn about the origins of the concept race, including the actors (many of whom were scientists and statisticians) and actions that brought race into being and continue to justify racial thinking. We will also discuss how these efforts have impacted our current collective and individual understandings of race, especially as they relate to the quantitative study of race and various social problems. This course satisfies the core math requirement and carries the quantitative reasoning flag.

II. Course Requirements

A. Required Readings/ Materials
Leon-Guerrero, Anna, and Chava Frankfort-Nachmias. 2015. Essentials of Social Statistics for a

Diverse Society. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. (LGFN) Scientific calculator

Additional readings will be available online through Canvas. Some of the readings posted are required for the course. Other readings, exercises, information sheets, and links to websites are posted to assist you in this course and enhance your class experience. I encourage you to look them over.

Numbering Race, Irizarry Fall 2015

B. Assignments and Assessment

Problem Sets

Problem sets include calculation and interpretation questions designed to gauge your understanding of the methodological and statistical concepts covered throughout the semester. Problem sets will be posted on Canvas at least one week prior to their due date. Students will need to show all of their work/calculations to receive full credit. Partial credit will be given to answers that are partially correct.

Reading Quizzes

Almost every week throughout the semester, you will have a short quiz on the material covered in the readings. You will be allowed to refer to your notes while taking the quiz, but not the readings or text. There are no make-ups for quizzes; however, I will drop your lowest quiz grade at the end of the semester.

In-Class Assignments

In-class assignments will offer you the opportunity to practice the mathematical, statistical, and critical thinking concepts covered in class.

Team Lab Assignments

To help familiarize you with quantitative methodology and the interpretation and presentation of quantitative data, there will be two team lab assignments. I will post each lab assignment on Canvas at least one week prior to the deadline. Lab assignments must be done with your team members (team member selections will be made after the final drop/add date).

Essays

Students must complete two essays that summarize/evaluate news articles/stories that present racial comparisons stemming from statistical analysis (due dates are noted on course schedule). Each essay must include a minimum of three news stories on a particular topic. These news stories can be from magazines, newspapers, or credible online news sources (check with your instructor if you have any questions). Essays must (1) be at least three-pages (typed), (2) summarize and critique/evaluate your selected news stories, and (3) incorporate concepts and ideas from class discussion and readings. Note: You may not use advertisements and data highlights (these are usually brief and present no real story or argument), academic articles (articles from peer-reviewed journals), or research articles from course readers to complete this assignment. More details regarding each essay will be provided during the semester.

AFR 321L • Sociology Of Education

30500 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLP 1.104
(also listed as SOC 321L, WGS 345)

Please check back for updates.

AFR 302M • Numbering Race

30115 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 1.404
QR MA

I. Course Description and Objectives

In this course, you will learn about quantitative methodology and statistics through the lens of race. You will have the opportunity to examine, analyze, and critique real-world data, quantitative research, and public discourse concerning race in America. Some empirical and quantitative skills you will learn this semester include (1) conceptualization and operationalization in quantitative measurement, (2) the calculation and interpretation of descriptive statistics and statistical relationships, (3) the application of statistical techniques to understand social phenomenon, and (4) techniques for presenting results from quantitative analysis. As we cover various statistical techniques, you will also learn about the origins of the concept race, including the actors (many of whom were scientists and statisticians) and actions that brought race into being and continue to justify racial thinking. We will also discuss how these efforts have impacted our current collective and individual understandings of race, especially as they relate to the quantitative study of race and various social problems. This course satisfies the core math requirement and carries the quantitative reasoning flag.

II. Course Requirements

A. Required Readings/ Materials
Leon-Guerrero, Anna, and Chava Frankfort-Nachmias. 2015. Essentials of Social Statistics for a

Diverse Society. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. (LGFN) Scientific calculator

Additional readings will be available online through Canvas. Some of the readings posted are required for the course. Other readings, exercises, information sheets, and links to websites are posted to assist you in this course and enhance your class experience. I encourage you to look them over.

Numbering Race, Irizarry Fall 2015

B. Assignments and Assessment

Problem Sets

Problem sets include calculation and interpretation questions designed to gauge your understanding of the methodological and statistical concepts covered throughout the semester. Problem sets will be posted on Canvas at least one week prior to their due date. Students will need to show all of their work/calculations to receive full credit. Partial credit will be given to answers that are partially correct.

Reading Quizzes

Almost every week throughout the semester, you will have a short quiz on the material covered in the readings. You will be allowed to refer to your notes while taking the quiz, but not the readings or text. There are no make-ups for quizzes; however, I will drop your lowest quiz grade at the end of the semester.

In-Class Assignments

In-class assignments will offer you the opportunity to practice the mathematical, statistical, and critical thinking concepts covered in class.

Team Lab Assignments

To help familiarize you with quantitative methodology and the interpretation and presentation of quantitative data, there will be two team lab assignments. I will post each lab assignment on Canvas at least one week prior to the deadline. Lab assignments must be done with your team members (team member selections will be made after the final drop/add date).

Essays

Students must complete two essays that summarize/evaluate news articles/stories that present racial comparisons stemming from statistical analysis (due dates are noted on course schedule). Each essay must include a minimum of three news stories on a particular topic. These news stories can be from magazines, newspapers, or credible online news sources (check with your instructor if you have any questions). Essays must (1) be at least three-pages (typed), (2) summarize and critique/evaluate your selected news stories, and (3) incorporate concepts and ideas from class discussion and readings. Note: You may not use advertisements and data highlights (these are usually brief and present no real story or argument), academic articles (articles from peer-reviewed journals), or research articles from course readers to complete this assignment. More details regarding each essay will be provided during the semester.

AFR 374D • Community Research & Analysis

30385 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 1.404
CDIIQR (also listed as MAS 374)

Course Description:

Regardless of the sector, students pursuing careers in community leadership and program development related careers will be tasked with making important decisions that can have huge implications for the populations they serve. Now that we are in the age of big data, students and professionals alike are bombarded with a constant stream of information from a wide variety of sources (e.g., television, the Internet, newspapers, and magazines), which make these decisions all the more challenging. Much of the information we receive comes in the form of or is rooted in statistics, and we are often confronted with contradictory claims based on this statistical information. Knowing how to understand and sort through all of this information---or even better, knowing how to gather and analyze our own information-requires a level of methodological and statistical literacy that many individuals lack. As a result, we tend to either become skeptical of all statistics or only incorporate and utilize statistics that fit our worldview, both of which can lead to poor decision making.

This course is a formal introduction to quantitative methodology and statistical analysis for Latino and Black serving professionals pursuing private, nonprofit, and public sector careers in community and/or organizational leadership. This is also an experiential learning course. In addition to learning about the nuts and bolts of applied quantitative research, including techniques for collecting (or finding), preparing, analyzing, and interpreting quantitative data, we will collectively (as a class) undertake a quantitative research study for a Texas-based organization or community agency. Although no prior knowledge of statistics is assumed, you should have a good understanding of basic algebraic concepts. If you have never had a course in algebra at the high school level or above, you should consider taking one before enrolling in this course.

 

Proposed Readings: 

1) Nardi, Peter. 2006. Doing Survey Research: A Guide to Quantitative Methods. 2nd ed.

Boston: Pearson.

2) Nardi, Peter. 2006. Interpreting Data (with Research Navigator). Boston: Pearson.

 

Proposed Grading Policy: 

Problem Sets: 25%   250 points

Academic Reviews:     15%    150 points

Assignments:            30%   300 points

Applied Project:         30%    300 points

AFR 302M • Numbering Race

30010 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 1.404
QR MA

I. Course Description and Objectives

In this course, you will learn about quantitative methodology and statistics through the lens of race. You will have the opportunity to examine, analyze, and critique real-world data, quantitative research, and public discourse concerning race in America. Some empirical and quantitative skills you will learn this semester include (1) conceptualization and operationalization in quantitative measurement, (2) the calculation and interpretation of descriptive statistics and statistical relationships, (3) the application of statistical techniques to understand social phenomenon, and (4) techniques for presenting results from quantitative analysis. As we cover various statistical techniques, you will also learn about the origins of the concept race, including the actors (many of whom were scientists and statisticians) and actions that brought race into being and continue to justify racial thinking. We will also discuss how these efforts have impacted our current collective and individual understandings of race, especially as they relate to the quantitative study of race and various social problems. This course satisfies the core math requirement and carries the quantitative reasoning flag.

II. Course Requirements

A. Required Readings/ Materials
Leon-Guerrero, Anna, and Chava Frankfort-Nachmias. 2015. Essentials of Social Statistics for a

Diverse Society. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. (LGFN) Scientific calculator

Additional readings will be available online through Canvas. Some of the readings posted are required for the course. Other readings, exercises, information sheets, and links to websites are posted to assist you in this course and enhance your class experience. I encourage you to look them over.

Numbering Race, Irizarry Fall 2015

B. Assignments and Assessment

Problem Sets

Problem sets include calculation and interpretation questions designed to gauge your understanding of the methodological and statistical concepts covered throughout the semester. Problem sets will be posted on Canvas at least one week prior to their due date. Students will need to show all of their work/calculations to receive full credit. Partial credit will be given to answers that are partially correct.

Reading Quizzes

Almost every week throughout the semester, you will have a short quiz on the material covered in the readings. You will be allowed to refer to your notes while taking the quiz, but not the readings or text. There are no make-ups for quizzes; however, I will drop your lowest quiz grade at the end of the semester.

In-Class Assignments

In-class assignments will offer you the opportunity to practice the mathematical, statistical, and critical thinking concepts covered in class.

Team Lab Assignments

To help familiarize you with quantitative methodology and the interpretation and presentation of quantitative data, there will be two team lab assignments. I will post each lab assignment on Canvas at least one week prior to the deadline. Lab assignments must be done with your team members (team member selections will be made after the final drop/add date).

Essays

Students must complete two essays that summarize/evaluate news articles/stories that present racial comparisons stemming from statistical analysis (due dates are noted on course schedule). Each essay must include a minimum of three news stories on a particular topic. These news stories can be from magazines, newspapers, or credible online news sources (check with your instructor if you have any questions). Essays must (1) be at least three-pages (typed), (2) summarize and critique/evaluate your selected news stories, and (3) incorporate concepts and ideas from class discussion and readings. Note: You may not use advertisements and data highlights (these are usually brief and present no real story or argument), academic articles (articles from peer-reviewed journals), or research articles from course readers to complete this assignment. More details regarding each essay will be provided during the semester.

AFR 374D • Community Research & Analysis

29505 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 1.404
CDIIQR (also listed as MAS 374)

Please check back for updates.

AFR 376 • Senior Seminar

29571 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.120
Wr

A capstone course fpr AFR majors focusing on black intellectual traditions.

AFR 302M • Numbering Race

29535 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 1.402
QR MA

I. Course Description and Objectives

In this course, you will learn about quantitative methodology and statistics through the lens of race. You will have the opportunity to examine, analyze, and critique real-world data, quantitative research, and public discourse concerning race in America. Some empirical and quantitative skills you will learn this semester include (1) conceptualization and operationalization in quantitative measurement, (2) the calculation and interpretation of descriptive statistics and statistical relationships, (3) the application of statistical techniques to understand social phenomenon, and (4) techniques for presenting results from quantitative analysis. As we cover various statistical techniques, you will also learn about the origins of the concept race, including the actors (many of whom were scientists and statisticians) and actions that brought race into being and continue to justify racial thinking. We will also discuss how these efforts have impacted our current collective and individual understandings of race, especially as they relate to the quantitative study of race and various social problems. This course satisfies the core math requirement and carries the quantitative reasoning flag.

II. Course Requirements

A. Required Readings/ Materials
Leon-Guerrero, Anna, and Chava Frankfort-Nachmias. 2015. Essentials of Social Statistics for a

Diverse Society. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc. (LGFN) Scientific calculator

Additional readings will be available online through Canvas. Some of the readings posted are required for the course. Other readings, exercises, information sheets, and links to websites are posted to assist you in this course and enhance your class experience. I encourage you to look them over.

Numbering Race, Irizarry Fall 2015

B. Assignments and Assessment

Problem Sets

Problem sets include calculation and interpretation questions designed to gauge your understanding of the methodological and statistical concepts covered throughout the semester. Problem sets will be posted on Canvas at least one week prior to their due date. Students will need to show all of their work/calculations to receive full credit. Partial credit will be given to answers that are partially correct.

Reading Quizzes

Almost every week throughout the semester, you will have a short quiz on the material covered in the readings. You will be allowed to refer to your notes while taking the quiz, but not the readings or text. There are no make-ups for quizzes; however, I will drop your lowest quiz grade at the end of the semester.

In-Class Assignments

In-class assignments will offer you the opportunity to practice the mathematical, statistical, and critical thinking concepts covered in class.

Team Lab Assignments

To help familiarize you with quantitative methodology and the interpretation and presentation of quantitative data, there will be two team lab assignments. I will post each lab assignment on Canvas at least one week prior to the deadline. Lab assignments must be done with your team members (team member selections will be made after the final drop/add date).

Essays

Students must complete two essays that summarize/evaluate news articles/stories that present racial comparisons stemming from statistical analysis (due dates are noted on course schedule). Each essay must include a minimum of three news stories on a particular topic. These news stories can be from magazines, newspapers, or credible online news sources (check with your instructor if you have any questions). Essays must (1) be at least three-pages (typed), (2) summarize and critique/evaluate your selected news stories, and (3) incorporate concepts and ideas from class discussion and readings. Note: You may not use advertisements and data highlights (these are usually brief and present no real story or argument), academic articles (articles from peer-reviewed journals), or research articles from course readers to complete this assignment. More details regarding each essay will be provided during the semester.

AFR 321L • Sociology Of Education

29590 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 1.106
(also listed as SOC 321L, WGS 345)

This course is an introduction to current issues in the sociology of education. The goal of this course is to ask some fundamental questions about the relationship between education and society. To answer these questions, we will take an in depth look at the structures, practices, content, and outcomes of schooling, in light of their relationships to the wider society in which schools are situated. We will identify the role(s) of schools and schooling, note the link between schools and social stratification, discuss the outcomes of schooling and how these outcomes are produced, and consider sociological perspectives on contemporary educational inequality and reform. Throughout the course, you will have opportunities to reflect upon your own educational experience and worldview, while also thinking critically about how various social forces have come to shape your own schooling experiences, as well as those of others around you.

Required Texts:

Schools and Society: A Sociological Approach to Education 5th Edition, edited by Jeanne H. Ballantine and Joan Z. Spade.

Additional readings are available on Canvas. 

Grading Breakdown:

Reflection Papers 30% 

Current Events Essay 15%

 Quizzes 10%

 Exams 45% 

AFR 374D • Community Research & Analysis

29786 • Spring 2015
Meets T 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A303A
CD (also listed as MAS 374)

Course Description:

Regardless of the sector, students pursuing careers in community leadership and program development related careers will be tasked with making important decisions that can have huge implications for the populations they serve. Now that we are in the age of big data, students and professionals alike are bombarded with a constant stream of information from a wide variety of sources (e.g., television, the Internet, newspapers, and magazines), which make these decisions all the more challenging. Much of the information we receive comes in the form of or is rooted in statistics, and we are often confronted with contradictory claims based on this statistical information. Knowing how to understand and sort through all of this information---or even better, knowing how to gather and analyze our own information-requires a level of methodological and statistical literacy that many individuals lack. As a result, we tend to either become skeptical of all statistics or only incorporate and utilize statistics that fit our worldview, both of which can lead to poor decision making.

This course is a formal introduction to quantitative methodology and statistical analysis for Latino and Black serving professionals pursuing private, nonprofit, and public sector careers in community and/or organizational leadership. This is also an experiential learning course. In addition to learning about the nuts and bolts of applied quantitative research, including techniques for collecting (or finding), preparing, analyzing, and interpreting quantitative data, we will collectively (as a class) undertake a quantitative research study for a Texas-based organization or community agency. Although no prior knowledge of statistics is assumed, you should have a good understanding of basic algebraic concepts. If you have never had a course in algebra at the high school level or above, you should consider taking one before enrolling in this course.

 

Proposed Readings: 

1) Nardi, Peter. 2006. Doing Survey Research: A Guide to Quantitative Methods. 2nd ed.

Boston: Pearson.

2) Nardi, Peter. 2006. Interpreting Data (with Research Navigator). Boston: Pearson.

 

Proposed Grading Policy: 

Problem Sets: 25%   250 points

Academic Reviews:     15%    150 points

Assignments:            30%   300 points

Applied Project:         30%    300 points

AFR 317D • Numbering Race

30413 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JES A216A
CDQR (also listed as SDS 310T)

Description:

As public consumers, we are constantly bombarded by numbers in our daily lives.  We come across reports on the news and articles in magazines about topics like race and obesity or poverty, and assume more often than not that these numbers must be true.  How do we definitely know without the right tools?

 

In this course, we will learn how to critically examine numbers produced by social statistics and presented in our daily lives.  We will accomplish this goal by learning about 1) the history of race and social statistics, 2) the methods used by social scientists to understand relationships, 3) how to approach social statistics with a critical eye, and 4) the use of critical race and feminist methodologies in quantitative research.  This class will cover several topic areas related to race and intersectionality with a focus on quantitative reasoning in the understanding and production of social statistics. 

 

By the end of this course, you will be able to critically evaluate quantitative race research and social science research more generally, both in your studies and in your daily life. 

AFR 321L • Sociology Of Education

30485 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM JES A207A
(also listed as SOC 321L)

This course is an introduction to current issues in the sociology of education. The goal of this course is to ask some fundamental questions about the relationship between education and society. In this course, we will look at the structure, practices, content, and outcomes of schooling, in light of their relationships to the wider society in which schools are situated. We will note the link between schools and social stratification, discuss the outcomes of schooling and how these outcomes are produces, and consider sociological perspectives on contemporary education reform.

In addition to having an overview of current topics in schools, this class should help you to start thinking critically about your own schooling experiences, as well as those of others'. You will ultimately begin to understand schools as societal institutions that influence and are influenced by other societal groups, as well as the intersection between schools, family, and community.

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages


External Links



  •   Map
  • Population Research Center

    University of Texas at Austin
    305 E. 23rd Street / RLP 2.602
    Mail Stop G1800
    Austin, Texas 78712-1699
    512-471-5514