Department of Rhetoric & Writing
Department of Rhetoric & Writing

Amy Tuttle-Charron


PhD Candidate, The University of Texas at Austin

Digital Rhetoric and Research Methods/Methodologies
Amy Tuttle-Charron

Contact

  • Office: FAC 14
  • Office Hours: Monday and Wednesday 2:30-3:30 pm and Thursday from 1-2 pm

Interests


computational and digital rhetoric, data science, technical writing, professional communication, posthumanist theory, new media, digital humanities

Biography


I am a PhD candidate in the Department of Rhetoric and Writing where I research computational methods, digital rhetoric, data science, new media, and information design. My current research project, "The Method Machine," begins with a historical appraisal of the research methods and methodologies of rhetoric and writing in order to investigate the ways in which embracing the fractured methodological history of the field is critical to understanding the current unified epistemological contributions of rhetoric and writing as an academic research discipline. I illustrate rhetoric’s contribution to research methods by describing common methodological moves via a case study in which I use a quantitative research environment (R) to identify Russian Twitter bots (automated accounts that are used to spread propaganda) that were active during the 2016 US Presidential election.

Courses


RHE 309K • Remixing Rhetoric

42495 • Fall 2019
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM FAC 10
Wr

What do Tupac’s “California Love,” Andy Warhol’s Marilyn prints, and South Park have in common? They’re creative and cultural works of genius that have influenced and shaped generations. However, these aren’t entirely original works born of a lightning-in-a-bottle, “a-ha!” moment of creation by a lone inventor. In fact, each one of these is a copy, combination, transformation, or remix of previous works presented as something new. “California Love” samples Joe Cocker’s “Woman to Woman,” Warhol’s Marilyn prints derive from original photographs of the actress, and South Park draws its comic remix from a variety of serious current events and cultural phenomena. Therefore, we might say that one characteristic of “good writing” is the ability to be inspired by great things and to combine and transform them into something entirely new.

Remixing—or the process of taking existing pieces of text, images, sounds, and video and stitching them together to form a new product—is how individual writers and communities build common values; it is how composers achieve persuasive, creative, and parodic effects. Throughout the semester, we will examine remix as a method for argumentation—a multimodal method that works across the registers of sound, text, and image to make claims and provide evidence to support those claims. Essentially, students in this course should develop an appreciation for remix and for the ways in which the cannons of rhetoric—invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery—can be remixed, never acting in isolation, but always moving alongside and through a number of “original” texts.

Assignments and Grading

  • Paper 1.1
  • Peer Review 1
  • Paper 1.2
  • Paper 2.1
  • Peer Review 2
  • Paper 2.2
  • Multimodal Project 3.1
  • Edited Collection 3.2
  • Short Writing Assignments (6)

Grades are determined by a portfolio-style, evidence-based model called the Learning Record (LR). Once at the midterm and once at the final, students will compose a persuasive essay that documents their improvement as a student by explaining both what they have learned and how they have learned it. Students will base their assessments on the semester’s coursework, including writing, revision, and class participation, as documented in a reflective journal. By using the dimensions of learning, grade criteria, and the course goals as heuristics, each student will argue for the grade he/she thinks is fair. I will review each student’s argument and either agree with or revise the request.

Required Texts and Course Readings

REQUIRED Rhetorical Analysis: A Brief Guide for Writers. Longaker & Walker. Pearson, 2010.

REQUIRED Understanding and Composing Multimodal Projects. DeVoss. Bedford/St. Martins, 2013.

RECOMMENDED Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference. Fifth ed. Lunsford. Bedford/St. Martins, 2013.

RHE 312 • Writing In Digtl Environments

43405 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 104
Wr

Artificial intelligence (AI) has transformed society over the past 50 years.  It has enabled increased human productivity, a broad array of news, entertainment, and communication options, and technological advances in almost every branch of science and engineering.  At the same time, AI has contributed to threats to privacy, new categories of crime, disruptions in the workforce, and a societal focus on systems capable of catastrophic failure. Scientific approaches to AI foreground its practical application through established bodies of knowledge, often encouraging an authority-based view of “truth.” By contrast, rhetorical approaches to AI encourage discussion and dissent, equipping students to reason about situations that have no single correct answer. In this course, we will consider all of this and more, with the goal of better understanding how to shape AI in ways that maximize the benefits and minimize the costs.

This course will provide a broad overview and introduction to the field of AI, focusing on the impacts it has made on society during the past 50 years. The intended audience for this course is that of the general student. No computational background is required. The course will begin by providing a broad overview of what AI is and what it is not. The course will also take up applications of AI that have made their ways into our everyday lives, ultimately attending to the ethical implications of the continued impact of AI on society. The aim of this course is to prepare students to recognize ethical problems in their present and future work in digital environments, focusing on methods of applied ethical reasoning (for the future), as well as on particular current problems. We will read and discuss both scientific and philosophical articles, as well as fiction and non-fiction texts that explore these ideas.

RHE 309K • Remixing Rhetoric

43260 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 6
Wr

What do Tupac’s “California Love,” Andy Warhol’s Marilyn prints, and South Park have in common? They’re creative and cultural works of genius that have influenced and shaped generations. However, these aren’t entirely original works born of a lightning-in-a-bottle, “a-ha!” moment of creation by a lone inventor. In fact, each one of these is a copy, combination, transformation, or remix of previous works presented as something new. “California Love” samples Joe Cocker’s “Woman to Woman,” Warhol’s Marilyn prints derive from original photographs of the actress, and South Park draws its comic remix from a variety of serious current events and cultural phenomena. Therefore, we might say that one characteristic of “good writing” is the ability to be inspired by great things and to combine and transform them into something entirely new.

Remixing—or the process of taking existing pieces of text, images, sounds, and video and stitching them together to form a new product—is how individual writers and communities build common values; it is how composers achieve persuasive, creative, and parodic effects. Throughout the semester, we will examine remix as a method for argumentation—a multimodal method that works across the registers of sound, text, and image to make claims and provide evidence to support those claims. Essentially, students in this course should develop an appreciation for remix and for the ways in which the cannons of rhetoric—invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery—can be remixed, never acting in isolation, but always moving alongside and through a number of “original” texts.

Assignments and Grading

  • Paper 1.1
  • Peer Review 1
  • Paper 1.2
  • Paper 2.1
  • Peer Review 2
  • Paper 2.2
  • Multimodal Project 3.1
  • Edited Collection 3.2
  • Short Writing Assignments (6)

Grades are determined by a portfolio-style, evidence-based model called the Learning Record (LR). Once at the midterm and once at the final, students will compose a persuasive essay that documents their improvement as a student by explaining both what they have learned and how they have learned it. Students will base their assessments on the semester’s coursework, including writing, revision, and class participation, as documented in a reflective journal. By using the dimensions of learning, grade criteria, and the course goals as heuristics, each student will argue for the grade he/she thinks is fair. I will review each student’s argument and either agree with or revise the request.

Required Texts and Course Readings

  • REQUIRED - Rhetorical Analysis: A Brief Guide for Writers. Longaker & Walker. Pearson, 2010.
  • REQUIRED - Understanding and Composing Multimodal Projects. DeVoss. Bedford/St. Martins, 2013.
  • RECOMMENDED - Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference. Fifth ed. Lunsford. Bedford/St. Martins, 2013.

RHE S306 • Rhetoric And Writing

86320 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM MEZ 2.118

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.