Department of Rhetoric & Writing
Department of Rhetoric & Writing

Tristin Brynn Hooker


Assistant Director of Lower-Division Writing
Tristin Brynn Hooker

Contact

Biography


Tristin Hooker, M.A., M.A.T. is a Ph.D. student in Rhetoric and Writing at the University of Texas at Austin, currently focusing on the rhetoric of health and medicine. She has been working in K-12 and higher education for ten years as a writing and literacy instructor, disability support services coordinator, and the founder/director of the Writing and Learning Lab at Ozarks Technical Community College Table Rock Campus. She currently also serves as the Assistant Director of Lower Division Writing in the Department of Rhetoric and Writing at UT-Austin, and as the Associate Editor of Praxis: A Writing Center Journal.
 

Courses


RHE 312 • Writing In Digtl Environments

42890 • Spring 2022
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 104
Wr

Increasingly, we live in a world where science and expertise seem “up for debate” in public life. The communities you join, the language you use there, and the branding you recognize or develop have a significant impact on your on-and-offline life, and your understanding of the world. In this class, we will look at the Health & Wellness industry and its online culture as a way to think about how we judge the trustworthiness of sources we engage with and how we convey trustworthiness and belonging in digital spaces and communities, ourselves.

What does it mean for Health and Wellness to become commodities you can seek—or participate in—in a digital, disembodied space? How do you decide that the information, products, or community you find in that space is beneficial or trustworthy? Even further, if you want to be part of this culture or industry, how do you connect with it and effectively or ethically? How can health—or your health—become a brand?

The goal of this class is not just to analyze other people’s rhetoric: it’s to become familiar with the ways digital texts, platforms, marketing, and data are produced and circulated to create and maintain an industry. The course is organized into three units, each asking students to examine a different element of rhetorical analysis for this industry, and to develop particular hands-on skills for writing in a digital environment relevant to the unit’s theme.

Required Textbooks

Becoming Rhetorical by Jodi Nicotra

• UNC-Chapel Hill’s Writing Center Resources (online)

• Other readings available on Canvas or by instructor.

RHE 312 • Writing In Digtl Environments

43909 • Fall 2021
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 104
Wr

Increasingly, we live in a world where science and expertise seem “up for debate” in public life. The communities you join, the language you use there, and the branding you recognize or develop have a significant impact on your on-and-offline life. In this class, we will look at the Health & Wellness industry and its online culture as a way to think about how we judge the trustworthiness of sources we engage with and how we convey trustworthiness and belonging in digital spaces and communities, ourselves.

 

What does it mean for Health and Wellness to become commodities you can seek—or participate in—in a digital, disembodied space? How do you decide that the information, products, or community you find in that space is beneficial or trustworthy? Even further, if you want to be part of this culture or industry, how do you connect with it and effectively or ethically? How can health—or your health—become a brand?

 

The goal of this class is not just to analyze other people’s rhetoric: it’s to become familiar with the ways digital texts, platforms, marketing, and data are produced and circulated to create and maintain an industry.  The course is organized into three units, each asking students to examine a different element of rhetorical analysis for this industry, and to develop particular hands-on skills for writing in a digital environment relevant to the unit’s theme.

 

Assignments:

 

Project 1: (20%) : Digital Wellness Primer (webtext)

Project 2: (20%) : Digital Disclosure Analysis (video essay)

Project 3: (20%) : Digital Branding Performance (multi-page website design)

Course Dictionary (10%)

Short Assignments and Reading Responses  (20%)

Participation: (10%):

 

Required Texts:

 

RHE 309S • Crit Read/Persuas Writ-Nsds-Wb

43680 • Spring 2021
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
Wr

The more expert you become in a subject, the more difficult it can be to explain your ideas and work to others outside your immediate area. Yet, giving a compelling, persuasive explanation of your work is what allows it to continue, or even to be real for the broader public. This is nowhere more true than in the natural sciences, where the need for effective communication of scientific ideas in a way that is comprehensible and persuasive in public settings has never been clearer. In this course you will develop your understanding and mastery of rhetoric—the art of persuasion—as it applies to science. 

We’ll look at how scientists work to persuade one another, the general public, and the institutions that invest in and fund further research. We will look at a variety of texts, genres, and media to identify typical moves and strategies scientists and science writers employ, as well as common difficulties they encounter in the process. You will have the opportunity to look closely at the way persuasion works in your particular field, and to work with other natural sciences students to find what’s common and what’s particular in writing and persuasion across the sciences. 

Our goal will be to help you develop both as an analyst and as a user of rhetoric in the sciences and in broader public discourse, through a variety of media. In our work together we will challenge ourselves to understand why some arguments are more persuasive than others, and how those strategies make science—and the public—as we know it. 

Projects

  • Project 1: Analyzing a scientific argument
  • Project 2: Analyzing how projects get investment and funding
  • Project 3: Translating an argument to a public 
  • Project 4: Engaging with advocacy and policy 

Required Texts

  • How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper 8th Edition by Barbara Gastel and Robert A. Day
  • Acting in an Uncertain World: an Essay on Technical Democracy by Michel Callon, Pierre Lascoumes, and Yannick Barthe 
  • Additional materials provided by the instructor

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Wrestling

43385 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM FAC 7
Wr

Professional wrestling isn’t just about bodyslams. It’s about narrative, audience, feedback, and persuasion: all the things that make up Rhetoric. In this course, we will begin by analyzing how those strategies play out in the small scale (within the ring and also in televised/digitally shared promos), and extend through the entire constructed wrestling world. We will examine how what happens in the ring bleeds into public personas outside of the ring, especially on social media. We will look at aspects of performance, gender, sexuality, ethnicity and cultural representation, as they appear within the wrestling world. We will also examine rhetorical strategies and how both fans and wrestling companies have seized on the growth of social media to interact with and/or direct their fanbase (and the way the fans have used those same strategies to talk back). Ultimately, the course will also help students produce texts that solidify the critical ideas we are looking at. We will also look at the way the language and tropes of wrestling have crept into broader public discourse, from journalism to politics.

In this class, we will watch a lot of footage, read some critical texts and some tweets. We will learn important terminology and principles from classical rhetoric and apply them to what we see. We will learn to recognize major tropes and subgenres within wrestling, but also to recognize rhetorical choices made in performing and producing sports entertainment. We will get into the rhetorical ring, ourselves, creating personas and commentary and defending the rhetorical moves we make. We will consider the audience’s role in production and persuasion, and evaluate the relationship between rhetorical performance, suspension of disbelief, and reality.

 

List of Assignments:

Major Writing Assignments: 45%

  • Project One: Rhetorical analysis of a wrestler or storyline. (15%)
  • Project Two: Rhetorical analysis of culture in wrestling (15%)
  • Project Three: Researched argument on a rhetorical strategy in wrestling (15%)
  • Project Four:  Build a rhetorical wrestler (20%) 

6 Blog Posts 10%

2 Course Dictionary Entries (minimum) 5%

3 Project Drafts and Peer Review 15%

Participation 5%

TEXTBOOK/READINGS

Required Texts

  • Jodie Nicotra, Becoming Rhetorical: Analyzing and Composing in a Multimedia World
  • The Little Longhorn Handbook, Norton

Additional Readings

Additional texts will be assigned during the course, and either the text/materials themselves or guidelines for searching will be distributed electronically.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Wrestling

43715 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM FAC 9
Wr

Professional wrestling isn’t just about bodyslams. It’s about narrative, audience, feedback, and persuasion: all the things that make up Rhetoric. In this course, we will begin by analyzing how those strategies play out in the small scale (within the ring and also in televised/digitally shared promos), and extend through the entire constructed wrestling world. We will examine how what happens in the ring bleeds into public personas outside of the ring, especially on social media. We will look at aspects of performance, gender, sexuality, ethnicity and cultural representation, as they appear within the wrestling world. We will also examine rhetorical strategies and how both fans and wrestling companies have seized on the growth of social media to interact with and/or direct their fanbase (and the way the fans have used those same strategies to talk back). Ultimately, the course will also help students produce texts that solidify the critical ideas we are looking at. We will also look at the way the language and tropes of wrestling have crept into broader public discourse, from journalism to politics.

In this class, we will watch a lot of footage, read some critical texts and some tweets. We will learn important terminology and principles from classical rhetoric and apply them to what we see. We will learn to recognize major tropes and subgenres within wrestling, but also to recognize rhetorical choices made in performing and producing sports entertainment. We will get into the rhetorical ring, ourselves, creating personas and commentary and defending the rhetorical moves we make. We will consider the audience’s role in production and persuasion, and evaluate the relationship between rhetorical performance, suspension of disbelief, and reality.

 

List of Assignments:

Major Writing Assignments: 45%

  • Project One: Rhetorical analysis of a wrestler or storyline. (15%)
  • Project Two: Rhetorical analysis of culture in wrestling (15%)
  • Project Three: Researched argument on a rhetorical strategy in wrestling (15%)
  • Project Four:  Build a rhetorical wrestler (20%) 

6 Blog Posts 10%

2 Course Dictionary Entries (minimum) 5%

3 Project Drafts and Peer Review 15%

Participation 5%

TEXTBOOK/READINGS

Required Texts

  • Jodie Nicotra, Becoming Rhetorical: Analyzing and Composing in a Multimedia World
  • The Little Longhorn Handbook, Norton

Additional Readings

Additional texts will be assigned during the course, and either the text/materials themselves or guidelines for searching will be distributed electronically.

Curriculum Vitae


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