Jason Lustig


LecturerPhD, UCLA, History

Israel Institute Teaching Fellow and Lecturer, History

Contact

Biography


Jason Lustig is a Lecturer and Israel Institute Teaching Fellow at the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies. Dr. Lustig's research focuses on the development of Jewish archives in Germany, the United States, and Israel/Palestine in the course of the twentieth century, and the struggles over who can claim to "own" Jewish history, which is the topic of a book manuscript, A Time to Gather: Archives and the Control of Jewish Culture. Previously, Dr. Lustig has been a Harry Starr Fellow in Judaica at Harvard University’s Center for Jewish Studies and a Gerald Westheimer Early Career Fellow at the Leo Baeck Institute, and his research has appeared in The Journal of Contemporary History and American Jewish History and is forthcoming in History of the Human Sciences and Shofar. He is also the creator and host of the Jewish History Matters podcast. The program, which comes out every two weeks during the academic year, features conversations with leading scholars about their research and why it matters in a broad social, intellectual, and political context. You can find it online at www.jewishhistory.fm or on wherever you listen to podcasts.

 At UT, Dr. Lustig teaches a range of classes that deal with the history and cultures of Israel and Palestine, the history of archives and cultural property, and Jewish history. 

Courses


J S 304N • Jewish Civ: 1492 To Present

38970 • Spring 2022
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GAR 2.112
GC (also listed as EUS 306, HIS 306N)

This is the second half of a two-semester survey of Jewish civilization. It begins with a brief discussion of Jewish history from earliest times, but focuses on the period from Spain’s Expulsion of the Jews in 1492 to the present. We will examine the major movements of Jews within an expanding diaspora, the impact of the Reformation, the changing attitudes to Jews, the breakdown of traditional authority in Jewish communities and the trend toward secularization.

J S 364 • Jews: Nation Or People

39005 • Spring 2022
Meets MW 11:30AM-1:00PM JES A218A
GC (also listed as HIS 366D, MES 343)

Classical Zionism declared the Jewish people a nation in need of a state, “a people without a land for a land without a people.” Today, some claim that Jewish nationhood was a fiction created with political goals in mind. This course considers the nature of nations: Are they real or imagined, “organic” or invented? Examines how history has been used and abused for political purposes in the history of Zionism, Israel/Palestine, and beyond.

J S 311 • American Jewish History

39979 • Fall 2021
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM CAL 100
CDGC HI (also listed as HIS 317L)

Surveys the development of American Jewish life from 1492 to the present. Students will examine cultural, religious, and migratory trends that have shaped Jews in the western hemisphere and in the United States in particular. Focus will be on the emergence of Jewish life in America, its growth into the world’s leading Jewish community in the twentieth century, and its continual transformation both in the past as well as the present.

J S 311 • History Of Israel

39980 • Fall 2021
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GDC 4.302
(also listed as HIS 311J, MES 311)

The modern state of Israel was founded in a land known in modern times as Palestine, and this course examines the origins and history of modern Israel and the Zionist project to create a state for the Jews within the context of the land and the people who have lived there, of diverse faiths and ethnic backgrounds. The class brings together the history of Palestine and the land of Israel, the Zionist movement, Palestinian and Arab nationalism, modern Jewish history, and the history of Israel’s state and cultures. Students will gain a historical context to understand the complex movement of ideas, peoples, and polities across a small stretch of land which since ancient times has been a site of political and religious conflict. The course proceeds chronologically from the nineteenth century to the present, focusing on political, intellectual, and cultural history so that we can consider how one land has had so many histories but all those who live there have an intertwined destiny.

J S 311 • American Jewish History-Wb

39730 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM
Internet; Synchronous
CDGC HI (also listed as HIS 317L)

Surveys the development of American Jewish life from 1492 to the present. Students will examine cultural, religious, and migratory trends that have shaped Jews in the western hemisphere and in the United States in particular. Focus will be on the emergence of Jewish life in America, its growth into the world’s leading Jewish community in the twentieth century, and its continual transformation both in the past as well as the present.

J S 364 • Jews: Nation Or People?-Wb

39750 • Spring 2021
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM
Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as HIS 366N, MES 343)

Classical Zionism declared the Jewish people a nation in need of a state, “a people without a land for a land without a people.” Today, some claim that Jewish nationhood was a fiction created with political goals in mind. This course considers the nature of nations: Are they real or imagined, “organic” or invented? Examines how history has been used and abused for political purposes in the history of Zionism, Israel/Palestine, and beyond.

J S 311 • History Of Israel-Wb

38539 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as MES 310)

Please check back for updates.

J S 364 • Holocaust/Restitutn/Justice-Wb

38564 • Fall 2020
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
Internet; Synchronous
GC (also listed as EUS 346, MES 343)

Please check back for updates.

J S 364 • Holocaust/Restitutn/Justice

39104 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 208
GC (also listed as EUS 346, HIS 366N, MES 343)

Examines attempts to find a measure of justice after the Holocaust, with themes of human rights and international law. How did Jews and non-Jews pursue reconstruction, restitution, and restorative justice after genocide? Focuses on the restitution of property looted by the Nazis, cultural reconstruction around the world, and continuing efforts to garner reparations for Holocaust survivors and search for looted artwork. Ultimately, we will think about the Holocaust and questions of restitution and justice within a wide comparative frame, considering attempts at transitional and restorative justice for other twentieth-century genocides and changing approaches to looted property and reparations.

J S 364 • Jews: Nation Or People?

39109 • Spring 2020
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 105
GC (also listed as HIS 366N, MES 343)

Classical Zionism declared the Jewish people a nation in need of a state, “a people without a land for a land without a people.” Today, some claim that Jewish nationhood was a fiction created with political goals in mind. This course considers the nature of nations: Are they real or imagined, “organic” or invented? Examines how history has been used and abused for political purposes in the history of Zionism, Israel/Palestine, and beyond.

HIS 350L • Archives And Memory

38254 • Fall 2019
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM MEZ 1.204
GCWr (also listed as MES 343)

In today’s world, we live in an information age surrounded by the possibilities of seemingly unlimited storage and a ubiquitous culture of archiving that privileges the packrat and borders on the obsessive/compulsive. One does not delete an email: it is archived. We document our lives digitally under the pretense of “sharing” with friends and family, but the photos and status updates are stored permanently in the “cloud” even after one’s passing, morphing into perpetual memorials. Almost every website has an “archive,” which more often than not simply refers to anything older than the front page. How do we understand a world of archives, where data and information are the keys to twenty-first century capitalism?

We will investigate archives as a focal point around which to understand the practice of history, the relationship between archives and modern memory, and in the context of the emergence of the state, bureaucracy, the public sphere, and the beginnings of the information age: What binds the processes through which history and memory are constructed, and how do institutions that foster historical scholarship, such as archives, play an active role in the formation of historical narratives and communal memory? Archives have been alternately termed the foundation of human civilization, the historian’s laboratory, the sediment left by the stream of history, as well as a sealed room under lock and key, where archivists protect history for historians and from historians: hiding unseemly details of the past from prying eyes and shaping historical narrative through the form and shape in which historical materials are presented. And once past the Kafkaesque keeper of the keys to history, one may find him or herself, literally, buried alive in the historical evidence. We will investigate the nature of archives and their purpose in civil society, public life, and the historical discipline, and what (if any) relationship exists between the twenty-first century everyday digital archiving experience and the future of history.

J S 311 • History Of Israel

38640 • Fall 2019
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GDC 4.302
(also listed as HIS 306N, MES 310)

Please check back for updates.

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