Slavic and Eurasian Studies

Karen Chilstrom


LecturerPhD, UT Austin

Karen Chilstrom

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-6145
  • Office: BUR 578
  • Office Hours: Mondays 1:30 – 2:00 PM & 3:00 – 3:30 PM; Thursdays 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM; and by appointment (Fall 2017)
  • Campus Mail Code: F3600

Interests


Language and education policy in Ukraine; applied linguistics/Russian language teaching methodology; best practices in the teaching of culture; psycholinguistics

Biography


Karen Chilstrom earned her PhD in the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies, where she taught first- and second-year Russian as an Assistant Instructor and tutored Russian-language students of all levels. She began traveling to and conducting research in Russia while living and working in the city of Astrakhan, in southern Russia, from 1995 to 1997. As Resident Director of the Moscow Plus program during the summers of 2009, 2010 and 2011, she oversaw UT-Austin students' studies in Moscow and organized cultural excursions for the groups. In 2013, she received a Title VIII grant for advanced Russian-language studies in Kiev, Ukraine. The following year, she began dissertation research with the help of funding from a Foreign Language and Area Studies fellowship.

Chilstrom wrote her doctoral dissertation on language policy in post-Soviet Ukraine. Her research examined the evolution of language policy in Ukraine over the past 25 years, focusing on its effects on Russian-language education in that country. 

Chilstrom regularly serves as a judge for local Russian-language competitions, makes presentations on Russian culture at UT-Austin and at area schools, and is a former Graduate Student Assembly representative of the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies. She regularly presents her research findings at national conventions and was a "by special invitation" panelist at the South Central Modern Language Association convention in 2014. 

 

 

Courses


RUS 611C • Intensive Russian II

44420 • Spring 2018
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM JES A303A

This course is the second semester of intensive Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed both through workbook home assignments and brief reviews and summaries of your reading material. 

 

The entire second-year sequence is covered in one semester.

We will cover all of the basic textbook, Units One through Unit Ten, plus an introductory unit, in the textbook, spending about seven class days on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop your reading skills through both in-class reading assignments, and individual “free reading” based on a text of your choosing. Portfolio exercises will continue to develop your computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functionally proficient and competitive in the language, as well as chronicle your progress in your independent reading project throughout the course. 

RUS 601C • Intensive Russian I

44870 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM BUR 228

Course Description:

An intensive Russian language instruction course developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed primarily through workbook and computer-based home assignments.  We will cover all of Volumes One and Two of the textbooks, Units One through Unit Fourteen in the textbooks, spending about one week on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functional and competitive in the language.

The entire first-year sequence is covered in one semester.

Readings:

Textbook: 

• Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! 2nd ed., vols. 1 and 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008 and 2009). These packaged sets comprise two basic textbooks, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and two DVDs. Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:           

  • Russian/English Dictionary
  • Gerhart, G., The Russian’s World, Orlando: Houghton Mifflin, 1994.
  • Garza, T., Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers  and Students, Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications, 1993.

Grading:

There are five components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  35%

Unit tests: 15%

Final exam: 20%

2.  Homework:  15% 

3.  Participation:  15% 

4.  Portfolio:  15%

5.  Oral Presentation:  20%

RUS 412L • Second-Year Russian II

45140 • Spring 2013
Meets MTWTH 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 310

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by theAmerican Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

RUS 412K • Second-Year Russian I

44995 • Fall 2012
Meets MTWTH 10:00AM-11:00AM CAL 419

Course Content: This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.

Welcome to Russian 412! You are entering the intermediate level of language instruction in one of the world’s most spoken and influential languages. Russian is spoken by 150 million people in the former Soviet Union and by another 50 million Russians living all over the world – including New York, Los Angeles, and Houston. This is the year of Russian study that will best prepare you to read brilliant works of Russian literature, undertake a longer term of study abroad, watch Russian films and television in the original language, and of course major in Slavic Studies here at UT! Russian is not only one of the official languages of diplomacy at the U.N. and a member language of the G-8, it is a language for which your prospects in business, engineering, teaching, law, and medicine are greatly enhanced with a reasonable functional proficiency. So whatever your goal, we hope that your second year of Russian-language studies will rewarding and memorable! ? ??????, ??????? ??????!  

Required Textbook: • Irina Dolgova and Cynthia Martin.  Russian: Stage Two: Welcome Back!,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:  All available at the University Co-op:

 • Wade, Terrence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar (Oxford: Blackwell, 1994).

 • Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World.  (Bloomington: Slavica Publishers, 2000).

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

RUS F412K • Second-Year Russian I

88255 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:30AM UTC 3.120

Required Textbook: • Irina Dolgova and Cynthia Martin.  Russian: Stage Two: Welcome Back!,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:  All available at the University Co-op:

            • Wade, Terrence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar (Oxford: Blackwell, 1994).

             • Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World.  (Bloomington: Slavica Publishers, 2000).

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

***

Welcome to Russian 412! You are entering the intermediate level of language instruction in one of the world’s most spoken and influential languages. Russian is spoken by 150 million people in the former Soviet Union and by another 50 million Russians living all over the world – including New York, Los Angeles, and Houston. This is the year of Russian study that will best prepare you to read brilliant works of Russian literature, undertake a longer term of study abroad, watch Russian films and television in the original language, and of course major in Slavic Studies here at UT! Russian is not only one of the official languages of diplomacy at the U.N. and a member language of the G-8, it is a language for which your prospects in business, engineering, teaching, law, and medicine are greatly enhanced with a reasonable functional proficiency. So whatever your goal, we hope that your second year of Russian-language studies will rewarding and memorable! ? ??????, ??????? ??????!

Course Content: This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.  

RUS 412L • Second-Year Russian II

44970 • Spring 2012
Meets MTWTH 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 310

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by theAmerican Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

RUS 412K • Second-Year Russian I

44795 • Fall 2011
Meets MTWTH 10:00AM-11:00AM CAL 419

Required Textbook: • Irina Dolgova and Cynthia Martin.  Russian: Stage Two: Welcome Back!,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:  All available at the University Co-op:

            • Wade, Terrence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar (Oxford: Blackwell, 1994).

             • Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World.  (Bloomington: Slavica Publishers, 2000).

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

***

Welcome to Russian 412! You are entering the intermediate level of language instruction in one of the world’s most spoken and influential languages. Russian is spoken by 150 million people in the former Soviet Union and by another 50 million Russians living all over the world – including New York, Los Angeles, and Houston. This is the year of Russian study that will best prepare you to read brilliant works of Russian literature, undertake a longer term of study abroad, watch Russian films and television in the original language, and of course major in Slavic Studies here at UT! Russian is not only one of the official languages of diplomacy at the U.N. and a member language of the G-8, it is a language for which your prospects in business, engineering, teaching, law, and medicine are greatly enhanced with a reasonable functional proficiency. So whatever your goal, we hope that your second year of Russian-language studies will rewarding and memorable! ? ??????, ??????? ??????!

 

 

 

I.            General

 

Course Content: This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction and focuses on the development of functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.  We will cover the Introductory Unit during the first full week of classes and then continue with Units 1 through 5 in the Textbook, spending ten class days on each unit. 

Course Requirements: You are expected to attend classes regularly, participate actively in class, do all assigned coursework, and take all exams.  A description of each unit’s work, listing video episodes (found on the DVD), communicative goals, lexical fields, and grammatical topics, is found on pp. vii - xvii in your Textbook.  The homework assignments are found in the Workbook and, for aural work, on the CDs. You will be allowed a maximum of five (5) unexcused absences during the semester.  More than five (5) unexcused absences will result in the lowering of your final course grade by a diacritical (a B+ goes to a B, a B to a B-, etc.) for each absence. PREPARING AND HANDING IN DAILY HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS IS ESSENTIAL TO PASSING THE COURSE!  This means that, using the Course Syllabus, you should go over and be familiar with this material (or prepare relevant questions) in advance of class.

You are also responsible for learning the words and expressions contained in the texts and exercises covered in the Course Syllabus that appear in the vocabulary lists at the end of each unit in the TextbookYou should plan to spend about two hours of preparation for each hour in the classroom.  If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to contact your instructor or another student and find out what was covered and make up the missed work. Excused absences shall be for illness and family emergency only.  Your instructor will need to see documentation.

All cell phones, pagers, and other electronic devices must be turned off and put away prior to entering the classroom. No electronic devices are to be used before or during class.

Special Accommodations: If you have extenuating physical circumstances, all instructors in the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies will make themselves available to discuss appropriate academic accommodations that you may require as a student with a disability.  Before course accommodations will be made, students may be required to provide documentation to the Office of the Dean of Students -- Services for Students with Disabilities.

Testing:  There will be five (5) in-class one-hour tests and a final examination for this course.  The in-class tests, each covering one unit, will be given on September 21, October 10, October 26, November 14, and December 1.  A fifteen-minute individual oral proficiency exam will be given during the final week of classes, and a comprehensive three-hour final exam will be given during the University's exam period between December 7 and 13, 2011.  

II. Grading

 

There are three components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are as follows:

1.  Testing:  60%

In-class tests: 40%

Final exam: 15%

Oral Proficiency Interview: 5%

Because of the time constraints and pace of this course, make-ups on any of the tests will be given only in unusual cases with extenuating circumstances.

2.  Homework:  25%

Written homework and in-class quizzes (e.g., vocabulary, grammar checks, etc.) will be graded on a credit/ no credit basis.  All assignments from the Workbook must be turned in on the class day after being assigned; a "no credit" assignment—provided the student has demonstrated true effort to complete the work correctly—may be resubmitted for possible credit the day after being returned to the student. Your homework grade will be the percentage of "credit" assignments you submit during the term.

3.  Participation:  15%

 

Your instructor determines this component as a reflection of your overall preparedness and performance in class; it is NOT merely an attendance grade.  You are expected to a) attend class daily, b) prepare assigned material in advance for each class, and c) respond in class with reasonable accuracy and, of course, enthusiasm.

The result of these calculations will be a number on a scale of 0-100.  This numerical grade will be converted to a letter grade as follows:

94 – 100 = A

90 – 93 = A-

88 – 89 = B+

84 – 87 = B

80 – 83 = B-

78 – 79 = C+

74 – 77 = C

70 – 73 = C-

68 – 69 = D+

64 – 67 = D

60 – 63 = D-

59 and below = F

III. Media resources

Your Textbook comes with two audio CDs and a DVD that correspond to many of the exercises in each unit, indicated by a "disk" and "camera" symbol, respectively.  You will greatly enhance your own listening comprehension of Russian by downloading and listening to these media on your iPod or home/car stereo as often as possible.  If you prefer to use the media on campus, there are facilities available in several locations, such as the Perry Castañeda Library and Flawn Academic Center. In addition, the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies also has in Calhoun 422 a collection of both classic and very recent DVDs with movies, music, speeches and documentaries from and about Russia and the former Soviet states.  These DVDs are interesting from both a cultural and entertainment point of view.  Many of the DVDs have both English subtitles (which can help build your confidence and facility in hearing spoken Russian and deriving meaning), and some also have Russian subtitles, which are a real benefit to building listening comprehension as you gain a larger vocabulary and fluency. These may be checked out for home viewing; see your instructor for suggestions.  

RUS 507 • First-Year Russian II

45520 • Spring 2011
Meets MTWTHF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 2.128

This course is the continuation of your introduction to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world. Russian is spoken by more that 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, and Putin. The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students each year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as recent events indicate, such as those in North Ossetia and Georgia – or even this winter’s incident with the Russia-Ukraine oil pipeline, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. 

RUS 506 • First-Year Russian I

44875 • Fall 2010
Meets MTWTHF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 2.128

Taught with interactive and student focused methods, this first semester of the traditional four semester sequence in Russian language, students will engage in a variety of activities to develop all-around skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing.  The first semester provides a solid foundation for further language study. Students will become familiar with the Cyrillic alphabet, Russian grammar basics, useful daily vocabulary, and Russian culture.  With several years of established success, our traditional four semester sequence in Russian language has established links to summer programs and study abroad opportunities.  It is designed to provide students time to absorb and master the Russian language in two five-credit courses in the first year, and two four-credit courses in the second year. It is rigorous, but also respects students' needs to simultaneously pursue their non-language course work.  Upon completion of this sequence, students will possess intermediate language ability and be well prepared for advanced study of the Russian language abroad or at UT.
Text
Live From Russia Volume 1 (2008)
Requirements and Grading
In-class tests 25%
Homework 30%  
Final exam 30%
Attendance and participation 15%,
 
Prerequisites- NONE

RUS 507 • First-Year Russian II

45825 • Spring 2010
Meets MTWTHF 12:00PM-1:00PM CAL 221
                           The University of Texas at Austin
Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies
http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/slavic
Spring Semester 2010



FIRST-YEAR RUSSIAN II
RUS 507


COURSE SYLLABUS
Class Time:    M-F 12-1
Place:        CAL 221
Instructor:    Karen Chilstrom
Office:        Calhoun 429C
Phone:        471-3607 (Slavic Department)
E-mail:        chilstrom@mail.utexas.edu
Office hours:     Tuesdays 2-3 and Fridays 1-2


                                    
Required Textbook:   

• Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia!           
vol. 2,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009).  This packaged set 
comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available
at the University Co-op.

Recommended Texts:

• Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor,
MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).

• Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for
Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary,
(New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

All Required and Recommended Texts are available at the University Co-op.


***


Welcome back to UT and to Russian 507! This course is the continuation of your introduction to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world. Russian is spoken by more that 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, and Putin. The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students each year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as recent events indicate, such as those in North Ossetia and Georgia – or even this winter’s incident with the Russia-Ukraine oil pipeline, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support. Good luck!


I.    GENERAL

Course Content: This course is the second semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.  We will cover Unit Seven through Unit Thirteen in the textbook (Vol. 2), spending about two weeks on each unit. In addition, we will cover Unit Fourteen, a review unit, in the final three days of the semester.

Course Requirements: You are expected to attend daily classes regularly, participate actively in class, do all assigned coursework, and take all exams.  You will be allowed a maximum of five (5) unexcused absences during the semester.  More than 5 (five) unexcused absences will result in the lowering of your final course grade by a diacritical (a B+ goes to a B, a B to a B-, etc.); more than 8 (eight) absences will result in a grade lowered by a letter.  Also, chronic tardiness will be treated as absences, as determined by your instructor. A Course Syllabus for the entire semester, briefly describing goals and in-class activities, is found on pp. xiii - xx in your Textbook. Corresponding homework assignments for each daily class meeting are found in the Workbook. PREPARING AND HANDING IN DAILY HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS IS ESSENTIAL TO PASS THE COURSE!  This means that you should go over and be familiar with this material (or prepare relevant questions) in advance of class.  You are also responsible for learning all of the words and expressions contained in the texts and exercises covered in the Course Syllabus which appear in non-italic type in the vocabulary lists at the end of each unit.  You should plan to spend about two hours of preparation for each hour in the classroom.  If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to contact your instructor or another student and find out what was covered and make up the missed work. 

Special Accommodations: If you have extenuating physical circumstances, all instructors in the Slavic Department will make themselves available to discuss appropriate academic accommodations that you may require as a student with a disability. Before course accommodations will be made, students may be required to provide documentation to the Office of the Dean of Students -- Services for Students with Disabilities.

Testing:  There will be six in-class one-hour tests and a final examination for this course.  The in-class tests, each covering one unit, will be given on February 2, February 16, March 2, March 23, April 6, April 20 and May 4.  A comprehensive final exam will be given during the University's exam period between May 12 and 18, 2010.  The final exam for this section of RUS 507 will be posted later in the semeter.

II.     GRADING

There are three components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  55%
    In-class tests: 25%
    Final exam: 30%
    Because of the time constraints and pace of this course, make-ups on any of the tests will be given only in unusual cases with extenuating circumstances.

2.  Homework:  30%
    Written homework or in-class quizzes (e.g., vocabulary, grammar checks, etc.) will be graded on a credit (4) / no credit (7) basis.  All assignments from the Workbook must be turned in on the class day after being assigned; a "no credit" assignment may be resubmitted for credit on the following day after being returned to the student.  Your homework grade will be the percentage of "credit" assignments you submit during the term.

3.  Participation:  15%
    Your instructor determines this component as a reflection of your overall preparedness and performance in class; it is NOT merely an attendance grade.  You are expected to a) attend class daily and on time, b) prepare assigned material in advance for each class, and c) respond in class with reasonable accuracy and, of course, enthusiasm!

The result of these calculations will be on a number on a scale of 0-100.  This numerical grade will be converted to a letter grade as follows:

       
94 – 100    =    A
90 – 93     =    A-
88 – 89    =    B+
84 – 87    =    B
80 – 83    =    B-
78 – 79    =    C+
74 – 77    =    C
70 – 73    =    C-
68 – 69    =    D+
64 – 67    =    D
60 – 63    =    D-
59 and below    =    F


III.    SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS

Your Textbook comes with an audio CD and a DVD that correspond to many of the exercises in
each unit, indicated by a "cassette" and "camera" symbol, respectively. You will greatly enhance
your own listening comprehension of Russian by downloading and using these media in your
iPod or home/car stereo as often as possible. If you prefer to use the media on campus, there are facilities available in several locations, such as the Perry Castañeda Library and Flawn Academic
Center. In addition, the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies also has in Calhoun 422 a collection of classic and very recent DVDs with movies, music, speeches and documentaries from and about Russia and the former Soviet states. These DVDs are interesting from both a cultural and purely entertainment point of view. Many of the DVDs have English subtitles (which can help you build your confidence and facility in hearing spoken Russian and deriving meaning), and some also have Russian subtitles, which are a real benefit to building listening comprehension as you gain a larger vocabulary and fluency. These may be checked out for home viewing; see your instructor for suggestions.



RUS 507 COURSE OUTLINE


UNIT SEVEN:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Tuesday, January 19 - Monday, February 1

    Unit Seven Exam:  Tuesday, February 2


UNIT EIGHT:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Wednesday, February 3 – Friday, February 12

    Unit Eight Exam:  Tuesday, February 16


UNIT NINE:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Wednesday, February 17 - Monday, March 1

    Unit Nine Exam:  Tuesday, March 2


UNIT TEN:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Wednesday, March 3 - Monday, March 23

[NB: Spring Break occurs during this unit: March 15-20.]

    Unit Ten Exam:  Tuesday, March 23


UNIT ELEVEN:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Wednesday, March 24 - Monday, April 5

    Unit Eleven Exam:  Tuesday, April 6

UNIT TWELVE:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Wednesday, April 7 - Monday, April 19

    Unit Twelve Exam:  Tuesday, April 20

UNIT THIRTEEN:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Wednesday, April 21 - Monday, May 3

    Unit Thirteen Exam:  Tuesday, May 4

REVIEW UNIT FOURTEEN:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Wednesday, May 5 - Friday, May 7

No exam for Unit Fourteen; Scheduled Final Exam during University Exam Week.


Have a wonderful summer!

RUS 506 • First-Year Russian I

45940 • Fall 2009
Meets MTWTHF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 305
                           The University of Texas at Austin
Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies
http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/slavic
Fall Semester 2009



FIRST-YEAR RUSSIAN I
RUS 506
COURSE SYLLABUS


Class Time:    M-F 12-1 pm
Place:        Welch 4.224     
Instructor:    Karen Chilstrom
Office:        Calhoun 429C   
Phone:         471-3607 (Slavic Department)
E-mail:        Chilstrom@mail.utexas.edu
Office hours:     M 2-3; T 5-6 pm


 

Required Textbook:   

• Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 1,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.


Recommended:


 • Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor, MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).

• Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).


Welcome to Russian 506! This course is designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world – today and over a millennium of history. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, Putin – and Medvedev! The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students every year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a Member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as events last year in North Ossetia and Georgia indicate, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! 쉇˜Ë LJÏ! Good luck!


I.    GENERAL

Course Content: This course is the first semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.  We will cover Units One through Unit Six in the textbook (Vol. 1), spending about two weeks on each unit.

Attendance Policy: You are expected to attend daily classes regularly, participate actively in class, do all assigned coursework, and take all exams.  You will be allowed a maximum of five (5) absences, excused or otherwise, during the semester.  Each absence beyond the fifth shall result in the lowering of your final course grade by a diacritic (a B+ goes to a B, a B to a B-, etc.). A student shall be considered absent after 15 minutes have elapsed from the beginning of class and the student has failed to arrive. 

Tardiness: You are to arrive to class on time. Students who arrive after class has begun shall incur a tardy. A total of three (3) tardies shall be equivalent to one (1) absence and shall count towards the five absences allowed each student. Students are expected to be aware of their own accumulated absences and tardies. Although the instructor will maintain daily records of attendance, he/she will not update students on the status of their attendance unless otherwise requested.

Course Requirements: A Course Syllabus for the entire semester, briefly describing goals and in-class activities, is found on pp. xiii - xx in your Textbook. Corresponding homework assignments for each daily class meeting are found in the Workbook. PREPARING AND HANDING IN DAILY HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS IS ESSENTIAL TO PASS THE COURSE!  This means that you should go over and be familiar with this material (or prepare relevant questions) in advance of class. Note that Days Eight and Nine in the syllabus are combined into ONE review day for us.  You are also responsible for learning all of the words and expressions contained in the texts and exercises covered in the Course Syllabus which appear in non-italic type in the vocabulary lists at the end of each unit.  You should plan to spend about two hours of preparation for each hour in the classroom.  If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to contact your instructor or another student and find out what was covered and make up the missed work. 

Technology Policy:  Students should turn off all cell phones and pagers before class begins.  Texting or taking/making calls during class is unacceptable and shall reflect poorly on students' participation grade. Although many students prefer to take notes on a computer, a language class is generally not conducive to this type of note taking.  Please refrain from using a computer during class unless you have sought and received the express consent of the instructor.

Special Accommodations: If you have extenuating physical circumstances, all instructors in the Slavic Department will make themselves available to discuss appropriate academic accommodations that you may require as a student with a disability.  Before course accommodations will be made, students may be required to provide documentation to the Office of the Dean of Students -- Services for Students with Disabilities.


Testing:  There will be six in-class one-hour tests and a final examination for this course.  The in-class tests, each covering one unit, will be given on September 17, October 1, October 15, October 29, November 12, and November 30. A comprehensive final exam will be given during the University's exam period between December 9 and 16, 2009.


II.     GRADING

There are three components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  55%
    In-class tests: 25%
    Final exam: 30%
    Because of the time constraints and pace of this course, make-ups on any of the tests will be given only in unusual cases with extenuating circumstances.

2.  Homework:  30%
    Written homework or in-class quizzes (e.g., vocabulary, grammar checks, etc.) will be graded on a credit (4) / no credit (7) basis.  All assignments from the Workbook must be turned in on the class day after being assigned; a "no credit" assignment may be resubmitted for credit on the following day after being returned to the student.  Your homework grade will be the percentage of "credit" assignments you submit during the term.

3.  Participation:  15%
    Your instructor determines this component as a reflection of your overall preparedness and performance in class; it is NOT merely an attendance grade.  You are expected to a) attend class daily, b) prepare assigned material in advance for each class, and c) respond in class with reasonable accuracy and, of course, enthusiasm.

The result of these calculations will be on a number on a scale of 0-100.  This numerical grade will be converted to a letter grade as follows:

94 – 100    =    A

90 – 93     =    A-

88 – 89    =    B+
84 – 87    =    B
80 – 83    =    B-
78 – 79    =    C+
74 – 77    =    C
70 – 73    =    C-

68 – 69    =    D+
64 – 67    =    D
60 – 63    =    D-
59 and below    =    F


III.    SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS

Your Textbook comes with an audio CD and a DVD that correspond to many of the exercises in each unit, indicated by a "cassette" and "camera" symbol, respectively.  You will greatly enhance your own listening comprehension of Russian by downloading and using these media in your iPod or home/car stereo as often as possible.  If you prefer to use the media on campus, there are facilities available in several locations, such as the Perry Castañeda Library and Flawn Academic Center. In addition, the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies also has in Calhoun 422 a collection of both classic and very recent DVDs with movies, music, speeches and documentaries from and about Russia and the former Soviet states.  These DVDs are interesting from both a cultural and purely entertainment point of view.  Many of the DVDs have English subtitles (which can help you build your confidence and facility in hearing spoken Russian and deriving meaning), and some also have Russian subtitles, which are a real benefit to building listening comprehension as you gain a larger vocabulary and fluency. These may be checked out for home viewing; see your instructor for suggestions. 




RUS 506 COURSE OUTLINE


FIRST DAY
Wednesday, August 26
        • Introduction to the course RUS 506 and how to use the materials with Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia!
        • "Learn the Cyrillic Alphabet in 20 Minutes!"

INTRODUCTION:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Thursday, August 27 - Thursday, September 3


UNIT ONE:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Friday, September 4 - Wednesday, September 16
    [Monday, September 7 is Labor Day holiday]

    Unit One Exam:  Thursday, September 17


UNIT TWO:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Friday, September 18 - Wednesday, September 30

    Unit Two Exam:  Thursday, October 1


UNIT THREE:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Friday, October 2 - Wednesday, October 14

    Unit Three Exam:  Thursday, October 15


UNIT FOUR:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Friday, October 16 - Wednesday, October 28

    Unit Four Exam:  Thursday, October 29


UNIT FIVE:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Friday, October 30 - Wednesday, November 11

    Unit Five Exam:  Thursday, November 12


UNIT SIX:  LIVE FROM MOSCOW!
    Friday, November 13 - Wednesday, November 25

    Unit Six Exam:  Monday, November 30
    [Thanksgiving holidays:  Thursday, November 26 - Sunday, November 29]


REVIEW ALL UNITS
    Tuesday, December 1 - Friday, December 4




Happy Holidays!
Happy New Year 2010!

RUS 506 • First-Year Russian I

45945 • Fall 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 302

Welcome to Russian 506! This course is designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world – today and over a millennium of history. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, Putin – and Medvedev! The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students every year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a Member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as events last year in North Ossetia and Georgia indicate, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ????? ???! Good luck! 

Course Content: This course is the first semester of first-year Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments. The second course in the first-year sequence is RUS 507.

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 1,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:

  • Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor, MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).
  • Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.
  • Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).
 

RUS 507 • First-Year Russian II

45060 • Spring 2009
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM GAR 2.112

Welcome back to UT and to Russian 507! This course is the continuation of your introduction to

the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world.

Russian is spoken by more that 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional

150 million throughout the world. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the

resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian

Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of

all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ?????!

 

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic. Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia!

vol. 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009). This packaged set

comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD. Available

at the University Co-op.

 

GRADING

1. Testing: 50%

2. Homework: 25%

3. Participation: 20%

RUS 506 • First-Year Russian I

46020 • Fall 2008
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM CAL 422

Welcome to Russian 506! This course is designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world – today and over a millennium of history. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, Putin – and Medvedev! The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students every year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a Member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as events last year in North Ossetia and Georgia indicate, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ????? ???! Good luck! 

Course Content: This course is the first semester of first-year Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments. The second course in the first-year sequence is RUS 507.

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 1,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:

  • Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor, MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).
  • Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.
  • Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).
 

RUS 506 • First-Year Russian I

46025 • Fall 2008
Meets MTWTHF 12:00PM-1:00PM WEL 4.224

Welcome to Russian 506! This course is designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world – today and over a millennium of history. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, Putin – and Medvedev! The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students every year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a Member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as events last year in North Ossetia and Georgia indicate, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! ????? ???! Good luck! 

Course Content: This course is the first semester of first-year Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments. The second course in the first-year sequence is RUS 507.

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 1,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:

  • Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor, MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).
  • Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.
  • Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).
 

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