Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Kelly McDonough


Associate ProfessorPh.D., University of Minnesota

Associate Professor / Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS) Program
Kelly McDonough

Contact

Interests


Critical Indigenous Studies; Latin American Literatures and Native Intellectual Histories, with emphasis on Mexico from Spanish colonialism to the present; Ethnohistory (Nahuatl Studies); Indigenous Science, Technology, and Society; Digital Humanities

Biography


In my first book,The Learned Ones: Nahua Intellectuals in Postconquest Mexico (University of Arizona Press, First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies), I presented case studies drawn from the past 500 years to show various forms of Nahua intellectual production, systematically debunking the erroneous racialized discourse that refused to see Nahuas as intellectuals. For my current book project, Indigenous Science and Technologies of Mexico Past and Present: Nahuas and the World Around Them, I am extending my contributions to the realm of science and technologies. Academics and the general public alike tend to picture Indigenous peoples as possessing quasi-mystical “elder knowledges,” but rarely think of them in terms of rigorous research and problem solving. Science and technology are thought to be the purview of the West, while “practices” and “habitus”—lacking intentionality—belonging to the rest (Norton 2017, Nelson 2014, 190; Seth 2009). In this interdisciplinary study, I place Indigenous peoples squarely within the realm of science and technologies through a series of case studies related to Nahua peoples of colonial and contemporary Mexico. I argue that recognizing and understanding their diverse scientific and technological knowledges should be a priority as we seek creative solutions to increasingly complex problems in our globalized world. Nahuas, as my study shows, have much to teach us.

Courses


ILA 387 • Critical Indigenous Studies

44095 • Spring 2020
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 1.104
(also listed as LAS 381)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The rapidly emerging discipline of Critical Indigenous Studies links the study of/by Indigenous peoples to colonial critique. It seeks to identify, understand, and potentially disrupt past and present asymmetrical structures and relations of power as they relate to Indigenous experiences and epistemologies. Equally, the discipline is committed to creating Indigenous-based methodologies to engage with Indigenous aesthetics and philosophies, as well as to solve complex problems they confront on a daily basis. With a transhemispheric approach, in this interdisciplinary seminar we will analyze key concepts and analytic tools that are the motor of the discipline, including the term “indigeneity” itself, rights, sovereignty, self-determination, race, gender, identity, and sexuality to name a few. We will consider legal, political, and economic concerns as well as the social and affective. By bridging state-of-the-art Critical Indigenous Studies methods, concepts, and theories from and about Abiayala with those of Turtle Island (together currently known as “The Americas”) we will recognize commonalities while also attending to specificities. We will pay particular attention to the role of researchers—Indigenous and non-Indigenous—in the field, both problematizing academic interventions as manifestations of coloniality and imagining different, perhaps decolonizing, approaches to our scholarship. Readings include excerpts from monographs and article-length pieces:

Emil Keme (Emilio del Valle Escalante), “Para Que Abiayala Viva, Las Américas Deben Morir: Hacia Una Indigeneidad Transhemisférica” (2018)

Emil Keme and José Yac Noj, “Arech Kak’asi’k Le Abiayala Rajawaxik Ne Kakam Le Americas: Utzukuxik Jun Ajwaralikil Winaq Chi Kab’e Chi Naj” (2018)

Colin Samson and Carlos Gigoux, Indigenous Peoples and Colonialism: Global Perspectives(2016)

Ben Saul, Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights: International and Regional Jurisprudence(2016)

Emily Snyder, “Indigenous Feminist Legal Theory” (2014)

Marisol de la Cadena, Marisol Orin Starn, eds., Indigeneidades Contemporáneas: Cultura, Política y Globalización(2010)

Moreton-Robinson, Aileen, ed., Critical Indigenous Studies: Engagements in First World Locations(2016)

Jennifer Gómez Menjívar and Gloria Elizabeth Chacón, eds., Indigenous Interfaces: Spaces, Technology, and Social Networks in Mexico and Central America(2019)

Hannah Burdette, Revealing Rebellion in Abiayala: The Insurgent Poetics of Contemporary Indigenous Literature(2019)

Gloria Elizabeth Chacón, Indigenous Cosmolectics: Kab’awil and the Making of Maya and Zapotec Literatures(2018)

Daniel Heath Justice, Why Indigenous Literatures Matter (2018)

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, As We Have Always Done: Indigenous Freedom through Radical Resistance(2017)

Daniel Nemser, Infrastructures of Race: Concentration and Biopolitics in Colonial Mexico(2017)

Ana Mariella Bacigalupo, Thunder Shaman: Making History with Mapuche Spirts in Chili and Patagonia (2016)

Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui, “‘Ch’ixinakax Utxiwa’: A Reflection on the Practices and Discourses of Decolonization” (2012)

Dian Million, “Felt Theory: An Indigenous Feminist Approach to Affect and History” (2009)

Natalie Clark, “Shock and Awe: Trauma as the New Colonial Frontier” (2016)

Charlotte Coté, “‘Indigenizing’ Food Sovereignty. Revitalizing Indigenous Food Practices and Ecological Knowledges in Canada and the United States” (2016)

Margaret Elizabeth Kovach, Indigenous Methodologies(2010)

Walter D. Mignolo and Catherine E. Walsh, On Decoloniality: Concepts, Analytics, Praxis(2018)

Margaret M. Bruchac, Savage Kin: Indigenous Informants and American Anthropologists (2018)

Alison Jones and Kuni Jenkins, “Rethinking Collaboration: Working the Indigene-Colonizer Hyphen” (2008)

Shannon Speed, “Structures of Settler Capitalism in Abya Yala” (2017)

Lorenzo Veracini, Settler Colonialism: A Theoretical Overview(2010)

Stephanie Nohelani Teves, Defiant Indigeneity: The Politics of Hawaiian Performance(2018)

Qwo-Lee Driskill, Queer Indigenous Studies: Critical Interventions in Theory, Politics, and Literature(2011)

Alyosha Goldstein, “Toward a Genealogy of the U.S. Colonial Present” (2014)

Grading

Commentator & Moderator            10%

Book Review                                10%

Concept Annotated Bibliography    20%

Method Annotated Bibliography     20%

Theory Annotated Bibliography      20%

Meta-Summary                            20%

UGS 302 • Global Indigenous Media

61295 • Spring 2019
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 208
Wr ID

This course offers a historical overview and critical exploration of Indigenous media producers, writers, directors, and audiences around the globe. We will survey a wide range of mediums from film, radio, animation, video games, comic books, podcasts, television, and new media to explore how they have been taken up by Indigenous media-makers to serve local needs and reach a wider audience. We will maintain a global perspective throughout the course, examining discourses about Indigenous peoples formulated from contact to the post-colonial era, highlighting issues of sovereignty, representation, creative change, and cultural continuity to name a few. In understanding how these discourses have been shaped through local assertions of cultural specificity and appeals to global Indigenous identity, the course maintains a critical interest in how Indigenous people have been defined and how they are now using media technologies to shape and respond to modernity.  We will also consider case studies while engaging with theoretical works that investigate the phenomenon of global Indigenous media movements. Through group presentations, we will also learn about many other Indigenous cultures, politics, and media efforts not covered in the course readings. Note: This course carries a Writing Flag.

ILA 387 • Critical/Digital Archives

45139 • Fall 2018
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM BEN 1.118
(also listed as LAS 381)

Co-Instructor: Hannah Alpert-Abrams

Course Description:

This course will use three newly developed Latin American digital archives to explore theoretical and practical issues related to their creation and access (the latter in the broadest terms: physical, technical, community, post-custodial, etc.). With emphasis on critical archive theory and state-of-the-art digital humanities approaches, this course draws from literary & cultural studies, critical indigenous studies, history, art history, and anthropology as we build a rigorous theoretical framework and engage in hands-on practice.

-We will begin with the John Carter Brown Library Latin American Digital Collections (JCB), with emphasis on Book History and Native Studies, in order to understand how archives actually come to be. Where did all of this stuff come from anyway? how did it get to Providence? How are digital archives designed/curated, and in what ways can this design create and/or perpetuate unequal power structures? What are possible decolonial archival practices that can be deployed? What are best practices for actually utilizing digital archives for scholarly work?

-The second archive is the Digital Archive of the Guatemalan National Police Historical Archive (AHPN), a collaborative project between LLILAS-Benson and Rapaport Center for Human Rights at UT Austin, and the AHPN. With materials related to the 1975-1985 Civil War in Guatemala, this behemoth (some 80 million documents) archive “is the largest single repository of documents ever made available to human rights investigators.”[1] How do you create an accessible, easily searchable, digital archive of this size and complexity that best serves human rights workers and affected families? What are the technical aspects of such an undertaking?

-Finally, our third archive is the Fondo Real de Cholula (FRC), which is being digitalized in Summer 2018 as a joint project between Kelly McDonough (UT Austin) and Lidia García-Gómez (BUAP, Mexico). Only recently discovered, the FRC is the judicial archive of Cholula, Mexico, spanning the early colonial period through independence, the Porfiriato, and much of the 20th century. As we identify and study indigenous, female, and afro-descendant cases in the archive, we will also consider issues of community engagement and working with cultural heritage sources. What are our ethical responsibilities when dealing with digitization projects in a transnational context? What is our obligation to the communities of origin?

Approximately half of the course will consist of readings, discussion, and workshops related to the archives. Workshops range from instruction on digital mapmaking and other visualization; understanding networks; scraping data, and paleography and transcription. This course will be supported by LLILAS-Benson Digital Scholarship and Rare Books Collection specialists. Since one of the key goals of this course is to grapple with theory meeting practice, we will meet regularly with a similar course through the School of Information (“Humanists and Archive Professionals meet and attempt to talk to each other”).

The final grade will be primarily based on a semester-long portfolio with small essays or digital projects from each of the archives, a series of meta-reflections. The final project will consist of a proposal and detailed outline for a research project related either to critical/digital archive theory or in a digital collection of the student’s choice.  

Readings include: Rodrigo Rey Rosa, El material humano (fiction); Excerpts from: Lisa Sousa, The Woman who Turned into a Jaguar, and Other Narratives of the Colonial Archive; Bianca Premo, The Enlightenment on Trial; Joanne Rappaport and Tom Cummins, Beyond the Lettered City; Kathryn Burns, Into the Archive; Ann Stoler, Along the Archival Grain; Michel Trouillot, Silencing the Past; Kirsten Weld, Paper Cadavers; Jane Anderson, “Anxieties of Authorship in the Colonial Archive,” Jeannette Bastien, “Reading Colonial Records through an Archival Lens,” Michelle Caswell, “Owning Critical Archival Studies: A Plea,” Kim Christen, “Does Information Really Want to be Free?” Andrew Flinn, Mary Stevens, and Elizabeth Shepherd, “Whose Memories, Whose Archives? Independent Community Archives, Autonomy, and the Mainstream,” Kelvin White, “Mestizaje and Remembering in Afro-Mexican Communities of the Costa Chica,” Howard Zinn, “Secrecy, Archives, and the Public Interest.”

Other Archives:

There are numerous other digital archival sources at UT and elsewhere that students can draw upon for their work in this course. However, in workshops priority will be given to the recently-launched Latin American Digital Initiatives (http://ladi.lib.utexas.edu/. LADI is a collaboration between LLILAS Benson Latin American Studies and Collections at The University of Texas at Austin and Latin American partner institutions to preserve and provide access to unique archival documentation from Latin America, with an emphasis on collections documenting human rights, race, ethnicity, and social exclusion in the region. The project embraces a horizontal approach to archival collaboration, and aims to build capacity within partner institutions in areas such as digitization, preservation, arrangement, description, and access, while maintaining partners’ collections in their original context. Physical archives housed at the Benson, of course can and should supplement the digital research as appropriate.

[1] https://ahpn.lib.utexas.edu/about_ahpn

SPN 379C • Capstone Seminar In Lit & Cul

45790 • Fall 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.210
GCIIWr

Brings together central issues, concepts, and themes that define Iberian or Latin American literatures and cultures, while focusing on a specific case-study or case-studies.

SPN 328C • Intro To Literatures/Culs

45945 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.210
GCWr (also listed as LAS 370S)

Overview of Iberian and/or Latin American literatures and cultures, including the arts and popular expressions, from a multidisciplinary perspective. Among the regions studied are Spain; North, Central, and South America; the Caribbean; and related areas in Africa.

SPN 355 • Cult Contact Colonial Spn Amer

45982 • Spring 2018
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.212
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Study of important themes or issues in the cultural production of the Latin American world. Among the regions studied are Spain; North, Central, and South America; the Caribbean; and related areas in Africa.

Topic 1: Fantastic Fiction from Latin America. Analysis of short stories by Latin American writers that in some way represent an alternative to realism.

Topic 2: Nonfiction Narratives from Latin America. Study of nonfiction works written in contemporary Latin America as experimental narrative forms that offer insight about current political, social, and economic problems of the region. Examination of these realities through readings and careful analysis of the works of popular nonfiction Latin American writers.

Topic 3: Jewish Voices from Latin America. Overview of popular Jewish writers from Brazil and Spanish America, with special emphasis on those who portray in their work the situation of the Jewish communities of their respective cities and countries.

Topic 4: Sex and Sexuality in Latin America. Examines different representations of sex, sexuality, and eroticism in the various cultures of Latin America. These concepts do not refer to explicit or provocative texts or images in books, films, or photographs alone. On the contrary, they include a vast gamut of life, love, pain, and social conflict.

Topic 5: Revolutionary Imagination in Latin American Cultures. Explores literary expressions in Latin America that reflect a dissident or transgressive imaginary published during the revolutionary period (1960-1990). Examination of how different sociohistorical experiences require new narrative forms, and innovative ways of exploring and codifying collective community identities.

Topic 6: Violence in Contemporary Mexican Culture. Studies the representation of violence in contemporary literary and cultural production in Mexico in order to understand social, political, and cultural implications of current violence there. Taught in Spanish.

Topic 7: East/West/New World Encounters. Survey of works mostly in the Latin American and Hispanic literary tradition in which images or themes related to the East (Asia, Eastern Africa, the Middle East) are developed.

Topic 8: Memory and Writing in Caribbean Culture. Studies literary works from the greater Caribbean basin (with a focus on Cuba and Puerto Rico) in which the act of remembering is emphatically dramatized and described.

Topic 9: Literary Figurations in the Multimedia Age. Focuses on the figurations of sounds and images in literary language in the context of the multimedia environment of modern and contemporary Latin America.

SPN 356 • Indigen Voices Lat Amer Lit

46490 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 214
EGC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Examines how indigenous writers, artists, and cultural producers have established their own voices and languages through writing and other forms of media. Analysis of the indigenous artistic and intellectual production in concrete political and cultural contexts. 

UGS 302 • Global Indigenous Media

62050 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:00PM-1:30PM UTC 4.120
Wr ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

ILA 387 • Colonialism/Postcolonialism

45810 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.118
(also listed as LAS 381)

Course Description:  In this interdisciplinary graduate seminar we will explore key issues related to Colonial Studies today. Through the analysis of primary sources, as well as seminal and cutting-edge research, this course allows students to acquire and develop a rigorous theoretical/conceptual framework, historical background, and method for research related to colonial cultures and subjectivities. Topics to be addressed throughout the semester include, among others: representations; alphabetic and visual literacies; languages in contact; gender and sexuality; race and ethnicity; law and ordering; diasporic cultures; ritual and religion; performance; and objects in circulation.

 Primary Sources may include: “Alboroto y motín” (Carlos de Sigüenza y Góngora), “Lienzo de Tlaxcala”, “Florentine Codex,”  “Codex Mexicanus,” “Brevísima relación” (Bartolomé de las Casas), “Democrates alter” (Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda), “Historia general y natural de las Indias” (Oviedo), “Comentarios Reales de Los Incas” (El Inca Garcilaso de la Vega), “Nueva corónica y buen gobierno” Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala, “Pinturas de castas,” and “Recopilación de las leyes de las Indias.”

 Theoretical/Secondary readings may include: José Rabasa, Peter Hulme, Elizabeth Hill-Boone, Barbara Mundy, Walter Mignolo, Michel de Certeau, Edward Soja, Simon Springer, Steve Borgatti, Jennifer Shepper-Hughes, Byran Hamman, Yolanda Martínez-San Miguel, Lori Boornazian-Diel, Rolena Adorno, Joanne Rappaport and Tom Cummins, Jens Baumgarten, Anne Twinam, Martha Few, Anne McClintock, Pete Sigal, and JZ Smith.

 Requirements:

Weekly Reflection Papers and Discussion Questions 30%

Book Review 10%

Oral Discussion Leader 10%

Literature Review 25%

Primary Source Analysis 10%

Article Abstract and Outline 10%

Undergraduate Lesson Plan 5%

SPN 328C • Intro To Literatures/Culs

46520 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.120
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Taught in Spanish. Overview of Iberian and/or Latin American literatures and cultures, including the arts and popular expressions, from a multidisciplinary perspective. Among the regions studied are Spain; North, Central, and South America; the Caribbean; and related areas in Africa. 

SPN 328C • Intro To Literatures/Culs

46435 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.120
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Overview of Iberian and/or Latin American literatures and cultures, including the arts and popular expressions, from a multidisciplinary perspective. Among the regions studied are Spain; North, Central, and South America; the Caribbean; and related areas in Africa.

UGS 302 • Global Indigenous Cultures

61945 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 1.108
Wr ID

The Signature Course (UGS 302 and 303) introduces first-year students to the university’s academic community through the exploration of new interests. The Signature Course is your opportunity to engage in college-level thinking and learning.

ILA 387 • Colonial Space And Mapping

44875 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.118
(also listed as LAS 381)

Course Description: In this interdisciplinary graduate seminar we will analyze the production and interaction of visual signs (written, painted, and cartographic) issuing from distinct cultures in the ever-changing temporal, social, and geographic space of colonial Latin America. Specifically, with an emphasis on the oftentimes unequal encounters between European and indigenous peoples, we will study how the cultural texts in question were both reflective and constitutive of the colonial experience. This course allows students to acquire and develop a rigorous theoretical framework and historical background for research related to colonial cultures in contact, particularly in the areas of: 1) the construction of identity in relation to interpretations and representations of self and others; 2) written and visual assertions of domination, subordination, negotiation, and appropriation; and 3) the circulation and impact of these texts in their own time, as well as the present day.

Primary Sources include:

Códice Mendoza

Colón, Cristóbal. Diario del primer viaje (1492-1493)

Cortés, Hernán. Cartas de relación

Díaz del Castillo, Bernal. Historia verdadera de la conquista de la Nueva España

Fernández de Oviedo y Valdés, Gonzalo. Historia general y natural de las Indias

Garcilaso de la Vega, El Inca. Comentarios Reales de Los Incas

Guaman Poma de Ayala, Felipe Guaman. Nueva corónica y buen gobierno

La historia tolteca-chichimeca

Mapa de Cuauhtinchan No. 2

Miscellaneous Maps (Kraus Map Collection at the Harry Ransom Center; LLILAS Benson Rare Books Collection; James Ford Bell Library [online])

Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Alvar. Naufragios

El Requerimiento

Relaciones geográficas (written questionnaire responses and accompanying maps);

Sahagún, Bernardino de, et al. Historia General de Las Cosas de Nueva España (Códice Florentino, Book 11, Earthly Things)

Secondary and/or Theoretical Texts by: Michel de Certeau; Edmundo O’Gorman; Rolena Adorno; José Rabasa; Walter Mignolo; Ricardo Padrón; Edward Soja; Michel Foucault; Ellen T. Baird; Barbara Mundy; Ileana Rodríguez; Dana Liebsohn; Doreen Massey; Antonello Gerbi; Santa Arias; Ángel Rama; Elizabeth Hill Boone; Camilla Townsend; and José Luis Romero.

Requirements:

30% Class Discussion Participation

20% Undergraduate Lesson Plan

50% Final Research Paper

SPN 328C • Intro To Literatures/Culs

45590 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.120
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Overview of Iberian and/or Latin American literatures and cultures, including the arts and popular expressions, from a multidisciplinary perspective. Among the regions studied are Spain; North, Central, and South America; the Caribbean; and related areas in Africa.

SPN 328C • Intro To Literatures/Culs

45635 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.108
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Taught in Spanish. Overview of Iberian and/or Latin American literatures and cultures, including the arts and popular expressions, from a multidisciplinary perspective. Among the regions studied are Spain; North, Central, and South America; the Caribbean; and related areas in Africa.

SPN 328C • Intro To Literatures/Culs

46118 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.120
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

The contact zone, according to literary and cultural studies scholar Mary Louise Pratt, can be defined as “social spaces where cultures meet, clash, and grapple with each other, often in contexts of highly asymmetrical relations of power, such as colonialism, slavery, or their aftermaths as they are lived out in many parts of the world today.”1 With the contact zone as an organizing framework, this course is an introduction to the cultural texts produced in the complex social, cultural, historical, geographical, and political contexts of Iberian and Latin America. As opposed to the impossible task of a chronological march through hundreds of years and more than twenty countries, we will instead utilize a multidisciplinary approach utilizing concepts crucial to understanding Iberian and Latin American literary/cultural phenomena. These concepts include mapping and representation; the politics and legacy of encounters; social identities; coercion and subversion; discourses of the modern nation; inclusions and exclusions; and movements and migrations. Throughout the semester you will acquire and practice the skills necessary to analyze a variety of written, visual, oral, and embodied texts, culminating in an original and independent multi-media research project related to the course topic(s).

SPN 328C • Intro To Literatures/Culs

46119 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.212
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

The contact zone, according to literary and cultural studies scholar Mary Louise Pratt, can be defined as “social spaces where cultures meet, clash, and grapple with each other, often in contexts of highly asymmetrical relations of power, such as colonialism, slavery, or their aftermaths as they are lived out in many parts of the world today.”1 With the contact zone as an organizing framework, this course is an introduction to the cultural texts produced in the complex social, cultural, historical, geographical, and political contexts of Iberian and Latin America. As opposed to the impossible task of a chronological march through hundreds of years and more than twenty countries, we will instead utilize a multidisciplinary approach utilizing concepts crucial to understanding Iberian and Latin American literary/cultural phenomena. These concepts include mapping and representation; the politics and legacy of encounters; social identities; coercion and subversion; discourses of the modern nation; inclusions and exclusions; and movements and migrations. Throughout the semester you will acquire and practice the skills necessary to analyze a variety of written, visual, oral, and embodied texts, culminating in an original and independent multi-media research project related to the course topic(s).

ILA 387 • Indigenous Cult Colonial Mex

46595 • Fall 2014
Meets TH 9:30AM-12:30PM BEN 1.118

Description:

The study of Latin American literatures and cultures during the colonial period has traditionally been carried out through the analysis of texts produced by Europeans and their descendants. These perspectives are useful and valid; however without taking into account indigenous voices we are left with an incomplete understanding of the colonial experience. With this in mind, the aim of this interdisciplinary course is to investigate how Nahuas (native speakers of Nahuatl, one of the most widely spoken and best-documented indigenous languages in the Americas) shaped and responded to colonial rule in New Spain during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Through the analysis of visual and alphabetic texts we will attend to how Nahuas asserted and negotiated social, political, and territorial rights and authority within a context of domination. Specifically, we will focus on the paradoxical roles that alphabetic literacy, the Catholic Church, and the complex colonial legal system played in both the production and contestation of coloniality in the economic, political, civic, and epistemological domains of Nahua life. By emphasizing this lesser-known history of indigenous survival and creative adaptation, as well as cross-cultural communications between indigenous peoples and Europeans, this course allows students to acquire and develop a rigorous theoretical framework and historical background for research related to colonial cultures in contact and their legacies today. This course welcomes graduate students from the Humanities and Social Sciences. Advanced undergraduate students may enroll with special permission from the instructor.

Requirements:

Weekly 1-page Reaction Paper with discussion questions and General Participation 20%

Oral of Assigned Reading 15%

Oral Presentation of Final Research Paper (preview/summary) 15%

Final Research Paper (20-25 pages, including notes and bibliography) 50%

Primary Sources:

Carta de Huejotzingo

Chimalpahin, Las ocho relaciones y el memorial de Colhuacan (excerpts)

Codex Telleriano Remensis (folio 46r)

The Florentine Codex (prologues and excerpts)

Historia Tolteca Chichimeca (complete)

Lienzo de Tlaxcala (at LLILAS BENSON)

La nobleza indígena del centro de México después de la conquista. Ed. Emma Pérez Rocha and Rafael Tena. (assorted letters)

Proceso inquisitorial del cacique de Tetzcoco: Don Carlos Ometochtzin, Chichimecatecotl (1539).

Relaciones geográficas & Questionnaire (maps at LLILAS Benson)

Tezozomoc, Hernando de Alvarado, Cronica mexicana and Cronica mexicayotl (excerpts)

Titulos primordiales (various narratives of possession of land, acceptance of Christianity)

Zapata y Mendoza, Don Juan Buenaventura. Historia cronológica de la Noble Ciudad de Tlaxcala(excerpts, funeral processions for the King of Spain)

Monographs

Christensen, Mark Z. Nahua and Maya Catholicisms: Texts and Religion in Colonial Central Mexico and Yucatan. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2013.

Connell, William. After Moctezuma: Indigenous Politics and Self-Government in Mexico City (1524-1730). Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2011.

Sigal, Peter H. The Flower and the Scorpion: Sexuality and Ritual in Early Nahua Culture. Durham: Duke University Press, 2011.

Tavárez, David. The Invisible War: Indigenous Devotions, Discipline, And Dissent in Colonial Mexico. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 2011. (also available in Spanish)

Theoretical and Secondary Sources

Boone, Elizabeth Hill. “Introduction: Writing and Recording Knowledge.” Writing without Words. Ed. Elizabeth Hill Boone and Walter D. Mignolo. Durham: Duke University Press, 1994. 3-26.

de Certeau, Michel. The Practice of Everyday Life. Trans. Steven F. Rendall. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984.

___. “Preface.” “Introduction: Writing and Histories” “Ethnography.” The Writing of History. Trans. Tom Conley. New York: Columbia University Press, 1988. xv-xviii, 1-16, 209-243.

Fabian, Johannes. “Time and the Emerging Other.” Time and the Other: How Anthropology Makes its Objects. New York: Columbia University Press, 1983. 1-35.

Fitzpatrick, Peter, and Eve Darian-Smith. “Laws of the Postcolonial: An Insistent Introduction.” Laws of the Postcolonial. Ed. Eve Darian-Smith and Peter Fitzpatrick. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1999. 1-17.

Green, L.C. “Claims to Territory in Colonial America.” The Laws of Nations and the New World. Ed. L.C. Green and Olive P. Dickason. Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 1989. 1-39.

Gruzinski, Serge. La colonización de lo imaginario: Sociedades indígenas y occidentalización en el México español. Siglos XVI-XVIII. Mexico City: FCE, 1998. (Chapters 1 and 2).

Kellogg, Susan. “Introduction—Back to the Future: Law, Politics, and Culture in

Colonial Mexican Ethnohistorical Studies.” Negotiation within Domination: New Spain’s Indian Pueblos Confront the Spanish State. Ed. Ethelia Ruiz Medrano and Susan Kellogg. Boulder: University Press of Colorado, 2010.

Liebsohn, Dana. “Primers for Memory: Cartographic Histories and Nahua Identity.” Writing without Words. Ed. Elizabeth Hill Boone and Walter D. Mignolo. Durham: Duke University Press, 1994. 161-187.

Lockhart, James. The Nahuas after the Conquest. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1992. (excerpts)

___.     Background and Course of the New Philology.  http://whp.uoregon.edu/Lockhart/index.html. 2007.

Lopes Don, Patricia. “The 1539 Inquisition and Trial of Don Carlos of Texcoco in Early Mexico.” Hispanic American Historical Review88.4 (2008): 573-606.

Mesoamerican Voices: Native Language Writings from Colonial Mexico, Oaxaca, Yucatan, and Guatemala. Ed. Restall, Matthew, Lisa Sousa, and Kevin Terraciano. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005. (chapter 1)

Mignolo, Walter. The Darker Side of the Renaissance: Literacy, Territoriality, and Colonization. 1995. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2007. (excerpts)

Mundy, Barbara. The Mapping of New Spain: Indigenous Cartography and the Maps of the Relaciones geográficas. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996.61-89.

Rabasa, José. Tell Me the Story of How I Conquered You: Elsewheres and Ethnosuicide in the Colonial Mesoamerican World. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2011. (chapters 1 and 2)

___. “Writing and Evangelization in Sixteenth Century Mexico.” Early Images of the Americas: Transfer and Invention. Ed. Jerry M. Williams and Robert E. Lewis. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1993. 65-92.

Rama, La ciudad letrada. Hanover: Ediciones del Norte, 1984. (chapters 1 and 2)

Roa de la Carrera, Cristián.Translating Nahua Rhetoric: Sahagun’s Nahua Subjects in Colonial Mexico.” Rhetorics of the Americas: 3114 BCE to 2012 CE. Ed. Damián Baca and Victor Villanueva. New York: Palgrave McMillan, 2010. 69-88.

Roseberry, William. “Hegemony and the Language of Contention.” Everyday Forms of State Formation: Revolution and the Negotiation of Rule in Modern Mexico. Ed. Gilbert M. Joseph and Daniel Nugent. Durham: Duke University Press, 1994. 355-366.

Taylor, Diana.“Performance and/as History.” The Drama Review(Spring 2006): 67-86.

Wood, Stephanie. “The Social vs. Legal Context of Nahuatl Títulos.” Native Traditions in the Postconquest World. Ed. Elizabeth Hill Boone and Tom Cummins. Washington D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks, 1998. 201-231.

 

SPN 355 • Cult Contact Colonial Spn Amer

47335 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.202
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Taught in Spanish. Latin American Studies 322 and 370S may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

SPN 325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

47180 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.122
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism.

SPN 350 • Indigen Voices Lat Amer Lit

47340 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.122
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Sequel to Spanish 322K and 328, approaching in a more specialized way the study of important currents in Hispanic civilization.

SPN 325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

46680 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.102
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism.

SPN 380K • Writ/Repr In Colonial Lat Amer

46920 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BEN 1.118

SPN380K Writing and Representation in Colonial Latin America

McDonough

 

Description:

The central concern of this interdisciplinary course is how both writing and images served to claim and (re-claim) territories, peoples, and histories/knowledges in early colonial Latin America (XV-XVII). With an emphasis on the oftentimes unequal encounters between European and indigenous peoples, we will study how the cultural texts in question were both reflective and constitutive of the colonial experience. Some of the interrelated issues we will address include: 1) interpretations and representations of self and others; 2) written and visual assertions of domination, subordination, negotiation, and appropriation; and 3) constructions of social identities in this evolving geographic and cultural space. Our readings will focus on the individual and/or collective positioning and discursive frames of a wide variety of texts including journal entries and letters, laws and decrees, relaciones, natural histories, crónicas, European and indigenous maps, codexes and lienzos, among others. We will view the Lienzo de Tlaxcala as well as the questionnaire and resulting Relaciones geográficas maps from New Spain held at the Benson Latin American Collection. This seminar welcomes graduate students from the Humanities and Social Sciences disciplines. Advanced undergraduate students may enroll with special permission from the instructor.

 

Course Readings:

Required Texts:

Mignolo, Walter. The Darker Side of the Renaissance: Literacy, Territoriality, & Colonization. 2nd ed. Ann Arbor: U of Michigan Press, 2003. (available at University Co-op)

Rabasa, José. Tell Me the Story of How I Conquered You: Elsewheres and Ethnosuicide in the Colonial Mesoamerican World. University of Texas Press, 2011. (available at University Co-op)

All other required course readings will be posted to Blackboard or available online

 

Course Readings:

Required Texts:

Mignolo, Walter. The Darker Side of the Renaissance: Literacy, Territoriality, & Colonization. 2nd ed. Ann Arbor: U of Michigan Press, 2003. (available at University Co-op)

Rabasa, José. Tell Me the Story of How I Conquered You: Elsewheres and Ethnosuicide in the Colonial Mesoamerican World. University of Texas Press, 2011. (Best price through University of Texas Press website: http://www.utexas.edu/utpress/books/rabtel.html)

All other required course readings will be posted to Blackboard or available online

 

Primary Sources:

Requerimiento; Cristóbal Colón (Diario del primer viaje [fragment]); Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo (Sumario de la natural historia de las Indias); Hernán Cortés (Second Letter [fragment]); Bernal Díaz del Castillo (Historia verdadera de la conquista de la Nueva España [fragment]); Códice Mexicanus [fragment]; Anales de Tlatelolco [fragment]; Códice Florentino [fragment] / Bernardino de Sahagún (Historia general de las cosas de la Nueva España); Códice Aubin [fragment]; Anales de Cuauhtitlan [fragment]; Carta del Cabildo de Huejotzingo; Lienzo de Tlaxcala; Códice Telleriano Remensis; Relaciones geográficas; Titu Cusi Yupanqui (Instrucción); Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala (El primer nueva corónica y buen gobierno); El Inca Garcilaso de la Vega (Comentarios reales de los Inca)

 

Secondary critical and theoretical works include those of: Walter Mignolo, Elizabeth Hill Boone, Carlos Jáuregi, Patricia Seed, Justyna Olko, Miguel León-Portilla, Stephanie Merrim, Antonello Gerbi, Natalio Hernández, Camilla Townsend, José Rabasa, Frank Salomon, Rolena Adorno, Mary Louise Pratt, and Margarita Zamora.

 

Grade Distribution:

15% Attendance, General Discussion, and Workshop Participation

10% (2) Two 15-minute Presentations

15% Mid-term Paper: 5-7 page essay on any of the readings of the first part of the course

10% Article Reviews: 4-5 page written report on 3 recent articles found in JSTOR or MLA on any of the texts/topics studied in class 1

50% Final Paper: 12-15 page research paper on a topic related to the course

 

SPN 325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

46410 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GAR 0.128
GC (also listed as LAS 370S)

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism.

SPN 327W • Adv Grammar And Composition II

46523 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ 1.212
Wr

Develops writing skills needed for upper-division coursework in Spanish. Emphasizes grammar in Spanish language, literature, and culture, exploring different compositional styles.


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