Working Group on Law and Democracy

Terrence Chapman


Ph.D., Emory University

Associate Professor
Terrence Chapman

Contact

Interests


International organizations, international conflict, international law, international political economy, formal modeling

Biography


In addition to his role in the Government Department, Professor Chapman is a distinguished scholar of the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law and affiliated faculty member of both the Center for European Studies and the Clements Center on History Strategy, and Statecraft.  His research interests span the study of international institutions, international security, and international political economy. In 2009-2010 he held a position as a visiting associate research scholar at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton University.  His work has appeared or is forthcoming in International Organization, the Journal of Politics, the British Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, the Journal of Theoretical Politics, International Interactions, and International Studies Quarterly. His book, Securing Approval: Domestic Politics and Multilateral Authorization for War, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2011 and won the 2011-2012 American Political Science Association Conflict Processes Section Book Award. He is currently a senior editor for International Studies Quarterly.   He received his Ph.D. in 2007 from Emory University. His current projects address the relationship between domestic bargaining over taxation and international diplomacy, the reaction of financial markets to crisis lending, international investment arbitration, the international criminal court, and the origins and consequences of constitutional balanced budget amendments. 

Courses taught: He teaches courses on international relations, international organizations, international political economy and game theory.

Courses


GOV 385N • Intro To Formal Pol Analysis

38525 • Spring 2018
Meets M 9:30AM-12:30PM BAT 1.104

This course will help students develop the tools necessary to consume formal theory in academic work and to write their own formal theories. Heavy emphasis will be placed on logic and the construction of valid arguments.

Grading policy:

Students will be graded on semi-weekly homework (30%), two exams (50%), and a final paper in which students identify a research question and specify, but need not solve, a game capable of answering it (20%). 

Texts:

Osborne, Martin J. 2004. An Introduction to Game Theory. Oxford University Press.

 

S S 301 • Intro To Internatl Relatns

42755 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 1.126

Course Description 

This course will serve as a broad introduction to international relations topics and research.  The course will be framed around a series of questions or topics, including (but not limited to) the following:

 

-       Is there an order to the international system?  If so, what are the determinants of that order?

-       Why do wars occur?  If war is costly in terms of lives and resources, when and why do governments fail to solve their differences by other means?

-       How has globalization changed the landscape of international politics?  What aspects of globalization are most important for understanding contemporary trends in national and international politics?

-       What role do international institutions and international law play in facilitating cooperation and order in the international system?

 

The course will analyze these questions through the lens of modern social scientific approaches, meaning we will spend time thinking rigorously about theoretical explanations and evidence based approaches to adjudicating between multiple explanations.  In that vein, students will be exposed to common research strategies employed by modern international relations scholars, ranging from qualitative historical and case study accounts to statistical analysis to experimental methods.  Likewise, students will be exposed to a variety of theoretical approaches, including formal models of interstate interactions (i.e. game theory), psychological explanations of foreign policy-making, and ideational or sociological approaches to understanding the international system.

 

Texts/readings:

Bruce Bueno de Mesquita. 2014. Principles of International Politics. 5th Edition.  Thousand Oaks, CA: CQ Press.

 

Joseph Nye and David Welch. 2013. Understanding Global Conflict and Cooperation: An Introduction to Theory and History.  9th Edition.

 

Assorted articles and news items made available through the library’s electronic subscriptions.

 

Course Requirements:

The course will consist of the following grades:

15% participation

25% midterm

25% final

20% expert reading assignment and paper (2-4 page analytical “thought” paper)

15% group debate

 

Biography:

Terrence Chapman is an associate professor of Government.  He is also a distinguished scholar of the Strauss Center on International Law and Security a faculty affiliate of the Clements Center on International History and the European Studies Center.  During 2009-2010, Professor Chapman served as a visiting associate research scholar at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton University.  His book, Securing Approval: Domestic Politics and Multilateral Authorization for War, received the 2011-2012 American Political Science Association Conflict Processes Best Book Award.  His work appears in the Journal of Politics, the British Journal of Political Science, International Organization, International Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, the Journal of Theoretical Politics, International Interactions, Perspectives on Politics and Political Science Quarterly.  His current work uses game theory, statistics, survey experiments, and case studies to examine diverse topics such as cross-national attitudes toward the International Criminal Court, financial market reactions to International Monetary Fund Lending, the politics of legal arbitration in foreign direct investment disputes, the effects of balanced budget rules in national constitutions, and the links between domestic bargaining over taxation and international diplomacy.  Professor Chapman also serves as an associate editor for International Studies Quarterly, the flagship journal of the International Studies Association.  Aside from his professional career, he stays occupied with two-year old twin daughters, Eden and 

UGS 302 • Science Fiction And Politics

62230 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM MAI 220E

GOV 360N • Global Governance

38725 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 420

GOV 360N  Global Governance

 

Description:

This course examines the forces that shape global stability (and instability).  Building on a basic framework outlining how and why actors interact in the international system, this course will explore how states design and agree to international agreements, what those agreements consist of, and how those agreements influence state behavior.  The course will also expose students to studies of international law and organizations.

Readings:

Jeffery Freiden, David Lake, and Ken Schultz. 2015. World Politics: Interests, Interactions, and Institutions. W.W. Norton and Norton & Co., Inc.  Third Edition.

Other readings made available electronically through the library’s subscriptions to news and academic periodicals.

Grading:

25% expert discussion leading/reaction paper

25% class participation

25% exam 1

25% exam 2

Prerequisites: upper division standing

GOV 388L • International Organization

38945 • Spring 2017
Meets M 9:30AM-12:30PM BAT 1.104

GOV 388L International Organizations

Description:

This is a graduate political science/government seminar studying international organizations and institutions. International institutions, meaning both formal organizations and less formal sets of rules, norms, and expectations, are now a common and increasing presence in international affairs. This prompts a number of questions from international relations scholars: Why do states form and act through international institutions? Can international institutions alter states’ behavior? If so, through what mechanisms? How do international institutions influence domestic politics? How does power play out in international organizations? Can international organizations create and spread new norms about appropriate behavior?

These are some of the questions that we will address throughout the semester. As a graduate seminar in the government department, most of the reading will be in the tradition of positive social science. That means that there will be a heavy emphasis on the careful exploration and development of theoretical ideas and expectations and attention to empirical evidence that can arbitrate between competing theoretical explanations.

This seminar also aims to prepare graduate students for comprehensive exams in international relations and/or conducting original and cutting edge research in the area of international organizations. The readings and assignments are organized with these goals in mind.

Books:

Robert O. Keohane. 1984. After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in International Political Economy. Princeton University Press.

Randall Stone. 2011. Controlling Institutions: International Organizations and the Global Economy. Cambridge University Press.

G. John Ikenberry. 2001. After Victory: Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order after Major Wars.

Articles:

3-5 articles per week

Assignments:

Short analytical papers: Four times during the semester you will write a 3-5 page analytical paper addressing a question from the week’s reading. Your paper should lay out the question clearly, discuss how existing work (especially from the class reading) has attempted to answer it, and identify potential extensions or areas that are not suitably “settled.” This will be worth 25% of your grade.

Replication paper: Pick one empirical study (qualitative or quantitative) and, building off of your short analytical papers, develop a critique of the research design employed in the paper. Your chosen study need not be listed on the syllabus, though it must be published in a peer-reviewed political science journal and be relevant to the course (i.e. somehow related to international governance). Show, through replication and extension, how the results are either (a) robust to alternative research design choices or (b) don’t hold up to changes to research design choices. These changes may include, but are not limited to, alternative measures for core variables, alternative estimation techniques, alternative case comparisons, alternative experimental design, or extensions to temporal or cross-sectional extensions of the data. During the last two weeks of class you will deliver a conference-style presentation (15 minutes for presentation, 15-30 minutes for q&a). Combined the paper and presentation will be worth 50% of your grade. Absolutely no late papers will be accepted, pending a serious illness that physically prevents you from completing the paper, a death in the family that prevents you from completing the paper, or an otherwise legitimate life catastrophe that prevents you from completing the paper. Please notify me immediately if any of these events occurs.

Class attendance and active participation: Class attendance is required. The success of this seminar, in terms of what you get out of it, depends crucially on the active participation and input of everyone. 25% of your grade will therefore come from how actively you participate by asking questions, raising relevant points, and maintaining a respectful scholarly atmosphere. 

GOV 360N • Global Governance

38520 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 420

GOV 360N  Global Governance

 

This course examines the forces that shape global stability (and instability).  Building on a basic framework outlining how and why actors interact in the international system, this course will explore how states design and agree to international agreements, what those agreements consist of, and how those agreements influence state behavior.  Part of the course will be theoretical/conceptual, introducing students to the latest academic approaches to understanding the role of international law and organizations.  A second component will be applied — examining international agreements, international law, and international organizations in contemporary international life — ranging from IMF interventions in Greece and beyond to the Iranian nuclear accord to international tribunals and the international criminal court.  

 

Readings:

 

Jeffery Freiden, David Lake, and Ken Schultz. 2015. World Politics: Interests, Interactions, and Institutions. Third addition.   W.W. Norton and Norton & Co. 

Other readings made available electronically through the library’s subscriptions to news and academic periodicals.

 

Grading:

 

25% expert discussion leading/reaction paper

25% class participation

25% exam 1

25% exam 2

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37664 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.130

 

Gov 312: America and the World

 

This course provides a basic and broad introduction to U.S. foreign policy and international relations theory.   The course covers classic approaches to studying international relations and foreign policy and deals with issues areas ranging from military intervention, terrorism, and international law to international trade, finance, and environmental cooperation. 

 

Prerequisites: none

 

Grading:

 

3 exams: 25% each

 

Weekly quizzes: 25% in total

 

Textbook: Jon Pevehouse and Joshua Goldstein, International Relations, 10th edition

 

Various journal articles and news items, available electronically on blackboard.

EndFragment

--------------------------

Terrence Chapman

Associate Professor

Department of Government

The University of Texas at Austin

Batts Hall 3.104

http://terrencechapman.weebly.com

 

BookSecuring Approval: Domestic Politics and Multilateral Authorization for War http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/S/bo10944414.html

 

Recent Articles:

"The Domestic Politics of Strategic Retrenchment, Power Shifts, and Preventive War," International Studies Quarterly http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/isqu.12154/abstract

 

"Mixed Signals: IMF Lending and Capital Markets," British Journal of Political Science http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0007123415000216

GOV 360N • Global Governance

37778 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GDC 1.304

Fall 2015 Course Descriptions

Chapman

 

GOV 360N  Global Governance

This course examines the forces that shape global stability (and instability).  Building on a basic framework outlining how and why actors interact in the international system, this course will explore how states design and agree to international agreements, what those agreements consist of, and how those agreements influence state behavior.  The course will also expose students to studies of international law and organizations.

Readings:

Jeffery Freiden, David Lake, and Ken Schultz. 2010. World Politics. Norton and Norton

Other readings made available electronically through the library’s subscriptions to news and academic periodicals.

Grading:

25% expert discussion leading/reaction paper

25% exam 1

25% exam 2

25% exam 3

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38735 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.306

38735 GOV 312L 

Prerequisites:

None

 Course Description 

This course provides a basic and broad introduction to U.S. foreign policy and international relations theory.   The course covers classic approaches to studying international relations and foreign policy and deals with issues areas ranging from military intervention, terrorism, and international law to international trade, finance, and environmental cooperation. 

Grading:

3 exams: 25% each

Weekly quizzes: 25% in total

Textbook:

Jon Pevehouse and Joshua Goldstein, International Relations, 10th edition

Various journal articles and news items, available electronically on blackboard.

GOV 388L • International Organization

39095 • Fall 2014
Meets M 12:30PM-3:30PM CBA 4.346

39095 GOV 388L

 

Course Description

This course is a graduate seminar on international institutions and international cooperation.  As such, it will focus on the cutting edge research on why states create international institutions and agreements, how these agreements are crafted, and how international organizations influence state behavior. The course cover, among other topics the effect of international law, enforcement of and compliance with international obligations, the interplay between domestic politics and international organizations, the design of international institutions, the origins and role of international trade and financial institutions, and the role of international organizations in security affairs.  Students are expected to do the required readings, which will consist mainly of journal articles, and additionally know the recommended readings for the IR comprehensive exam

Grading Policy

Grading will consist of four short papers and discussion leading (40%), a literature review, research design, and data replication project (40%) and general class participation (10%).

Texts

To be determined

GOV F360N • Internatl Political Economy

84800 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM MEZ B0.306

 GOV F360N • Internatl Political Economy

Prerequisites

Upper Division standing

 

Course Description

This is an introductory course in international political economy.  The course explores the distributional consequences and subsequent political dynamics associated with global production, international trade, international lending, international monetary policy coordination, and economic development.  The course also analyzes how countries achieve cooperation over international economic exchange and whether global institutions, like the World Trade Organization or the International Monetary Fund, facilitate and aid international economic exchange.

 

Grading Policy

3 exams: 25% each

1 short analytical paper: 25%

 

Texts

Thomas Oatley, International Political Economy, 5th edition

Various journal articles available eletronically

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

39085 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.306

Prerequisites:

None

 

Course Description 

This course provides a basic and broad introduction to U.S. foreign policy and international relations theory.   The course covers classic approaches to studying international relations and foreign policy and deals with issues areas ranging from military intervention, terrorism, and international law to international trade, finance, and environmental cooperation. 

  

Grading:

3 exams: 25% each

Weekly quizzes: 25% in total

 

Textbook:

Jon Pevehouse and Joshua Goldstein, International Relations, 10th edition

Various journal articles and news items, available electronically on blackboard.

GOV F360N • Internatl Political Economy

85090 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM MEZ B0.306

Prerequisites

Upper Division standing

 

Course Description

This is an introductory course in international political economy.  The course explores the distributional consequences and subsequent political dynamics associated with global production, international trade, international lending, international monetary policy coordination, and economic development.  The course also analyzes how countries achieve cooperation over international economic exchange and whether global institutions, like the World Trade Organization or the International Monetary Fund, facilitate and aid international economic exchange.

 

Grading Policy

3 exams: 25% each

1 short analytical paper: 25%

 

Texts

Thomas Oatley, International Political Economy, 5th edition

Various journal articles available eletronically

 

 

GOV 360N • Global Governance

38765 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 1

Course Description

This course examines the forces that shape global stability (and instability).  Building on a basic framework outlining how and why actors interact in the international system, this course will explore how states reach international agreements, what those agreements consist of, and how those agreements influence state behavior.  The course will also expose students to studies of international law and organizations. 

Grading Policy

2 exams (25% each), 1 5 page paper (25%), 1 discussion leading and 2 page response paper (25%)

Texts

Required: Frieden, Lake, and Schultz, World Politics.  Other readings will be available electronically through blackboard.

GOV 388L • International Organization

38950 • Fall 2012
Meets W 3:30PM-6:30PM BAT 5.102

Course Description

This course is a graduate seminar on international institutions and international cooperation.  As such, it will focus on the cutting edge research on why states create international institutions and agreements, how these agreements are crafted, and how international organizations influence state behavior. The course cover, among other topics the effect of international law, enforcement of and compliance with international obligations, the interplay between domestic politics and international organizations, the design of international institutions, the origins and role of international trade and financial institutions, and the role of international organizations in security affairs.  Students are expected to do the required readings, which will consist mainly of journal articles, and additionally know the recommended readings for the IR comprehensive exam

Grading Policy

Grading will consist of handing in weekly 1-2 pages critiques of one article (40%), a literature review and research design (40%) and class participation (10%).

Texts

To be determined. 

GOV F360N • Global Governance

85310 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM MEZ B0.306

Course Description

This course examines the forces that shape global stability (and instability).  Building on a basic framework outlining how and why actors interact in the international system, this course will explore how states reach international agreements, what those agreements consist of, and how those agreements influence state behavior.  The course will also expose students to studies of international law and organizations.

 

Grading Policy

2 exams (25% each), 1 5 page paper (25%), 1 discussion leading and 2 page response paper (25%)

 

Texts

Required: Frieden, Lake, and Schultz, World Politics.  Other readings will be available electronically through blackboard.

GOV 385N • Intro To Formal Pol Analysis

38955 • Spring 2012
Meets TH 12:30PM-3:30PM BAT 5.102

This course provides an introduction to utility theory, decision theory, and non-cooperative game theory.  The course begins with the foundations of preferences, utility theory, expected utility, and will build to cover normal form games, extensive form games, repeated games, and games of imperfect and incomplete information.  The course will cover basic solution concepts in noncooperative game theory, including Nash equilibria, subgame perfection, and perfect Bayesian equilibria.  

The course grade consists of semi-weekly homeworks (30%), a midterm and final exams (25% each), and a paper in which the students will introduce a question and specify, but not solve, a game capable of providing theoretical insight into the research question (20%).

Required Text: Martin J. Osborne. 2004. An Introduction to Game Theory. Oxford University Press.

GOV 360N • Global Governance

38770 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 1

Course Description:

This course examines the forces that shape global stability (and instability).  Building on a basic framework outlining how and why actors interact in the international system, this course will explore how states reach international agreements, what those agreements consist of, and how those agreements influence state behavior.  The course will also expose students to studies of international law and organizations.

Grading Policy:

2 exams (25% each), 1 5 page paper (25%), 1 discussion leading and 2 page response paper (25%)

Textbooks:

Required: Frieden, Lake, and Schultz, World Politicsother readings will be available electronically through blackboard.

GOV 388L • Internatl Political Economy

38945 • Fall 2011
Meets W 12:30PM-3:30PM BAT 5.102

See Syllabus

GOV 360N • Global Governance

38980 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM MEZ B0.306

This course examines the forces that shape global stability (and instability).  Building on a basic framework outlining how and why actors interact in the international system, this course will explore how states reach international agreements, what those agreements consist of, and how those agreements influence state behavior.  The course will also expose students to studies of international law and organizations.

GOV 385R • Applied Game Theory

39180 • Spring 2011
Meets T 9:30AM-12:30PM BAT 1.104

See syllabus

GOV 360N • Global Governance

38595 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM PAR 201

Course Description:

This course examines the forces that shape global stability (and instability).  Building on a basic framework outlining how and why actors interact in the international system, this course will explore how states reach international agreements, what those agreements consist of, and how those agreements influence state behavior.  The course will also expose students to studies of international law and organizations.


Grading Policy:

3 exams (20% each), 2 3-5 page papers (20% each).


Textbooks:
Required: Frieden, Lake, and Schultz, World Politics
other readings will be available electronically through blackboard.

GOV 388L • International Organization

38830 • Fall 2010
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM BAT 1.104

Course Description:

This course is a graduate seminar on international institutions and international cooperation.  As such, it will focus on the cutting edge research on why states create international institutions and agreements, how these agreements are crafted, and how international organizations influence state behavior. The course cover, among other topics the effect of international law, enforcement of and compliance with international obligations, the interplay between domestic politics and international organizations, the design of international institutions, the origins and role of international trade and financial institutions, and the role of international organizations in security affairs.  Students are expected to do the required readings, which will consist mainly of journal articles, and additionally know the recommended readings for the IR comprehensive exam.



Grading Policy:

Grading will consist of handing in weekly 1-2 pages critiques of one article (40%), a literature review and research design (40%) and class participation (10%).

Textbooks:

Robert O. Keohane. 1984. After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in International Political Economy. Princeton University Press.
Andy Moravcisk.  1998. The Choice for Europe. Cornell University Press.
Andrew Guzman. 2008. How International Law Works. Oxford University Press.
G. John Ikenberry. 2001. After Victory. Cornell University Press.

GOV 360N • Amer & Internatl Institutions

38350 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 301

Please check back for updates.

GOV 360N • Amer & Internatl Institutions

38352 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 308

Please check back for updates.

GOV 360N • Amer & Internatl Institutions

39353 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 3.116

Please check back for updates.

GOV 360N • Amer & Internatl Institutions

40070 • Fall 2007
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM UTC 3.110

Please check back for updates.

Publications


Terrence L. Chapman, Songying Fang, Xin Li, and Randall Stone. Forthcoming. "Mixed Signals: Crisis Lending and Capital Markets." British Journal of Political Science.

Terrence L. Chapman, Patrick J. McDonald and Scott Moser. Forthcoming. "The Domestic Politics of Strategic Retrenchment, Power Shifts, and Preventive War." International Studies Quarterly.

Terrence L. Chapman and Henry Pascoe. 2015. "Information and Institutions Redux: A Response to Fey, Jo, and Kenkel." Journal of Conflict Resolution 59(1): 161-172.

Terrence L. Chapman and Eric Reinhardt. 2013. Global Credit Markets, Political Violence, and Politically Sustainable Risk Premia." International Interactions 39(3).

Terrence L. Chapman and Stephen Chaudoin. 2013. "Ratification Patterns and the International Criminal Court." International Studies Quarterly 57(2): 400-409.

Terrence Chapman, Johannes Urpelainen, Scott Wolford. 2013. "International Bargaining, Endogenous Domestic Constraints, and Democratic Accountability." Journal of Theoretical Politics 25(2). 

Terrence L. Chapman. 2011. Securing Approval: Domestic Politics and Mutilateral Authorization for War.  Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Terrence L. Chapman and Scott Wolford. 2010. "International Organizations, Strategy, and Crisis Bargaining." Journal of Politics 72(1): 227-42.

Terrence L. Chapman. 2009. "Audience Beliefs and International Organization Legitimacy." International Organization 63(4): 733-764.

Terrence L. Chapman. 2008. "Unraveling the Ties Between Civic Engagement and Attitudes Toward Political Violence." International Studies Quarterly 52(3): 515-532.

Terrence L. Chapman. 2007. "International Security Institutions, Domestic Politics, and Institutional Legitimacy." Journal of Conflict Resolution 31(1): 134-166.

Terrence L. Chapman and Dan Reiter. 2004. "The UN Security Council and the Rally 'Round-the-Flag Effect." Journal of Conflict Resolution 48(6): 886-909.

Curriculum Vitae


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