African and African Disapora Studies Department
African and African Disapora Studies Department

Omoniyi Afolabi


Associate ProfessorPh.D, Luso-Brazilian Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Associate Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies
Omoniyi Afolabi

Contact

Interests


Afro-Brazilian Cultural Studies; Yoruba Diaspora Studies; Lusophone African Literature; Comparative African Diaspora Studies; Latin American Cultural Studies.

Biography


Niyi Afolabi teaches Luso-Brazilian, Yoruba, and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin—in the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies department. He is the author of The Golden Cage: Regeneration in Lusophone African Literature and Culture, Afro-Brazilians: Cultural Production in a Racial Democracy, and editor of The Afro-Brazilian Mind and Marvels of the African World, among others. His scholarly interests range from the Lusophone Atlantic Triangle (Lusophone Africa, Brazil, and Portugal) and Latin American studies, to broader issues of cultural studies, transnationalism, migrations, and exile. Through focused case studies or comparative approaches, he has published in the areas of culture, literature, and religion, drawing parallels between the centrality of Yoruba mythology in the African diaspora as well as the place of the African cosmological and strategic essences in the New World or global studies. Niyi Afolabi’s current research focuses on the interface between literature, historicism, and culture studies with particular focus on Afro-Brazil.

Courses


AFR 374E • Afro-Luso-Brazilian Worlds

30267 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CAL 221
(also listed as LAS 328, PRC 320E)

OBJECTIVES

  1. Introduce students to the richness and diversity of the Afro-Luso-Brazilian worlds.
  2. Engage students on some of the main myths and realities of these worlds through a comparison of issues that connect and distinguish these worlds.
  3. Get students excited about these worlds that they will want to study, live, or visit any of them.

 

DESCRIPTION

            The notion of a “Portuguese commonwealth” has always been an imperial desire of Portugal to the extent of justifying conquest and subjugation in the so-called “colonies” through varying tropical mythologies.  Even after independence, Portugal continued to exercise tremendous cultural and political influences on its former colonies, namely, Brazil, Angola, Mozambique, Cape Verde, etc.  This course engages some of the myths and realities in the Afro-Luso-Brazilian worlds while at the same time drawing connections and contrasts between them.  In addition to a contextual survey of the “triangle,” we will examine some of the strategies adopted by the colonized to decolonize their minds through multidisciplinary case studies.  Drawing upon a mix of theoretical, cultural, historical, sociological, and literary readings, we will tease out the vibrant affinities or/and tensions between Africa and Brazil, Africa and Portugal, Brazil and Portugal, Portugal and Asia, etc.  We will foreground our discussions with the concepts of Luso-Tropicalism and Postcolonialism while reflecting on the myth of racial harmony in the Lusophone Atlantic world.  Readings will include representative texts such as New World in the Tropics, Brazilian Mosaic, Racism in a Racial Democracy, Angola Under the Portuguese, and Sleepwalking Land.

  

 REQUIRED READINGS

  1. Summ, G. Harvey.  Brazilian Mosaic.  Wilmington: SR Books, 1995.  ISBN #0842024921
  2. Bender, Gerald.  Angola Under the Portuguese.  New Jersey: Africa World Press, 2004. ISBN # 1592212581
  3. Twine, France Winddance.  Racism in a Racial Democracy.  New Jersey: Rutgers UP, 1997. ISBN # 0813523656.
  4. Couto, Mia.  Sleepwalking Land.  London: Serpent’s Tail, 2006.  ISBN 185242897x. 

XEROX/EXCERPTS

  • Freyre, Gilberto.  New World in the Tropics.  (Out of Print)
  • Dickinson, Margaret.  When Bullets Begin to Flower (Out of Print)

 

GRADING                                                      

  • 5 Response Papers                           = 25%           
  • Midterm Exam                                  = 25%           
  • Participation & Attendance              = 15%
  • Research Proposal & Bibliography  = 10%           
  • Final Research Paper                        = 25%            

YOR 611C • Intermediate Yoruba

29995 • Spring 2015
Meets MTWTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 305

An intensive intermediate course with emphasis on basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

POR 328C • Intro To Lit & Cul

46725 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BEN 1.102

Taught in Portuguese. Overview of Luso-Brazilian literatures and cultures, including the arts and popular expressions from a multidisciplinary perspective. Among the regions studied are Brazil, Portugal, and related areas in Africa. Latin American Studies 322 and 370P may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

POR F341 • Afro-Bra: Lit/Cul/Pol Ag-Bra

88405 • Summer 2013

POR 341

Summer 2007, Salvador, Bahia

 

AFRO-BRAZIL AND AFRO-BRAZILIANS: LITERATURES, CULTURE, REPRESENTATION

The purpose of this six week course is to analyze the literary, cultural and social representation of Afro-Brazilians (blacks and mulattoes) from 1800s to contemporary authors. After a brief introduction of the histories of resistance against slavery in colonial times (quilombos), the course will focus on Nineteenth century literatures on and about Afro-Brazilians with an emphasis on Nineteenth century black rebellions (Malês), and the contradictions of abolitionist literature. The first four decades of the twentieth century will focus on modernismo-regionalista literatures, to criticize views of Brazilian racial democracy and the contradictions of Populist depictions of Afro-Brazilians. The last part of the course will focus on contemporary works written by Afro-Brazilian authors, from the social emergence of Abdias do Nascimento “Movimento Negro” to contemporary narratives, music and documentaries which main focus are the cultures of poverty, abandonment, violence in the inner cities, and social discrimination. The course will include cultural tours around main cultural sites in Salvador, Bahia. The course will be taught in Portuguese (readings in English and Portuguese) and will include documentaries and film in Portuguese (or with English subtitles). Students will write a 10 page final paper in Portuguese. The topic will be chosen by the student with the assistance of Prof. Arroyo.

 

The class will meet from Monday to Thursday (10-12) in ACBEU.

Thursdays and Friday afternoons will be used for tours. Please check your calendars. Attendance is mandatory. All materials are required. One 10 page paper will be presented at the end of the six week period. Two themes, students choose one.

 

Books (required):

João J. Reis, Black Rebellions in Brazil. The Muslims uprisings of 1835 in Bahia (Amazon)

 

Luso-Brazilian Books:

Guimãraes Bernardo. A escrava Isaura.

Caminha, Adolfo. Bom crioulo.

Amado, Jorge. Tenda dos milagres.

Rui Gomes. O Pagador de promessas.

 

 

One course pack available at Speedway Copy and Printing (Dobie Mall) (Pquete inclui Leituras críticas e Quarto de despejo, Joanna Carolina de Jesus)

AFR 372E • Afro-Luso-Brazilian Worlds

30315 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM BEN 1.126
(also listed as LAS 370P, PRC 320E)

The notion of a “Portuguese commonwealth” has always been an imperial desire of Portugal to the extent of justifying conquest and subjugation in the so-called “colonies” through varying tropical mythologies. Even after independence, Portugal continued to exercise tremendous cultural and political influences on its former colonies, including Brazil, Angola, Mozambique, and Cape Verde. This course engages some of the myths and realities in the Afro-Luso-Brazilian worlds while at the same time drawing connections and contrasts between them. In addition to a contextual survey of the “triangle”, we will examine some of the strategies adopted by the colonized to decolonize their minds through interdisciplinary case studies. Drawing upon a mix of theoretical, cultural, historical, sociological, and literary readings, we will tease out the vibrant affinities and/or tensions between Africa and Brazil, Africa and Portugal, Brazil and Portugal, Portugal and Asia, etc. We will foreground our discussions with the concepts of Luso-Tropicalism and Postcolonialism while reflecting on the myth of racial harmony in the Lusophone Atlantic world.

POR 381 • Ritual/Theater/Race In Brazil

46238 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CLA 0.124

Description

In an era in which racial and violent acts of domination persist albeit camouflaged under the pretext of operating in a fallacious “multicultural,” “miscegenated,” and “post-racial” society, ritual performance or what Wole Soyinka calls “The Fourth Stage” brings about restorative justice in the midst of cosmic chaos.  As heroes or/and heroines descend into the transitional gulf, they return transformed and regenerated after going through performative rites of passage.  In the Afro-Brazilian context, ritual performance captures those strategies through which the oppressed liberate themselves from the fangs of slavery and its disempowering aftermath.  Drawing upon the theories of Augusto Boal (Poética do oprimido), Anatol Rosenfeld (O mito e o herói no moderno teatro brasileiro), Leda Maria Martins (A cena em sombras) as well as from the objectives of the Teatro Experimental do Negro (TEN) as propounded by Abdias Nascimento, this seminar examines the relationship between race and theatrical practices in post-1945 Brazil.  In addition to exploring the historical panorama of modern Brazilian theater as a whole, we will focus on its experimental emergence, its problematic professionalization, and systematic popularization over the decades. For primary dramatic analysis, we will study a selection of plays by TEN such as Sortilégio, O filho pródigo, Anjo negro, and Emparedado—all taken from the classical anthology, Dramas para negros e prólogos para brancos—highlighting the risks, polemics, accomplishments, and contradictions of the group as they represented the politics and aesthetics of the theatrical moment and movement. We will also study other dramatic works such as Orfeu da Conceição,  Eles não usam black tie, Arena conta Zumbi, O tesouro da Chica da Silva, and O pagador de Promessas, situating them within Brazilian historical, political, and mythological realities.

Objectives:

1. Provide a critical historical survey of modern Brazilian theater while highlighting the exclusive/inclusive place of the Afro-Brazilian within that space.

2. Examine the objectives of TEN and its significance in Brazilian theatrical history and politics.

3. Engage a number of concepts and theories within Afro-Brazilian dramatic discourse such as mythology, heroism, ritual performance, and the “poetics of the oppressed” which will equip students in the configuration and elaboration of their individual research projects.

Required Texts:

  1. Abdias Nascimento: Dramas para negros e prólogos para brancos
  2. Vinicius de Moraes: Orfeu da Conceição
  3. Augusto Boal: Poética do oprimido
  4. Anatol Rosenfeld: O mito e o herói no moderno teatro brasileiro
  5. Leda Maria Martins: A cena em sombras
  6. Miriam Garcia Mendes: O negro e o teatro brasileiro
  7. Antônio Callado: A revolta da cachaça (seleta)
  8. Gianfrancesco Guarnieri e Augusto Boal: Arena conta Zumbi
  9. Dias Gomes: O pagador de promessas

Recommended:

David George: The Modern Brazilian Stage

Grading:

5 Response Papers: 25%; Final Oral Presentation: 20%; Midterm Annotated Bibliography: 15%; Research Proposal: 10%; Final Research Paper: 30% 

YOR 312L • Second-Year Yoruba II

30590 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM PAR 101

One of the three main languages of Nigeria, Yoruba accounts for about 20 million speakers of the language in Southwestern Nigeria alone as we as another 15 million beyond the immediate Yorubaland, including Nigerian neighbors such as the Republic of Benin and Togo as well as in Haiti, Trinidad, Cuba, Brazil, among other diaspora nations where Yoruba is used in ritual and sacred rites.  This course focuses on the spoken standard Yoruba language as used in contemporary Nigeria. Students will acquire all four skills in language instruction: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  In addition, students will be exposed to several cultural issues and values as they are gradually immersed into the Yoruba world and culture through language and other multimedia.

AFR 374E • Lusophone African Lits & Culs

30490 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 303
(also listed as LAS 370P, POR 329)

This is a survey course on Lusophone African literatures with particular emphasis on Angola, Mozambique, and Cape Verde Islands. The course focuses on combative struggle that led to the independence of the five nations as well as the new postcolonial tendencies such as ideological subversion, mythification, demythification, remythification, globalization, and resistance in the face of modernity and “post-colonial” disillusion. The course seeks to provide a panoramic view highlighting the common and divergent characteristics between the five.  Beyond the analysis of poems in A Horse of White Clouds: Poems from Lusophone Africa, we will focus on a few select authors such as Mia Couto, Luandino Vieira, Luís Bernardo Honwana, Lina Magaia, Paulina Chiziane, Germano Almeida, etc.

Objectives:

  1. Introduce students to the decisive moments of the literary history of Lusophone Africa.
  2. Analyze representative texts and highlight the thematic, contextual, and ideological issues.
  3. Question the current critical models and propose other more inclusive possibilities. 

Basic Themes:

  • Brief historical contextualization of Portuguese colonialism in Africa.
  • Exotic / colonial / national literatures.
  • Negritude movement, Pan Africanism, and African Personality.
  • Colonial wars; armed struggle; Affirmation of African identity.
  • Insularity, evasion, and anti-evasion.
  • Miscegenation, Lusotropicalism, mulatitude.
  • Colonial indictment and quest for freedom.
  • Slavery; Diaspora, “Contract” work.
  • Critique of the colonial society.
  • Rural vs. urban space.
  • Hope and Anticipation of new order.
  • Counterpoint of independence waves (Civil War—Angola & Mozambique)
  • Comparative perspectives: Africa, Afro-Brazil, Portugal? 

Texts:

  1. Don Burness (ed.): A Horse of White Clouds: Poems from Lusophone Africa.
  2. José Luandino Vieira: The Real Life of Domingos Xavier.
  3. Luís Bernardo Honwana: We Killed Mangy-Dog.
  4. Lina Magaia: Dumba Nengue: Run for Your Life.
  5. Mia Couto: Voices Made Night.
  6. Germano Almeida: The Last Will of Senhor da Silva Araújo.

Films:

  • “Udju Azul de Yonta” (Blue Eyes of Yonta)
  • “Mortu Mega” (Those Whom Death Refused)
  • “O Herói” (The Hero)
  • “Terra Sonâmbula” (Sleepwalking Land)
  • “O Testamento do Sr. Napumoceno” (Napumoceno’s Will)

YOR 312L • Second-Year Yoruba II

30670 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM PAR 101

One of the three main languages of Nigeria, Yoruba accounts for about 20 million speakers of the language in Southwestern Nigeria alone as we as another 15 million beyond the immediate Yorubaland, including Nigerian neighbors such as the Republic of Benin and Togo as well as in Haiti, Trinidad, Cuba, Brazil, among other diaspora nations where Yoruba is used in ritual and sacred rites.  This course focuses on the spoken standard Yoruba language as used in contemporary Nigeria. Students will acquire all four skills in language instruction: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  In addition, students will be exposed to several cultural issues and values as they are gradually immersed into the Yoruba world and culture through language and other multimedia.

POR 381 • Carnival In Brazilian Lit/Cul

45850 • Fall 2011
Meets W 3:30PM-6:30PM PAR 304

THE CLASS WILL BE: CARNIVAL IN BRAZIL 

AND WILL BE TAUGHT BY PROFESSOR NIYI AFOLABI

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course interrogates the relationship between the rituals of carnival, the interfacial myths of celebration and renewal, and the complex dynamics of inclusive exclusion that the event represents for marginalized populations, who, ironically, bear the burden of the actual bacchanal. The course focuses on the interrogation of how this singular event serves as a duality of “masking” and “negotiation of power” for both the oppressed and the oppressor in literature and culture.  Beyond this panoramic foreground regarding origins and transformations, the course will examine the representation(s) of carnival in literature and popular culture from the viewpoint of performance and cultural theory.  Case studies of Schools of Samba in Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, and Blocos Afros as well as Afoxés in Salvador-Bahia will also be explored in order to have a balanced comparative perspective on the multiple dynamics of carnival as a political cultural space.

Some of the questions the course attempts to answer include:

i. What are the paradigmatic discourses on carnival in Brazil and in the African diaspora?

ii. To what extent is carnival an all-inclusive phenomenon where everyone participates without regard to social hierarchies and racial discrimination?  Is it really possible to “neutralize” social hierarchies in a patriarchal and marginalizing space in which blackness still represents the “marginal” other? 

iii. What are the main pretexts and realities of performing and engaging carnival in a space that is economically and structurally controlled by hegemonic forces?

iv. In contrasting and comparing the main arguments (for or against), what are the popular and epistemological orientations that shape carnival as a “collective” performance in which participants can propagate their own individuality through political masking?

v. Is there an absolute conviction on the possibility of an alternative or paradigmatic shift that evokes both relative nostalgia of Africa and the disillusionment of Afro-descendants in the enigmatic Brazilian mosaic?

vi. How is this space redefined shortly after the ephemeral cultural performance?  

PREREQUISITES:

Portuguese 612, 312L or 516. 

REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING:

The final grade will be based on 5 short papers (30%), active class participation (15%), a midterm presentation (15%), a research proposal (10%) and a final research paper (30%).

TEXTBOOKS AND/OR CLASS MATERIALS:

Texts for critical analysis will include:

Mikhail Bakhtin’s A cultura popular na idade média,

Mircea Eliade’s O sagrado e o profano,

Anatol Rosenfeld’s O mito e o herói no moderno teatro brasileiro,

Zeca Ligeiro’s Malandro divino,

Jorge Amado’s O país do carnaval,

Roberto da Matta’s Carnavais, malandros e heróis,

Ruy Castro’s Carnaval no fogo,

Vinicius de Moraes’ Invenção do Orfeu,

Moacyr Scliar’s O carnaval dos animais, and

Wilson Louzada’s Contos de carna

YOR 312K • Second-Year Yoruba I

30430 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 305

Yoruba Language second year I

YOR 312L • Second-Year Yoruba II

30670 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM PAR 101

One of the three main languages of Nigeria, Yoruba accounts for about 20 million speakers of the language in Southwestern Nigeria alone as we as another 15 million beyond the immediate Yorubaland, including Nigerian neighbors such as the Republic of Benin and Togo as well as in Haiti, Trinidad, Cuba, Brazil, among other diaspora nations where Yoruba is used in ritual and sacred rites.  This course focuses on the spoken standard Yoruba language as used in contemporary Nigeria. Students will acquire all four skills in language instruction: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  In addition, students will be exposed to several cultural issues and values as they are gradually immersed into the Yoruba world and culture through language and other multimedia.

AFR 374E • Lusophone African Lits & Culs

35373 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ 1.118

Please check back for updates.

YOR 312K • Second-Year Yoruba I

35500 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 206

SECOND-YEAR YORUBA I, A Nigerian Language.

AFR 374E • Afro-Luso-Brazilian Worlds

35515 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM GAR 2.128

Please check back for updates.

YOR 312L • Second-Year Yoruba II

35625 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM PAR 101

YOR 312L: SECOND YEAR YORUBA II

#35625 (Spring 2010)

 

PROF. NIYI AFOLABI

afolabi@mail.utexas.edu

PAR 101
MWF: 3: 00 – 4: 00

OFFICE HOURS

MW 1: 00 - 2:00***BENEDICT 3.110

(and by appointment)***512-232-4510

 

REQUIRED TEXTS

 

1. JE KÁ KA YORUBA by Antonia Y. Folarin Schleicher (Yale University Press, 1993) [JKKY]

2. Ìwé Keji - Alawiye by J.F. Odunjo (1970)

3. JE KÁ KA YORUBA Companion CD-ROM by Antonia Y. Folarin Schleicher (1998) [JKKY CD-ROM]

4. Yoruba Newspaper Reader by Antonia Y. Folarin Schleicher (1998) [YNR]

5. Yoruba Dictionary

 

DESCRIPTION

 

One of the three main languages of Nigeria, Yoruba accounts for about 20 million speakers of the language in Southwestern Nigeria alone as we as another 15 million beyond the immediate Yorubaland, including Nigerian neighbors such as the Republic of Benin and Togo as well as in Haiti, Trinidad, Cuba, Brazil, among other diaspora nations where Yoruba is used in ritual and sacred rites.  This course focuses on the spoken standard Yoruba language as used in contemporary Nigeria. Students will acquire all four skills in language instruction: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  In addition, students will be exposed to several cultural issues and values as they are gradually immersed into the Yoruba world and culture through language and other multimedia.

 

OBJECTIVES

  1. Develop students’ communicative skills in all four areas: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.
  2. Develop oral skills through a variety of activities such as dialogues, pronunciation, skits, group activities, role playing, etc.
  3. Ensure that by the end of the semester students are able to conduct basic, meaningful, and conversational activities in Yoruba.
  4. Encourage the understanding of Yoruba culture on the continent as well as in its diaspora.
  5. Seize all opportunities for linguistic and cultural immersion by having students perform a short play as part of their final exam project.

 

 

 

GRADING POLICY

20% Attendance and Class Participation
20% Quizzes

10% Homework & Essays

10% Technology Presentations
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam

 

NUMERIC GRADING

A       = 95-100
A-      = 90-93
B       = 86-90
B-      = 81-85
C       = 70-80
D       = 60-69
F       = 00-59

 

ATTENDANCE & PARTICIPATION

Language learning involves practice. Attendance counts for 20% and involves participation.  You cannot participate if you are absent. Three unexcused absences will lower your final grade by a letter grade.

 

QUIZZES

Four (4) quizzes over the course of the semester will account for 20% of the final grade. 

 

HOMEWORK & WRITING

Four (4) essays will also account for 10% of the final grade.  Homework assignments will be graded to improve learning and systematically assist in the writing of the 4 graded essays.  Individual efforts will translate into steady accumulation of competence and performance in the language in the course of the semester.

 

MIDTERM EXAM

The midterm exam will include both written and oral proficiency test and account for 20% of the final grade.

 

 

 

FINAL EXAM

This is a cumulative test of all the four skills: spoken, listening, reading, and writing. It will also involve a short play to be performed by the entire class. The final exam counts for 20% of the final grade.

 

ORAL TEST & PERFORMANCE

Oral tests will be integrated within the 4 quizzes (above), hence it is important to avoid arriving late to class as these oral tests will be administered at the beginning of the class.  The oral performance part will take the form of rehearsals and ultimate performance of a short play at the end of the semester. We will discuss schedules by mid semester in order to decide appropriate time for such rehearsals outside of class time.  The entire performance will count for 15%.

 

TECHNOLOGY PRESENTATIONS

This builds upon the foundational technological skills from YOR 507 and YOR 312K.  Students are encouraged to choose a project topic that is different from previous class to avoid redundancy.  Possible topics will be provided in consultation with the professor.  This project accounts for 10% of the final grade.

IMPORTANT DUE DATES

 

Essay 1: January 27

Quiz 1: February 5

Essay 2: February 15

MIDTERM: February 26

Essay 3: March 3

Quizzes 2 & 3: March 10

Essay 4: March 12

Quiz 4: March 24

Technology Presentations: May 3 & 4

Final Exam: TBA

 

GENERAL INFORMATION:

 

QUIZZES

These will be based on material covered in class through the scheduled date of the quizzes.  Attention should be placed to assigned homework and in-class activities.

 

ESSAYS

These are opportunities to practice the language in a more applied form.  While plagiarism will NOT be tolerated, students should read as much as possible outside of class to familiarize with forms of essay writing beyond the class.

 

MIDTERM

This will be cumulative and is designed to serve as a form of review of the material covered up until that time.

COURSE OUTLINE

JANUARY

20                Introduction & Course Overview

Classroom Structure & Expectations

Review of Greetings & Social Interaction

 

          22                Review of Culture Among the Yoruba

                             Use of Songs to Teach Culture

                             READ-JKKY pp. 114-116

 

          25                Raising Children

                             Tone Drills: JKKY  p. 128

                       READ: Lesson 7: JKKY pp. 119-122

 

     27                Raising  children (contd.)

Tone Drills

READ: Lesson 7: JKKY pp. 119-122

DUE-- ESSAY 1-- Describe your childhood values in Yoruba

 

          29                Tone Drills           

                             Review of Negation

                             READ: Lesson 7: JKKY pp. 122-123

                             HOMEWORK-- Exercises—6 & 7, p. 123

 

                    

 

FEBRUARY

 

1                 Storytelling

READ— Ijapa ati Erin, JKKY pp. 124-126

HOMEWORK--Exercise 9, p. 126

 

3                 Raising Children—Reviewed

                   READ-- JKKY pp. 119-128

 

5                 QUIZ #1

 

8                 Government Jobs

                             Tone Drills

                             Role Play with describing your favorite profession  or job                              READ: Lesson 8: JKKY pp. 131-133

                             STUDY: JKKY CD-ROM

 

10                Description of EACH or EVERY

                             READ: Lesson 8: JKKY pp. 133-135

                             Exercise 5, p. 134

                             STUDY: JKKY CD-ROM

 

12                Tax Collection—OWO ORI

                             Comprehension—Exercise 10, p. 139

                             READ: Lesson 8:  JKKY pp. 137-139

                             HOMEWORK—Exercise 13, p.139

 

12                 Nigerian Currency—NAIRA

Poem on Money

                             READ: JKKY pp. 140

 

15                Jobs, Taxation, & Money -- reviewed

                             READ: JKKY pp. 137-141

                             DUE: ESSAY #2 (My Favorite Profession)

 

17                Storytelling in Yoruba—ON HYGIENE

                             READ: Aláwìíyé Ìwé Kejì pp. 31-33

 

19                Traditional Jobs—FARMING

                        Farming in Yorubaland

                        READ: Lesson 9-JKKY pp. 143-145

                        Exercise 1, p. 145

 

22                 Ways to Use `LATI`

READJKKY pp. 146-147

                             Exercise 7, p. 147

                             READ—ISE OWO JKKY pp. 148-149

 

24                Traditional Jobs—Reviewed

READJKKY pp. 143-151

                   Midterm Review

 

26                MIDTERM

 

MARCH

 

1                 Food Preparation

                   READJKKY pp. 153-155

                   Exercise 1, p. 154

 

3                      Differences btw FI and LO

Relative Marker TI

Differences btw TI, PE, KI

                             READ: Lesson 10: JKKY pp. 155-159

                             STUDY: JKKY CD-ROM

                             DUE: ESSAY #3: (My Favorite Food)

 

5                 Naming Ceremony in Yoruba

                             Tone Drills

                             READ: JKKY pp. 159-164

                             HOMEWORK—ex. 10, p. 163

 

8                 Lesson 10 Reviewed—pp. 153-165

 

10                QUIZZES #2 & 3                            

 

          12                Traveling & Transportation

                             READ: Lesson 11: JKKY pp. 167-169

                             Compehension Ex.1, p. 169

                             DUE—ESSAY #4 (My Favorite Means of Travel) 

 

15                 Spring Break!!!         

17                Spring Break!!!

19                  Spring Break!!!

 

22                Using verbs—San vs. Sanwo

Ji  vs. Jale

Je vs. Jeun

                             READ: Lesson 11: JKKY pp. 170-173

                             HOMEWORK--EXS. 5 & 6

 

24                QUIZZ #4

Leisure Activities & Hands-On Recreation

 

XEROX: Distribute Short Play (excerpt) to Students

 

 

26                Overview of Play & Preliminary Rehearsal   

 

29                Yoruba Movie: Title TBA

                    Discussion  

 

31                Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

APRIL

 

          2        Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

5        Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

7             Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

9        Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

12      Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

14      Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

16      Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

19      Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

21      Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

23      Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

26      Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

28      Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

30      Mock Performance (In Class)

 

 

MAY

3        Technology Presentations I

 

4        Technology Presentations II

 

7        Review & Final Exam Prep

 

FINAL EXAM

(TBA)

                             _____________

* * *

APPENDIX

THE STANDARD OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY AT UT-Austin

 

A fundamental principle for any educational institution, academic integrity is highly valued and seriously regarded at The University of Texas at Austin, as emphasized in the standards of conduct. More specifically, you and other students are expected to "maintain absolute integrity and a high standard of individual honor in scholastic work" undertaken at the University (19-128, Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities). This is a very basic expectation that is further reinforced by the University's Honor Code.

 

At a minimum, you should complete any assignments, exams, and other scholastic endeavors with the utmost honesty, which requires you to:

  • acknowledge the contributions of other sources to your scholastic efforts;

 

  • complete your assignments independently unless expressly authorized to seek or obtain assistance in preparing them;

 

  • follow instructions for assignments and exams, and observe the standards of your academic discipline;

 

  • and avoid engaging in any form of academic dishonesty on behalf of yourself or another student.

 

Useful Websites for Yoruba Language and Yoruba Studies

 

www.omniglot.com/writing/yoruba.htm

www.abeokuta.org/yoruba.htm

yeyeolade.wordpress.com

www.lmp.ucla.edu/Profile.aspx?menu=004&LangID=22 - 46k

www.lonweb.org/link-yoruba.htm

www.motherlandnigeria.com/languages.html

www.yoruba.org/education.htm

www.worldlanguage.com/Languages/Yoruba.htm

groups.yahoo.com/community/Yorubalang

www.languageresourceonline.com

yo.wikipedia.org/wiki/ÈdèeYorùbá

www.naijarules.com/vb/yoruba-movies

www.yorubanation.org/YorubaEurope

www.yorubaforkidsabroad.com

www.uga.edu/aflang/YORUBA/links.html

wikipedia.org/wiki/Orisha

YOR 312K • Second-Year Yoruba I

35920 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 206

YOR 312K: SECOND YEAR YORUBA I

#35920 (Fall 2009)

 

PROF. NIYI AFOLABI

afolabi@mail.utexas.edu

PAR 206
MWF: 1: 00 – 2: 00

OFFICE HOURS

MF 2: 00 - 3: 00***BENEDICT 3.110

(and by appointment)***512-232-4510

 

REQUIRED TEXTS

 

1. JE KÁ KA YORUBA by Antonia Y. Folarin Schleicher (Yale University Press, 1993) [JKKY]

2. Ìwé Keji - Alawiye by J.F. Odunjo (1970)

3. JE KÁ KA YORUBA Companion CD-ROM by Antonia Y. Folarin Schleicher (1998) [JKKY CD-ROM]

4. Yoruba Newspaper Reader by Antonia Y. Folarin Schleicher (1998) [YNR]

5. Yoruba Dictionary

 

DESCRIPTION

 

One of the three main languages of Nigeria, Yoruba accounts for about 20 million speakers of the language in Southwestern Nigeria alone as we as another 15 million beyond the immediate Yorubaland, including Nigerian neighbors such as the Republic of Benin and Togo as well as in Haiti, Trinidad, Cuba, Brazil, among other diaspora nations where Yoruba is used in ritual and sacred rites.  This course focuses on the spoken standard Yoruba language as used in contemporary Nigeria. Students will acquire all four skills in language instruction: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  In addition, students will be exposed to several cultural issues and values as they are gradually immersed into the Yoruba world and culture through language and other multimedia.

 

OBJECTIVES

  1. Develop students’ communicative skills in all four areas: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.
  2. Develop oral skills through a variety of activities such as dialogues, pronunciation, skits, group activities, role playing, etc.
  3. Ensure that by the end of the semester students are able to conduct basic, meaningful, and conversational activities in Yoruba.
  4. Encourage the understanding of Yoruba culture on the continent as well as in its diaspora.
  5. Seize all opportunities for linguistic and cultural immersion by having students perform a short play as part of their final exam project.

 

 

 

GRADING POLICY

20% Attendance and Class Participation
20% Quizzes & Orals 

10% Homework & Written Assignments

10% Technology Presentations
20% Midterm Exam
20% Final Exam

 

NUMERIC GRADING

A       = 93-100
A-      = 90-92
B+     = 86-89
B       = 80-85
C       = 70-79
D       = 60-69
F       = 00-59

 

ATTENDANCE & PARTICIPATION

Language learning involves practice. Attendance counts for 20% and involves participation.  You cannot participate if you are absent. Three unexcused absences will lower your final grade by a letter grade.

 

QUIZZES

Six (6) quizzes over the course of the semester will account for 20% of the final grade. 

 

HOMEWORK & WRITING

Six (6) essays will also account for 10% of the final grade.  Homework assignments will be graded to improve learning and systematically assist in the writing of the 6 graded essays.  Individual efforts will translate into steady accumulation of competence and performance in the language in the course of the semester.

 

ORAL TEST & PERFORMANCE

Oral tests will be integrated within the 6 quizzes (above), hence it is important to avoid arriving late to class as these oral tests will be administered at the beginning of the class.  The oral performance part will take the form of rehearsals and ultimate performance of a short play at the end of the semester. We will discuss schedules by mid semester in order to decide appropriate time for such rehearsals outside of class time. 

 

MIDTERM EXAM

The midterm exam will include both written and oral proficiency test and account for 20% of the final grade.

 

 

FINAL EXAM

This is a cumulative test of all the four skills: spoken, listening, reading, and writing. It will also involve a short play to be performed by the entire class. The final exam counts for 20% of the final grade.

 

 

TECHNOLOGY PRESENTATIONS

This builds upon the foundational technological skills from YOR 507.  Students are encouraged to choose a project topic that is different from previous class to avoid redundancy.  Possible topics will be provided in consultation with the professor.  This project accounts for 10% of

 the final grade.

IMPORTANT DUE DATES

 

Quiz 1: September 4

Essay 1: September 11

Quiz 2: September 14

Essay 2: September 25

Quiz 3: September 28

 

MIDTERM: September 30

 

Essay 3: October 5

Quiz 4: October 9

Essay4: October 12

Quiz 5: October 23

Essay 5: October 26

Quiz 6: November 9

Essay 6: November 9

 

Technology Presentations: December 2 & 4

Final Performance: TBA

GENERAL INFORMATION:

 

QUIZZES

These will be based on material covered in class through the scheduled date of the quizzes.  Attention should be placed to assigned homework and in-class activities.

 

ESSAYS

These are opportunities to practice the language in a more applied form.  While plagiarism will NOT be tolerated, students should read as much as possible outside of class to familiarize with forms of essay writing beyond the class.

 

MIDTERM

This will be cumulative and is designed to serve as a form of review of the material covered up until that time.

COURSE OUTLINE

AUGUST

26    (wed)          Introduction & Course Overview

Classroom Structure & Expectations

Assign Yoruba Names to Students

Review of Greetings & Social Interaction

 

      28    (fri)                   Review of Culture Among the Yoruba

                             READ: Preliminary Lesson: JKKY pp. 1-8

                             HOME STUDY: JKKY CD-ROM

 

      31   (mon)       Apartments & Housing

                             Tone Drills

                       READ: Lesson 1: JKKY pp. 11-19

 

SEPTEMBER

2   (wed)      Apartments & Housing (contd.)

Tone Drills

READ: Lesson 1: JKKY pp. 20-27

READ: YNR 29 & 30; pp. 54-57

 

4   (fri)         Tone Drills           

                             Numbers & Expressions

                             Descriptive Verbs

                             READ: Lesson 1: JKKY pp. 11-27

                             QUIZ #1

 

7 (mon)       LABOR DAY HOLIDAY

 

 

9 (wed)        Reading Skills: Intro to Aláwìíyé Ìwé Kejì (#1-3)

                             READ: Aláwìíyé Ìwé Kejì pp. 1-5

 

11 (fri)         Storytelling in Yoruba

                             Tone Drills

                             READ: Aláwìíyé Ìwé Kejì pp. 6-9

                             DUE: ESSAY #1: Describe Your School/University

 

14 (mon)      On Friendship

                             Tone Drills

                             READ: YNR pp. 76-77

                             Quiz #2

 

16 (wed)      Characteristics & Personal Traits

                             Tone Drills

                             Role Play with describing someone

                             READ: Lesson 2: JKKY pp. 29-34

                             STUDY: JKKY CD-ROM

 

18  (fri)        Adjectives & Adjectival Verbs

                             Opposite of Adjectives

                             READ: Lesson: JKKY pp. 35-45

                             STUDY: JKKY CD-ROM

 

21 (mon)      Seasons & Weather (cold, hot, warm, etc)

                             Adverbs

                             Tone Drills

                             READ: Lesson 3:  JKKY pp. 47-54

 

23 (wed)      Seasonal Greetings

                             Tone Drills

                             READ: JKKY pp. 54-63 

 

25 (fri)         More on Seasonal Greetings     

                             READ: JKKY pp. 47-63

                             STUDY: JKKY CD-ROM

                             DUE: ESSAY #2 (Describe your Favorite Season)

 

28 (mon)      Storytelling in Yoruba

                             READ: Aláwìíyé Ìwé Kejì pp. 10-14

                             QUIZ # 3

                             Quick Midterm Review

 

          30 (wed)      MIDTERM

 

 

OCTOBER

 

2 (fri)           Reading Skills: Socio-Cultural Issues

                             READ: YNR pp. 58-62

                             STUDY: JKKY CD-ROM

 

5 (mon)       Review of Seasons and Weather

                             Role play to talk about the seasons

                             Expressing Feelings & Opinions

                             Emphatic Possessive Pronouns          

                             READ:  Lesson 3: JKKY

                             DUE: ESSAY #3: (Your favorite Ceremony or Holiday)

 

7 (wed)        Health & Sickness

                             Expressing discomfort and pain

                             READ: Lesson 4: JKKY pp. 65-72

 

9 (fri)           Health & Sickness (contd.)

                             Use of Negative Markers

                             Vowel Elision

                             READ: Lesson 4: JKKY pp. 73-80

                             QUIZ # 4

 

12 (mon)      Review of Health & Sickness

                             READ: Lesson 4: JKKY pp. 65-80

                             STUDY: JKKY CD-ROM

                             DUE: ESSAY #4: (Describe Your Health)

 

14 (wed)      Reading Skills: Family Matters

                             Tone Drills

                             READ: YNR pp. 63-67

 

16 (fri)         Reading Skills: Customs & Culture

                             READ: Aláwìíyé Ìwé Kejì pp. 15-18

 

19 (mon)      Yoruba Market System

                             Buying & Selling in Yoruba land

                             READ: Lesson 5: JKKY pp. 83-90

                             STUDY: JKKY CD-ROM

 

21 (wed)      Yoruba Market System (contd.)

                             Idiomatic Expressions

                             READ: Lesson 5: JKKY pp. 90-99

 

23 (fri)         Review of Yoruba Market Scene

                             READ: Lesson 5: JKKY pp. 83-99

                             QUIZ #5

 

26 (mon)      Reading Skills: Storytelling & Recreation

                             READ: Aláwìíyé Ìwé Kejì pp. 20-22

                             DUE: ESSAY #5 (Describe a Yoruba Market Scene)

 

28 (wed)      Leisure Activities

                             Games & Activities

                             Conditional Marker (ìbá..)

                             Tone Drills

                             READ:  Lesson 6: JKKY pp. 101-106

 

          30 (fri)         Letter Writing

                             READ: Lesson 6: JKKY pp. 106-108   

 

NOVEMBER

 

2 (mon)       Folk Tale & Recreation

                             Tone Drills

                             READ: Lesson 6: JKKY pp. 111-116

 

4 (wed)        Review of Leisure Activities

 

 

6 (fri)           READ: Lesson 6: JKKY pp. 101-116

 

9 (mon)       Hands-On Recreation

                             QUIZ #6

                             ESSAY #6 (My Favorite Game)

 

11 (wed)      Yoruba Movie: Title TBA

                             Discussion

                             XEROX: Distribute Short Play (excerpt) to Students

 

13 (fri)         Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

16 mon)       Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

18 (wed)      Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

20 (fri)         Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

23(mon)       Rehearsals (Short Play)

 

25 (wed)      Mock Performance (In Class)

 

November 26-28: THANKSGIVING BREAK!!!

 

          30 (wed)      Performance Review & Discussion

 

DECEMBER

2        Technology Presentations I

4        Technology Presentations II

 

FINAL EXAM IN FORM OF A PUBLIC PERFORMANCE TO THE CENTER FOR AFRICAN & AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

(TBA: On or before December 4, 2009)

                             _____________

* * *

APPENDIX

THE STANDARD OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY AT UT-Austin

A fundamental principle for any educational institution, academic integrity is highly valued and seriously regarded at The University of Texas at Austin, as emphasized in the standards of conduct. More specifically, you and other students are expected to "maintain absolute integrity and a high standard of individual honor in scholastic work" undertaken at the University (Sec. 11-801, Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities). This is a very basic expectation that is further reinforced by the University's Honor Code.

 

At a minimum, you should complete any assignments, exams, and other scholastic endeavors with the utmost honesty, which requires you to:

  • acknowledge the contributions of other sources to your scholastic efforts;

 

  • complete your assignments independently unless expressly authorized to seek or obtain assistance in preparing them;

 

  • follow instructions for assignments and exams, and observe the standards of your academic discipline;

 

  • and avoid engaging in any form of academic dishonesty on behalf of yourself or another student.

 

  • students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

 

Useful Websites for Yoruba Language and Yoruba Studies

 

www.omniglot.com/writing/yoruba.htm

www.abeokuta.org/yoruba.htm

yeyeolade.wordpress.com

www.lmp.ucla.edu/Profile.aspx?menu=004&LangID=22 - 46k

www.lonweb.org/link-yoruba.htm

www.motherlandnigeria.com/languages.html

www.yoruba.org/education.htm

www.worldlanguage.com/Languages/Yoruba.htm

groups.yahoo.com/community/Yorubalang

www.languageresourceonline.com

yo.wikipedia.org/wiki/ÈdèeYorùbá

www.naijarules.com/vb/yoruba-movies

www.yorubanation.org/YorubaEurope

www.yorubaforkidsabroad.com

www.uga.edu/aflang/YORUBA/links.html

wikipedia.org/wiki/Orisha

AFR 317C • Yoruba Religious Studies

34920 • Spring 2009
Meets TH 4:00PM-7:00PM JES A230

Please check back for updates.

AFR 374E • Afro-Luso-Brazilian Worlds

35018 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM GAR 2.128

Please check back for updates.

YOR 312L • Second-Year Yoruba II

35145 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM PAR 101

One of the three main languages of Nigeria, Yoruba accounts for about 20 million speakers of the language in Southwestern Nigeria alone as we as another 15 million beyond the immediate Yorubaland, including Nigerian neighbors such as the Republic of Benin and Togo as well as in Haiti, Trinidad, Cuba, Brazil, among other diaspora nations where Yoruba is used in ritual and sacred rites.  This course focuses on the spoken standard Yoruba language as used in contemporary Nigeria. Students will acquire all four skills in language instruction: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  In addition, students will be exposed to several cultural issues and values as they are gradually immersed into the Yoruba world and culture through language and other multimedia.

Publications


Afolabi, O. (2009) Afro-Brazilians: Cultural Production in a Racial Democracy. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press.

Afolabi, O. (2008) Cadernos Negros/ Black Notebooks: Afro-Brazilian Literary Movement. Trenton, NJ: Africa World Press.
Afolabi, O. (2008) Trans-Atlantic Migration: The Paradoxes of Exile. New York/London: Routledge.
Afolabi, O. (2007) Afro-Brazilian Mind/ A Mente Afro-Brasileira: Contemporary Cultural and Critical Criticism. New Jersey: Africa World Press.

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages