Department of Classics

Michael Gagarin


Professor Emeritus

James R. Dougherty, Jr. Centennial Professor Emeritus
Michael Gagarin

Contact

Interests


Greek Law, Literature, and Philosophy

Biography


FieldsGreek Law, Literature, and Philosophy

 

 

 

 

Courses


GK 385 • Attic Oratory

32245 • Spring 2009
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10

GK 385 Graduate Reading Course:

Topics given in recent years include Plato and Greek prose, Sophocles, and Sophists.

GK 180K • Greek Meter

32920 • Spring 2008
Meets M 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 10

This course is meant to provide new graduate students with an introduction to materials and methods of classical scholarship.  The instructor and other members of the department will present introductory lectures and bibliographies on the various disciplines involved in contemporary classical studies.  

Students will be required to attend lectures and colloquia, given by visitors and members of our department.

All students should register for this course on a credit/no credit basis.

GK 390 • Sophists

32932 • Spring 2008
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as PHL 381)

GK 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Greek studies. Topics given in recent years include Mycenaean documents, Aristotle's ethics, Archaic poetry, and Plato's Symposium.

C C 348 • Athenian Law And Oratory-W

33138 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112
(also listed as HIS 350L)

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

GK 324 • Jr Rdng: Lysias

33330 • Fall 2007
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 112

GK 324 Advanced Greek:

Reading and analysis of classical authors such as Homer, Herodotus, Euripides, and Plato.

Prerequisites: Greek 312K or 312L (or 322) with a grade of at least C; or Greek 412 with a grade of at least A-, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

31240 • Spring 2006
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 10

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506.  Starting with a brief review, we shall complete the basic grammar and move on to read passages from various Greek authors.

Daily assignments covering grammar, vocabulary, composition, and translation will enable the diligent student to acquire a firm grasp of Attic Greek.  Regular attendance is essential.  Evaluation will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and three tests and a final.

Prerequisite:  Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek).

This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

GK 390 • Greek Law

31310 • Spring 2006
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 10

GK 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Greek studies. Topics given in recent years include Mycenaean documents, Aristotle's ethics, Archaic poetry, and Plato's Symposium.

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

29850 • Spring 2005
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 10

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506.  Starting with a brief review, we shall complete the basic grammar and move on to read passages from various Greek authors.

Daily assignments covering grammar, vocabulary, composition, and translation will enable the diligent student to acquire a firm grasp of Attic Greek.  Regular attendance is essential.  Evaluation will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and three tests and a final.

Prerequisite:  Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek).

This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

GK 383 • Orators

28700 • Spring 2004
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 10

Greek Literature Survey

This course is the second half of a two-semester sequence surveying the major forms and genres of Greek literature from the Archaic through Classical, Hellenistic, and Roman periods. As in the first half, we’ll proceed mainly in chronological order, beginning with oratory and rhetoric in the fifth century BCE, moving on to historiography, philosophy, and Hellenistic poetry, and ending with Imperial literature from the second century CE. Most of our time and effort will be devoted to reading and analyzing representative selections by some of the more influential authors in these areas and periods. Readings will include large helpings of Greek, additional reading in translation, and critical commentary and scholarship.

The survey has multiple overlapping goals:

  • Strengthen and refine reading and translating skills: speed, accuracy, precision, etc.
  • Sharpen critical and analytical skills through exercises in close reading informed by recent scholarship and related resources.
  • Survey classical and later Greek literature in its various forms and genres, including how they developed and interacted over time.
  • Close study of representative examples of these forms and genres from each period.
  • Practice methods and techniques for developing and articulating an informed critical response to your reading, both orally and in writing.

The survey is also designed to help students prepare for the doctoral exams in literature, not as a glorified crib-sheet but by fostering the skills and core knowledge required for teaching and scholarship in Classics – precisely what the exams are meant to promote and assess. There is of course far more to Greek literature than we can explore here, but the survey will help students to develop both a global map of the wider terrain and the critical skills and resources to broaden and deepen that knowledge as they advance through the program and beyond.

Forms and periods covered include Classical prose (oratory, historiography, philosophy), New Comedy, Hellenistic poetry (including hymn, elegy, pastoral, epigram), and Imperial prose (including biography, novel, satire). Readings will be drawn from Antiphon, Gorgias, Lysias, Isocrates, Demosthenes, Thucydides, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, Menander, Callimachus, Aratus, Theocritus, Plutarch, Longus, Lucian, and others.

Grading: participation 10%, sight translation 20%, passage commentaries 25%, essays 35%

There is no final exam. In its place, the written portion of the doctoral exam in Greek Literature will be offered in two parts near the end of the semester:

   1) take-home portion over a weekend before the end of classes

   2) two essays at the scheduled final exam period

See  http://www.utexas.edu/cola/classics/graduate/admissions/exam-prompts/lit-written.php

GK 311 • Sec-Yr Gk I: Prose And Poetry

28990 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 112

Continuation of Greek 601C or 507. Introductory readings from classical authors such as Lysias, Plato, and Xenophon. Includes grammar review.

Prerequisites: Greek 601C or 507 with a grade of at least C, or Greek 804 and 412 with a grade of at least C in each.

GK 180K • Greek Meter

28450 • Spring 2002
Meets T 11:00AM-12:00PM CBA 4.340

This course is meant to provide new graduate students with an introduction to materials and methods of classical scholarship.  The instructor and other members of the department will present introductory lectures and bibliographies on the various disciplines involved in contemporary classical studies.  

Students will be required to attend lectures and colloquia, given by visitors and members of our department.

All students should register for this course on a credit/no credit basis.

GK 390 • Sophists

28475 • Spring 2002
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 210

GK 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Greek studies. Topics given in recent years include Mycenaean documents, Aristotle's ethics, Archaic poetry, and Plato's Symposium.

C C 348 • Ancient Greek Law-W

29040 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 112

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

GK 365 • Advanced Readings In Plato

28165 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112

GK 365 Seminar in Greek:

Critical study of authors such as Thucydides, Demosthenes, and Aeschylus.

Prerequisites: Greek 324 or 328.

Carries the Independent inquiry and Writing flags.

GK 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

28180 • Spring 2000

Prerequisites: Previous enrollment in Greek 679HA

Course Description: Supervised conference course for honors candidates in Greek. Three conference hours a week for two semesters.

Majors who plan to seek special honors in Ancient History and Classical Civilization, special honors in Greek, special honors in Latin, or special honors in Classics should apply to the honors adviser for admission to the honors program at least one full academic year before they expect to graduate. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in the coursework required for the major of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors, which are in addition to the requirements of the major, are (1) AHC 679HA and 679HB-W, Greek 679HA and 679HB-W, Latin 679HA and 679HB-W, or Classical Civilization 679HA and 679HB-W, Honors Tutorial Course, with a grade of A in each half; (2) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in the coursework required for the major and an “A” in each half of the honors tutorial course; and (3) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.

Requirements for the Honors Thesis:

(1.) The student must discuss the Honors program option with the Faculty Academic Advisor.
(2.) The student must fill out and have signed a Conference Course form for the 679HA and 679HB-W courses.
(3.) The student must spend one semester enrolled in 679HA for directed reading and research under a faculty mentor.
(4.) The student must spend one semester enrolled in 679HB-W writing the Honors Thesis. Students should consult a semester academic calendar and consult with their faculty mentors to determine a schedule for completion of the Thesis. A second faculty reader must also review the Thesis.
(5.) The College of Liberal Arts expects a Thesis to require at least 20 pages of reviewed and revised text. Although there is no other required minimum, the Thesis should consist of more substantial output.
(6.) The final version of the Thesis must be turned in to the Department of Classics Undergraduate Advisor in an electronic (PDF) format or bound copy.

Carries an Independent Inquiry flag.

Publications


Books (sole author):

Writing Greek Law (Cambridge University Press, 2008); Greek translation, Athens (Kardamitsa) 2011.

Antiphon the Athenian: Oratory, Law and Justice in the Age of the Sophists (University of Texas Press, 2002). Won the Texas Institute of Letters' Friends of the Dallas Public Library Award for the Book Making the Most Significant Contribution to Knowledge in 2002.

Antiphon, the speeches (edition and commentary). Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics (Cambridge 1997).

The Murder of Herodes: A Study of Antiphon 5. (Studien zur klassischen Philologie 45, Frankfurt 1989).

Early Greek Law (University of California Press 1986; paperback edition 1989).

Drakon and Early Athenian Homicide Law (Yale University Press 1981).

Aeschylean Drama (University of California Press 1976).

 

Books (joint author or editor):      

(with Paula Perlman) The Laws of Ancient Crete, c. 650-400 BCE. (Oxford 2016)

(Ed. with Adriaan Lanni) Symposion 2013. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, Vol. 24 (Vienna 2014).

(Ed.) Speeches from Athenian Law. (Austin 2011)

(Editor in Chief) Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome. 7 vols. Oxford University Press 2010.

(Ed. with David Cohen) The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (Cambridge 2005).

(Ed. with Bob Wallace) Symposion 2001. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, Vol. 16 (Vienna 2005).

(Translator, with Douglas MacDowell) Antiphon and Andocides (Austin 1998).

(with Paul Woodruff) Early Greek Political Thought from Homer to the Sophists. (Cambridge 1995). New printing, Beijing 2003.

(Ed.) Symposion 1990. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 8 (Cologne 1992).

 

Series Editor:

“The Oratory of Classical Greece.” Series of translations of classical Greek oratory; in preparation for the University of Texas Press (15 volumes are planned).

--   Vol. 1: Antiphon and Andocides (trans. M. Gagarin & D. M. MacDowell) Austin 1998.

--   Vol. 2: Lysias (trans. Stephen Todd) Austin 2000.

--   Vol. 3. Aeschines (trans. Christopher Carey) Austin 2000.

--   Vol. 4. Isocrates I (trans. David Mirhady and Yun Lee Too) Austin 2000.

--   Vol. 5. Dinarchus, Hyperides, Lycurgus (trans. Ian Worthington, Craig Cooper, Edward M. Harris) Austin 2001.

--   Vol. 6. Demosthenes 50-59 (trans. Victor Bers) Austin 2003.

--   Vol. 7. Isocrates II (trans. Terry Papillon) Austin 2004.

--   Vol. 8. Demosthenes 27-38 (trans. Douglas MacDowell) Austin 2004.

--   Vol. 9. Demosthenes 18-19 (trans. Harvey Yunis) Austin 2005.

--   Vol. 10. Demosthenes 60-61, Prologues, Letters (trans. Ian Worthington) Austin 2006.

--   Vol. 11. Isaeus (trans. Michael Edwards) Austin 2007.

--   Vol. 12. Demosthenes 20-22 (trans. Edward M. Harris) Austin 2008.

--   Vol. 13. Demosthenes 39-49 (trans. Adele Scafuro) Austin 2010.

--   Vol. 14. Demosthenes 1-17 (trans. Jeremy Trevett) Austin 2010.

Articles:

“Demosthenes Against Meidias. A Response to Anna Lucia Curado.” In Symposion 2015 (forthcoming).

“Court Procedures and Arbitration.” Forthcoming in The Oxford Handbook to Demosthenes, ed. Gunther Martin.

“Abuse is in the Eye of the Beholder.” Forthcoming in the proceedings of a conference on Use and Abuse of the Law in Athenian Courts.

“Logography and the Development of Athenian Forensic Argument.” Forthcoming in the Proceedings of a conference on  From Antiphon to Autocue: Aspects of Speechwriting Ancient and Modern.

“The Athenaian ‘Law” on Contracts: What Law?” Forthcoming in the proceedings of a conference “Greek Law in the 21st Century”.

“Law and Rhetoric in Ancient Greece.” Forthcoming in the The Oxford Handbook of Rhetorical Studies.

“Vengeance, Pollution, and Homicide in Plato and Antiphon.” Forthcoming in the papers of the Conference on Vengeance (Classical Press of Wales).

Ancient Greek Laws on Sacrifice.” Forthcoming in the proceedings of a conference on Sacrifice.

Ancient Law in Eurasia.” Horizons (Seoul) 6 (2015) 1-18.

Aeschylus’ Prometheus: Regress, Progress, and the Nature of Woman.” Hyperboreus 20 (2014) 92-100. (Festschrift for Bernd Seidensticker)

“Rhetoric as a Source of Law in Athens.” Symposion 2013. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 24, ed. Michael Gagarin and Adriaan Lanni (Vienna 2014) 131-44.

“Methods of Argument in Lysias and Demosthenes: A Comparison.” In Papers in Rhetoric XII, ed. Lucia Caboli Montefusco and Maria Silvana Celentano (Perugia 2014) 87-97.

Eikos Arguments in Athenian Forensic Oratory.” In Probabilities, Hypotheticals, and Counterfactuals in Ancient Greek Thought, ed. Victoria Wohl (Cambridge 2014) 15-29.

Law and Religion in Early Greece.” In Law and Religion in the Eastern Mediterranean: From Antiquity to Early Islam, ed. Anselm C. Hagedorn and Reinhard G. Kratz (Oxford 2013) 59-78.

Laws and Legislation in Ancient Greece.” A Companion to Ancient Greek Government, ed. Hans Beck (Malden MA 2013) 221-234.

Anna Missiou on Oratory, Literacy, and Democracy.” Ariadne 18 (2012) 39-49.

Observations on the Great Rhetra: A Response to Françoise Ruzé.” In Symposion 2011. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 23, ed. Bernard Legras and Gerhard Thür (Vienna 2012), 17-20.

Law, Politics and the Question of Relevance in the Case On the Crown.” Classical Antiquity 31 (2012) 293-314.

Women and the Law in Gortyn.” Index 40 (2012) 57-67 (Studies for Eva Cantarella).

The Laws of Crete.” In Transferts culturels et droits dans le monde grec et hellénistque, ed. Bernard Legras, 17-29. Paris 2012.

Writing Sacred Laws in Archaic and Classical Crete.” In Sacred Words: Orality, Literacy and Religion, ed. A. P. M. H. Lardinois, J. H. Blok, and M. G. M. van der Poel (Leiden 2011), 101-11.

Legal Procedure at Gortyn,” Symposion 2009. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 21, ed. Gerhard Thür (Vienna 2010) 127-45.

Slaves and Serfs at Gortyn,” Zeitschrift der Savigny Stiftung 127 (2010) 14-31.

Women and Property at Gortyn,” Dike 11 (2008) 5-25.

Writing in Athenian Law: Response to M. Faraguna.” Symposion 2007. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 20 (Vienna 2008) 83-86.

Protagoras et l’Art de la Parole.” Philosophie antique 8 (2008) 23-32.

(with Paul Woodruff) “The Sophists,” for The Oxford Handbook of Presocratic Philosophy, ed. Patricia Curd and Daniel W. Graham (Oxford 2008), 365-82.

Nomos and Physis in Antiphon,” in Physis and Nomos: Power, Justice and the Agonistical Ideal of Life in High Classicism, ed. Apostolos L. Pierris (Patras 2007) 355-80.

Rational Argument in Early Athenian Oratory,” in Logos: Rational Argument in Classical Rhetoric, ed. Jonathan Powell (BICS Suppl. 96, London 2007) 9-18.

From Oral Law to Written Laws: Draco's Law and its Homeric Roots,” Symposion 2005. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 19 (Vienna 2007) 3-17.

Litigants’ Oaths in Athenian Law,” in Horkos: The Oath in Greek Society, ed. Alan H. Sommerstein and Judith Fletcher (Exeter 2007) 39-47, 227-28.

(with Paul Woodruff) “Early Greek Legal Thought,” in A History of the Philosophy of Law from the Ancient Greeks to the Scholastics, ed. Fred D. Miller, Jr. (Dordrecht 2007) 7-34.

Background and Origins: Oratory and Rhetoric before the Sophists,” in A Companion to Greek Rhetoric, ed. Ian Worthington (Oxford 2007) 27-36.

The Unwritten Monument: Speaking and Writing Pericles’ Funeral Oration,” in III International Symposium on Thucydides, ed. Marios Scortsis (Athens 2006) 176-87 (with summary in Greek).

Inscribing Laws in Greece and the Near East,” Symposion 2003. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 17 (Vienna 2006) 9-20.

Legal Procedure in Solon’s Laws,” in Solon of Athens: New Historical and Philological Approaches, ed. Josine H. Blok & André P. Lardinois (Leiden 2006) 261-75.

La violence dans les plaidoyers attiques,” in La violence dans les mondes grec et romain, ed. Jean-Marie Bertrand (Paris 2005) 365-76.

Justice, Games, and the Brabeus: A Response to Vélissaropoulos-Karakostas,” Symposion 2001. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 16 (Vienna 2005) 317-19.

Early Greek Law” in The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law, ed. Michael Gagarin and David Cohen (Cambridge 2005) 82-94.

The Unity of Greek Law,” in The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law, ed. Michael Gagarin and David Cohen (Cambridge 2005) 29-40.

La loi de Dracon sur l’homicide : pourquoi était-elle écrite?” in Le législateur et la loi dans l’Antiquité: Hommage à Françoise Ruzé (Actes du colloque de Caen, 15-17 mai 2003), ed. Pierre Sineux (Caen 2005) 119-26.

Writing Athenian Law,” in Law, Rhetoric, and Comedy in Classical Athens: Essays in Honour of Douglas M. MacDowell, edited by D. L. Cairns and R. A. Knox (London 2004) 15-31.

The Rule of Law in Gortyn,” in The Law and the Courts in Ancient Greece, ed. Edward M. Harris and Lene Rubinstein (London 2004) 173-83.

Telling Stories in Athenian Law,” Transactions of the American Philological Association 133 (2003) 197-207.

Who Were the Kakourgoi? Career Criminals and the History of Apagoge in Athens,Symposion 1999. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 14 (Cologne 2003) 183-91.

Socrates and Antiphon: Intellectuals on Trial in Classical Athens," in Mélanges en l’honneur Panayotis Dimakis: Droits antiques et société (Athens 2002) 397-404.

“Athenian Homicide Law: Case Studies,”  lecture for the Center for Hellenic Studies Web Series on “Athenian Law in its Democratic Context” (web publication). URL: http://www.chs.harvard.edu/online_disc/athenian_law/lect_gagarin.htm

Letters of the Law: Written Texts in Archaic Greek Law,” in Written Texts and the Rise of Literate Culture in Ancient Greece, ed. Harvey Yunis (Cambridge 2003) 59-77.

Protagoras’ New Fragment: Thirty Years Later,” in Noctes Atticae: Studies Presented to Jørgen Mejer on his Sixtieth Birthday March 19,2002 (Copenhagen 2002) 114-20

Greek Law and the Presocratics,” in Presocratic Philosophy: Essays in Honour of Alexander Mourelatos, ed. by Victor Caston and Daniel W. Graham (Burlington VT 2002) 19-24.

Logos as Ergon in Isocrates,” in Papers in Rhetoric IV, ed. by Lucia Calboli Montefusco (Rome 2002) 111-19.

Écriture et oralité en droit grec,” Revue historique de droit français et étranger 79 (2001) 447-62.

The Gortyn Code and Greek Legal Procedure,” Symposion 1997. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 13 (Cologne 2001) 41-52.

Did the Sophists Aim to Persuade?Rhetorica 19 (2001) 275-91.

The Truth of Antiphon’s Truth,” in Anthony Preus, ed. Before Plato (Essays in Ancient Greek Philosophy VI, Albany 2001), 171-85.

Women’s Voices in Attic Oratory,” in André Lardinois and Laura McClure eds. Making Silence Speak: Women’s Voices in Greek Literature and Society (Princeton 2001) 161-76.

The Legislation of Demetrius of Phaleron and the Transformation of Athenian Law,” in William W. Fortenbaugh and Eckart Schütrumpf, edd. Demetrius of Phalerum: Text, Translation and Discussion. Rutgers University Studies in Classical Humanities, vol. 9 (New Brunswick, NJ 2000) 347-65.

The Basileus in Athenian Homicide Law,” in Pernille Flensted-Jensen, Thomas Heine Nielsen, and Lene Rubinstein, edd. Polis & Politics: Studies in Ancient Greek History Presented to Mogens Hansen on His Sixtieth Birthday, August 20, 2000 (Copenhagen 2000) 569-79.

Le Code de Platon et le droit grecque,” in Edmond Lévy, ed. La codification des lois dans l’antiquité (Actes du Colloque de Strasbourg, 27-29 novembre 1997, Strasbourg 2000) 215-27.

Rhétorique et anti-rhétorique à Gortyne,” in Catherine Dobias-Lalou, ed. Des dialectes grecs aux lois de Gortyne (Nancy 1999) 65-74.

The Orality of Greek Oratory,” in E. Anne Mackay, ed. Signs of Orality: the Oral Tradition and its Influence in the Greek and Roman World (Mnemosyne Suppl. 188, Leiden 1999) 163-80.

Women in Athenian Courts,” Dike 1 (1998) 39-51.

Oaths and Oath-Challenges in Greek Law,” Symposion 1995. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 11 (Cologne 1997) 125-34.

On the Not-Being of Gorgias’ On Not-Being (ONB),” Philosophy and Rhetoric 30 (1997) 38-40.

Gertrude Elizabeth Smith (1894-1985),” Classical World 90 (1996-97) 167-77.

La torture des esclaves dans le droit athénien,” Le IVe siècle av. J.-C.: Approches historiographiques (Nancy 1996) 273-79.

The Torture of Slaves in Athenian Law,” Classical Philology 91 (1996) 1-18.

The First Law of the Gortyn Code Revisited,” Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 36 (1995) 7-15.

The Economic Status of Women at Gortyn: Retroactivity and Change,” Symposion 1993. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 9 (Cologne 1994) 61-71.

Probability and persuasion: Plato and early Greek rhetoric” in Ian Worthington, ed. Persuasion. Greek Rhetoric in Action (London 1994) 46-68. Translated into modern Greek in Peitho: Ten Essays on Modern Rhetoric, edited by D. G. Spatharas and L. Tzallila (Athens 2003) 31-62.

“Gertrude Elizabeth Smith (1894-1985),” Classical Outlook 71 (1993-94) 53-54.

(with Lucy Shoe Meritt) “Supplementary Bibliography of Benjamin D. Meritt,” Hesperia 61 (1992) 291-92.

The Poetry of Justice: Hesiod and the Origins of Greek Law,” Ramus 21 (1992) 61-78.

Response to van Effenterre on Criminal Law in Archaic Crete,” Symposion 1990. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 8 (Cologne 1992) 87-91.

“'Flow Backwards, Sacred Rivers': Tradition and Change in the Classics,” CAMWS Presidential Address, Classical Journal. 87 (1992) 361-71.

The Ancient Tradition on the Identity of Antiphon,” Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 31 (1990) 27-44.

The Ambiguity of Eris in the Works and Days,” Cabinet of the Muses:: Essays on Classical and Comparative Literature in Honor of Thomas G. Rosenmeyer. Ed. Mark Griffith and Donald Mastronarde (Scholars Press 1990) 173-183.

Bouleusis in Athenian Homicide Law,” Symposion 1988. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 7 (Cologne 1990) 81-99.

The Nature of Proofs in Antiphon,” Classical Philology 85 (1990) 22-32. Reprinted (with bibliographical update) in Oxford Readings in Classical Studies: The Attic Orators, ed. Edwin Carawan (Oxford 2007), 214-28.

The Function of Witnesses at Gortyn,” Symposion 1985. Akten der Gesellschaft für griechische und hellenistische Rechtsgeschichte, vol. 6 (Cologne 1990) 29-54.

The First Law of the Gortyn Code,” Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 29 (1988) 335-43.

Morality in Homer,” Classical Philology 82 (1987) 285-306 (with responses by Arthur Adkins and Hugh Lloyd-Jones).

The Testimony of Witnesses in the Gortyn Laws,” Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 25 (1984) 345-49.

Antilochus' Strategy: The Chariot Race in Iliad 23,” Classical Philology 78 (1983) 35-39.

The Organization of the Gortyn Law Code,” Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 23 (1982) 129-46.

The Thesmothetai and the Earliest Athenian Tyranny Law,” Transactions of the American Philological Association 111 (1981) 71-77.

The Prosecution of Homicide in Athens,” Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 20 (1979) 301-23.

The Athenian Law against Hybris, in Arktouros: Hellenic Studies presented to Bernard M. W. Knox (Berlin 1979) 229-36.

The Prohibition of Just and Unjust Homicide in Antiphon's Tetralogies,” Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 19 (1978) 269-301.

Self-defense in Athenian Homicide Law,” Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies 19 (1978) 111-20.

Socrates' Hybris and Alcibiades' Failure,” Phoenix 31 (1977) 22-37.

The Vote of Athena,” American Journal of Philology 96 (1975) 121-27.

Hesiod's Dispute with Perses,” Transactions of the American Philological Association 104 (1974) 103-11.

Dike in Archaic Greek Thought,” Classical Philology 69 (1974) 186-97.

Dike in the Works and Days,” Classical Philology 68 (1973) 81-94.

The Purpose of Plato's Protagoras,” Transactions of the American Philological Association 100 (1969) 133-64.

Profile Pages


External Links