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Tracie M. Matysik


Associate ProfessorPh.D., 2001, Cornell University

Tracie M. Matysik

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-7251
  • Office: GAR 3.402
  • Office Hours: Spring 2011 - Th 1-3 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography


Research interests

She works in the field of modern European intellectual history, with a particular focus on the evolution of secularism as a social movement. At present she is working on a book manuscript provisionally entitled "Spinoza Matters: Pantheism, Materialism, and Alternative Enlightenment Legacies in Nineteenth-Century Europe." She is also producing an anthology of writings by women from across Europe who were influenced directly or indirectly by the thought of Friedrich Nietzsche.

Courses taught

Modern European and German history with a focus on European intellectual history and the history of sexuality.

 

Courses


HIS 301G • Modern World

38385 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CLA 0.128

This course will concentrate on the themes and methodologies necessary to thinking about the history of the planet, roughly 1500-present.  It will not provide a synthetic, chronological overview of everything that has happened on this planet in the last 500 years.  Rather, it will concentrate on the movements of technology, ideas, and persons that have made possible something like a globalized, interconnected – albeit differentiated – world.  Attention will be given to the interplay between universalizing forces and local specificities, to shifting conceptions of the universal and of difference, and to instabilities of boundaries and borders – geographical, political, and conceptual – that result from and regulate the tensions between broadly planetary and locally differentiated developments.  In the course we will devote as much time to the concepts and methodologies of global history as we will to the content of empirical historical developments.

Texts:

Robert Strayer, Ways of the World: A Brief Global History, Vol. 2 (Boston and New York:  Bedford/St. Martin’s (2009).

Tayeb Salih, Season of Migration to the North, trans. Denys Johnson-Davies (New York: New York Review Books, 1969).

Jonathan Spence, The Question of Hu (New York: Vintage, 1989).

Grading:

Midterm: 25%

Midterm: 30%

Final Exam: 30%

Weekly Quizzes and Participation: 15%

EUS 346 • Sacred/Sec In Mod Euro Thought

35425 • Fall 2015
Meets W 4:00PM-7:00PM GAR 0.128
(also listed as CTI 335, HIS 362G, R S 357)

            Europe was long thought to have undergone a process of “secularization” in the modern era, beginning roughly with the sixteenth century and becoming largely unstoppable by the nineteenth.  According to this narrative, “God” was supposed to have slowly disappeared from the political, social, and cultural arenas; the supernatural, the divine, and the sacred were supposed to have receded from daily life; and the European world was supposed to have found itself  “disenchanted.”  More recently, however, historians and critical theorists have begun to reassess this story, finding instead mutually-evolving processes of disenchantment and re-enchantment, as new formations of the divine and the sacred appeared on the intellectual and emotive landscape.  Some theorists now talk about “varieties of secularism” at play in the modern world, while others have resuscitated a language of “political theology” to discuss the ever-complicated relationship between the state, sovereignty, power, and the sacred or divine. 

            This course will introduce students to key themes and methodologies of intellectual history and social theory by exploring the dueling approaches to secularization and sacralization in modern European thought.  In the first two weeks, we will read recent theoretical works on the sacred and the secular (essays from Peter Berger, Simon Critchley, Charles Taylor, and others).  With theoretical tools in hand, we will turn to the period between 1800 and 1945 to read classic works in philosophy and social theory that thematize the sacred and the secular.  Drawing on founding works in social and human sciences (from sociology,  psychoanalysis, philosophy and beyond), we will investigate related sub-themes of violence, sacrifice, ritual,  redemption, the sublime, and transcendence.  We will also discuss select artworks from the Romantic period through Surrealism as a means to enhance our discussion of these themes. 

            Central to our concerns will be the sacred and secular formations of modern ethics.  We will observe on the one hand how modern thinkers have sought to establish ethical systems on purely immanent and secular grounds, even as they intentionally or unintentionally retained notions of the divine and the sacred (e.g., Immanuel Kant’s Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone).  On the other hand, we will grapple with explicitly religious works that nonetheless establish ethics on what might seem like secular-humanist foundations (e.g., Søren Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling).  We will read works that seek to explicate the structure of religions and their guidelines for comportment according to social categories of the sacred and profane or the taboo (Émile Durkheim’s Elementary Forms of Religion; Roger Caillois’s Man and the Sacred; Sigmund Freud’s Totem and Taboo); and we will read works that seek to rediscover and/or re-insert the sacred into the modern and profane world (e.g., George Bataille’s Theory of Religion; Walter Benjamin’s “Critique of Violence” and “Theses on the Philosophy of History”; Franz Rosenzweig’s Star of Redemption). 

            The course lends itself naturally to the requirements of the Flag in Ethics and Global Leadership.  Our readings themselves concentrate on the question of the secular and sacred foundations of ethical systems and decisions.  As a final project, worth 35% of the grade, students will be asked to identify and analyze a sacred, secular, or taboo function that governs moral presuppositions.  They may find such a function represented in a film, a novel, an artwork, a legal decision, a U.N. declaration, etc.  Their task will not be to assess whether or not the practice is “right” or “good” or “ethical,” but rather to analyze the practice in terms of its (usually unstated) sacred, secular, taboo, or ritual context.  They will be asked to ground their analysis in one or more of our core readings.

 

 

Texts:

Immanuel Kant, Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone (excerpt)

G. W. F. Hegel, Philosophy of History (excerpt from the introduction)

Søren Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling

Friedrich Nietzsche, Genealogy of Morality (Books I and II) (but may substitute The Gay

            Science, Book IV)

Émile Durkheim, Elementary Forms of Religion (selections)

Roger Caillois, Man and the Sacred (selections)

George Bataille, Theory of Religion (selections)

Sigmund Freud, Totem and Taboo (selections)

—, “The Uncanny”

Franz Rosenzweig, Star of Redemption (selections)

Simon Critchley, Faith of the Faithless (selections)

Peter Berger, Desecularization of the World (introduction)

Judith Butler, Jürgen Habermas, Charles Taylor, and Cornell West, The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere

 

Grading:

Journal                         10%

Short Essay 1                        20%

Short Essay 2                        20%

Final Essay                           35%

Class Participation                  15%

T C 302 • History Of The Self

41965 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 206

Description:

What does it mean to say “I,” and where does that “I” come from?  Does the self, or the I, exist in the body, or is it something purely mental and immaterial?  Do I have one self that stays with me over time, or do I constantly generate a new self with all my actions and thoughts?  What happens if I lose my self?  Or if part of my self is unconscious or beyond my control?  Importantly, why does it matter how we understand the self?  That is, what implications does our conception of the self and its stability or instability have for our understanding of political, cultural, and historical developments? 

This course examines these questions and their evolution throughout the history of European philosophy and social theory from roughly1600 to the present, with special emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  It asks how and especially why people have thought about the formation of the self – and its dissolution – over time, and about the changing historical circumstances that have motivated thinkers to return constantly anew to the matter. While we will work primarily with European philosophical and social-theoretical traditions, we will also read and discuss more literary and historical texts that help us to see what the stakes have been in historically-specific approaches to understanding the self.

Texts/Readings:

René Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy

Friedrich Nietzsche, selected excerpts and aphorisms

Hedwig Dohm, Become Who You Are!

Sigmund Freud, The Ego and the Id

Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness (short excerpt)

Jacques Lacan, “The Mirror Stage”

Michel Foucault, Technologies of the Self (excerpts)

Judith Butler, “Introduction” to Bodies that Matter

Donna Haraway, “A Manifesto for Cyborgs”

Nick Mansfield, Subjectivity: Theories of the Self from Freud to Harraway

Requirements:

Three short (3-4 page) papers 45% (each at 15%)

One oral report (10-15 minutes, with text)15%

Ten weekly response papers (1 page)10%

Final Take-Home Exam 20%

Class Participation 10%

About the Professor:

As a European intellectual historian, my academic interests reside at the intersection of philosophy, social theory, public activism, and theories of gender and sexuality. I have recently completed a book entitled Against Morality: Subjectivity and Sexuality in fin-de-siècle Central Europe, and am now working on the history of materialism from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. I have also begun a project that is a direct product of a teaching need: a collection of writings by women on the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche from roughly 1890 to 1930.

After receiving my Ph.D. in European intellectual history at Cornell University in 2001, and before arriving at the University of Texas in August of 2003, I was the grateful recipient of two post-doctoral fellowships. The first was a fellowship from the Mellon Foundation and awarded by the German Studies Department at Cornell, and the second was from the Center for European Studies at Harvard University. Since coming to UT, I have enjoyed teaching courses such as “History and the Unconscious,” and “Marx and Nietzsche,” as well as staples such as “Western Civilizations in Modern Times.” When I am not teaching, I am usually researching in Germany, sometimes in Berlin and more recently in the culturally-rich towns of Weimar, Jena, and Gotha.

Of course I do take time off from teaching and researching once in a while. And when I do get a break from work, I like to run, bike, and play with my dog (who doesn’t like to run or bike). My favorite, more sedentary activity in Austin is to visit the Alamo Drafthouse, where I will happily view almost anything they are showing.

HIS 301G • Modern World

38365 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CAL 100

This course will concentrate on the themes and methodologies necessary to thinking about the history of the planet, roughly 1500-present.  It will not provide a synthetic, chronological overview of everything that has happened on this planet in the last 500 years.  Rather, it will concentrate on the movements of technology, ideas, and persons that have made possible something like a globalized, interconnected – albeit differentiated – world.  Attention will be given to the interplay between universalizing forces and local specificities, to shifting conceptions of the universal and of difference, and to instabilities of boundaries and borders – geographical, political, and conceptual – that result from and regulate the tensions between broadly planetary and locally differentiated developments.  In the course we will devote as much time to the concepts and methodologies of global history as we will to the content of empirical historical developments.

Texts:

Robert Strayer, Ways of the World: A Brief Global History, Vol. 2 (Boston and New York:  Bedford/St. Martin’s (2009).

Tayeb Salih, Season of Migration to the North, trans. Denys Johnson-Davies (New York: New York Review Books, 1969).

Jonathan Spence, The Question of Hu (New York: Vintage, 1989).

Grading:

Midterm: 25%

Midterm: 30%

Final Exam: 30%

Weekly Quizzes and Participation: 15%

HIS 383 • History And Social Theory

38945 • Spring 2015
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 2.124

This reading course introduces students to social theorists whose work has shaped and continues to shape the field of historical inquiry.  Two “tracks” dominate: the history of Marxist and sociological thought, on the one hand, and recent developments in theories of biopolitics on the other.  The theme that ties these two “tracks” together is the relationship of interest and desire to social force, violence, surveillance. Accordingly, we will attend throughout our readings and discussions to the mutually implicated problems of structure and subjectivity (universal and particular; structure and agency, state and techniques of subjectification). Readings combine “classics” (e.g., readings from Marx, Weber, Gramsci, Benjamin, et al.) with some of the newest efforts in social theory (e.g., Hardt and Negri, Asad, Agamben, and Butler).

Texts:

Robert Tucker, ed., Marx-Engels Reader (New York:  Norton, 1978).

Max Weber, Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (New York:  Routledge, 1992).

Antonio Gramsci, The Antonio Gramsci Reader, eds. David Forgacs and Eric Hobsbawm (New York: NYU Press, 2000).

Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri, Commonwealth (Cambridge: Belknap, Harvard University Press, 2009).

Michel Foucault, “Society Must Be Defended” (Picador, 2003).

Giorgio Agamben, Homo Sacer (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1998).

Dipesh Chakrabarty, Provincializing Europe (Princeton:  Princeton University Press, 2000).

Ann Stoler, Race and the Education of Desire (Durham:  Duke, 1995).

Talal Asad, On Suicide Bombing (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007).

Judith Butler, Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence (New York: Verso, 2006).

Grading:

?Class Summary:  20%

?Class Introduction of Material: 20%

?Weekly  Papers: 35%

?Class Participation: 25%

EUS 346 • Marx And Western Marxism

36607 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 6:00PM-7:30PM GAR 3.116
(also listed as CTI 335, HIS 362G, PHL 334K)

This course introduces students to the writings of Karl Marx as well as to those of his westernintellectual successors in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It will treat the nineteenthcenturycontext of industrialization and democratization in Europe in which Marx formulated hissocial, political, and philosophical critique, as well as the theoretical and philosophical legacythat followed through the twentieth century. The course will not focus on Soviet Marxism, butwill examine how western Marxism’s critique of capital evolved in complex relationship to theexistence of Soviet Marxism. We will spend roughly eight weeks reading Marx’s writings, andthen seven weeks reading his western intellectual successors (including writings from RosaLuxemburg, Georg Lukács, Walther Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, Antonio Gramsci, Jean-PaulSartre, Louis Althusser, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri, and Slavoj iek). Students shouldexpect to read significant amounts of philosophy and social theory.

Texts:

Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader, 2nd edition (New York: Norton, 1978).Vincent Barnett, Marx (New York: Routledge, 2009).

Grading:

First paper: 25%

Second paper: 25%

Option II or III: 10- to 12-page paper: 50%

Final Journal: 30%!Class Presentation: 10%

Participation (including attendance and also sustained constructive contribution to classdiscussion): 10%

HIS 362G • Sacred/Sec In Mod Euro Thought

39730 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM GAR 3.116
(also listed as CTI 335, R S 357)

Europe was long thought to have undergone a process of “secularization” in the modern era, beginning roughly with the sixteenth century and becoming largely unstoppable by the nineteenth.  According to this narrative, “God” was supposed to have slowly disappeared from the political, social, and cultural arenas; the supernatural, the divine, and the sacred were supposed to have receded from daily life; and the European world was supposed to have found itself  “disenchanted.”  More recently, however, historians and critical theorists have begun to reassess this story, finding instead mutually-evolving processes of disenchantment and re-enchantment, as new formations of the divine and the sacred appeared on the intellectual and emotive landscape.  Some theorists now talk about “varieties of secularism” at play in the modern world, while others have resuscitated a language of “political theology” to discuss the ever-complicated relationship between the state, sovereignty, power, and the sacred or divine.

This course will introduce students to key themes and methodologies of intellectual history and social theory by exploring the dueling approaches to secularization and sacralization in modern European thought.  In the first two weeks, we will read recent theoretical works on the sacred and the secular (essays from Peter Berger, Simon Critchley, Charles Taylor, and others).  With theoretical tools in hand, we will turn to the period between 1800 and 1945 to read classic works in philosophy and social theory that thematize the sacred and the secular.  Drawing on founding works in social and human sciences (from sociology,  psychoanalysis, philosophy and beyond), we will investigate related sub-themes of violence, sacrifice, ritual,  redemption, the sublime, and transcendence.  We will also discuss select artworks from the Romantic period through Surrealism as a means to enhance our discussion of these themes. 

Central to our concerns will be the sacred and secular formations of modern ethics.  We will observe on the one hand how modern thinkers have sought to establish ethical systems on purely immanent and secular grounds, even as they intentionally or unintentionally retained notions of the divine and the sacred (e.g., Immanuel Kant’s Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone).  On the other hand, we will grapple with explicitly religious works that nonetheless establish ethics on what might seem like secular-humanist foundations (e.g., Søren Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling).  We will read works that seek to explicate the structure of religions and their guidelines for comportment according to social categories of the sacred and profane or the taboo (Émile Durkheim’s Elementary Forms of Religion; Roger Caillois’s Man and the Sacred; Sigmund Freud’s Totem and Taboo); and we will read works that seek to rediscover and/or re-insert the sacred into the modern and profane world (e.g., George Bataille’s Theory of Religion; Walter Benjamin’s “Critique of Violence” and “Theses on the Philosophy of History”; Franz Rosenzweig’s Star of Redemption). 

The course lends itself naturally to the requirements of the Flag in Ethics and Global Leadership.  Our readings themselves concentrate on the question of the secular and sacred foundations of ethical systems and decisions.  As a final project, worth 35% of the grade, students will be asked to identify and analyze a sacred, secular, or taboo function that governs moral presuppositions.  They may find such a function represented in a film, a novel, an artwork, a legal decision, a U.N. declaration, etc.  Their task will not be to assess whether or not the practice is “right” or “good” or “ethical,” but rather to analyze the practice in terms of its (usually unstated) sacred, secular, taboo, or ritual context.  They will be asked to ground their analysis in one or more of our core readings.

Texts:

Immanuel Kant, Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone (excerpt)

G. W. F. Hegel, Philosophy of History (excerpt from the introduction)

Søren Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling

Friedrich Nietzsche, Genealogy of Morality (Books I and II) (but may substitute The Gay

            Science, Book IV)

Émile Durkheim, Elementary Forms of Religion (selections)

Roger Caillois, Man and the Sacred (selections)

George Bataille, Theory of Religion (selections)

Sigmund Freud, Totem and Taboo (selections)

—, “The Uncanny”

Franz Rosenzweig, Star of Redemption (selections)

Simon Critchley, Faith of the Faithless (selections)

Peter Berger, Desecularization of the World (introduction)

Judith Butler, Jürgen Habermas, Charles Taylor, and Cornell West, The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere

Grading:

Journal                         10%

Short Essay 1                        20%

Short Essay 2                        20%

Final Essay                           35%

Class Participation                  15%

T C 302 • A History Of The Self

43705 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CAL 200

Description:

What does it mean to say “I,” and where does that “I” come from?  Does the self, or the I, exist in the body, or is it something purely mental and immaterial?  Do I have one self that stays with me over time, or do I constantly generate a new self with all my actions and thoughts?  What happens if I lose my self?  Or if part of my self is unconscious or beyond my control?  Importantly, why does it matter how we understand the self?  That is, what implications does our conception of the self and its stability or instability have for our understanding of political, cultural, and historical developments? 

This course examines these questions and their evolution throughout the history of European philosophy and social theory from roughly1600 to the present, with special emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  It asks how and especially why people have thought about the formation of the self – and its dissolution – over time, and about the changing historical circumstances that have motivated thinkers to return constantly anew to the matter. While we will work primarily with European philosophical and social-theoretical traditions, we will also read and discuss more literary and historical texts that help us to see what the stakes have been in historically-specific approaches to understanding the self.

 

Texts/Readings:

René Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy

Friedrich Nietzsche, selected excerpts and aphorisms

Hedwig Dohm, Become Who You Are!

Sigmund Freud, The Ego and the Id

Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness (short excerpt)

Jacques Lacan, “The Mirror Stage”

Michel Foucault, Technologies of the Self (excerpts)

Judith Butler, “Introduction” to Bodies that Matter

Donna Haraway, “A Manifesto for Cyborgs”

Nick Mansfield, Subjectivity: Theories of the Self from Freud to Harraway

 

Requirements:

Three short (3-4 page) papers 45% (each at 15%)

One oral report (10-15 minutes, with text)15%

Ten weekly response papers (1 page)10%

Final Take-Home Exam 20%

Class Participation 10%

 

About the Professor:

As a European intellectual historian, my academic interests reside at the intersection of philosophy, social theory, public activism, and theories of gender and sexuality. I have recently completed a book entitled Against Morality: Subjectivity and Sexuality in fin-de-siècle Central Europe, and am now working on the history of materialism from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. I have also begun a project that is a direct product of a teaching need: a collection of writings by women on the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche from roughly 1890 to 1930.

After receiving my Ph.D. in European intellectual history at Cornell University in 2001, and before arriving at the University of Texas in August of 2003, I was the grateful recipient of two post-doctoral fellowships. The first was a fellowship from the Mellon Foundation and awarded by the German Studies Department at Cornell, and the second was from the Center for European Studies at Harvard University. Since coming to UT, I have enjoyed teaching courses such as “History and the Unconscious,” and “Marx and Nietzsche,” as well as staples such as “Western Civilizations in Modern Times.” When I am not teaching, I am usually researching in Germany, sometimes in Berlin and more recently in the culturally-rich towns of Weimar, Jena, and Gotha.

Of course I do take time off from teaching and researching once in a while. And when I do get a break from work, I like to run, bike, and play with my dog (who doesn’t like to run or bike). My favorite, more sedentary activity in Austin is to visit the Alamo Drafthouse, where I will happily view almost anything they are showing.

HIS 381 • Secularism And Critical Theory

40080 • Fall 2013
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 1.122
(also listed as MES 385, R S 383C)

Co-instructors: Tracie Matysik and Benjamin Brower

This research seminar will reflect on questions of political community, secularism, and the sacred in both critical-theoretical and historical literature. Raising questions about the nature of religion and the secular is of considerable political and theoretical urgency for our era, an era marked by evangelical promises of regeneration, redemption, and apocalyptic rebirth. In theoretical circles, the concept of “political theology” has made a triumphant return in the twenty-first century, not only to address explicit theocracies past and present but also to address the transcendent and semi-divine claims of sovereignty in even the most secular-seeming constitutional settings.  Our readings will help us reconsider contemporary currents of thought starting from the perspective of history and critical theory.  In the process, the seminar will aim to clarify key currents of modernity and consider the ways in which the last century may or may not represent a turning point towards the “postsecular.”

Readings:

  1. Mohammed Arkoun (selections)
  2. Talal Asad, Formations of the Secular: Christianity, Islam, Modernity ISBN: 0804747687
  3. Georges Bataille (selections)
  4. Roger Caillois, Man and the Sacred ISBN: 0252070348
  5. Michel de Certeau, The Possession at Loudun ISBN: 0226100359
  6. Emile Durkheim (selections)
  7. Jacques Derrida Acts of Religion ISBN: 0415924014
  8. Sigmund Freud, Moses and Monotheism, ISBN:  0394700147
  9. Dominick LaCapra (selections)
  10. Saba Mahmood, Politics of Piety: The Islamic Revival and the Feminist Subject ISBN: 0691149801
  11. Eric Santner (selections)
  12. Carl Schmitt Political Theology: Four Chapters on the Concept of Sovereignty ISBN: 0226738892
  13. Charles Taylor, A Secular Age ISBN: 0674026764
  14. Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism: and Other Writings ISBN: 0140439218

Grading:

  • History of a Class Session:  20%
  • Class Participation and Presentation:  30%
  • Final Essay:  50%

 

 

EUS 306 • Reason & Its Discontents

36340 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM BIO 301
(also listed as CTI 310, HIS 317N)

This course introduces students to themes  and methods  in the study  of European Intellectual History. We will address what it means to read philosophy and social theory  in historical context, understanding close reading  as historical  methodology. In terms  of chronological focus, the course will concentrate on the modern  era broadly understood, roughly  1600-present. We will examine  how reason came to be a dominant and contested category  of philosophical inquiry in the seventeenth century and then follow  its vicissitudes into the twentieth century. Along the way we will witness the embrace  and rejection of what has come to be known  as the "Enlightenment tradition." Readings will be primarily philosophical and socia l ­ theoreticaI.

 

Readings (subject to change):

 

Rene Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy

Baruch Spinoza, Short Treatise  on God, Man, and His Well-Being

Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Friedrich  Nietzsche, On the Birth  of Tragedy

Jurgen Habermas, selections

Michel Foucault, Madness and Civilization

 

 

Grading:

Short  paper (four  pages): 25°/o

Short  paper (four  pages): 30°/o

Final exam:  35°/o

Participation: 10°/o

EUS 346 • Spinoza And Modernity

36460 • Spring 2013
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM GAR 0.128
(also listed as CTI 335, HIS 362G, J S 364, PHL 354)

Baruch Spinoza, the seventeenth-century Dutch-Jewish philosopher of Portuguese descent, has been alternately labeled the instigator of the “radical enlightenment” (Jonathan Israel), the “renegade Jew who gave us modernity” (Rebecca Goldstein), the betrayer of the Jewish tradition (Hermann Cohen), a “savage anomaly” in the western intellectual tradition (Antonio Negri), and the theorist of the one kind of god in which a physicist of the twentieth century might conceivably believe (Albert Einstein).  In his own seventeenth-century Amsterdam context, his writings – and even mere rumor of them – were enough to earn him full excommunication from the Jewish community.  Yet in subsequent centuries those scandalous writings have become a crucial chapter in histories of western philosophy.  G. W. F. Hegel, for instance, would argue that only after Spinoza could one really begin to philosophize properly.  This course will introduce students to the core of Spinoza’s writings that have produced such diverse reactions over the centuries, as well as to exemplary moments in those reactions.  We will examine Spinoza’s refusal of a transcendent god or ideal, as well as of the mind-body dualism so prominent in western thought, understanding along the way the unique intellectual modernity he made possible. Reading

Baruch Spinoza, “Ethics”; “Theological-Political Treatise”; and “Political Treatise,” all in Spinoza: Complete Works, ed. Michael Morgan, trans. Samuel Shirley (Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing, 2002), ISBN: 0872206203.

Genevieve Lloyd, Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Spinoza and the Ethics (New York:  Routledge, 1996), ISBN:  0415107822.

 

Grading (using the +/- rubric):

  • 12- to 15-page paper: 45% (includes evaluation of outline and/or draft)
  • Presentation: 20%
  • Final Journal: 25% (includes credit for timely submission of quality response papers)
  • Participation: 10% (includes attendance and regular and constructive contribution to class discussion)

EUS 346 • Marx And Western Marxism

36415 • Fall 2012
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM GAR 2.128
(also listed as CTI 335, HIS 362G)

This course introduces students to the writings of Karl Marx as well as to those of his westernintellectual successors in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It will treat the nineteenthcenturycontext of industrialization and democratization in Europe in which Marx formulated hissocial, political, and philosophical critique, as well as the theoretical and philosophical legacythat followed through the twentieth century. The course will not focus on Soviet Marxism, butwill examine how western Marxism’s critique of capital evolved in complex relationship to theexistence of Soviet Marxism. We will spend roughly eight weeks reading Marx’s writings, andthen seven weeks reading his western intellectual successors (including writings from RosaLuxemburg, Georg Lukács, Walther Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, Antonio Gramsci, Jean-PaulSartre, Louis Althusser, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri, and Slavoj iek). Students shouldexpect to read significant amounts of philosophy and social theory.

 

GRADING (using the +/- system)

First paper: 25%

Second paper: 25%

Option II or III: 10- to 12-page paper: 50%

Final Journal: 30%!Class Presentation: 10%

Participation (including attendance and also sustained constructive contribution to classdiscussion): 10%

TEXTS

Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader, 2nd edition (New York: Norton, 1978).Vincent Barnett, Marx (New York: Routledge, 2009).

HIS 306N • Modern World

39117 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 201

This course will concentrate on the themes and methodologies necessary to thinking about the history of the planet, roughly 1500-present.  It will not provide a synthetic, chronological overview of everything that has happened on this planet in the last 500 years.  Rather, it will concentrate on the movements of technology, ideas, and persons that have made possible something like a globalized, interconnected – albeit differentiated – world.  Attention will be given to the interplay between universalizing forces and local specificities, to shifting conceptions of the universal and of difference, and to instabilities of boundaries and borders – geographical, political, and conceptual – that result from and regulate the tensions between broadly planetary and locally differentiated developments.  In the course we will devote as much time to the concepts and methodologies of global history as we will to the content of empirical historical developments. 

 

Grading

Midterm: 25%

Midterm: 25%

Final Exam: 30%

Weekly Quizzes and Participation: 20%

 

Texts

•Robert Strayer, Ways of the World: A Brief Global History, Vol. 2 (Boston and New York: Bedford/St.Martin’s (2009).

•Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness (New York: Dover, 1990).

•Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano; or, Gustavus Vassa, theAfrican (New York: Modern Library, 2004).

•Tayeb Salih, Season of Migration to the North, trans. Denys Johnson-Davies (New York: New YorkReview Books, 1969).

•Jonathan Spence, The Question of Hu (New York: Vintage, 1989).

EUS 346 • Marx And Western Marxism

36520 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 2.112
(also listed as HIS 362G, PHL 334K)

 

Course Description:

This course introduces students to the writings of Karl Marx as well as to those of his western intellectual successors in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  It will treat the nineteenth-century context of industrialization and democratization in Europe in which Marx formulated his social, political, and philosophical critique, as well as the theoretical and philosophical legacy that followed through the twentieth century.  The course will not focus on Soviet Marxism, but will examine how western Marxism’s critique of capital evolved in complex relationship to the existence of Soviet Marxism.  We will spend roughly eight weeks reading Marx’s writings, and then seven weeks reading his western intellectual successors (including writings from Rosa Luxemburg, Georg Lukács, Walther Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, Antonio Gramsci, Jean-Paul Sartre, Louis Althusser, Juliet Mitchell, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri, and Slavoj iek).  Students should expect to read significant amounts of philosophy and social theory.

 

Texts (subject to change):

Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader, 2nd edition (New York: Norton, 1978).

Karl Marx, Capital, Vol. I, trans. Ben Fowkes (New York: Penguin, 1992).

Roger S. Gottlieb, ed., An Anthology of Western Marxism (New York: Oxford, 1989).

 

Grading:

12- to 15-page paper:     50%

Final Journal:            20%

Class Presentation:        20%

Class Participation:        10%

 

EUS 346 • Spinoza And Modernity

36525 • Spring 2011
Meets M 4:00PM-7:00PM GAR 0.128
(also listed as HIS 362G, J S 364, PHL 354, R S 357)

 

Spinoza and Modernity

EUS 347, HIS 362G, JS 364, PHL 354, RS 357

 

Course Description:

Baruch Spinoza, the seventeenth-century Dutch-Jewish philosopher of Portuguese descent, has been alternately labeled the instigator of the “radical enlightenment” (Jonathan Israel), the “renegade Jew who gave us modernity” (Rebecca Goldstein), the betrayer of the Jewish tradition (Hermann Cohen), a “savage anomaly” in the western intellectual tradition (Antonio Negri), and the theorist of the one kind of god in which a physicist of the twentieth century might conceivably believe (Albert Einstein).  In his own seventeenth-century Amsterdam context, his writings – and even mere rumor of them – were enough to earn him full excommunication from the Jewish community.  Yet in subsequent centuries those scandalous writings have become a crucial chapter in histories of western philosophy.  G. W. F. Hegel, for instance, would argue that only after Spinoza could one really begin to philosophize properly.  This course will introduce students to the core of Spinoza’s writings that have produced such diverse reactions over the centuries, as well as to exemplary moments in those reactions.  We will examine Spinoza’s refusal of a transcendent god or ideal, as well as of the mind-body dualism so prominent in western thought, understanding along the way the unique intellectual modernity he made possible.     

 

Texts (subject to change)

•Baruch Spinoza, The Essential Spinoza: Ethics and Related Writings, trans. Samuel Shirley, ed. 

    Michael L. Morgan (Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing, 2006), ISBN:  0872208036.

•Baruch Spinoza, The Theological-Political Treatise, trans. Samuel Shirley (Indianapolis: 

    Hackett Publishing, 2001), ISBN:  0872206076.

•Genevieve Lloyd, Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Spinoza and the Ethics (New York: 

    Routledge, 1996), ISBN:  0415107822.

•Warren Montag and Ted Stolze, eds., The New Spinoza (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota 

    Press, 2008), ISBN:  0816625417.

 

Grading:

12- to 15-page paper:     50%

Final Journal:            20%

Class Presentation:        20%

Class Participation:        10%

 

HIS 383 • History And Social Theory

39565 • Fall 2010
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM GAR 1.122

This course introduces students to social theorists whose work has shaped the field of historical inquiry. The readings will pay particular attention to the construction and organization of knowledge, the functions of ideology, and the production of the knowing subject. The first half of the course will follow developments in Marxism and sociology, looking at their contributions to issues of ideology and value formation; the second half of the course will trace a different set of challenges that poststructuralism has posed to the certainty of historical claims. In the end, we will be able to ask if and how a language of ideology – or perhaps of discourse or practice – remains useful to the scholar interested in pursuing questions about the past.

Grading

Class Participation (including discussion and weekly response papers): 35%

Short Paper (5-6 pp.) and presentation #1: 30%

Short Paper (5-6 pp.) and presentation #2: 30%

Texts

Readings (subject to change):

G. W. F. Hegel, “Introduction” to The Philosophy of History.

Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader.

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism.

Benjamin, Adorno, and Habermas, selections.

Antonio Gramsci, Selections from the Prison Notebooks.

Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities.

Pierre Bourdieu, Distinction (excerpts).

Dipesh Chakrabarty, Provincializing Europe.

Friedrich Nietzsche, On the Genealogy of Morals.

Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish.

Michel Foucault, History of Sexuality, Vol. 1.

Ann Laura Stoler, Race and the Education of Desire.

Jacques Derrida, “Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences,” and other selections.

Hayden White and Dominick LaCapra, selections.

Gayatri Spivak and Homi Bhabha, selections.

 

 

EUS 347 • Marx And Nietszche-W

36220 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 1.134
(also listed as HIS 350L)

Please check back for updates.

EUS 347 • Spinoza And Modernity-W

36240 • Spring 2010
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM GAR 2.124
(also listed as HIS 362G, PHL 354)

Please check back for updates.

EUS 347 • Eur Intel Hist,Enlght-Nietzs-W

36500 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM CBA 4.326
(also listed as HIS 332G)

Course Description:

This course aims to introduce students to the most significant philosophical, social-theoretical, literary, and artistic currents in Europe in the "long nineteenth century."  After looking briefly at the Enlightenment, it will follow the
trials and tribulations of nineteenth-century thinkers as they sought to come to terms with intellectual secularization.  In particular, it will examine the impact of secularization on conceptions of the self and social order.  As a course in intellectual history, it will ask how intellectual trends relate to their historical contexts, e.g. political events and socio-economic developments.  Students should complete the course with an historically informed understanding of major nineteenth-century intellectual movements: romanticism, conservatism, liberalism, utilitarianism, Marxism and socialism, aestheticism, nihilism, and positivism.                                  

Course Expectations:  

Reading: Each week there will be a substantial primary source reading. Individual books are available for purchase at the University Co-op.  They are also on reserve at PCL Reserves.  Readings that are not available for purchase at the Co-op will be available on E-Reserves.

The individual books to be bought at the University Co-op are:
*G.W.F. Hegel, Reason in History, trans. R. Hartman (New York:  Macmillan, 1953).
*Soren Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling (New York: Penguin, 1985).
*Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader (New York: Norton, 1978).
*John Stuart Mill, The Basic Writings of John Stuart Mill, ed. J. B. Schneewind (New
York: Modern Library, 2002).
*Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science (New York: Vintage, 1974).
Recommended:
*Joan Neuberger, Europe and the Making of Modernity (New York:  Oxford University Press,
2005).

Participation:  Regular attendance and participation in class discussions is required. Absences will be excused only for documented family and medical emergency (doctor's note, obituary, etc.), or religious holiday.  One unexcused absence will be overlooked.  Each subsequent unexcused absence will result in a half-grade deduction to the participation grade.  No student attending less than twenty sessions without documented excuse will pass the class.

Assignments

Essays:  Each student will be expected to write two 6-page papers, both of which will be preceded by a substantial outline and elements of a rough draft.  The schedule for these papers is indicated in the Course Schedule below.  Topics will be of your own choosing. Option II: You may opt to write just one longer (12-page) paper that would be due Nov. 24.  This is a good option if there is a topic you want to explore in more detail.  If you choose this option, you must decide early and follow the alternate schedule as indicated in the Course Schedule.

8 Weekly Response Papers and Final Journal of 14 Response Papers:  These 1- to 2-page papers (and no more than two pages!) are due at the beginning of each class session. Students should write a minimum of eight papers, four of which must be written before October 6.   They will not be individually graded throughout the semester, but rather will be marked on a ?system, but their revision and inclusion in the final journal will
be graded.  To qualify towards the fulfillment of this requirement, these papers must be ready for submission at the beginning of the class session on the day that we are to discuss the relevant reading.  Because these reading-response papers are intended to aid in class discussion, I will not be able to accept late submissions.

At the end of the semester, students should compile these papers and submit them with an additional seven entries as a class journal.  Students are welcome to revise the papers in the course of the semester.  A grade will be given to the final journal.  Both original and revised versions of response papers should be included in the journal. A Note on Writing Format:  All writing assignments should be double-spaced and printed in 12-point font with one-inch margins.  They should be well-written, spell-checked, and proofread for grammar and content.  Papers that do not satisfy these expectations may be returned and considered not eligible for completion of the requirement. Grading (on a +/- scale)

First Essay: 30%
Second Essay: 30%
Journal: 30% (includes timely submission of quality response papers)
Class Participation: 10%

Religious Holidays:
Special accommodations can be made if a student must miss class due to a religious holiday.  Please notify me as soon as possible and, in accordance with university policy, no later than two weeks prior to the relevant holiday and anticipated absence.

Accommodations: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-6441 TTY.

A Note on Classroom Etiquette:
   * Please display basic respect for classmates' questions, opinions, and arguments.  Especially in large classes, good discussion is dependent upon a general atmosphere of openness, tolerance, and respect.   
* Please turn off all cell phones before coming into the classroom, and make an effort to avoid other distracting behavior (talking to one another during lecture, arriving late, leaving early, etc.).
   * Laptop computers are allowed solely for the purpose of note-taking.  Any violation of this policy by one student will result in the loss of the privilege to use computers for all students.

Academic Integrity:
Academic integrity will be taken very seriously in this course.  Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure of the assignment, failure in the course, and/or dismissal from the University.  For an overview of University policy regarding scholastic dishonesty, see the website of Student Judicial Services.

COURSE SCHEDULE:


Unit 1: INTRODUCTION AND ENLIGHTENMENT?

Week 1, August 26: Introduction
           W: Introduction to Course, Discussion of Syllabus
  
Week 2, Aug. 1-Sept. 3:
   Reading:     M: Kant, "An Answer to the Question: 'What is Enlightenment?'" (on E-  Reserves)
           W: Kant, "Universal History" (excerpts on E-Reserves)

Week 3, Sept. 7-9:
   Reading:    M: Bentham (on E-Reserves)
           W: Wordsworth ("Preface" and "Tinturn Abbey") (on E-Reserves)

          UNIT 2: ROMANTICISM AND DIALECTICS

Week 4,  September 14-16:
   Reading:    M: Schleiermacher (on E-Reserves)
           W: Hegel, Reason in History, 10-49

Week 5, Sept. 21-23:
   Reading:    M: Hegel, Reason in History, 49-67
           W: Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling, 41-82

Week 6, Sept. 28-30:    
    Reading:    M: Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling, 83-108
           W: Peer Review -- in-class (thesis paragraphs and outlines)
          Option II: Paper Topic and Bibliography due, one-paragraph justification of the topic (i.e., what do you want to learn, etc.)

              UNIT 3: SOCIALISM,  MATERIALISM, SCIENCE

Week 7, October 5-7:   Radical Politics, Radical Drama
           M: Flexibility Day
           W:  PAPERS DUE
           Saint-Simon (on e-Reserves)

Week 8, October 12-14:
           M: August Comte
           W:  Woyzeck

Week 9, October 19-21:
   Reading:      M: Marx, in Marx-Engels Reader, 67-93
           W: Marx in  Marx-Engels Reader, 294-329
           Option II: Introduction and Complete Outlines Due

Week 10, October 26-28:
   Reading:    M: Darwin (E-Reserves)
           W: Spencer (E-Reserves)

Week 11, November 2-4:
   Reading:    M: Mill, On Liberty, pp. 1-15; The Subjection of Women, pp. 123-173
           W: Culture Shock

  UNIT 4: ART AND CRITICISM

Week 12, November 9-11
   Reading:    M: Schopenhauer Excerpt (on E-Reserves); Wagner (viewing)
           W:  Rough Drafts Due, Options I and II, in-class peer review

  Week 13, November 16-18:
   Reading:    M: Nietzsche, The Gay Science, Book 4
           W: Nietzsche, The Gay Science, Book 5

Week 14, November 23-25:
   M: PAPERS DUE
   Reading:    M: Lou Andreas-Salomé (on E-Reserves)
                 Helene Stöcker (on E-Reserves)
                 Nelly Melin (on E-Reserves)
           W:  Selections from the Universal Races Congress (on E-Reserves)

Week 15, November 30-December 2:
   Reading:    M: flexibility day (maybe we could read Freud or Durkheim, students choose!)
   Discussion:    W: Nineteenth Century: A Century of the Nation or a Century of Cosmopolitanism?

RECOMMENDED READING:


Nineteenth-Century Surveys:
   Roland Stromberg, European Intellectual History Since 1789
   Joan Neuberger, Europe and the Making of Modernity, 1815-1914
   Peter Gay, Schnitzler's Century

   J. W. Burrow, The Crisis of Reason: European Thought, 1848-1914

Histories of the Self:
   Jerrold Seigel, The Idea of the Self: Thought and Experience in Western Europe since the Seventeenth Century
   Charles Taylor, Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity
   Raymond Martin and John Barese, The Rise and Fall of Soul and Self: An Intellectual History of Personal Identity
   Donald Kelley, The Descent of Ideas: The History of Intellectual History
   Dominick LaCapra, Rethinking Intellectual History

T C 302 • A History Of The Self-W

43700 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 9:30AM-11:00AM CRD 007A

A History of the Self
TC 302, Fall 2009
Professor: Tracie Matysik

Course Description:
What does it mean to say "I," and where does that "I" come from?  Does the self, or the
I, exist in the body, or is it something purely mental and immaterial?  Do I have one
self that stays with me over time, or do I constantly generate a new self with all my
actions and thoughts?  And how do social forces inform the shaping of the self?  What
happens if I lose my self?  Or if part of my self is unconscious or beyond my control?
Importantly, why does it matter how we understand the self?  That is, what implications
does our conception of the self and its stability or instability have for our
understanding of political, cultural, and historical developments? This course examines
these questions and their evolution throughout the twentieth century.  It asks how and
especially why people have thought about the formation of the self -- and its dissolution
-- over time, and about the changing historical circumstances that have motivated
thinkers to return constantly anew to the matter. While we will work primarily with
European philosophical and social-theoretical traditions, we will also read and discuss
more literary and historical texts that help us to see what the stakes have been in
historically-specific approaches to understanding the self.

Course Expectations:    Reading: Each week there will be a substantial primary source
reading.  Individual books are available for purchase at the University Co-op.  Readings
that are not available for purchase at the Co-op will be available on E-Reserves.

The individual books to be bought at the University Co-op are:
Nick Mansfield, Subjectivity: Theories of the Self from Freud to Haraway (New York: New
York University Press, 2000).
Friedrich Nietzsche, On the Genealogy of Morality, trans. Maudemarie Clark and Alan J.
Swensen (Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing, 1998).
Sigmund Freud, The Ego and the Id, trans. Joan Riviere (New York: Norton, 1989).
René Descartes, Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy, trans. Donald
A. Cress (Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing, 1999).

Participation:  Regular attendance and participation in class discussions is required.
Absences will be excused only for documented family and medical emergency (doctor's note,
obituary, etc.), or religious holiday.  One unexcused absence will be overlooked.  Each
subsequent unexcused absence will result in a half-grade deduction to the participation
grade.  No student attending less than twenty sessions without documented excuse will
pass the class.  Please note: a strong participation grade is not dependent on attendance
alone, but on active and constructive contributions to class discussion and activities.
Assignments

(1) Two five-page papers.  You will be responsible to define the topics of your papers,
but we will talk in class about how to do that.  These papers will be written in phases,
consisting of outlines, rough drafts, and final drafts.  Please see hand-out for more
details.

(2) One oral report and text.  Each student will be responsible to introduce one of our
authors to the class, and to provide a reading of the relevant text that situates the
text in the context of our general inquiry into the history of the self.  Please see
hand-out for more details.

(3) Weekly Response Papers and Final Journal:  These 1- to 2-page papers (and no more
than two pages!) are due at the beginning of each class session. Students should write a
minimum of ten papers, five of which must be written by October 8, and one of which must
be written already for August 31. These response papers will not be individually graded
throughout the semester, but rather will be marked on a ?system.  A grade will be given
solely for the timely submission of the papers. To qualify towards the fulfillment of
this requirement, these papers must be ready for submission at the beginning of the class
session on the day that we are to discuss the relevant reading.  Because these
reading-response papers are intended to aid in class discussion, I will not be able to
accept late submissions.   At the end of the semester, students should compile these
papers and submit them in sum as a class journal.  Students are welcome to revise the
papers in the course of the semester.  A grade will be given to the final journal. A Note
on Writing Format:  All writing assignments should be double-spaced and printed in
12-point font with one-inch margins.  They should be well-written, spell-checked, and
proofread for grammar and content. 

Grading (on +/- scale)
Two five-page papers                                         40% (each at 20%)
One oral report    (10-15 minutes, with text)        10% for oral report / 20% for paper
Ten weekly response papers (1 page)                   10%             
A Final Journal or Take-Home Exam                      10%
Class Participation:                                             10%

Religious Holidays:
Special accommodations can be made if a student must miss class due to a religious
holiday.  Please notify me as soon as possible and, in accordance with university policy,
no later than two weeks prior to the relevant holiday and anticipated absence.

Accommodations: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate
academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information,
contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-6441 TTY.

Academic Integrity:
Academic integrity will be taken very seriously in this course.  Students who violate
University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties,
including the possibility of failure of the assignment, failure in the course, and/or
dismissal from the University.  For an overview of University policy regarding scholastic
dishonesty, see the website of Student Judicial Services.

A Note on Classroom Etiquette:
   * Please display basic respect for classmates' questions, opinions, and arguments.    Especially in seminars, good discussion is dependent upon a general atmosphere of openness, tolerance, and respect.    
* Please turn off all cell phones before coming into the classroom, and make an effort to avoid other distracting behavior (talking to one another, arriving late, departing early, etc.).
   * Computers will be allowed solely for purposes of note-taking.  Any violation of this policy by one individual will result in a general ban on computers in the classroom for all.


COURSE SCHEDULE (subject to change depending on the rate and direction of our discussions)

Week 1, August 26: Introduction
           W: Introduction to Course, Discussion of Syllabus

Week 2, August 31-Sept. 2              
           M:     Mansfield, 1-12
               Eghigian et al., intro to the Osiris issue (on E-Reserves)
           W:    Library Day: Meet in PCL 1.124 (lower level)

Week 3, Sept. 7-9
           M: NO ClASS -- LABOR DAY
           W:      Descartes, Meditations, pp. 59-81 (Meditations 1-3)
               Mansfield, pp. 13-24

Week 4,  September 15-17:
           M:      Descartes, Meditations, pp.  81-103 (Meditations 4-5)
           W:    Nietzsche, Genealogy, pp. 1-33
               Mansfield, pp. 55-58

Week 5, Sept. 22-24:
            M:    Nietzsche, Genealogy, pp. 46-66
           W:    Kafka, "In the Penal Colony" (on E-Reserves)

Week 6, Sept. 29-Oct. 1:
           M:     Freud, Ego and the Id, pp. 3-36
               Mansfield, 25-37
           W:    Freud, Ego and the Id, pp.  37-62

Week 7, October 6- 8:           
           M:    Kafka, The Trial
           W:    Schnitzler, Fräulein Else (on E-Reserves) (possibly to be replaced by
Hugo von Hofmannsthal, "Letter of Lord Chandos" (also on E-Reserves)
               Paper Outlines Due (in-class peer review)

Week 8, October 13-15:
           M:    Kojeve (on E-Reserves)
           W:    Full Paper Drafts Due (in-class peer review)

Week 9, October 20-22:
           M:    Sartre , "A New, Authentic Way of Being Oneself" (on E-Reserves)
           W:    Camus, "An Absurd Reasoning" (on E-Reserves)
               Full Papers Due (Final)

Week 10, October 27-29:
           M:    Lacan, "The Mirror Stage" (on E-Reserves)
               Joan Copjec, "Supposing the Subject" (on E-Reserves)
               Mansfield, 38-50
           W:      Althusser, "Ideological State Apparatuses) (on E-Reserves) (possibly
to be substituted by Z(iz(ek)

Week 11, November 3-5:
           M:    Beckett, "Not I" (on E-Reserves)
               Excerpt on trauma (on E-Reserves)
           W:    Foucault (on E-Reserves)
               Mansfield, 51-65

Week 12, November 10-12:
           M:    Foucault (on E-Reserves)
           W:    Fanon, Black Skin, White Mask, excerpt (on E-Reserves)
               Mansfield, 118-135

Week 13, November 17-19:
           M:    Spivak, "Can the Subaltern Speak?" (on E-Reserves)
           W:    Paper Outlines Due (in-class peer review)
                  
Week 14, November 24-26:
           M:    Donna Haraway, "Cyborg Manifesto" (on E-Reserves)
               Mansfield, 148-161
           W:    David Cronenberg, Existenz
               Paper Drafts Due (in-class peer review)               

Week 15, December 1-3:
           M:    David Cronenberg,  Existenz
               Mansfield, 162-180
           W:    Final Papers Due
               Wrap-up discussion

EUS 347 • Eur Intel Hist,Enlght-Nietzs-W

36690 • Fall 2008
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM GAR 2.108

Please check back for updates.

HIS 350L • Marx And Nietzsche-W

40145 • Spring 2008
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM GAR 2.104

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 350L • The Enlightenment-W

39690 • Spring 2007
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM ESB 133

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 350L • Marx And Nietzsche-W

38870 • Spring 2006
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM MEZ 1.122

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 383 • History And Social Theory

39130 • Spring 2006
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM PAR 8A

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

HIS 309L • Western Civ In Modern Times

38170 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM UTC 3.122

Course Overview: In this course, we examine the central cultural characteristics of the Western heritage after the Reformation and discuss their transformation up to the present. A chronological narrative of the history in question will be provided by the lecturer and the textbook, but the most significant portion of our time together will be devoted to the examination of a number of central questions within western society since the Reformation. We will attempt to formulate an understanding of “western civilization” and its central concerns and transformations, with a particular attention paid to economy and politics in their relationships to culture and freedom. We will discuss such issues as the construction of political authority and its relationship to emerging conceptions of political liberty, revolution, popular sovereignty, and political economy. We will examine and explain the emergence of the central characteristics of modern Western society, including mass society, democracy, colonialism, secularism, political sovereignty, and the nation-state. Focus in the course is away from memorization of factual information about European history and toward reading, discussion, interpretation and criticism of texts that exemplify certain moments in the western tradition. By reading, discussing, analyzing and criticizing these sources, students will receive an introduction to the tasks involved in “thinking like a historian.”

 

Prerequisites:  Students taking this course are assumed to be capable of an informed, critical stance toward the claims of the lecturer. No previous knowledge of the subject matter is assumed.

 

Possible Texts:

 

Mark Kishlansky et al., Civilization in the West, vol. 2

Jean Calvin, Golden Book of the True Christian Life

John Locke, Second Treatise of Government

Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders

Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations (selections)

Émile Zola, The Ladies’ Paradise

Ernst Jünger, Storm of Steel

J. M. Keynes, The End of Laissez-Faire / Economic Consequences of the Peace (selections)

Franz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth

Milton Friedman, Capitalism and Freedom (selections)

Additional readings will be distributed in class or are available on the Internet

 

Assignments & Grading:

 

Compliance with syllabus policy 0%

Compliance with attendance policy 0%

Paper 1 @ 15%

Paper 2 @ 25%

Final paper @ 30%

Average of regular quizzes @ 30% each (I will drop your two lowest scores)

 

HIS 350L • Hist/Unconscious In Mod Eur-W

38625 • Fall 2005
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 107

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 309L • Western Civ In Modern Times

36880 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM UTC 3.110

Course Overview: In this course, we examine the central cultural characteristics of the Western heritage after the Reformation and discuss their transformation up to the present. A chronological narrative of the history in question will be provided by the lecturer and the textbook, but the most significant portion of our time together will be devoted to the examination of a number of central questions within western society since the Reformation. We will attempt to formulate an understanding of “western civilization” and its central concerns and transformations, with a particular attention paid to economy and politics in their relationships to culture and freedom. We will discuss such issues as the construction of political authority and its relationship to emerging conceptions of political liberty, revolution, popular sovereignty, and political economy. We will examine and explain the emergence of the central characteristics of modern Western society, including mass society, democracy, colonialism, secularism, political sovereignty, and the nation-state. Focus in the course is away from memorization of factual information about European history and toward reading, discussion, interpretation and criticism of texts that exemplify certain moments in the western tradition. By reading, discussing, analyzing and criticizing these sources, students will receive an introduction to the tasks involved in “thinking like a historian.”

 

Prerequisites:  Students taking this course are assumed to be capable of an informed, critical stance toward the claims of the lecturer. No previous knowledge of the subject matter is assumed.

 

Possible Texts:

 

Mark Kishlansky et al., Civilization in the West, vol. 2

Jean Calvin, Golden Book of the True Christian Life

John Locke, Second Treatise of Government

Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders

Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations (selections)

Émile Zola, The Ladies’ Paradise

Ernst Jünger, Storm of Steel

J. M. Keynes, The End of Laissez-Faire / Economic Consequences of the Peace (selections)

Franz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth

Milton Friedman, Capitalism and Freedom (selections)

Additional readings will be distributed in class or are available on the Internet

 

Assignments & Grading:

 

Compliance with syllabus policy 0%

Compliance with attendance policy 0%

Paper 1 @ 15%

Paper 2 @ 25%

Final paper @ 30%

Average of regular quizzes @ 30% each (I will drop your two lowest scores)

 

HIS 350L • Marx And Nietzsche-W

37325 • Spring 2005
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 111

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 383 • Knowledge Of History

36040 • Spring 2004
Meets M 5:00PM-8:00PM GAR 107

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

HIS 309L • Western Civ In Modern Times

36230 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM UTC 4.112

Course Overview: In this course, we examine the central cultural characteristics of the Western heritage after the Reformation and discuss their transformation up to the present. A chronological narrative of the history in question will be provided by the lecturer and the textbook, but the most significant portion of our time together will be devoted to the examination of a number of central questions within western society since the Reformation. We will attempt to formulate an understanding of “western civilization” and its central concerns and transformations, with a particular attention paid to economy and politics in their relationships to culture and freedom. We will discuss such issues as the construction of political authority and its relationship to emerging conceptions of political liberty, revolution, popular sovereignty, and political economy. We will examine and explain the emergence of the central characteristics of modern Western society, including mass society, democracy, colonialism, secularism, political sovereignty, and the nation-state. Focus in the course is away from memorization of factual information about European history and toward reading, discussion, interpretation and criticism of texts that exemplify certain moments in the western tradition. By reading, discussing, analyzing and criticizing these sources, students will receive an introduction to the tasks involved in “thinking like a historian.”

 

Prerequisites:  Students taking this course are assumed to be capable of an informed, critical stance toward the claims of the lecturer. No previous knowledge of the subject matter is assumed.

 

Possible Texts:

 

Mark Kishlansky et al., Civilization in the West, vol. 2

Jean Calvin, Golden Book of the True Christian Life

John Locke, Second Treatise of Government

Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders

Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations (selections)

Émile Zola, The Ladies’ Paradise

Ernst Jünger, Storm of Steel

J. M. Keynes, The End of Laissez-Faire / Economic Consequences of the Peace (selections)

Franz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth

Milton Friedman, Capitalism and Freedom (selections)

Additional readings will be distributed in class or are available on the Internet

 

Assignments & Grading:

 

Compliance with syllabus policy 0%

Compliance with attendance policy 0%

Paper 1 @ 15%

Paper 2 @ 25%

Final paper @ 30%

Average of regular quizzes @ 30% each (I will drop your two lowest scores)

 

HIS 350L • Trauma In Modern Europe-W

36630 • Fall 2003
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM PAR 105

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

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  • Center for European Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    158 W 21st Street
    A1800
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-232-3470