Department of Geography and the Environment

Paul C. Adams


ProfessorPh.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

Associate Professor
Paul C. Adams

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-1599
  • Office: CLA 3.410
  • Office Hours: Spring 2015- T/W 11:00-12:00
  • Campus Mail Code: A3100

Interests


Place Images in the Media, Technologically-Mediated Gathering, Topologies of Communication, Geopolitical Discourses, Formation of Subjectivity

Biography


Paul Adams received his Bachelor of Environmental Design from the University of Colorado-Boulder in 1984 (Special Honors), and his MS and Ph.D. in geography from University of Wisconsin-Madison (1990, 1993). Since 2003 he has been Director of the Urban Studies Program and Chair of the Communication Geography Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers. He was a Fulbright Research Fellow at the University of Bergen, Norway, in fall of 2010. He was a visiting Fulbright Fellow and Thomas O. Enders Fellow at McGill University and University of Montreal, Quebec, in fall semester, 2001. 

Adams regularly teaches GRG305, This Human World (introductory human geography) and URB301, Introduction to Urban Studies, as well as URB315, Urban Studies Research Methods and GRG390L, Research in Geography. He has also taught Geographies of the Information Society, Statistics for Policy Design, and graduate seminars addressing geopolitics and representation.

Adams applies various geographical lenses to communication, addressing communication infrastructure, communication as a social process, and communication as an element of individual experience.  

Publications

Adams, P.C. and Gynnild, A. 2013. “Communicating Environmental Messages in Online Media: The Role of Place” Environmental Communication 7 (1): 113-130.

Gynnild, A. and Adams, P.C., 2013. “Animation, Documentary or Interactive Gaming? Exploring Communicative Aspects of Environmental Messaging Online,” International Symposium on Online Journalism 3 (1): 39-60.

Adams, P.C. 2012. “Trajectories of the Nobel Peace Prize” Geopolitics 17 (3): 553-577.

Adams, P.C. and Jansson, A. 2012.“Communication Geography: A Bridge between Disciplines” Communication Theory 22: 298-317.

Adams, P.C. 2012. “Multilayered Regionalization in Northern Europe” GeoJournal 77: 293-313.

Adams, P.C. 2011. A Taxonomy for Communication Geography. Progress in Human Geography 35 (1): 37-57. Find it on SagePub

Adams, P.C.  2010. Networks of Early Writing. Historical Geography 38: 70-89. 

Adams, P.C. 2009. Geographies of Media and Communication: A Critical Introduction. Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. Find it on UT WorldCat

Adams, P.C. 2007. Atlantic Reverberations: French Representations of an American Election. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Press.   Find it on UT WorldCat

Adams, P.C. 2007. Technological Change. Guest editor of special issue of Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (1).

Adams, P.C. 2005. The Boundless Self: Communication in Physical and Virtual Spaces. Syracuse, New York: Syracuse University Press. Find it on UT WorldCat

Adams, P.C. 2004. The September 11 Attacks as Viewed from Quebec: The Small-Nation Myth in Geopolitical Discourse. Political Geography 23 (6), 765-795.

Adams, P.C. and Ghose, R. 2003. India.com: the Construction of a Space Between. Progress in Human Geography 27 (4), 414-437. Find it on SagePub

Adams, P.C., Hoelscher, S. and Till, K., editors. 2001. Textures of Place. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Find it on UT WorldCat

 

Courses


GRG 396T • Geopolitics

36740 • Spring 2016
Meets M 5:00PM-8:00PM CLA 3.106
(also listed as SOC 396P)

This seminar examines how power is exercised by large human collectives like empires and states which have the power to act on other large collectives as well as on their own subjects and citizens. Geopolitical power takes many forms, ranging from benign paternalism to warfare. The class develops techniques for critical analysis of geopolitics, including how geopolitical models have been defended philosophically, have guided public policy, and have surfaced in popular culture. Students learn various ways of understanding issues in geopolitics including borders, migration, environmental change, North-South and East-West dynamics, national security, war and peace, scarcity and hunger, and movements empowering minorities and women.

URB 315 • Urban Studies Research Methods

36865 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.108

An introduction to urban studies research methodologies. Includes sources of urban data, the use of the library in urban research, formulating research questions, research design, methods commonly used in urban research, the use of computers to store and manipulate quantitative urban data, and an introduction to data analysis and theoretical and practical applications of urban research. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C or 408K with a grade of at least C-; Mathematics 316 or Statistics and Scientific Computation 305 with a grade of at least C-; and Urban Studies 301.

May be counted toward the writing flag requirement.

Designed to accommodate 35 or fewer students. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

36355-36414 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WCH 1.120

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

URB 315 • Urban Studies Research Methods

36940 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 1.108

An introduction to urban studies research methodologies. Includes sources of urban data, the use of the library in urban research, formulating research questions, research design, methods commonly used in urban research, the use of computers to store and manipulate quantitative urban data, and an introduction to data analysis and theoretical and practical applications of urban research. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C or 408K with a grade of at least C-; Mathematics 316 or Statistics and Scientific Computation 305 with a grade of at least C-; and Urban Studies 301.

May be counted toward the writing flag requirement.

Designed to accommodate 35 or fewer students. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

37480-37535 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM JES A121A

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 356T • Geography Of Media

37620 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.102

Explores the media from a geographical perspective. Geography 356T (Topic: Geography of Media) and 356T (Topic 7) may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

GRG F305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

84210 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM CLA 0.112

GRG f305 THIS HUMAN WORLD: INTRO TO GRG

Introductory survey of human geography, including human-environment relations, cultural patterns and processes, and geography's relation to other fields of study.

May be counted toward the global cultures flag requirement.

Additional hour(s) to be arranged.

URB 315 • Urban Studies Research Methods

38040 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 1.108

An introduction to urban studies research methodologies. Includes sources of urban data, the use of the library in urban research, formulating research questions, research design, methods commonly used in urban research, the use of computers to store and manipulate quantitative urban data, and an introduction to data analysis and theoretical and practical applications of urban research.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C or 408K with a grade of at least C-; Mathematics 316 or Statistics and Scientific Computation 305 with a grade of at least C-; and Urban Studies 301.

May be counted toward the writing flag requirement.

Designed to accommodate 35 or fewer students. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

37725-37780 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WCH 1.120

An introduction to human geography, includes a required weekly discussion section.

GRG 356T • Geography Of Media

37857 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 1.102

A wide-ranging exploration of the ways in which communication media can be understood through geographical ways of knowing.

URB 315 • Urban Studies Research Methods

37750 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CLA 0.128

Meets MWF 2:00-3:00

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

37295-37350 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WCH 1.120

DESCRIPTION

Geography means learning where things are but more importantly it means understanding how and why things got to be where they are. To address these questions goes far beyond simply memorizing place names. It demands that we inquire deeply into the processes behind spatial patterns, including elements of religion, language, politics, and the built environment. Geographical processes also involve the inherent opportunities and constraints offered by the natural environment. This course therefore focuses on the patterns and flows that make culture spatial, while a secondary focus is human-environment interactions. In regard to both foci we take the time to think intensely about what is involved in responsible citizenship.

Students will learn how to think spatially, including the ability to recognize spatial processes and patterns, and the various factors affecting the connections between spatial processes and patterns.

The course includes a 90 minute lecture twice a week and a 1-hour discussion section once a week.

 

TEXTBOOK

 •The Human Mosaic, 11th edition (by Domosh, Neumann, Price and Jordan-Bychkov)

 •Online Supplements at: http://bcs.whfreeman.com/jordan11e/

 •Student Atlas of World Geography, 6th or 7th edition (by John Allen)

 

GRADING:

PARTICIPATION

Students will receive credit for participating in discussions and in-class activities, as well as for quizzes, special campus events and (randomly sampled) attendance.

PROJECTS

Three projects prompt a creative response to issues, ideas and techniques presented in the class.

EXAMS

The three exams are mostly multiple choice format with a few short answer questions.

GRG F305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

84685 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM GRG 102

DESCRIPTION

We all know that geography means learning where things are but more importantly it means understanding how things got where they are, and why they are there. Beyond simply memorizing place names we need to inquire deeply into the processes behind spatial patterns, into roots that include religion, language, politics, and the built environment. Geographical processes also reflect and modify the inherent opportunities and constraints offered by the natural environment. This course therefore focuses on the patterns and flows that make culture spatial, while a secondary focus is human-environment interactions. In regard to both foci we take the time to think intensely about what is involved in responsible citizenship.

 

TEXTBOOK

  • The Human Mosaic, 11th edition (by Domosh, Neumann, Price and Jordan-Bychkov)
  • Online Supplements at: http://bcs.whfreeman.com/jordan11e/
  • Student Atlas of World Geography, 6th edition (by John Allen)

 

GRADING:

PARTICIPATION

This portion of the grade includes a mix of the following: contribution to discussions, in-class activities, quizzes, special events on campus and randomly sampled attendance. 30 pts.

EXAMS

 Exams are mostly multiple choice format with a few short answer questions. 180 pts.

  • Exam 1: 50 pts. (Ch. 1-3 + mapping)
  • Exam 2: 50 pts. (Ch. 4-7)
  • Final Exam: 80 pts. (cumulative)

PROJECTS

This component of the grade see how well you can apply ideas introduced in the lecture through self-directed mapping, research, group problem solving and analytical writing. 90 pts.

  • Project 1: 25 pts.
  • Project 2: 40 pts.
  • Project 3: 25 pts.

300 pts. total

GRG 390L • Research In Geography

37465 • Spring 2012
Meets M 5:00PM-8:00PM GRG 408

Builds on topics explored in Geography 390K by focusing on epistemology and research in the field of geography. Students develop plans for research and write a research proposal. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Required of all first-year graduate students in geography. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Geography 390K.

URB 315 • Urban Studies Research Methods

37600 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 3.116

An introduction to urban studies research methodologies. Includes sources of urban data, the use of the library in urban research, formulating research questions, research design, methods commonly used in urban research, the use of computers to store and manipulate quantitative urban data, and an introduction to data analysis and theoretical and practical applications of urban research. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

37240-37280 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WCH 1.120

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 307C • Introduction To Urban Studies

37305 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM GRG 102

GRG F305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

84660 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM GRG 102

We all know that geography means learning where things are but more importantly it means understanding how things got where they are, and why they are there. Beyond simply memorizing place names we need to inquire deeply into the processes behind spatial patterns, into roots that include religion, language, politics, and the built environment. Geographical processes also reflect and modify the inherent opportunities and constraints offered by the natural environment. This course therefore focuses on the patterns and flows that make culture spatial, while a secondary focus is human-environment interactions. In regard to both foci we take the time to think intensely about what is involved in responsible citizenship.

GRG 390L • Research In Geography

37685 • Spring 2011
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM GRG 408

Research in Geography is designed as the second course in a two-course sequence preparing graduate students to conduct scholarly research.  The course addresses questions of geographical epistemology, ontology, and methodology, as well as providing a forum for the discussion of academic life, competitiveness and professionalism.  The course will include guest presentations from various faculty on the subject of research with attention to grant-writing, conducting fieldwork, analyzing data, utilizing theoretical frameworks, publishing and getting hired.

URB 315 • Urban Studies Research Methods

37815 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 1.126

Urban Studies Research methods is a required core course for Urban Studies majors.  Students develop a research question of a broad and general nature then design their own research projects that will help answer that research question in various ways.  These short, independent, field-based projects develop abilities in applying the following methodologies: structured observation, surveys, interviews, and statistical analysis of secondary data.  Prerequisite: an introductory course in statistical methods, either SSC 305 or M316 with a grade of C- or better.

GRG F305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

84195 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GRG 102

GRG f305 THIS HUMAN WORLD: INTRO TO GRG

Introductory survey of human geography, including human-environment relations, cultural patterns and processes, and geography's relation to other fields of study.

May be counted toward the global cultures flag requirement.

Additional hour(s) to be arranged.

GRG 396T • Geographies Of Communication

37550 • Spring 2010
Meets M 4:00PM-7:00PM GRG 408
  • Communication and Geography intersect in complex ways.
  • Places and spaces are part of the contents of communications.
  • Places and spaces also form diverse contexts for communication.
  • The course will chart a path across the space defined by the two dichotomies: space vs place and content vs context.

Grading
In-class presentations 50 points (Everyone will pick a day and lead the discussion that day, following
the guidelines below.)
Research paper draft 50 points
Due April 19
Research paper 100 points
____________________________________________
Total 200 points

Books
• Adams. Geographies of Media and Communication. Wiley-Blackwell.
• McEwan & Blunt (MB). Postcolonial Geographies. Continuum.
• Latour. Reassembling the Social. Oxford U. Press.
• Adams, Hoelscher & Till (AHT). Textures of Place. U. of Minnesota Press.

In-class presentation guidelines:
Presentations should include:
◊ A summary of the main ideas in the readings for that week, taken as a
whole. This should be organized into key terms and concepts, each with
one or more supplementary terms and/or concepts. This is not the place
to ask questions; it is the place to collect and paraphrase the main
objectives, arguments, and assumptions of the entire set of readings.
Print these points in outline format for everyone in the class.
◊ A critical introduction to each of the readings for that week, taken
individually. This is the place to discuss the organization of arguments by
particular authors--what comes first, what comes last, how are arguments
structured and what counts for evidence? Are you convinced or are there
problems with their arguments?
◊ Comparison and contrast of the differences between authors (if more than
one author is included that week). In some cases you may notice tensions
between the perspectives of the authors. Deal with these tensions at this
point in your presentation
◊ Questions for class discussion: at least 4 fertile questions the class can
discuss, relating to the readings and (optimally) with some visual
materials or artifacts (like ads, news photos, or video clips) that you bring
to class. Remember, this presentation counts for 25% of your total grade!

URB 315 • Urban Studies Research Meths-W

37670 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GRG 424

See PDF

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

37660-37700 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM JGB 2.324

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 390L • Research In Geography

36925 • Spring 2009
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM GRG 408

Builds on topics explored in Geography 390K by focusing on epistemology and research in the field of geography. Students develop plans for research and write a research proposal.

Required of all first-year graduate students in geography.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Geography 390K.

URB 315 • Urban Studies Research Meths-W

37060 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 1.126

An introduction to urban studies research methodologies. Includes sources of urban data, the use of the library in urban research, formulating research questions, research design, methods commonly used in urban research, the use of computers to store and manipulate quantitative urban data, and an introduction to data analysis and theoretical and practical applications of urban research. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C or 408K with a grade of at least C-; Mathematics 316 or Statistics and Scientific Computation 305 with a grade of at least C-; and Urban Studies 301.

May be counted toward the writing flag requirement.

Designed to accommodate 35 or fewer students. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

37890-37945 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 2.102A

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

38290-38345 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 1.308

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 396T • Geopolitics And Representation

37305 • Spring 2007
Meets T 9:00AM-12:00PM GRG 408

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic description: Aspects of soil geomorphology: soil formation, earth surface processes (erosion, sedimentation, and salinization) soil sustai nability, and landscape interactions in the Mediterranean, Mexico, and t he American Corn Belt. Will explore management and policy, soil interact ions in watersheds, and field and laboratory methods through readings, l abs, and field trips.

MEETS WITH LAS 388.

URB 315 • Urban Studies Research Meths-W

37490 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GRG 424

An introduction to urban studies research methodologies. Includes sources of urban data, the use of the library in urban research, formulating research questions, research design, methods commonly used in urban research, the use of computers to store and manipulate quantitative urban data, and an introduction to data analysis and theoretical and practical applications of urban research. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C or 408K with a grade of at least C-; Mathematics 316 or Statistics and Scientific Computation 305 with a grade of at least C-; and Urban Studies 301.

May be counted toward the writing flag requirement.

Designed to accommodate 35 or fewer students. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

37975-38030 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 1.308

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG F305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

85315 • Summer 2006
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GRG 102

GRG f305 THIS HUMAN WORLD: INTRO TO GRG

Introductory survey of human geography, including human-environment relations, cultural patterns and processes, and geography's relation to other fields of study.

May be counted toward the global cultures flag requirement.

Additional hour(s) to be arranged.

GRG 356T • Geography: Information Society

36165 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM GRG 424

Please check back for updates.

GRG 396T • Place, Politics, And Culture

36335 • Spring 2006
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM GRG 408

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic description: Aspects of soil geomorphology: soil formation, earth surface processes (erosion, sedimentation, and salinization) soil sustai nability, and landscape interactions in the Mediterranean, Mexico, and t he American Corn Belt. Will explore management and policy, soil interact ions in watersheds, and field and laboratory methods through readings, l abs, and field trips.

MEETS WITH LAS 388.

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

36005-36060 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 1.308

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 356T • Geography: Information Society

34709 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM GRG 424

Please check back for updates.

GRG 396T • Place, Politics, And Culture

34875 • Spring 2005
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM GRG 408

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic description: Aspects of soil geomorphology: soil formation, earth surface processes (erosion, sedimentation, and salinization) soil sustai nability, and landscape interactions in the Mediterranean, Mexico, and t he American Corn Belt. Will explore management and policy, soil interact ions in watersheds, and field and laboratory methods through readings, l abs, and field trips.

MEETS WITH LAS 388.

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

35670-35725 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 1.308

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 305 • This Human World-Intro Grg-Fra

33352 • Spring 2004

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 356T • Geography: Information Socty-W

33500 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GRG 316

Please check back for updates.

GRG 374 • Frontiers In Geography-W

33575 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WMB 4.118

Course Objective and Subjects

The primary objective of this course is to provide you a ‘working understanding’ of the contemporary nature of Geography, which means I am interested in considering Geography as it is practiced. My department expects this course, Frontiers in Geography, to be a ‘capstone’ experience, although none of us really knows what that means. It can be interpreted in a variety of ways and the faculty of our department have tried many of them while teaching this course, based to a great extent upon their own respective personal and academic histories, styles, personalities, and general sense of what is important and what is not. None of them are wrong.

The route I have chosen is a ‘working understanding’, which it is hoped, will complement and supplement what you have been studying for these last few years.

I begin with the simplest of questions—What is Geography?—and then provide a set of fundamentals that will help answer the question, thus providing a ‘working’ understanding:

 It is a set of concepts

 It is a frame for study

 It is a discipline

 It is a university subject

 It is a job

1)  Concepts. In this section we provide an overview of the nature of the discipline—“what are the fundamental precepts that define Geography?” To some extent this is a summary and gathering together of ideas that surround what you have been doing for the last few years as a Geography major. At the same time it is my opportunity to stress my favorite geo-concept: Place, perhaps along with space, its little stepsister.

2) Frame. We use these concepts to help frame our study of geographic processes, especially in terms of the patterns of human activity. Such a framing will help illuminate the essences of these processes.  For the purposes of this class we will focus primarily on ‘place’ in research focused on the example of tourism. The focus of your final capstone paper and most of your readings will be here, therefore, on the subject called “A Geography of Tourism”, framed within the concept of place.

3) Discipline. We will discuss Geography as a contemporary academic discipline in terms of its history, associations, journals, and departments.

4) University. The heart and history of a discipline begins with the university. Here we will talk about the contemporary nature of the American University, especially in this contentious political and economic era; issues of note at the national, state, and UT levels will be discussed.  We do so to understand the home of Geography, but we will spend time on issues that may not have immediate relevance to our discipline.

5) Job. Several of you will be disappointed that this course is not centered on getting you a job.  In fact, we won’t spend much time on the subject at all.  Why?  Because basically it is not within my purview; the truth be known, I don’t know much about that subject, which is true of most of my colleagues.  This goes back to our subject of the University (above); more on that later. But we will not ignore it.  We will work on your resumes, discuss ways you can aggressively engage the lousy market out there, consider issues of cover letters and interviewing, and we will bring people into the classroom who can help provide us some practicalities of the search.  We will also discuss graduate school.  Here I can help much more, although if the past is any predictor fewer than five or six of you will be immediately interested.  We’ll play that one by ear.

The discussion of these five issues will be linear in the most general sense, but because they are often so closely intertwined we will integrate them at times. Also, I cannot assign a specific amount of time for each subject—although the system often asks that I do—because we reserve the right to spend more or less time on individual subjects as we see fit, once we are there. No worries; it will work.

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

34240-34265 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WEL 1.308

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 356T • Geography: Information Socty-W

33190 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GRG 102

Please check back for updates.

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

33720-33760 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM FAC 21

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 374 • Frontiers In Geography-W

33905 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GRG 408

Course Objective and Subjects

The primary objective of this course is to provide you a ‘working understanding’ of the contemporary nature of Geography, which means I am interested in considering Geography as it is practiced. My department expects this course, Frontiers in Geography, to be a ‘capstone’ experience, although none of us really knows what that means. It can be interpreted in a variety of ways and the faculty of our department have tried many of them while teaching this course, based to a great extent upon their own respective personal and academic histories, styles, personalities, and general sense of what is important and what is not. None of them are wrong.

The route I have chosen is a ‘working understanding’, which it is hoped, will complement and supplement what you have been studying for these last few years.

I begin with the simplest of questions—What is Geography?—and then provide a set of fundamentals that will help answer the question, thus providing a ‘working’ understanding:

 It is a set of concepts

 It is a frame for study

 It is a discipline

 It is a university subject

 It is a job

1)  Concepts. In this section we provide an overview of the nature of the discipline—“what are the fundamental precepts that define Geography?” To some extent this is a summary and gathering together of ideas that surround what you have been doing for the last few years as a Geography major. At the same time it is my opportunity to stress my favorite geo-concept: Place, perhaps along with space, its little stepsister.

2) Frame. We use these concepts to help frame our study of geographic processes, especially in terms of the patterns of human activity. Such a framing will help illuminate the essences of these processes.  For the purposes of this class we will focus primarily on ‘place’ in research focused on the example of tourism. The focus of your final capstone paper and most of your readings will be here, therefore, on the subject called “A Geography of Tourism”, framed within the concept of place.

3) Discipline. We will discuss Geography as a contemporary academic discipline in terms of its history, associations, journals, and departments.

4) University. The heart and history of a discipline begins with the university. Here we will talk about the contemporary nature of the American University, especially in this contentious political and economic era; issues of note at the national, state, and UT levels will be discussed.  We do so to understand the home of Geography, but we will spend time on issues that may not have immediate relevance to our discipline.

5) Job. Several of you will be disappointed that this course is not centered on getting you a job.  In fact, we won’t spend much time on the subject at all.  Why?  Because basically it is not within my purview; the truth be known, I don’t know much about that subject, which is true of most of my colleagues.  This goes back to our subject of the University (above); more on that later. But we will not ignore it.  We will work on your resumes, discuss ways you can aggressively engage the lousy market out there, consider issues of cover letters and interviewing, and we will bring people into the classroom who can help provide us some practicalities of the search.  We will also discuss graduate school.  Here I can help much more, although if the past is any predictor fewer than five or six of you will be immediately interested.  We’ll play that one by ear.

The discussion of these five issues will be linear in the most general sense, but because they are often so closely intertwined we will integrate them at times. Also, I cannot assign a specific amount of time for each subject—although the system often asks that I do—because we reserve the right to spend more or less time on individual subjects as we see fit, once we are there. No worries; it will work.

GRG F305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

85085 • Summer 2002
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GRG 102

GRG f305 THIS HUMAN WORLD: INTRO TO GRG

Introductory survey of human geography, including human-environment relations, cultural patterns and processes, and geography's relation to other fields of study.

May be counted toward the global cultures flag requirement.

Additional hour(s) to be arranged.

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

32985-33025 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM FAC 21

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 356T • Intro Technol/Literacy/Cul-W

33185 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GRG 102

Please check back for updates.

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