History Department
History Department

Jennifer V Ebbeler


Associate ProfessorPhD 2001, University of Pennsylvania

Jennifer V Ebbeler

Contact

Courses


C C S302 • Intro To Ancient Rome-Wb

81023 • Summer 2016

This introductory-level, fully online course covers the cultural and political history of Ancient Rome from the city’s origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BCE) to the height of its imperial power in the 2nd century CE. Students will have the opportunity to learn about Rome’s evolution from a small, hilltop settlement to the most powerful city in Italy to the head of a world empire. The course is made up of textbook readings, primary source readings and objects, and ten highly interactive, multimedia content modules. Upon completion of the course, you will be familiar with the most important buildings, artistic works, events and historical figures that shaped the history of ancient Rome.

Successful completion of this course fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts (VAPA) requirement.  The course also carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 302 • Intro To Ancient Rome-Wb

32141 • Spring 2016

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.



LAT 323 • Sallust

32580 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.108

This course will focus on Sallust’s account of the Second Catilinarian Conspiracy in Rome.  This conspiracy took place during Cicero’s consulship in 63 BC and was supposedly led by the disaffected and impoverished patrician Catiline.  We are told that Catiline gathered together his fellow disaffected patricians as well as other debt-ridden citizens with the intention of overthrowing the ruling aristocracy and forgiving debts.  Cicero and Sallust both report the details of the conspiracy—Cicero in four speeches and Sallust in his monograph titled Bellum Catilinae.   We will read Sallust’s Latin text, with careful attention to syntax and morphology.  As well, we will read a selection of primary and secondary sources on the conspiracy, to stimulate discussion and analysis of Sallust’s treatment of the events.  In particular, we will pay attention to the figure of Catiline in both Cicero’s speeches and Sallust’s monograph.

At the start of the semester, we will attempt to cover 7-15 lines of Latin.  As the semester progresses, I will gradually increase assignments to cover c. 40 lines of Latin by the end of the semester.  Your final grade will be determined by your performance on: 2 midterm exams; article summary and discussion; 5-7 page paper on some aspect of Sallust’s rhetoric; 5-7 page paper on some historical aspect of the conspiracy

C C 302 • Intro To Ancient Rome-Wb

32130-32133 • Fall 2015

This introductory-level, fully online course covers the cultural and political history of Ancient Rome from the city’s origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BCE) to the height of its imperial power in the 2nd century CE. Students will have the opportunity to learn about Rome’s evolution from a small, hilltop settlement to the most powerful city in Italy to the head of a world empire. The course is made up of textbook readings, primary source readings and objects, and ten highly interactive, multimedia content modules. Students will be able to work through the modules at their own pace within a period of 7-10 days.   Each module concludes with a practice quiz, so that students can evaluate their progress and identify misunderstandings with the help of the course instructor.  Each week, students will take a graded, 20 question quiz based on the content from the week’s modules.  There are three graded midterms which will be scheduled in the evening and held on the UT Austin campus.  Students must take the midterm exams on campus or at an approved testing center.  Throughout the semester, the instructor will provide feedback to each student on various assignments, tests, and exercises throughout the course. Upon completion of the course, you will be familiar with the most important buildings, artistic works, events and historical figures that shaped the history of ancient Rome.

Course grades will be determined by performance on: modules (completion) and graded quizzes; 3 midterm exams; short, weekly assignments; and a movie module. The course is offered on demand. With the exception of the three midterm exams, the course can be done on the student’s own schedule (asynchronously).  There are deadlines for all assignments, but students will have the opportunity to work on those assignments when they want to, provided they are handed in by the listed due date.  There will also be optional, weekly, in person (and live-streamed) review sessions as well as exam reviews prior to each midterm exam.  There are no prerequisites.

Successful completion of this course fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts (VAPA) requirement.  The course also carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

33195 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A121A

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.



C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

33245 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A121A

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.



C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

33125 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A121A

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.



LAT 390 • Inventing Trajan

33645 • Spring 2013
Meets T 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 10

LAT 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Roman studies. Topics given in recent years include Roman comedy, Pliny, and Roman fragmentary historians.

LAT 398T • Supervised Teaching In Latin

33655 • Spring 2013
Meets F 1:00PM-4:00PM WAG 10

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to methods of teaching, especially introductory and intermediate Latin classes. Topics will include planning the course and devising the syllabus, presenting lessons, assigning and evaluating homework, making up and grading quizzes and exams, and other matters of importance.

Grading will be based on class participation and a number of projects.

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

33005 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM JES A121A
(also listed as CTI 310)

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD. In general, individual lectures will closely follow the narrative of the course textbook and will trace out a chronology of important events, with some attention to the broader significance of these events.  Lectures will also explore such aspects of Roman culture as religion, the theater, slavery, gladiatorial games, and the relationship between the Roman state and the Christian church.  These textbook-based lectures will be pre-recorded and available online.  Students will be expected to listen to them prior to class.  Class time will be devoted to the presentation and careful analysis of famous “case studies” from Roman history (e.g. Aeneas’ departure from Carthage; the suicide of Lucretia; the assassination of Julius Caesar).  As a group, we will look carefully at our evidence for these events in substantial detail in order to better understand the ethical complexities at work.  Fridays will be reserved for the review of the at-home readings and lecture-viewings.  Exam weeks will likewise be devoted to review and preparation for the exams. 

 

By the end of the semester, you will be familiar with the most important events and historical figures that shaped the history of Rome from its origins as a small city in Italy to its emergence as a world power.  As well, you will have learned how to analyze historical events from the perspective of a student of ethics.  Your final grade will be determined by attendance/quizzes; your performance on four non-cumulative midterms; and a short review of Stanley Kubrick’s Spartacus.  In lieu of a cumulative final exam, students will be required to produce a 5-page ethical analysis of a case study.  The topic will be distributed on the last day of class.  There are no prerequisites for this course and it is assumed that students are new to the course material.  This course carries a global cultures flag and an ethics flag. 

 

Required Textbook

 

Boatwright, Mary T., et al., The Romans: From Village to Empire, 2nd Ed. (Oxford: OUP, 2012).  Pb.

ISBN 978-0-19-973057-5

Iclicker

ISBN 978-0-71-6779391

 

 

REQUIRED

LAT 383 • Grad Rdng: Latin Prose

33485 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM WAG 10

Latin 383 is an intensive prose reading course intended for MA students in Classics and related disciplines who wish to improve their ability to read Latin accurately and at speed.  Students should already have a firm grasp of Latin morphology and syntax as well as significant experience with Latin prose before attempting this course.  You will be expected to prepare a substantial amount of Latin for each class meeting (c. 300 lines/week).  Although the focus of the course will be on acquainting students with the several important Late Republican texts, we will also spend some time with the Imperial Latin Prose of Seneca the Elder.  Class meetings will be devoted to close translation of selected passages from the prepared assignments; detailed review of Latin syntax; and sight reading.  By the end of the semester, students will be able to read quickly and with a strong grasp of Classical Latin syntax.  Your grade will be determined by your performance on 2 midterm exams, a comprehensive final exam, and class participation.

 

Required Texts (available at The Co-op or Amazon.com)

 

Cynthia Damon, ed.  Nepos: Life of Atticus (Bryn Mawr Classical Commentaries, 1993).

John T. Ramsey, ed.  Cicero, Philippics I-II  (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003). 

William A. Edward, ed. Seneca the Elder: Suasoriae (Duckworth, 2002).

P. McGushin, ed.  Sallust: Bellum Catilinae (Duckworth, 2008).

LAT 365 • Nero

33462 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 112
(also listed as LAT 385)

The Emperor Nero's controversial life and reign are well-documented in both the literary and material record.  This course will introduce students to our most important extant sources in Latin for Nero's life and reign: the biographer Suetonius, the historian Tacitus, and the philosopher Seneca.  In addition to reading significant selections of Latin from each of these writers, we will read and discuss a range of secondary articles and will devote some time to the study of Nero's extensive rebuilding of Rome following the devastating fire of 64 AD.  Besides gaining a deep knowledge of Nero and his time in power, students will finish this course with improved skills in source criticism (i.e. identifying and explaining authorial bias).  

Final grades will be determined by performance on two translation exams; regular attendance and participation in class meetings; in-class presentations; a commentary project; and a final paper of c. 20 pp.

 

 

NOTE: meets with LAT 365; description same except for requirements, as follow:

 

Final grades will be determined by performance on two translation exams; regular attendance and participation in class meetings; in-class presentations; and a final paper of c. 15 pp.

LAT 398T • Supervised Teaching In Latin

33510 • Spring 2012
Meets F 1:00PM-4:00PM WAG 10

This course will prepare graduate students to teach beginning and intermediate level Latin courses as Assistant Instructors.   Hands-on experience in classroom instruction is an essential component of graduate training.  This course will instruct you in the basic skills necessary to be a successful and effective Latin instructor.  We will begin with a brief overview of the Latin curriculum at the University of Texas, Austin, with special attention to the structure and goals of the beginning and intermediate courses within the Latin undergraduate curriculum. Many aspects of the course will be pragmatic: we will practice writing syllabi, with thoughtful discussion of how to communicate expectations, comply with University policy and Texas state law, and effectively measure a students’ performance and readiness for the next level of Latin.  We will practice writing quizzes and exams, with attention to strategies for assigning points, giving partial credit, etc.  We will read about and discuss effective pedagogical techniques for introducing new material and drilling older material. Graduate students will leave this class with knowledge of a range of exercises and drills that can be used in the Latin classroom.  They will be taught how to run a student-centered, active classroom.  Graduate students will be introduced to strategies for effective classroom management.  They will be informed of University rules and regulations concerning cheating; managing difficult students, and the like.  Students will also be introduced to the mental health resources available on campus in case of a mental health emergency.

 

Observation, mentoring, and hands-on practice will be an integral feature of the class.  Graduate students will work closely with a current mentor AI and will regularly attend their class and, at times, teach part or all of a class session.  In this way, concepts learned in the class will immediately be put to the test in a “live” classroom.  This class will NOT be a review of First Year Latin.  Students are expected to have mastered the material covered in Wheelock’s Latin prior to the start of the semester.

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

32885 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM FAC 21
(also listed as CTI 310)

This course provides an introductory survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its shocking sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.  There are no prerequisites for this course.  Individual lectures will trace out a chronology of important events, with some attention to the broader significance of these events.  There will be occasional interludes for exploring such aspects of Roman culture as religion, the theater, slavery, gladiatorial games, and the relationship between the Roman state and the Christian church.  By the end of the semester, you will be familiar with the most important events and historical figures who shaped the history of Rome from its origins as a small city in Italy to its emergence as a world power.

C C 383 • Roman Africa

33030 • Fall 2011
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as LAT 390)

Required Texts (available at amazon.com and other online booksellers)

 

  • Henry Chadwick (trans.), Saint Augustine: Confessions (Oxford: Oxford World Classics, 1992).
  • Aubrey De Selincourt (trans.), Livy: The War with Hannibal (New York: Penguin Classics, 1965).
  • Leslie Dossey, Peasant and Empire in Christian North Africa (Berkeley: UC Press, 2010).
  • Robert Fagles (trans), Virgil: The Aeneid (New York: Penguin Books, 2006).
  • Serge Lancel, Carthage: A History, trans. Antonia Nevill (Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1995).
  • Susan Raven, Rome in Africa, 3rd ed. (London and NY: Routledge, 1993).
  • Amy Richlin (trans.), Rome and the Mysterious Orient: Three Plays by Plautus (Berkeley: UC Press, 2005).
  • A.J. Woodman (trans.), Sallust: Catiline’s War, The Jugurthine War, Histories (New York: Penguin Classics, 2007).

 

 

Course Description

 

This course offers a survey of the settlement of North Africa, beginning with the purported foundation of Carthage in the late ninth century BCE (814 BCE) and concluding with the arrival of the Vandal “barbarians” in 430 AD.  Particular attention will be devoted to the centuries-long and exceedingly complex interaction of Africa with the Italian Peninsula, most especially Sicily and Rome.  The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the wide range of evidence—material and textual—that underpins historical narratives of archaic, Punic, Roman, and Christian Africa.  Students will be encouraged to refine their skills in working with different types of historical evidence, and will be more aware of the strengths and limitations of this evidence and the kinds of research questions that it can (and cannot) answer.  There is a growing body of outstanding anthropological theory on the intricacies of colonization and cultural assimilation generally and Romanization in particular.  Though we will not be reading widely in this body of scholarship, many of the conclusions of this theoretical work will inform assigned secondary readings and our weekly discussions.  Weekly reading assignments and class discussion will emphasize specific case studies and their relevance to the larger historical narrative of North African history.  It is, however, expected that in class presentations and individual research projects will develop a topic of more limited scope in substantial depth (though not losing sight of the larger context).

 

Class meetings will be devoted to the careful translation of Latin passages; energetic discussion of assigned primary and secondary readings; and class presentations by seminar participants.  Your final grade in the seminar will be based on your performance during our weekly seminar meetings, including in-class presentations; performance on translation quizzes (for Latin students); and the quality of your written work. 

 

 

Grading Policies

 

Final grades will be determined by your performance on:

 

  • (Latin 390 students): Two 20-minute translation quizzes.  These quizzes are scheduled for 10 October and 7 November.  No make-up quizzes will be administered.
  • (CC 383 students): 5-7 page report on a Roman African inscription
  • Presentation of a secondary reading, including management of the subsequent discussion.  Your initial presentation of the article should be no more than 10 minutes and should include a brief summer of the article’s main arguments, evidence used, and your evaluation of its success.
  • Presentation on a jointly agreed upon topic.  The oral presentation should be approximately 25-30 minutes and should initiate an extended discussion.  On the day of your presentation, you will need to hand in a 7-10 page paper on the topic of your presentation.  This paper should form the basis of your presentation and should be thesis-driven.  Prospective topics and presentation dates will be circulated and assigned shortly after the start of the semester.
  • 1 page abstract of your conference paper; due 14 November
  • 15 minute Conference paper (c. 8 pages); revised into a seminar paper (c. 12-15 pages).   The conference papers will be presented on 5 December, 9 am-3 pm.  The final paper is due on 12 December at 12 pm.
  • Active and enthusiastic participation in weekly seminar meetings.  You will not earn an A (or an A-) in this seminar by sitting quietly on the sidelines, regardless of the quality of your written work.  I mean this.

LAT F323 • Ovid

82940 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 2:30PM-4:00PM WAG 112

Prerequisites

 

You must have completed Latin 311 and 312 with a grade of C or better or the equivalent through examination; and Latin 322 with a grade of C or better.  If you have not met these prerequisites, please see me ASAP to request a waiver.  A waiver may be granted, but on a case by case basis and will be based on your previous record in Latin courses.

 

Course Description

 

Although perhaps best known as the author of the Amores or the Metamorphoses, Ovid also experimented in the epistolary genre, composing two collections of poetic love letters and several books of elegiac letters from exile in Tomis.   This course will focus on the love letters—Ovid’s single and double Heroides.  The Heroides are epistolary elegies (or elegiac epistles) composed by mythological women (and Sappho) for the lovers who have abandoned them.  In the case of the double Heroides, we have both sides of the amatory correspondence.  In these poems, we finally “hear” the voices of familiar literary women—Medea, Dido, Ariadne, Penelope—whose stories previously were told from the perspective of their male lover.  Ovid may not qualify as a feminist, but his poems are remarkable for their complex psychological characterizations.  The rhetorician Quintilian observed that, while Ovid was a talented poet, he was excessively fond of his own genius (nimius amator ingenii sui).  I leave it to you to decide whether Ovid’s elegant wit and cleverness is excessive, but there is little doubt that the poet was endowed with an ample genius.  In addition to reading large parts of the Latin text, we will also look at a selection of recent secondary articles on the Heroides.  By reading these articles, you will gain some perspective on how scholars have approached the task of interpreting these complex but satisfying letter poems.  Assignments will range from approximately 30-40 lines of Latin early in the session to 60+ lines by the end of the session.

 

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

32175 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WEL 1.308
(also listed as CTI 310)

Survey of Ancient Rome from the Iron Age to the sack of Rome by the Visigothic leader Alaric.

LAT 383 • Grad Rdng: Latin Prose

32645 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:30PM CBA 4.346

Latin 383 is an intensive prose reading course intended for MA students in Classics and related disciplines who wish to improve their ability to read Latin accurately and at speed.  Students should already have a firm grasp of Latin morphology and syntax as well as significant experience with Latin prose before attempting this course.  You will be expected to prepare a substantial amount of Latin for each class meeting (c. 300 lines/week).  Although the focus of the course will be on acquainting students with the several important Late Republican texts, we will also spend some time with the Imperial Latin Prose of Seneca the Elder.  Class meetings will be devoted to close translation of selected passages from the prepared assignments; detailed review of Latin syntax; and sight reading.  By the end of the semester, students will be able to read quickly and with a strong grasp of Classical Latin syntax.  Your grade will be determined by your performance on 2 midterm exams, a comprehensive final exam, and class participation.

 

Required Texts (available at The Co-op or Amazon.com)

 

  • Cynthia Damon, ed.  Nepos: Life of Atticus (Bryn Mawr Classical Commentaries, 1993).
  • John T. Ramsey, ed.  Cicero, Philippics I-II  (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003). 
  • William A. Edward, ed. Seneca the Elder: Suasoriae (Duckworth, 2002).
  • P. McGushin, ed.  Sallust: Bellum Catilinae (Duckworth, 2008).

 

**If you do not own a comprehensive Latin grammar, you should purchase one.  I strongly recommend Allen and Greenough’s New Latin Grammar, rev. Anne Mahoney (Newburyport, MA: Focus Publishing, 2001)**

 

C C 348 • Nero

32550 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as EUS 346)

The famously fiddling Roman emperor Nero will be the subject of this course.  During the semester, we will carefully investigate Nero’s life in its larger social and historical context but also pay close attention to his reception in the medieval period and beyond.  When Nero came to power, his Roman subjects were full of optimism.  They believed that, like Augustus, he would bring a golden age to Rome.  As a young man, he was tutored by one of Rome’s pre-eminent philosophers, Seneca, and Seneca continued to advise Nero during the early years of his reign.  After a devastating fire in 64 CE, however, Nero came under attack for, among other things, his increasingly extravagant building program and reputed moral depravity.  Nero’s inglorious death in 68 CE was the culmination of a long fall from grace, though he continued to live on in the popular imagination as a depraved enemy of Christianity.  We will analyze some of the possible reasons for Nero’s decline and popularity and subsequent negative reputation.  Readings in the course will include Suetonius’ Life of Nero; Seneca’s De Clementia and Thyestes; and selections from Tacitus, Dio Cassius, and several medieval and Renaissance writers.  We will also read a range of secondary articles on such topics as Nero’s building program and watch the film Quo Vadis.  The course requirements will include several short, informal writing assignments; 2 longer essays (5-7 pages); and a substantial final paper (10-12 pages; a revised and expanded version of one of the longer essays).  There will also be two midterm exams

LAT 323 • Christian Martyrs In Roman Emp

32943 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 112

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

C C 304C • Pagans/Christns Late Roman Emp

32635 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WCH 1.120

C C 304C Topics in the Ancient World:

An introductory survey of the highlights of Greek and Roman civilization and early Christianity. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

LAT 390 • Pliny's Letters

33135 • Fall 2009
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10

LAT 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Roman studies. Topics given in recent years include Roman comedy, Pliny, and Roman fragmentary historians.

C C 304C • Pagans/Christns Late Roman Emp

32005 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 420

C C 304C Topics in the Ancient World:

An introductory survey of the highlights of Greek and Roman civilization and early Christianity. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

LAT 323 • Cicero

32435 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 112

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

C C 383 • Augustine's Confessions

32801 • Spring 2008
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as LAT 383)

C C 383 Studies in Classical Civilization:

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

LAT 323 • Jr Rdng: Seutonius

33120 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 208

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

C C 304C • Pagans/Christns Late Roman Emp

33097 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 3.102

C C 304C Topics in the Ancient World:

An introductory survey of the highlights of Greek and Roman civilization and early Christianity. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

LAT 390 • Cicero: Readings

33640 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

LAT 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Roman studies. Topics given in recent years include Roman comedy, Pliny, and Roman fragmentary historians.

LAT 323 • Catullus

32405 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JES A303A

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

LAT 383 • Letters

32435 • Spring 2007
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10

Latin Literature Survey

C C 348 • Age Of Augustine-W

32685 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RAS 213

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

LAT 324 • Adv Latin Grammar & Compositn

33135 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM WAG 112

This course will provide an intensive review of Latin grammar, morphology and syntax as well as an introduction to the fundamental elements of Latin prose style across a range of genres and periods.  It will be assumed that the student has a good, general grasp of Latin syntax and morphology.  Students registered for Latin 324 must have taken AT LEAST 4 semesters of Latin and, preferably, also at least one upper division Latin prose course at the University of Texas.  Please note that this course will be extremely challenging if you have no experience in reading extended passages of Latin prose.  No previous experience in prose composition is necessary for success in this course; you must, however, be willing to attend class regularly, participate, and prepare the assigned compositions and readings if you expect to do well.   Class meetings will be devoted to discussions of Latin grammar, syntax, and style; review of weekly assignments; and the close reading of extended prose passages.

LAT F311 • Sec-Yr Lat I: Sel Rom Writers

83580 • Summer 2006
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 308

This course is a continuation of Latin 507 (or 601C).  In Latin 311, students read Book 3 of Caesar’s Civil War.   The aim of the course is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to build command of basic Latin vocabulary; and to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Caesar’s narrative.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of assigned readings.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Caesar’s narrative.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 311 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement.  A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 312.

The completion of Latin 507 or 601C with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 311.

HIS 362G • Late Antiquity-W

37445 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112
(also listed as C C 348)

Topics in European History.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

LAT 365 • Augustine

30155 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CBA 4.336
(also listed as LAT 385)

LAT 365 Seminar in Latin:

Critical study of authors such as Horace, Livy, Lucretius, and Tacitus.

Prerequisites: Latin 323 with a grade of at least C.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags

LAT S312K • Sec-Yr Lat II: Vergil's Aeneid

83100 • Summer 2004
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 308

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312.

LAT 323 • Ovid

28920 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM WAG 112

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

HIS 362K • Intro To World Of Late Antiq

36773 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 101
(also listed as C C 304C, C C 348)

This one semester course will examine the development of warfare between the last Roman Empire and the early modern world (c. 400-1500). It will concentrate on the lands around the Mediterranean including northern and eastern Europe. Students will become acquainted with developments in warfare over the course of more than a millenium through the use of lectures and discussions, readings, photographs, and video. Among other things this course will examine the following topics: the collapse of the Roman military the advent of feudalism the rise of cavalry and its disputed connection to feudalism infantry in medieval warfare the birth of knighthood and chivalry evolving Christian and Muslim views of Just War the Crusades and Crusading orders (such as Knights Templar) the medieval castle and the race between fortifiers and attackers medieval arms and armor the influence of improved missile weapons on medieval warfare the gunpowder revolution of the later Middle Ages.

 

Required Reading/Viewing:

Books:

Charles W. C. Oman, The Art of War in the Middle Ages

Edward M. Peters, The First Crusade: The Chronicle of Fulcher of Chartres and Other

Source Materials

 

In addition to the two books assigned in this course, a number of articles will be posted on the

website.

 

Visual Materials (most or all of the following will be shown in class):

The Roman Legion (DVD)

The Barbarians/Visigoths (DVD)

The Barbarians/Huns (DVD)

The Barbarians/Vikings (DVD)

Modern Marvels: Castle and Dungeons (DVD)

NOVA/Ancient Empires: The Trebuchet (DVD)

The Bayeux Tapestry (CD)

The Crusades (as seen by Terry Jones) (3 of the 4 DVDs in the series)

Knights Templar (DVD)

The Barbarians/Mongols (DVD)

 

Grading

A course paper on some aspect of medieval war ( approximately 10 pages). Along with the paper, each student should submit photocopied source materials used in preparation of his/her paper. 33.3% of final grade

An in-class examination during a regular class period based on the lectures and readings, 33.3% of final grade

A final examination during the regularly scheduled final exam period. 33.3% of final grade

LAT 324 • Adv Latin Grammar & Compositn

29275 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 308

This course will provide an intensive review of Latin grammar, morphology and syntax as well as an introduction to the fundamental elements of Latin prose style across a range of genres and periods.  It will be assumed that the student has a good, general grasp of Latin syntax and morphology.  Students registered for Latin 324 must have taken AT LEAST 4 semesters of Latin and, preferably, also at least one upper division Latin prose course at the University of Texas.  Please note that this course will be extremely challenging if you have no experience in reading extended passages of Latin prose.  No previous experience in prose composition is necessary for success in this course; you must, however, be willing to attend class regularly, participate, and prepare the assigned compositions and readings if you expect to do well.   Class meetings will be devoted to discussions of Latin grammar, syntax, and style; review of weekly assignments; and the close reading of extended prose passages.

LAT 323 • Catullus

28505 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 200

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

C C 348 • Cultures Of The Book-W

28567 • Fall 2002
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 215

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

LAT 323 • Vergil's Eclogues And Georgics

29030 • Fall 2002
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 112

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

Curriculum Vitae


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