Department of Middle Eastern Studies
Department of Middle Eastern Studies

Kamran Scot Aghaie


Associate ProfessorPh.D., 1999, University of California at Los Angeles

Chair, Department of Middle Eastern Studies. Associate Professor
Kamran Scot Aghaie

Contact

Interests


Islamic studies, Shi'ism, modern Iranian and Middle Eastern history; secondary areas of interest: world history, historiography, religious studies, nationalism, gender studies and economic history

Biography


Research

Modern Islamic history; Shi'i symbols and rituals in modern Iran; modern Iranian history; Shi'ism; Islamic rituals; social and cultural history; religious and political discourses; historiography; nationalism; gender studies; Persian; Arabic; popular Islam

Research Subject Headings: Gender, Nation and national identity, Politics, Religion

Courses


MES 385 • Mod Iranian Hist & Historiog

41872 • Fall 2016
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM CAL 422
(also listed as HIS 388K)

This course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the historical developments in Modern Iran. Students will learn how Iranian society, culture, and politics have evolved throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This course will also introduce students to many of the key debates in the field of Modern Iranian history. Students will read, analyze, and discuss selected titles from a list of the most influential scholarly books on Modern Iranian History. Readings in primary historical documents will also be required. Whenever possible, these will be in the original Persian language. However, for students who do not have sufficient Persian language skills, translations will be used. One of the goals of the course is to give students the necessary research and writing skills, along with the requisite knowledge of the field, to conduct meaningful research in the area of Modern Iranian History.

Requirements: Weekly reading assignments, substantial classroom discussions and presentations, a short paper, and a graduate level research paper. Students will be allowed to select weekly readings for each week. 

Prerequisite: Graduate student standing.

Texts:

A Course Packet

Grading:

Short paper (due in week nine):  25%

Analytical paper on two weeks’ readings:  10%

Research paper (due at end of semester):  40%

Class participation:  20%

Assessment of quality of your feedback on student work:  5%

MES 385 • Islamic Revolution Of Iran

41165 • Spring 2016
Meets W 11:00AM-2:00PM PAR 310
(also listed as HIS 388K, R S 390T)

This course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the Islamic Revolution that took place in Iran in 1978-­?79. In order to provide an appropriate historical context for the study of the revolution students will be exposed to a broad survey of Shi'ism and Modern Iranian History. Students will learn the many theories regarding why the revolution happened, what factors contributed to its development, and how Iranian society, culture, politics, and religious beliefs and practices were affected by the revolution. In addition to weekly reading assignments, students will discuss these texts and present their research in class. In addition to class participation, students will write a graduate level research paper, as well as a short proposal for this paper.

Texts

Course packet containing selected articles and texts will be assigned.

Grading

Class participation 30%

Short paper (due week ten) 20%

Research paper (due at end of semester) 50%

MES 385 • Mod Iranian Hist & Historiog

41180 • Spring 2015
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM CAL 422
(also listed as HIS 388K)

This research course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the historical developments in Modern Iran. Students will learn how Iranian society, culture, and politics have evolved throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This course will also introduce students to many of the key debates in the field of Modern Iranian history. Students will read, analyze, and discuss selected titles from a list of the most influential scholarly books on Modern Iranian History. Readings in primary historical documents will also be required. Whenever possible, these will be in the original Persian language. However, for students who do not have sufficient Persian language skills, translations will be used. One of the goals of the course is to give students the necessary research and writing skills, along with the requisite knowledge of the field, to conduct meaningful research in the area of Modern Iranian History.

Texts:

A Course Packet, available for purchase at Speedway Copies, which is located on the ground floor of Dobie Mall

Grading:

Class participation 25%, Short paper (due in week nine) 25%, Analytical paper on one week’s readings 10%, Research paper (due at end of semester) 40%

MES 385 • Islamic Revolution Of Iran

42440 • Fall 2013
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM MEZ 1.104
(also listed as HIS 388K, R S 390T)

This course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the Islamic Revolution that took place in Iran in 1978-­?79. In order to provide an appropriate historical context for the study of the revolution students will be exposed to a broad survey of Shi'ism and Modern Iranian History. Students will learn the many theories regarding why the revolution happened, what factors contributed to its development, and how Iranian society, culture, politics, and religious beliefs and practices were affected by the revolution. In addition to weekly reading assignments, students will discuss these texts and present their research in class. In addition to class participation, students will write a graduate level research paper, as well as a short proposal for this paper.

Texts

Course packet containing selected articles and texts will be assigned.

Grading

Class participation 30%

Short paper (due week ten) 20%

Research paper (due at end of semester) 50%

MES 385 • Mod Iranian Hist & Historiog

41985 • Spring 2013
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM MEZ 1.122
(also listed as HIS 388K)

This course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the historical developments in Modern Iran. Students will learn how Iranian society, culture, and politics have evolved throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This course will also introduce students to many of the key debates in the field of Modern Iranian history. Students will read, analyze, and discuss selected titles from a list of the most influential scholarly books on Modern Iranian History. Readings in primary historical documents will also be required. Whenever possible, these will be in the original Persian language. However, for students who do not have sufficient Persian language skills, translations will be used. One of the goals of the course is to give students the necessary research and writing skills, along with the requisite knowledge of the field, to conduct meaningful research in the area of Modern Iranian History.

Texts:

A Course Packet, available for purchase at Speedway Copies, which is located on the ground floor of Dobie Mall

Grading:

Class participation                                                       25%

Short paper (due in week nine)                                    25%

Analytical paper on one week’s readings                    10%

Research paper (due at end of semester)                     40%

ISL 373 • Modern Iran

41556 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BUR 216
(also listed as HIS 331L, MES 324K)

Course Description

This is an introductory class to the history of the Middle East in the 20^th century. The main question for consideration is which forces and what sort of developments transformed this region from a relatively peaceful region to a radicalized environment and a source for opposition against the “West.” By exploring critical political, social, intellectual and economic themes such as colonialism, Arab nationalism, secular modernism, the impact of Zionism and military conflict, the rise of political Islam, the status of women and the oil revolution, we would identify the main internal and external forces, as well as the critical processes, that shaped the region during the last century. Conducted in English. 

 

Texts

Abrahamian: A History of Modern Iran

Ansari: Modern Iran since 1921

Keddie: Modern Iran

Satrapi: Persopolis

 

Grading & Requirements

Class attendance and participation: 25%

Quiz grade: 15%

Midterm exam: 30%

Final exam: 30%

MES 385 • Islamic Rev Of Iran, 1978-1990

41795 • Spring 2012
Meets W 12:00PM-3:00PM PAR 210
(also listed as HIS 388K)

This course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the Islamic Revolution that took place in Iran in 1978-­?79. In order to provide an appropriate historical context for the study of the revolution students will be exposed to a broad survey of Shi'ism and Modern Iranian History. Students will learn the many theories regarding why the revolution happened, what factors contributed to its development, and how Iranian society, culture, politics, and religious beliefs and practices were affected by the revolution. In addition to weekly reading assignments, students will discuss these texts and present their research in class. In addition to class participation, students will write a graduate level research paper, as well as a short proposal for this paper.

 

Texts

Course packet containing selected articles and texts will be assigned.

 

Grading

Class participation 30%

Short paper (due week ten) 20%

Research paper (due at end of semester) 50%

ARA 387 • Shi'Ite Polit/Relig Ideologues

41630 • Spring 2011
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM MEZ 1.206
(also listed as HIS 388K, MES 381, PRS 384C)

Students will learn about modern Shi'ism by focusing on the religious and political writings of selected Shi'i scholar, theologians and intellectuals, including the doctrines and symbols of modern Shi'ism, while at the same time learning about broader trans-national historical and political trends affecting Iran, Iraq and Lebanon. The course will focus on selected Shi'i ideologues, including prominent Iranian figures like Ruhollah Khomeini, Ali Shari'ati, Morteza Motahhari, and Abd al-Karim Sorush, as well as Iraqi and Lebanese figures like Musa al-Sadr, Mehdi Shams al-Din, Ali al-Sistani, Muhammad Husayn Fadl Allah, and Muhammad Baqir al-Sadr. Students will read two scholarly articles per week (in English) about the selcted ideologue for that week, as well as one 10-20 page selection from the writings of that figure (in both Persian and Arabic). Students can read either the Persian or the Arabic version. A separate discussion section of one hour per week in each language can be arranged based on student demand and interest. For students who are more advanced in language, additional texts can also be incorporated in the coursework on an informal basis.

Requirements:

Weekly readings, class discussions and presentations (in English), a translation into English of one short text, a short paper (10-15 pages), and a long paper (15-25 pages), using primary sources.

 

Grading:

Class participation    20%

Translation of one of the Persian/Arabic texts 15% Short paper (due in week nine)    25%

Research paper (due at end of semester)    40%

ISL 310 • Introduction To Islam

41895 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.306
(also listed as HIS 306N)

This course provides an introduction to the religion of Islam. It is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, in religion, or in History. We will examine the theology, history, and main social and legal institutions of Islam. Islam, as a major system of belief in the world, is experienced by Muslims and non-Muslims alike. Consequently, besides studying the basic tenets and texts of the religion, this course will focus on the variety of ways in which Muslims and non-Muslims have understood and interpreted Islam. We will review the debates surrounding the life of the prophet of Islam, Islamic pre-modern and modern history, the Islamic concept of God and society, the role of women, and finally, Islamic government and movements. The course is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, religions, or history. No prior knowledge of Islam or Islamic history is necessary.

Texts

To be provided by instructor. 

Grading

To be provided by instructor. 

HIS 388K • Rdngs In Iranian Natlism/Polit

40325 • Fall 2009
Meets W 5:00PM-8:00PM MEZ 2.202

This class is designed for graduate students of the non-Western world with the Middle East serving as a canvas for examining a broad array of methodological, theoretical and historiographical concerns. By critically reviewing recent scholarship on the Middle East in the fields of political science, history, international relationship and intellectual history this course hopes to introduce graduate students to the professional study of the Middle East. The idea is to aid prospective scholars of the non-Western world such as Latin America, Africa and the Far East in gaining an understanding of the history of their craft, of current professional debates and of ongoing historiographical trends and fashions. Specifically, the course will assist students to define their topic of interest and frame it as an MA thesis or a PhD dissertation. To achieve this goal we will critically review various historiographical traditions and debates while at the same time introduce the students to modern historical realities in Iraq, Palestine, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon and Yemen. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

 

ISL 310 • Introduction To Islam

42270 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.306
(also listed as HIS 306N)

This course provides an introduction to the religion of Islam. It is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, in religion, or in History. We will examine the theology, history, and main social and legal institutions of Islam. Islam, as a major system of belief in the world, is experienced by Muslims and non-Muslims alike. Consequently, besides studying the basic tenets and texts of the religion, this course will focus on the variety of ways in which Muslims and non-Muslims have understood and interpreted Islam. We will review the debates surrounding the life of the prophet of Islam, Islamic pre-modern and modern history, the Islamic concept of God and society, the role of women, and finally, Islamic government and movements. The course is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, religions, or history. No prior knowledge of Islam or Islamic history is necessary.

Texts

To be provided by instructor. 

Grading

To be provided by instructor. 

HIS 388K • Islamic Rev Of Iran, 1978-1990

39437 • Spring 2009
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM CAL 323

This class is designed for graduate students of the non-Western world with the Middle East serving as a canvas for examining a broad array of methodological, theoretical and historiographical concerns. By critically reviewing recent scholarship on the Middle East in the fields of political science, history, international relationship and intellectual history this course hopes to introduce graduate students to the professional study of the Middle East. The idea is to aid prospective scholars of the non-Western world such as Latin America, Africa and the Far East in gaining an understanding of the history of their craft, of current professional debates and of ongoing historiographical trends and fashions. Specifically, the course will assist students to define their topic of interest and frame it as an MA thesis or a PhD dissertation. To achieve this goal we will critically review various historiographical traditions and debates while at the same time introduce the students to modern historical realities in Iraq, Palestine, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon and Yemen. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

 

HIS 388K • Mod Iranian Hist And Historiog

40617 • Fall 2008
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM CAL 323

This class is designed for graduate students of the non-Western world with the Middle East serving as a canvas for examining a broad array of methodological, theoretical and historiographical concerns. By critically reviewing recent scholarship on the Middle East in the fields of political science, history, international relationship and intellectual history this course hopes to introduce graduate students to the professional study of the Middle East. The idea is to aid prospective scholars of the non-Western world such as Latin America, Africa and the Far East in gaining an understanding of the history of their craft, of current professional debates and of ongoing historiographical trends and fashions. Specifically, the course will assist students to define their topic of interest and frame it as an MA thesis or a PhD dissertation. To achieve this goal we will critically review various historiographical traditions and debates while at the same time introduce the students to modern historical realities in Iraq, Palestine, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon and Yemen. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

 

HIS 388K • Historcl Texts & Modern Media

40514 • Spring 2008
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM JES A203A

This class is designed for graduate students of the non-Western world with the Middle East serving as a canvas for examining a broad array of methodological, theoretical and historiographical concerns. By critically reviewing recent scholarship on the Middle East in the fields of political science, history, international relationship and intellectual history this course hopes to introduce graduate students to the professional study of the Middle East. The idea is to aid prospective scholars of the non-Western world such as Latin America, Africa and the Far East in gaining an understanding of the history of their craft, of current professional debates and of ongoing historiographical trends and fashions. Specifically, the course will assist students to define their topic of interest and frame it as an MA thesis or a PhD dissertation. To achieve this goal we will critically review various historiographical traditions and debates while at the same time introduce the students to modern historical realities in Iraq, Palestine, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon and Yemen. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

 

HIS 388K • Shi'Ite Polit/Relig Ideologues

41243 • Fall 2007
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM CAL 323

This class is designed for graduate students of the non-Western world with the Middle East serving as a canvas for examining a broad array of methodological, theoretical and historiographical concerns. By critically reviewing recent scholarship on the Middle East in the fields of political science, history, international relationship and intellectual history this course hopes to introduce graduate students to the professional study of the Middle East. The idea is to aid prospective scholars of the non-Western world such as Latin America, Africa and the Far East in gaining an understanding of the history of their craft, of current professional debates and of ongoing historiographical trends and fashions. Specifically, the course will assist students to define their topic of interest and frame it as an MA thesis or a PhD dissertation. To achieve this goal we will critically review various historiographical traditions and debates while at the same time introduce the students to modern historical realities in Iraq, Palestine, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon and Yemen. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

 

HIS 388K • Reading Iranian Historians

40005 • Spring 2007
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM MEZ 1.204

This class is designed for graduate students of the non-Western world with the Middle East serving as a canvas for examining a broad array of methodological, theoretical and historiographical concerns. By critically reviewing recent scholarship on the Middle East in the fields of political science, history, international relationship and intellectual history this course hopes to introduce graduate students to the professional study of the Middle East. The idea is to aid prospective scholars of the non-Western world such as Latin America, Africa and the Far East in gaining an understanding of the history of their craft, of current professional debates and of ongoing historiographical trends and fashions. Specifically, the course will assist students to define their topic of interest and frame it as an MA thesis or a PhD dissertation. To achieve this goal we will critically review various historiographical traditions and debates while at the same time introduce the students to modern historical realities in Iraq, Palestine, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon and Yemen. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

 

HIS 388K • Islamic Rev Of Iran, 1978-1990

40900 • Fall 2006
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM PAR 214

This class is designed for graduate students of the non-Western world with the Middle East serving as a canvas for examining a broad array of methodological, theoretical and historiographical concerns. By critically reviewing recent scholarship on the Middle East in the fields of political science, history, international relationship and intellectual history this course hopes to introduce graduate students to the professional study of the Middle East. The idea is to aid prospective scholars of the non-Western world such as Latin America, Africa and the Far East in gaining an understanding of the history of their craft, of current professional debates and of ongoing historiographical trends and fashions. Specifically, the course will assist students to define their topic of interest and frame it as an MA thesis or a PhD dissertation. To achieve this goal we will critically review various historiographical traditions and debates while at the same time introduce the students to modern historical realities in Iraq, Palestine, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon and Yemen. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

 

HIS 388K • Mod Iranian Hist And Historiog

39180 • Spring 2006
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM PAR 214

This class is designed for graduate students of the non-Western world with the Middle East serving as a canvas for examining a broad array of methodological, theoretical and historiographical concerns. By critically reviewing recent scholarship on the Middle East in the fields of political science, history, international relationship and intellectual history this course hopes to introduce graduate students to the professional study of the Middle East. The idea is to aid prospective scholars of the non-Western world such as Latin America, Africa and the Far East in gaining an understanding of the history of their craft, of current professional debates and of ongoing historiographical trends and fashions. Specifically, the course will assist students to define their topic of interest and frame it as an MA thesis or a PhD dissertation. To achieve this goal we will critically review various historiographical traditions and debates while at the same time introduce the students to modern historical realities in Iraq, Palestine, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon and Yemen. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

 

ISL 310 • Introduction To Islam

40665 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM TAY 2.006
(also listed as HIS 306N)

This course provides an introduction to the religion of Islam. It is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, in religion, or in History. We will examine the theology, history, and main social and legal institutions of Islam. Islam, as a major system of belief in the world, is experienced by Muslims and non-Muslims alike. Consequently, besides studying the basic tenets and texts of the religion, this course will focus on the variety of ways in which Muslims and non-Muslims have understood and interpreted Islam. We will review the debates surrounding the life of the prophet of Islam, Islamic pre-modern and modern history, the Islamic concept of God and society, the role of women, and finally, Islamic government and movements. The course is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, religions, or history. No prior knowledge of Islam or Islamic history is necessary.

Texts

To be provided by instructor. 

Grading

To be provided by instructor. 

HIS 388K • Muslim Travelers And Traders

37660 • Spring 2005
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM PAR 105

This class is designed for graduate students of the non-Western world with the Middle East serving as a canvas for examining a broad array of methodological, theoretical and historiographical concerns. By critically reviewing recent scholarship on the Middle East in the fields of political science, history, international relationship and intellectual history this course hopes to introduce graduate students to the professional study of the Middle East. The idea is to aid prospective scholars of the non-Western world such as Latin America, Africa and the Far East in gaining an understanding of the history of their craft, of current professional debates and of ongoing historiographical trends and fashions. Specifically, the course will assist students to define their topic of interest and frame it as an MA thesis or a PhD dissertation. To achieve this goal we will critically review various historiographical traditions and debates while at the same time introduce the students to modern historical realities in Iraq, Palestine, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon and Yemen. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

 

ISL 310 • Introduction To Islam

39320 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.246
(also listed as HIS 306N)

This course provides an introduction to the religion of Islam. It is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, in religion, or in History. We will examine the theology, history, and main social and legal institutions of Islam. Islam, as a major system of belief in the world, is experienced by Muslims and non-Muslims alike. Consequently, besides studying the basic tenets and texts of the religion, this course will focus on the variety of ways in which Muslims and non-Muslims have understood and interpreted Islam. We will review the debates surrounding the life of the prophet of Islam, Islamic pre-modern and modern history, the Islamic concept of God and society, the role of women, and finally, Islamic government and movements. The course is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, religions, or history. No prior knowledge of Islam or Islamic history is necessary.

Texts

To be provided by instructor. 

Grading

To be provided by instructor. 

HIS 366N • Prophet Of Islam: Life & Times

38500 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.306

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HIS 388K • Islamic Revolution Of Iran

38630 • Fall 2004
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM CAL 21

This class is designed for graduate students of the non-Western world with the Middle East serving as a canvas for examining a broad array of methodological, theoretical and historiographical concerns. By critically reviewing recent scholarship on the Middle East in the fields of political science, history, international relationship and intellectual history this course hopes to introduce graduate students to the professional study of the Middle East. The idea is to aid prospective scholars of the non-Western world such as Latin America, Africa and the Far East in gaining an understanding of the history of their craft, of current professional debates and of ongoing historiographical trends and fashions. Specifically, the course will assist students to define their topic of interest and frame it as an MA thesis or a PhD dissertation. To achieve this goal we will critically review various historiographical traditions and debates while at the same time introduce the students to modern historical realities in Iraq, Palestine, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon and Yemen. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

 

HIS 366N • Prophet Of Islam: Life & Times

35980 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.246

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HIS 388K • Mod Iranian Hist And Historiog

36085 • Spring 2004
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM PAR 105

This class is designed for graduate students of the non-Western world with the Middle East serving as a canvas for examining a broad array of methodological, theoretical and historiographical concerns. By critically reviewing recent scholarship on the Middle East in the fields of political science, history, international relationship and intellectual history this course hopes to introduce graduate students to the professional study of the Middle East. The idea is to aid prospective scholars of the non-Western world such as Latin America, Africa and the Far East in gaining an understanding of the history of their craft, of current professional debates and of ongoing historiographical trends and fashions. Specifically, the course will assist students to define their topic of interest and frame it as an MA thesis or a PhD dissertation. To achieve this goal we will critically review various historiographical traditions and debates while at the same time introduce the students to modern historical realities in Iraq, Palestine, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon and Yemen. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

 

HIS 388K • Shi'Ite Islam

36945 • Fall 2003
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM GAR 111

This class is designed for graduate students of the non-Western world with the Middle East serving as a canvas for examining a broad array of methodological, theoretical and historiographical concerns. By critically reviewing recent scholarship on the Middle East in the fields of political science, history, international relationship and intellectual history this course hopes to introduce graduate students to the professional study of the Middle East. The idea is to aid prospective scholars of the non-Western world such as Latin America, Africa and the Far East in gaining an understanding of the history of their craft, of current professional debates and of ongoing historiographical trends and fashions. Specifically, the course will assist students to define their topic of interest and frame it as an MA thesis or a PhD dissertation. To achieve this goal we will critically review various historiographical traditions and debates while at the same time introduce the students to modern historical realities in Iraq, Palestine, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon and Yemen. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

 

ISL 310 • Introduction To Islam

38625 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 101
(also listed as HIS 306N)

This course provides an introduction to the religion of Islam. It is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, in religion, or in History. We will examine the theology, history, and main social and legal institutions of Islam. Islam, as a major system of belief in the world, is experienced by Muslims and non-Muslims alike. Consequently, besides studying the basic tenets and texts of the religion, this course will focus on the variety of ways in which Muslims and non-Muslims have understood and interpreted Islam. We will review the debates surrounding the life of the prophet of Islam, Islamic pre-modern and modern history, the Islamic concept of God and society, the role of women, and finally, Islamic government and movements. The course is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, religions, or history. No prior knowledge of Islam or Islamic history is necessary.

Texts

To be provided by instructor. 

Grading

To be provided by instructor. 

HIS 306K • Intro M East: Rel/Cul/Hist Fnd

35700 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 1.102

This course surveys the history of the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the end of the fifteenth century. Students will be introduced to basic aspects of the political, social, and cultural dimensions of Islamic civilization.

HIS 366N • Prophet Of Islam: Life & Times

35725 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM ESB 115

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HIS 388K • Islamic Rev Of Iran, 1978-1990

36965 • Fall 2001
Meets T 4:00PM-7:00PM CAL 323

This class is designed for graduate students of the non-Western world with the Middle East serving as a canvas for examining a broad array of methodological, theoretical and historiographical concerns. By critically reviewing recent scholarship on the Middle East in the fields of political science, history, international relationship and intellectual history this course hopes to introduce graduate students to the professional study of the Middle East. The idea is to aid prospective scholars of the non-Western world such as Latin America, Africa and the Far East in gaining an understanding of the history of their craft, of current professional debates and of ongoing historiographical trends and fashions. Specifically, the course will assist students to define their topic of interest and frame it as an MA thesis or a PhD dissertation. To achieve this goal we will critically review various historiographical traditions and debates while at the same time introduce the students to modern historical realities in Iraq, Palestine, Egypt, Iran, Lebanon and Yemen. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

 

ISL 310 • Introduction To Islam

38560 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 101
(also listed as HIS 306N)

This course provides an introduction to the religion of Islam. It is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, in religion, or in History. We will examine the theology, history, and main social and legal institutions of Islam. Islam, as a major system of belief in the world, is experienced by Muslims and non-Muslims alike. Consequently, besides studying the basic tenets and texts of the religion, this course will focus on the variety of ways in which Muslims and non-Muslims have understood and interpreted Islam. We will review the debates surrounding the life of the prophet of Islam, Islamic pre-modern and modern history, the Islamic concept of God and society, the role of women, and finally, Islamic government and movements. The course is designed for students with a general interest in the Islamic world, religions, or history. No prior knowledge of Islam or Islamic history is necessary.

Texts

To be provided by instructor. 

Grading

To be provided by instructor. 

HIS 366N • Prophet Of Islam: Life & Times

35680 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 4.112

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HIS 366N • Prophet Of Islam: Life & Times

35360 • Spring 2000
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM MEZ 134

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Curriculum Vitae


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